Fitzgerald biosphere



Yüklə 0.98 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə1/4
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü0.98 Mb.
  1   2   3   4

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

FITZGERALD 

BIOSPHERE 

▪ 

Threatened Species 

Profiles 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FITZGERALD BIOSPHERE  ▪  Threatened Species Profiles 



 

CONTENTS 

Fauna 

 

Carnaby’s Black‐Cockatoo  ▪  Calyptorhynchus latirostris 



1 

 

Western Bristlebird  ▪  Dasyornis longirostris  



 

 

2 

 

Chuditch  ▪  Dasyurus geoffroii   



 

 

 

 

3 

 

Malleefowl  ▪  Leipoa ocellata   



 

 

 

 

4 

 

Numbat  ▪  Myrmecobius fasciatus 



 

 

 

 

 

Dibbler  ▪  Parantechinus apicalis 



 

 

 

 

6 

 

Western Ground‐Parrot  ▪  Pezoporus (wallicus) flaviventris 



7 

 

Red‐tailed Phascogale  ▪  Phascogale calura   



 

 

8 

 

Heath Mouse  ▪  Pseudomys shortridgei 



 

 

 

9 

 

Flora 

 

Acacia rhamphophylla 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10 

 

Adenanthos dobagii 



 

 

 

 

 

 

11 

 

Adenanthos ellipticus 



 

 

 

 

 

 

12 

 

Anigozanthos bicolor (subsp. minor)   



 

 

 

13 

 

Beyeria cockertonii  



 

 

 

 

 

 

14 

 

Boronia clavata 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15 

 

Caladenia bryceana (subsp. bryceana)  



 

 

 

16 

 

Conostylis lepidospermoides 



 

 

 

 

 

17 

 

Coopernookia georgei 



 

 

 

 

 

 

18 

 

Daviesia megacalyx 



 

 

 

 

 

 

19 

 

Daviesia obovata   



 

 

 

 

 

 

20 

 

Eremophila denticulata (subsp. denticulata)  



 

 

21 

 

Eremophila subteretifolia  



 

 

 

 

 

22 

 

Eucalyptus burdettiana   



 

 

 

 

 

23 

 

Eucalyptus coronata 



 

 

 

 

 

 

24 

 

Eucalyptus nutans   



 

 

 

 

 

 

25 

 

Eucalyptus purpurata 



 

 

 

 

 

 

26 

 

Grevillea infundibularis   



 

 

 

 

 

27 

 

Hibbertia abyssa   



 

 

 

 

 

 

28 

 

Kunzea similis (subsp. mediterranea)   



 

 

 

29 

 

Kunzea similis (subsp. similis)   



 

 

 

 

30 

 

Lepidium aschersonii 



 

 

 

 

 

 

31 

 

Marianthus mollis   



 

 

 

 

 

 

32 

 

Myoporum cordifolium   



 

 

 

 

 

33 

 

Ricinocarpos trichophorus 



 

 

 

 

 

34 

 

 

 



Stylidium galioides  

 

 

 

 

 

 

35 

 

Thelymitra psammophila  



 

 

 

 

 

36 

 

Verticordia crebra   



 

 

 

 

 

 

37 

 

Verticordia helichrysantha 



 

 

 

 

 

38 

 

Verticordia pityrhops 



 

 

 

 

 

 

39 

 

Communities 

 

Eucalyptus acies mallee‐heath   

 

 

 



 

40 

 

ABBREVIATIONS 

DEC  ▪  Western Australia Department of Environment and Conservation  

IUCN  ▪  International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural 

Resources 

Mt  ▪  Mount 

NP  ▪  National Park 

NR  ▪  Nature Reserve 

NSW  ▪  New South Wales 

NT  ▪  Northern Territory 

SA  ▪  South Australia 

spp.  ▪  multiple species belong to single genus 

subsp.  ▪  subspecies 

VIC  ▪  Victoria 

WA  ▪  Western Australia 



 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS  

These threatened species profiles were prepared by Saul Cowen for DEC 

South Coast Region.  The following people assisted in the preparation of 

these profiles: 



Sarah Barrett  ▪  DEC Threatened Flora Officer, South Coast Region

 

Sarah Comer  ▪  DEC Regional Ecologist, South Coast Region 

Janet Newell  ▪  DEC Recovery Planner, South Coast Region 

Deon Utber  ▪  DEC (Acting) Regional Leader Nature Conservation, South 

Coast Region 

Grateful thanks is extended to all those who contributed photographs.  

All photographs are copyright and may not be reproduced by a Third 

Party without prior permission of the photographer or DEC (where 

appropriate). 


Species Profile  ▪

 

 FITZGERALD BIOSPHERE PLAN 



Carnaby’s Black‐Cockatoo  ▪  Calyptorhynchus latirostris 

(Psittacidae) 

(White‐tailed or Short‐billed Black‐Cockatoo) 

Conservation Status 

 



IUCN Red List 2010:  Endangered 

 



Environment Protection & Biodiversity 

Conservation Act 1999:  Endangered 

 

Western Australian Wildlife 



Conservation Act 1950:  Endangered 

 

Photo:


 

© Raana Scott 



Description 

Large  black  cockatoo  (53‐58cm),  with 

white cheek patch and white interior to 

tail  feathers.    Males  distinguishable  by 

black (rather than grey) bill and red (not 

grey)  eye‐ring.    Heavy  bill  structure 

differs  slightly  from  very  similar 

Baudin’s  Black‐Cockatoo  (C.  baudinii)  in 

that  the  upper  mandible  is  shorter  but 

this  can  be  difficult  to  observe  in  the 

field.    Gregarious  and  outside  the 

breeding season forms large flocks. 

 

Distribution and Habitat 

Occurs patchily throughout much of the 

south‐west  land  division,  from  the 

Murchison  River  in  the  north‐west  to 

the Esperance region in the south‐east.  

Several 


nesting 

sites 


known 

with 


Fitzgerald Biosphere. 

Mainly  occurs  in  uncleared  or  remnant 

eucalypt woodland or heath.  Outside the 

breeding  season,  may  occur  in  Banksia 

woodland,  coastal  heathland  as  well  as 

pine  (Pinus  spp.)  plantations.    Feeding 

habitat  needs  to  be  within  20km  of 

nesting  site  for  successful  breeding  to 

occur.    Larger  eucalypts  (e.g.  Marri 

(Corymbia  callophylla);  Karri  (Eucalyptus 



diversicolor))  are  believed  to  be  less 

important  but  may  frequently  be  seen  in 

these habitats. 

 

Biology and Ecology 

Generalist seed‐eaters, feeding on a wide 

range of both native and introduced flora.   

Usually arboreal but will occasionally feed 

on  the  ground.    Will  also  feed  on  the 

nectar  of  native  Proteaceae,  as  well  as 

extracting  insect  larvae  from  the  fruits 

and flowers of Banksia  species. 

Socially  monogamous