Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, Western Australia – Avifauna and Flora


Revegetation 7 (planted 2010 and re-planted 2014)



Yüklə 7,54 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə9/18
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü7,54 Mb.
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   18

Revegetation 7 (planted 2010 and re-planted 2014) 
 
Plate 80: Quadrat in Revegetation 7 – photograph taken April 2015 by Tanith McCaw. 
 
 
 
GPS Quadrat (NW corner): 0405686 E, 6788452 N  Elevation: 301 m asl 
 
Location: West of main remnant (Remnant 4A, 4B); in newly planted areas (2014); some small 
shrubs/trees from previous planting. 
Landform: Hillside; lower slope; gentle; granite/ gneiss near surface; westerly aspect 
Land surfaceRed (2.5YR 4/6) sandy loam to sandy clay loam; surface rock (weathered granite, 
quartz,  dolerite)  10–20%  ^20cm;  litter  <10%  <1cm  deep;  fallen  timber  0%;  cryptogams  <1% 
(lichen); bare ground 25–30% 
Condition: Degraded 
Disturbance:  Historic  clearing,  cropping/pasture;  weeds;  recent  cultivation  for  revegetation; 
few survivors from prior planting in area. 
 
Table 21: Quadrat data for Revegetation 7 (obtained in 2014
 
Stratum  
& Height  
(m) 
Crown 
cover % 
Habit 
Dominant species & no individuals (trees & shrubs) 
No. 
stems 
<0.5 (0.2)  <1 
Tree 
Eucalyptus loxophleba subsp. supralaevis (6), Melaleuca  
?hamata (1) 

<0.5 (0.3)  <1 
Shrub 
Acacia ramulosa (1), A. acuminata (2), A. ?stereophylla (1), 
Maireana tomentosa (3), Melaleuca eleuterostachya (2),  
Ptilotus obovatus (1) 
 
10 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
84 
 
 
15–0  
Grass 
Hordeum leporinum*, Lamarckia aurea*, Avena barbata*, 
Pentameris airoides* 
 
 
35–40  
Forb 
Atriplex/ Chenopodium (?murale), Limonium sinuatum*,  
Echium plantagineum*, Emex australis*, Mesembryanthemum 
crystallinum*, Medicago polymorpha*, Maireana carnosa, 
Ptilotus gaudichaudii subsp. eremita, Sclerolaena eurotioides, 
Enchylaena seedlings, Brassica tournefortii*, Salsola australis 
 
 
Table 22: Quadrat data for Revegetation 7 (obtained in 2015
 
Stratum  
& Height 
(m)  
Crown 
cover % 
Habit 
Dominant species  
No. 
stems 
<0.5 (0.2)  <1 
Tree 
Eucalyptus loxophleba subsp. supralaevis (2), Melaleuca  
?hamata (1) 

<0.5 (0.3)  <1 
Shrub 
Maireana planifolia (9), Acacia ramulosa (1), A. acuminata (2), 
Maireana tomentosa (1), Ptilotus obovatus (2),  
Acacia seedling (1) 
16 
 
<1  
Grass 
Tragus australiensis, grass sp. 
 
 
30–40 
Forb 
Salsola australis, Enchylaena lanata, Atriplex gaudichaudianum,  
Chenopodium sp. *, Echium plantagineum*, Emex australis *,  
Arctotheca calendula* 
 
 
2014 No. stems/400 m

= 17 
2015 No. stems/400 m
2
 = 19 
 
Stem  counts  in  2015  showed  a  slight  increase.  However,  there  were  deaths  of  Eucalyptus, 
Melaleuca  and  Acacia  species  and  germination  of  Maireana,  Ptilotus  and  an  Acacia  seedling. 
The  surviving  trees/shrubs  from  2014  appeared  healthy  and  will  hopefully  continue  to  grow 
well throughout 2015. There is also the possibility that there will be some further germination 
of seed from the 2014 planting program.  
 
5.
 
Discussion 
 
5.1  Landscape patterns of habitat loss, fragmentation and land use 
 
The human ecological footprint on the  native vegetation of the Western Australian wheatbelt 
has  been  particularly  heavy  and  extensive  (Figure  13).  In  many  districts,  less  than  7%  of  the 
original  native  vegetation  cover  remains.  The  central  wheatbelt  has  only  2%  to  5%  of  its 
woodland/shrubland  left  which  is  typically  confined  to  highly  isolated  nature  reserves  and 
narrow roadside strips (Frost et al. 1999). Not surprisingly, the ecosystems of these landscapes 
and  their  indigenous  biodiversity  are  ranked  among  some  of  the  most  fragmented  and 
threatened  in  the  world  (Saunders  and  Ingram  1995;  Department  of  Environment  and 
Conservation 2008; InSight Ecology 2009; Laurance et al. 2011). 
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
85 
 
Figure  13:  The  spatial  distribution  of  remnant  native  vegetation  across  the  south-west  of  Western 
Australia.  The  extent  of  historical  land  clearing  is  clearly  evident,  spanning  the  area  from  north  of 
Geraldton east to the pastoral zone - delineated on this zone’s western border by the clearing line - and 
south to the Southern Ocean coast from Albany to east of Esperance. Image: Google™ earth 2013. 
 
 
 
In  the  northern  agricultural  region,  retention  rates  of  native  vegetation  in  some  areas  reach 
approximately  12%  (Huggett  et  al.  2004;  InSight  Ecology  2009).  Remnant  shrubland  and 
woodland  communities  tend  to  occur  in  larger  blocks  than  their  generally  more  fragmented 
central and southern counterparts. These occur in nature reserves and on crown land, rail and 
road reserves. The degree of habitat connectivity in some parts of the northern zone is slightly 
to  moderately  higher  than  in  the  central  and  southern  wheatbelt  zones.  The  Morawa  district 
retains  approximately  10%  of  its  remnant  native  vegetation  including  samphire  communities 
along  ancient  salt  lakes  and  saline  drainage  channels  (Figure  14).  These  provide  important 
natural linkages for fauna that move across landscapes in search of food and breeding sites. For 
instance,  the  summer  breeding  migrant  White-winged  Triller  has  been  observed  moving  en 
masse along saline drainage channels in the Yarra Yarra Lakes system  south-west of the study 
area (A.H. pers. obs.). 
 
The  northern  agricultural  region  was  cleared  of  its  native  vegetation  later  than  the  central 
wheatbelt  and  parts  of  the  southern  wheatbelt.  The  last  phase  of  clearing  for  farming  in  the 
region  was  in  the  late  1970s  and  early  1980s  (Neil  Kupsch  -  long-time  Nabawa  farmer,  pers. 
comm.) compared with the 1950s in the southern zone (Gibson et al. 2004). This may confer a 
time  lag  advantage  to  attempts  to  restore  and  re-connect  native  plant  communities  in  the 
northern wheatbelt relative to the central and  much of the southern wheatbelt zones. It may 
also  mean  that  the  northern  wheatbelt  has  yet  to  fully  pay  the  extinction  debt  described  in 
Section 1.1. Thus, some species that were recorded at “Hill View” during the study may be in 
the  process  of  becoming  functionally  extinct  despite  their  persistence  in  the  remnants.  More 
work is needed to confirm this but the low numbers of birds such as Crested Bellbird and Inland 
Thornbill recorded in the study are of concern (see Sections 5.2.2, 5.2.3 and 6.2.2, 6.2.3, 6.2.9). 
 
 
wheatbelt 
Perth 
Geraldton 
clearing line 

Albany 
Esperance 
“Hill View” 

447 km 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
86 
 
Figure 14: Large blocks of remnant shrubland and woodland characterise the Morawa district landscape 
near its boundary with the clearing line and pastoral lands further east. They provide important habitat 
‘stepping stones’ and refugia for birds and other species dispersing from drier inland habitats in the east 
to moister ones in the west. Some of the district’s saline drainage channels are prominent in this image 
and form part of Lake Moore catchment. Image: Google™ earth 2015. 
 
 
 
The  study  area  occurs  in  the  northern  sector  of  the  south-west  WA  landscape  which  is 
characterised by decreasing intensification of land use along a gradient from west - coastal and 
inland towns - to east - grain cropping and livestock grazing. The highly urbanised Swan Coastal 
Plain lies to the south and contrasts strongly, in terms of the amount, extent and configuration 
of  remnant  native  vegetation,  with  central  wheatbelt  districts  to  the  south-east.  Some  bird 
species  such  as  Western  Gerygone,  White-winged  Triller  and  Grey  Fantail  migrate  or 
nomadically move between these disparate sections of landscape and so only utilise habitat at 
“Hill View” for parts of each year. 
 
“Hill  View”  is  also  located  in  a  key  regional biodiversity transitional zone  between  arid  inland 
shrub-dominated  ecosystems  of  the  pastoral  zone  to  the  east  and  woodland/shrubland 
communities  of  higher  rainfall  areas  to  the  west.  This  creates  a  unique  mixing  of  plant  and 
animal  species  associated  with  both  contrasting  zones  and  conveys  additional  conservation 
significance to the study area. Some bird species present at “Hill View” are at or near the edge 
of their normal distributional range such as Southern Whiteface, Redthroat and Torresian Crow. 
 
5.2  The bird communities of “Hill View” 
 
5.2.1  Key determinants of species abundance, composition and habitat use 
 
A  set  of  key  landscape,  habitat,  threat-based  and  species  and  individual-specific  factors 
influenced the occurrence, relative abundance, composition and structure of bird communities 
recorded  at  “Hill  View”.  Together  these  variables  were  responsible  for  shaping  the  type  of 
extant  bird  assemblages  present  on  the  property  and  indeed  elsewhere  in  the  northern 
agricultural zone (see also Huggett et al. 2004; InSight Ecology 2009, 2012, 2013). 

13.1 km 

Nullewa  
Lake 
“Hill View” 
Moonagin  
Range 
Milhun  
Range 
Morawa 
clearing  
line 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
87 
 
Characteristics  of  the  landscape  in  which  birds  occurred  influenced  their  abundance,  species 
composition,  community  structure  and  patterns  of  habitat  use  (Section  5.1).  Relatively  small-
scale variation in the type, amount, condition, spatial arrangement and structural complexity of 
habitat  helped  determine  the  abundance,  diversity  and  composition  of  bird  assemblages 
present on “Hill View”. This was particularly evident in the largest remnant - Remnant 4. In this 
remnant  the  amount  and  range  of  different  microhabitats  varied  substantially  over  small 
distances  –  from  Jam  woodland  and  acacia/melaleuca  shrubland  on  the  lower  slopes,  Acacia 
umbraculiformis tall open shrubland with rocky outcrops on upper slopes to York Gum patches 
with  low  shrubland  at  Remnant  4A.  This  level  of  habitat  heterogeneity  and  complexity 
supported  a  healthy  and  relatively  diverse  shrubland/woodland  endemic  bird  community.  In 
contrast, smaller more degraded remnants such as the northern section of Remnant 5 and the 
western  portion  of  Remnant  1  were  smaller  in  size  and  offered  a  narrower  range  of 
microhabitats  for  bird  use.  A  consequently  smaller  suite  of  shrubland/woodland  bird  species 
occurred at these sites. 
 
The  floristic  composition  of  habitats  in  the  remnants  also  influenced  bird  community 
composition  and  structure  but  possibly  to  a  lesser  degree  than  habitat  heterogeneity  and 
complexity.  This  may  have  been  attributable,  in  part,  to  the  unseasonably  dry  conditions 
preceding  the  spring  survey  which  reduced  flowering  and  insect  abundance  levels  in  the 
remnants and revegetation alike. Inland Thornbill and Splendid Fairy-wren favoured Dodonaea 
inaequifoliaAcacia tetragonophylla and other acacia species. The only two honeyeater species 
recorded in remnants – Singing Honeyeater and Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater – foraged mostly on 
insects but also on nectar from flowering shrubs such as Eremophila oldfieldii subsp. oldfieldii 
and Melaleuca radula and some of the eucalypts, principally York Gum. Reduced nectar flows 
among  proteaceous  and  myrtaceous  flora  particularly  in  the  remnants  seems  likely  to  have 
triggered this pattern of resource switching which is typical for these honeyeater species. 
 
The  abundance,  species  composition,  reproductive  success  and,  ultimately,  survival  of  bird 
populations in these communities were influenced by several key threat-based stressors. These 
included  pressure  exerted  by  predation  -  particularly  by  fox  and  cat,  interspecific  and 
intraspecific competition, loss of habitat condition through grazing by feral herbivores such as 
goat and rabbit, historical grazing by sheep and cattle, fire, disturbance by mining exploration 
activities and the effects of a changing climate including increased severity of drought events. 
Weed  incursion  did  not  significantly  influence  bird  abundance  or  species  composition  in  the 
remnants.  However,  weeds  provided  supplementary  food  supplies  for  ground-foraging  bird 
species, particularly after good late summer rainfall in revegetation sites in autumn. 
 
Species-specific factors also helped influence the composition, structure and habitat utilisation 
patterns  of  bird  communities  in  the  study  area.  Different  bird  species  were  able  to  exploit 
available resources in different ways and at different times of the year and respond to seasonal 
changes in the abundance and availability of food supplies (see also Section 5.2.4). For example, 
several  core  woodland/shrubland  resident  species  such  as  Chestnut-rumped  Thornbill,  Inland 
Thornbill, Yellow-rumped Thornbill, Splendid Fairy-wren, Redthroat, Western Gerygone, Rufous 
Whistler,  Grey  Fantail  and  Red-capped  Robin  formed  ground-foraging  flocks  in  remnants  in 
autumn. This ‘teamwork’ strategy maximises the bird’s potential for encountering invertebrate 
prey when food supplies become less abundant or less available, typically with the onset of the 
cool season or sometimes during drought conditions. Each member species is able to expend 
less energy foraging as a group than they would individually. This is thought to be an adaptive 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
88 
 
response  that  helps  improve  species’  survival  prospects  during  times  of  environmental  stress 
imposed by cooler (or very dry) temperatures and reduced food supplies.  
 
Migratory species also varied in their patterns of resource utilisation across the study area (see 
also  Section  5.2.4).  Banded  Lapwing  foraged  for  grasshoppers  and  other  invertebrates  and 
nested in naturally regenerating open paddocks and planted sites in spring but by autumn had 
departed.  Flocks  of  insectivorous  Crimson  Chat  and  White-winged  Triller  used  remnants  as 
migratory  ‘stopover’  points  to  rest  and  ‘re-fuel’  before  continuing  their  spring/early  summer 
journeys south. Some individuals of both of these  species also nested in the remnants but by 
autumn  had  also  departed.  Western  Gerygone  and  Grey  Fantail,  in  contrast,  arrived  in 
remnants in autumn, often foraging in all layers of shrubland and woodland habitat in search of 
insect prey.  
 
Intraspecific  variation  also  contributed  to  shaping  the  composition  and  structure  of  bird 
communities  in the  study  area.  Behavioural,  foraging  efficiency, recognition  and  avoidance of 
predators, and disturbance tolerance differences between individual birds of the same species 
can affect their ability to persist and reproduce in  fragmented habitats and landscapes. These 
reflect  age,  stochastic  and  possibly  genetic  factors  –  for  example,  young  birds  require 
experience gained over time to know their habitat, interpret environmental cues, where to find 
food, shelter, mates, build nests and successfully raise young, and how to recognise, avoid or 
repel  potential  predators,  competitors  and  nest  parasites  (cuckoos).  Two  species  of  cuckoo  - 
Black-eared Cuckoo and Horsfield’s Bronze-Cuckoo - were present in some remnants in spring 
and  most  likely  parasitised  the  nests  of  some  breeding  pairs  of  Red-capped  Robin,  Splendid 
Fairy-wren, Chestnut-rumped Thornbill, Inland Thornbill, Crimson Chat or Redthroat. 
 
5.2.2  Trajectories of bird responses 
 
The  monitoring  of  diurnal  bird  communities  in  the  study area  has  identified  three postulated 
trajectories of response in species occurrence, abundance and persistence over time - stability, 
increase and decrease. Understanding how and why these responses have occurred including 
the  ecological  processes  that  have  driven  them  is  integral  to  the  protection  of  remnant 
woodland/shrubland and strategic revegetation of “Hill View” over the longer term (see Section 
6). A caveat is necessary in the interpretation of these responses given the short-term nature of 
the  recent  avifaunal  monitoring  program  at  “Hill  View”  and  poor  winter-spring  2014  rainfall. 
Continuation of monitoring will, however, help  determine if these outcomes hold true for the 
birds  of  “Hill  View”  over  time.  An  additional  trajectory  could  also  emerge  -  species  recovery. 
This  response  is  a  core  goal  of  all  ecological  restoration  initiatives  worldwide.  It  is  also  the 
hardest to achieve since it requires the commitment of adequate resources to enable long-term 
scientific  monitoring  of  sites,  populations  and  communities.  The  current  bird  and  flora  study 
has laid the foundation for this work to continue at “Hill View” (see Section 6.2.9). 
 
Populations  of  a  core  group  of  primarily  remnant-dependent  woodland  and  shrubland  birds 
appeared to be persisting in relatively stable numbers, at least over the short-term, in the study 
area. These were a mix of core woodland/shrubland birds – Crested Bellbird, Inland Thornbill, 
Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater and Splendid Fairy-wren, Weebill - a canopy insectivore that foraged 
and  nested  in  4  year-old+  planted  eucalypts,  and  a  ground  granivore  -  Zebra  Finch  which 
responds to increasing aridity in the interior by moving coastwards, in search of seed and water 
supplies.  

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
89 
 
Three of the woodland/shrubland species - Crested Bellbird, Inland Thornbill and Spiny-cheeked 
Honeyeater  -  maintained  small  populations  of  7,  9  and  7  individuals,  respectively,  over  both 
seasons.  Further  monitoring  is  needed  to  determine  whether  this  really  is  a  pattern  of 
population  stability  or  one  of  gradual  loss  and  decline  (see  below  and  Section  6.2.9).  Spiny-
cheeked Honeyeater is a part-nomadic, part-sedentary species that tracks seasonally available 
nectar  flows  in  remnants  sometimes  separated  by  significant  distances.  Thus,  it  is  of  less 
concern than Crested Bellbird and Inland Thornbill, both species that live all their lives in better 
quality remnants of above 30-40 ha in size and separated by gaps of not more than 300-350 m 
(Huggett  et  al.  2004;  InSight  Ecology  2009).  Significantly,  neither  Crested  Bellbird  or  Inland 
Thornbill were recorded in Remnant 1, the most isolated and smallest remnant on “Hill View”, 
but were detected in Remnants 2, 3, 4A and 4B. Inland Thornbill was also detected in Remnant 
5 and likely crossed from the main remnant (c. 130 ha in size) - a gap of c. 200 m. 
 
A  cohort  of  birds  recorded  in  the  study  increased  in  number  after  completion  of  the  spring-
summer  breeding  season.  In  a  moderate  departure  from  a  trend  evident  in  previous  surveys 
undertaken  in  the  northern  wheatbelt  (see,  e.g.,  InSight  Ecology  2009,  2013)  in  landscapes 
located  further  from  major  remnants  such  as  those  17  km  east  of  “Hill  View”  with  stepping 
stones  of  smaller  remnants  spaced  c.  2-2.5  km  apart,  these  were  mostly  remnant-dependent 
birds of woodland and shrubland habitats. The population increases of White-browed Babbler 
(30%), Rufous Whistler (15.4%) and Chestnut-rumped Thornbill (14.3%) were testament to the 
quality  of  habitat  in  the  larger  remnants  and,  in  the  case  of  the  babbler,  its  cooperative 
breeding system. There may have also been individuals that immigrated from other remnants 
outside of “Hill View”. However, further monitoring of these populations over several seasons is 
needed  to  confirm  that  this  trend  can  be  sustained  over  time.  This  would  help  eliminate  (or 
confirm) the possibility that these increases simply reflect the annual breeding increment, that 
is, the addition of young birds to the populations of these species after a breeding season.  
 
The  third  response  trajectory  identifies  several  remnant-dependent  bird  species  that  had 
decreased in number after the end of the 2014-15 breeding season. Plausible reasons for this 
outcome  include  losses  from  predation,  reduced  food  availability  following  poor 
spring/summer rainfall, post-natal dispersal of young within and between remnants, emigration 
of  birds  out  of  “Hill  View”  remnants  to  bush  on  adjoining  properties,  and  lack  of  detection 
during surveys conducted for this study.  
 
The  Galah’s  decrease  of  89.7%  reflected  a  poor  breeding  season  in  which  few  suitable  tree 
hollows  were  occupied  by  nesting  pairs  –  a  response  to  poor  rainfall  and  seed  production  in 
spring and summer. Reduction of numbers of Yellow-rumped Thornbill (51%) and Red-capped 
Robin (36%) may have been due to predation of eggs and nestlings by Australian Raven, Grey 
Butcherbird and reptiles, reduced food availability during the dry spring and summer, predation 
of adult birds by cat and fox, nest parasitism by small cuckoos, natural death of old birds and 
dispersal/emigration out of remnants to remnants on adjoining properties. Similar factors may 
have  been  implicated  in  losses  suffered  by  Grey  Shrike-thrush  (21.7%),  Redthroat  (18.5%), 
Singing Honeyeater (15.1%) and Southern Whiteface (13.1%). Whether these population sizes 
are  larger  enough  to  survive  major  events  such  as  wildfire,  prolonged  drought  or  elevated 
predation  levels  (or  a  combination  of  all  three)  is  unknown.  Further  monitoring  would  help 
confirm  population  sizes  and  detect  within  and  between-year  fluctuations  in  the  numbers  of 
these core species in the remnants over time (Section 6.2.9).  
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
90 
 
5.2.3  Extinction debt and time-lag effects 
 
There is an urgent need to determine the demographic structure and  reproductive success of 
remnant-dependent core woodland/shrubland bird populations. We particularly need to know 
the number and age (if possible) of males  relative to females and the number of young birds 
successfully  raised  to  independence  each  year  (see  Section  6.2.9).  This  information  will  help 
determine  if  these  species  are  successfully  reproducing  and  thus  surviving  over  time  in  the 
remnants or are declining and edging closer to local extinction. In effect, we need to know if the 
“Hill View” remnants are still paying an extinction debt and can restoration action be effective 
under this scenario.  
 
There is also a key question of whether the time-lag effect will be felt at “Hill View”. That is, will 
the  revegetation  areas  start  providing  supplementary  or  preferably  alternative  foraging  and 
breeding  habitat  to  core  woodland/shrubland  bird  species  soon  enough  to  help  offset  any 
population  declines  that  may  occur  in  especially  the  smaller  remnants?  This  is  an  important 
question that needs addressing through the continuation of monitoring of bird populations at 
the established sites on “Hill View” (see Section 6.2.9). 
 
5.2.4  Bird utilisation of habitat 
 
More individuals and species of birds  were recorded in remnants than in revegetation at “Hill 
View”. This reflected the larger size, higher habitat complexity and generally better ecological 
condition of remnants relative to revegetation on the property. The key remnants – Remnants 
4 (sites 4A and 4B), 3, 2 and 5 - provided a wider range of foraging, nesting, roosting and refuge 
substrates and food supplies than were available in the structurally simpler revegetation. Rocky 
outcrops,  small  escarpments,  boulders  and  gnamma  holes  provided  watering  and  bathing 
points generally not available in the revegetation. Standing dead trees and hollow-bearing York 
Gums  in  remnants  offered  perch  and  nest  sites  for  raptors,  migratory  insectivores  and  aerial 
insectivores. 
 
Fine-scale  variation  that  occurred  within  habitats  in  individual  remnants  influenced  the  range 
and  type  of  microhabitat  available  for  use  by  birds.  This  may  also  have  helped  shape  the 
composition and structure of resident and migratory bird communities recorded in the study. 
Differences  in  the  amount  and  distribution  of  foliage  cover,  height  of  cover,  floristic 
composition, and spatial arrangement of ground substrates such as logs, leaf litter, grasses and 
rocky outcrops are factors implicated in influencing bird community composition and structure 
(see,  e.g.,  Wiens  1989;  Huggett  2000).  Some  evidence  for  this  was  found  in  the  apparent 
preference  of  the  core  woodland/shrubland  insectivores  for  sites  containing  a  range  of 
microhabitats, sampled in Remnant 4A, 4B, 3 and 2. Selection of dense low shrubs for nesting 
and  creching  of  recently  fledged  birds  by  Splendid  Fairy-wren,  Chestnut-rumped  Thornbill, 
Inland  Thornbill  and  Red-capped  Robin  highlighted  the  importance  of  remnants  in  facilitating 
the reproductive success and thus contributing to the survival of these species on “Hill View”. 
 
Variation in the condition, structural complexity and floristic diversity of habitats  in remnants 
also  reflected  the  impact  of  historical  land  use  practices  and  current  stressors  including  past 
land  clearing,  grazing,  mining  exploration  and  feral  herbivore  incursion.  Sites  such  as  the 
western  part  of  Remnant  1,  upper  southern  and  western  slopes  of  Remnant  2  and  northern 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
91 
 
extension of Remnant 5 varied substantially in habitat condition, with patches degraded by past 
grazing, hervibory by goats and mining exploration activities. 
 
Bird utilisation of revegetated habitats was essentially in its infancy, in terms of the number and 
diversity  of  bird  species  recorded  foraging,  sheltering  and  in,  some  cases,  nesting  in  planted 
eucalypt and shrub rows. Older planted sites - Revegetation 1, 2 and 6 - had begun to provide 
these resources to some species more associated with habitats available in the remnants. The 
recorded  breeding  of  Weebill  and  the  presence  of  Singing  Honeyeater,  White-winged  Fairy-
wren, Brown Falcon and Nankeen Kestrel provided encouraging evidence of the supplementary 
habitat role of these sites in the study area.  
 
With  time,  these  plantings  will  develop  to  provide  a  wider  suite  of  resources  for  other 
woodland/shrubland birds on the property. Species such as Red-capped Robin, Yellow-rumped 
Thornbill, Inland Thornbill, Rufous Whistler, Grey Shrike-thrush and even Crested Bellbird and 
White-browed Babbler could be expected to forage through revegetation from the  c. 6+ year 
age class for robins and thornbills and  c. 10+ year for whistlers, shrike-thrush and, potentially 
babblers  and  bellbirds.  Red-capped  Robin,  Inland  Thornbill  and  Rufous  Whistler  have  been 
previously  recorded  foraging  in  11  year-old  melaleuca  and  eucalypt  revegetation  in  the 
southern part of the northern agricultural region (see InSight Ecology 2012) and in 10+ age-class 
plantings in Waddy Forest catchment near Coorow,  c. 56 km to the south/south-west of “Hill 
View”  (InSight  Ecology  2013).  Inland  Thornbill  nested  in  the  11  year-old  plantings  which  had 
moderate  nearby  connectivity  with  a  riparian  remnant  of  York  Gum  (InSight  Ecology  2012). 
Proximity  to  source  habitats  in  remnants,  the  nature  of  the  surrounding  landscape  which 
typically features a mosaic of cleared, naturally regenerating, planted and remnant vegetation 
(see Section 5.3), and the type and degree of threats to bird movement within this system are 
key factors that will influence the future bird species composition and habitat use patterns in 
this new future bush on “Hill View”. 
 
5.2.5  Conservation-reliant species and their management 
 
Ten  bird  species  recorded  in  the  study  require  management  intervention  to  ensure  they  are 
able to successfully reproduce and survive in the highly fragmented northern wheatbelt.  They 
are termed ‘decliners’ or ‘conservation-reliant’ species (InSight Ecology 2007, 2013; Scott et al. 
2010). These are species whose local populations may become extinct if intervention does not 
occur as the condition, size, connectivity, and intactness of their habitat continues to be eroded 
by  grazing  livestock,  local  land  clearing  events  such  as  grading  and  burning  of  road  verges, 
mining  activities,  predation  by  cat  and  fox,  browsing  of  native  vegetation,  erosion  and 
compaction of soil by rabbit and goat, and weed incursion.  
 
In  the  study  area,  conservation-reliant  species  included  Crested  Bellbird,  White-browed 
Babbler,  Chestnut-rumped  Thornbill,  Inland  Thornbill,  Redthroat,  Southern  Whiteface, 
Variegated  Fairy-wren,  Splendid  Fairy-wren,  Grey  Shrike-thrush  and  Wedge-tailed  Eagle.  It 
seems likely that these species have fine-scale differences or thresholds (see Huggett 2005) in 
sensitivity to habitat type and size, threats, and characteristics of the landscape in which they 
occur.  These  differences  require  flexibility  in  the  type  or  mix  of  conservation  management 
strategy used. For  instance, some - Chestnut-rumped Thornbill, Southern Whiteface, Splendid 
Fairy-wren  and  Variegated  Fairy-wren  -  are  ground/near-ground  foragers  with  small  home 
ranges  in  high  quality  woodland/shrubland  remnants.  They  are  particularly  vulnerable  to 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
92 
 
predation by cat and fox. Thus, the reduction of cat and fox numbers and the maintenance of 
habitat  structural  complexity  may  be  all  that  these  birds  need  to  survive  in  the  remnants. 
Others,  however,  will  require  more  intensive  management  including  the  creation  of  new 
habitat linking remnants, reduction of key threats and improvement of the condition of existing 
core habitat. They include Crested Bellbird, White-browed Babbler, Inland Thornbill, Redthroat 
and  Grey  Shrike-thrush.  Figure  15  illustrates  these  species-specific  characteristics  and 
responses  and  the  different  broad  types  of  conservation  management  intervention  required, 
using data from another study in the northern wheatbelt (InSight Ecology 2009). 
 
While  numbers  of  Wedge-tailed  Eagle  have  increased  in  recent  years,  the  impact  of  their 
persecution  by  some  farmers  over  the  past  few  decades  mean  that  this  species  is  still 
recovering  and  requires  ongoing  habitat  protection,  particularly  of  standing  dead  and  living 
trees for use as nest sites. The conservation of these species and the protection and expansion 
of their habitat on “Hill View” needs to be a key management priority (Section 6.2.1, 6.2.3). 
 
Figure  15:  The  influence  of  differences  in  the  sensitivity  of  key  woodland/shrubland  bird  species  to 
habitat  and  landscape  attributes  on  their  conservation  management  requirements  in  Buntine-
Marchagee Natural Diversity Recovery Catchment, 2006-2009 (InSight Ecology 2009, 2010 and courtesy 
DPaW).  Photographs  by  Graeme  Chapman  (Redthroat,  Crested  Bellbird)  and  Babs  &  Bert  Wells  and 
DPaW (Western Yellow Robin, Southern Scrub-robin). 
 
 

Yüklə 7,54 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   18




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə