Fishes of Marine Protected Areas Near La Jolla, California



Yüklə 335,86 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/8
tarix11.08.2017
ölçüsü335,86 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8
Fishes of Marine <a href="/a-guide-on-environmental-monitoring-of-rocky-seabeds-in-medite.html">Protected Areas Near La Jolla</a>, California

Fishes of Marine Protected Areas Near La Jolla, California

P. A. Hastings,

1

* M. T. Craig,



2

B. E. Erisman,

3

J. R. Hyde,



4

and H. J. Walker

1

1

Marine Biology Research Division, Marine Vertebrate Collection & Center for



Marine Biodiversity and Conservation, Scripps Institution of Oceanography,

University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0208 U.S.A.

2

Department of Environmental and Ocean Sciences, University of San Diego,



San Diego, CA 92110 U.S.A.

3

University of Texas, The University of Texas Marine Science Institute, 750 Channel



View Drive, Port Aransas, TX 78373

4

Southwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA/NMFS, 8901 La Jolla Shores Dr.,



La Jolla, CA 92037, USA

Abstract.—The marine waters surrounding La Jolla, California have a diverse array

of habitats and include several marine protected areas (MPAs). We compiled a list of

the fish species occurring in the vicinity based on records of specimens archived in

the Marine Vertebrate Collection (MVC) of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography

(SIO). Collection of fishes from La Jolla in the MVC started in 1905, but greatly

accelerated in 1944 when Carl L. Hubbs moved to SIO. By 1964, 90% of the 265

species recorded from the area had been collected and archived in the MVC. The

fishes of La Jolla are dominated by species whose center of distribution is north of

Point Conception (111 species), or between there and Punta Eugenia (96), with fewer

species with southern distributions (57), and one exotic species. Reflecting the

diversity of habitats in the area, soft-substrate species number 135, pelagic species 63,

canyon-dwelling species 123 (including 35 rockfish species of the genus Sebastes),

and hard-bottom species 140. We quantified the abundance of the latter group

between 2002 and 2005 by counting visible fishes in transects along the rocky

coastline of La Jolla, both within and adjacent to one of the region’s MPAs. In 500

transects, we counted over 90,000 fishes representing 51 species. The fish

communities inside and outside of the MPA were similar and, typical of southern

California kelp forests, numerically dominated by Blacksmith, Chromis punctipinnis

(Pomacentridae), and Sen˜orita, Oxyjulis californica (Labridae). Natural history

collections such as the MVC are important resources for conservation biology for

determining the faunal composition of MPAs and surrounding habitats, and

documenting both the disappearance and invasion of species.

The coastal environment in and around La Jolla, San Diego County, California is

notable for its complex and diverse array of habitats within a relatively small area. These

include kelp forests, rocky reefs, rocky intertidal, sandy beaches, sand and mud subtidal

areas, eelgrass and surf-grass stands, pier pilings, and submarine canyons, as well as the

pelagic environment. Because of the proximity of the La Jolla and Scripps submarine

canyons, depths range to over 500 meters within less than 7 km of the coastline. These

diverse habitats support a rich marine community, which has served as the focus of a

* Corresponding author: phastings@ucsd.edu

Bull. Southern California Acad. Sci.

113(3), 2014, pp. 200–231

E

Southern California Academy of Sciences, 2014



200

1

Hastings et al.: Fishes of La Jolla



Published by OxyScholar, 2014

variety of scientific investigations (e.g., Limbaugh 1955; Quast 1968; Craig et al. 2004;

Brueggeman 2008).

The nearshore environment of La Jolla is especially important within the context of

marine conservation because it houses a network of marine protected areas (MPAs) of

varying size and age and with varying levels of use restrictions (Fig. 1). Historically, the

first of these was the San Diego Marine Life Refuge established in 1957, which included

the Scripps Coastal Reserve, a part of the University of California Natural Reserve

system (McArdle 1997). Directly to the south is the San Diego-La Jolla Ecological

Reserve (SDLJER), a small no-take reserve on the northern end of the La Jolla rocky

coastline that was established in 1971. The San Diego-La Jolla Ecological Reserve Areas

of Special Biological Significance was established in 1974 and largely overlapped the

SDLJER (McArdle 1997). Recently the SDLJER was included in the Matlahuayl State

Marine Reserve (CDFG 2013). In addition, the area on the southern part of the La Jolla

peninsula was recently designated as the South La Jolla State Marine Reserve, and an

area directly west of that was designated as the South La Jolla State Marine Conservation

Area (CDFG 2013). These MPAs have a variety of use restrictions, but all recognize and

seek to protect the biodiversity of this ecologically important region.

This study documents the fish fauna in and around this series of marine protected

areas. The primary source of information on fishes occurring in the La Jolla area was

the Scripps Institution of Oceanography’s Marine Vertebrate Collection (MVC). The

important roles of natural history collections such as the MVC to conservation biology

have been widely documented (Allman 1994; Pyke and Ehrlich 2010; Drew 2011). These

include compiling biotic inventories, documenting the loss or degradation of habitats and

associated biota, documenting changes in the distribution and occurrence of native

species, and documenting species invasions. In addition to compiling an inventory of fish

species collected in the area and archived in the MVC, we report on diver surveys of the

abundance and diversity of fishes in kelp forests, one of the most prominent habitats in

the area, in and around the SDLJER (now the Matlahuayl State Marine Reserve) from

2002 to 2005.

Brief History of Fish Collecting in the La Jolla Area

The marine fishes of California have been studied for many decades and are well-known

(Miller and Lea 1972, 1976; Hubbs et al. 1979; Love et al. 2005; Allen et al. 2006) with at

least 519 species known from state waters (Horn et al. 2006). In addition to early collections

of fishes from the San Diego area reported by Jordan and Gilbert (1880, 1881), the study of

fishes in the San Diego region of southern California was begun in earnest with the

Albatross surveys (Moring 1999) as reported by C.H. Gilbert (1890, 1896, 1915), as well as

inventories by Eigenmann and Eigenmann (1890) and Eigenmann (1892).

The establishment of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) in the San Diego

region in 1903 and its subsequent move to La Jolla in 1905 marked a significant increase

in the study of the region’s biota (Hastings and Rosenblatt 2003). The on-site aquarium

displayed many of the common shallow-water fish species of the area. In 1918, Percy S.

Barnhart (Fig. 2A) was appointed as Collector and Curator of the Aquarium, and in

1926, Barnhart was elevated to the position of Curator of the Biological Collections, a

position he held until 1948. Barnhart studied the local fishes leading to a publication on

the fishes of southern California (Barnhart 1936), and he assembled a small collection of

preserved specimens from the region that ultimately formed the basis of the SIO Marine

Vertebrate Collection (MVC).

FISHES OF LA JOLLA

201

2

Bulletin of the Southern California Academy of Sciences, Vol. 113 [2014], Iss. 3, Art. 6



http://scholar.oxy.edu/scas/vol113/iss3/6

Knowledge of the ichthyofauna of the region greatly increased after 1944 when Carl L.

Hubbs (Fig. 2B) moved to SIO and began actively archiving collections of fishes in the

MVC. In negotiations regarding his forthcoming move from the University of Michigan

to SIO, Hubbs wrote to then SIO Director Harald Sverdrup:

‘‘I would no doubt want to put considerable emphasis on systematic and variational

studies of west coast marine fishes, particularly those in which speciation would be

correlated with oceanographical (sic) conditions…I would no doubt be interested in

exploratory work, for instance with the fauna of the deep basins off the southern

California coast. I will probably be interested too in detailed analyses of the

distribution of fishes along the entire west coast, again as correlated with the

oceanographic conditions.’’ (Shor et al. 1987, pp. 226-227).

Before his arrival in October 1944, Hubbs convinced Sverdrup to invest in facilities to

store his anticipated collection of fishes, leading to the ultimate establishment of the

Fig. 1.


Map of study area with MPAs designated. Kelp forest fishes were surveyed at La Jolla Cove

and Boomers.

202

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES



3

Hastings et al.: Fishes of La Jolla

Published by OxyScholar, 2014


MVC (Shor et al. 1987). Hubbs wasted little time in collecting fishes from the

surroundings of the SIO campus, amassing over 200 collections in his first year and over

500 by the end of the decade (Fig. 3).

Hubbs had another California project in mind when considering the move to La Jolla.

In 1944 he wrote to W. I. Follett in Oakland, with whom he had been corresponding for a

decade:


‘‘I look forward particularly to cooperating with you in making better known the

California fish fauna. I no doubt will have new material published from time to time

on the systematics and biology of the fishes but will definitely hope that you will

Fig. 2.


Photos of A) Percy S. Barnhart, 1935; B) Carl L. Hubbs, 1973; C) Richard H. Rosenblatt, 1979;

D) a view of La Jolla Shores and La Jolla peninsula looking southward from the SIO campus, circa 1910

(arrow indicates small embayment at La Jolla Shores). All images are from the Scripps Institution of

Oceanography Archives, UC San Diego Library.

FISHES OF LA JOLLA

203


4

Bulletin of the Southern California Academy of Sciences, Vol. 113 [2014], Iss. 3, Art. 6

http://scholar.oxy.edu/scas/vol113/iss3/6



maintain your plan to work toward a ‘Fishes of California.’ It will be a pleasure to

make records and other information available for your project.’’ (Shor et al. 1987,

p. 227).

That project was published shortly after Hubb’s death in 1979 (Hubbs et al. 1979).

In 1958, Professor and Curator Richard H. Rosenblatt (Fig. 2C) was hired to oversee

the growing collection of fishes at SIO. He and other researchers and students at SIO

actively collected fishes in and around the La Jolla region. By the end of 1969, over 1,000

collections and well over 3,000 lots of fishes from La Jolla had been archived in the MVC

(Fig. 3). Local collecting of fishes declined after that time due to diverging research

interests, and constraints of space in the MVC for storage of specimens. Since that time,

the MVC has archived specimens of fishes from the La Jolla region primarily when new

or unusual specimens become available, specimens from focused efforts associated with

faunal inventories of the area (e.g., Craig et al., 2004; Craig and Pondella, 2006), and

voucher specimens for the growing MVC tissue collection, established by H.J. Walker in

1993 (Hastings and Burton, 2008).

Materials and Methods

We compiled a list of fishes recorded from La Jolla, California based on specimens

collected and archived in the MVC of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography,

University of California San Diego (Table 1). We included all species collected less than

10 km from shore (east of 117

u20.59 W longitude) and from Torrey Pines State Beach

southward to Tourmaline Beach (32

u549 N - 32u489 N latitude). This area includes the

entire rocky headland of La Jolla, as well as the primary conservation areas in the vicinity

(Fig. 1). These include the San Diego-Scripps Coastal State Marine Conservation Area,

the Matlahuayl State Marine Reserve, the South La Jolla State Marine Reserve and

Marine Conservation Area (CDFG 2013).

Fig. 3.


Number of collections of fishes made within the study area and archived in the SIO Marine

Vertebrate Collection by year (bars) and cumulative number of species recorded from those collections

within the study area (line).

204


SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

5

Hastings et al.: Fishes of La Jolla



Published by OxyScholar, 2014

While some collections date to the early 1900s and a few were made in recent years, most

were made between 1944 and 1969 (Fig. 3). Archived specimens were collected using a wide

variety of sampling methods and were taken from the beach or ocean surface to depths of

over 500 meters. Species are listed in Table 1 arranged in taxonomic order. Common names

of families and species follow those recognized by the American Fisheries Society (Page et

al. 2013). Brief information on habitat or habitats occupied and special occurrences is

provided for each species. Habitat type was divided into three categories as follows: H 5

hard substrates, including rocky reef, rocky intertidal, kelp forest, sides of pier pilings,

boulders or any other type of hard substrate; S 5 soft bottom, including sand, mud, eelgrass

and surfgrass; P 5 pelagic, including species that always swim well above the bottom, as

well as those that periodically or regularly swim several meters above the bottom. Also

indicated in Table 1 are the species collected in the La Jolla and Scripps Canyons from .

30 meters depth (5 Cn), and the species observed in transects conducted in and adjacent to

the SDLJER (5 Tr) between 2002 and 2005 (see below).

Frequency of occurrence is based on the number of lots (occurrences) of each species that

have been archived in the MVC that were collected within the designated area, regardless of

the abundance of the species. Common (C) species are those represented by eleven or more

collections, uncommon (U) species were collected in the study area from three to ten times,

and rare (R) species were collected only once or twice in the La Jolla study area. In a few

cases, species that are known by us or reported by others to be more common in the study

area than indicated by collection records are indicated with an asterisk (*). The

biogeographic distribution of each species was designated based on the mid-point of the

entire known range of the species. Range endpoints are from Horn et al. (2006),

supplemented as needed based on published distribution records (e.g., Love et al. 2005).

Southern species (S) are those whose range midpoint is south of Punta Eugenia on the outer

coast of Baja California (27

u509 N), northern species (N) have range midpoints north of

Point Conception (34

u279 N), and central species (C) have range midpoints between these

well-established biogeographic barriers (Brusca and Wallerstein 1979; Horn et al. 2006).

Between 2002 and 2005, the abundance of fishes associated with kelp forests was visually

surveyed at La Jolla Cove (within the SDLJER, now called the Matlahuayl State Marine

Reserve) and an adjacent site (Boomers) a short distance beyond the reserve boundary

(Fig. 1). Both sites have moderate relief rocky reefs (1-3 m high) scattered throughout the

area and are dominated by red algal turf reefs and kelp forests (Parnell et al. 2005, 2006).

Survey protocols were modeled after established techniques for assessing abundance and

density of conspicuous fishes (McCormick and Choat 1987; Pondella et al. 2005). Randomly

selected, quantitative belt transects were swum by two SCUBA divers for a period of

5 minutes over a distance of 50 m. All fishes (excluding pelagic species) observed within a

two-meter window (i.e., one meter on either side of the diver and one meter above and

below) along the transect were identified to species where possible, and the number of

individuals was counted by each diver. If counts from the divers differed, the average was

recorded. Each transect accounted for 100 m

2

of bottom area surveyed. Three replicate



transects were conducted along rocky reef substrates at each of four depths (3 m, 6 m, 9 m,

and 12 m) for a total of twelve transects at each site per survey period. Surveys were

conducted every two months for a total of six periods per year between January 2002 and

December 2005. At certain periods throughout the study, persistent foul weather prevented

full surveys at each sample site, especially for the shallowest depth contours. However, at

least six transects were conducted at every site during each sample period throughout the

study except for July/August 2004 when continuous high surf precluded surveys at Boomers.

FISHES OF LA JOLLA

205

6

Bulletin of the Southern California Academy of Sciences, Vol. 113 [2014], Iss. 3, Art. 6



http://scholar.oxy.edu/scas/vol113/iss3/6

Ta

ble


1.

List


of

fishes


co

llected


from

La

Jolla,



Calif

ornia,


and

deposited

in

the


SIO

Marine


V

ertebra


te

Colle


ction.

Date


5

yea


r

of

fir



st

MV

C



rec

ord


from

study


area.

Oc

5



freque

ncy


of

oc

currenc



e

in

MVC



coll

ections


from

st

udy



area:

C

5



commo

n,

11



or

mo

re



records;

U

5



uncom

mon,


3

to

10



rec

ords;


R

5

rare



,

1

to



2

records;


*

indicates

spe

cies


known

to

be



more

comm


on

in

the



st

udy


area

than


collec

tion


rec

ords


indica

te

(see



text)

.

Habitat



(Hab)

cate


gories:

H

5



har

d

bo



ttom

(reefs,


etc);

P

5



pelagic;

S

5



soft

bottom


.

‘‘x’’


unde

r

C



n

and


Tr

ind


icate,

respec


tively,

col


lection

rec


ords

for


La

Jo

lla



or

Scripps


Cany

ons


at

.

30



me

ters


de

pth,


and

occurre


nce

in

kelp



forest

trans


ects

in

and



around

the


Mat

lahuay


l

State


Marin

e

Res



erve

(form


erly

San


Diego

-La


Jo

lla


Ec

ological


Res

erve;


see

Table


3).

SE

5



southe

rn

latit



ude

en

dpoint



of

range


(po

sitive


and

negative


valu

es

are



nort

h

and



sou

th

latit



ude,

respec


tively

);

NE



5

northe


rn

latitud


e

endpoi


nt

of

range;



mid

5

middle



latit

ude


of

range.


Distribut

ion


catego

ries:


So

5

southern



,

range


mid

point


sou

th

of



Punta

Euge


nia;

Ce

5



ce

ntral,


ran

ge

midpoin



t

betw


een

Pun


ta

Eugenia


and

Poin


t

Conceptio

n;

No

5



northe

rn,


range

midpoin


t

nort


h

of

Poin



t

C

onceptio



n.

Scien


tific

name


Com

mon


name

Date


Oc

Hab


Cn

Tr

SE



NE

mid


Dist

Myxinif


ormes

M

yxinida



e

hagfishe



s

Ep

tatretus



mcconn

augh


eyi

W

isner



&

M

cMillian,



1990

Shor


thead

Hagf


ish

1954


U

S

x



-

23

34



28.5

Ce

Ep



tatretus

stoutii


(Lockington,

1878)


Pacific

Hagf


ish

1948


C

S

x



-

27

60



43.5



Yüklə 335,86 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə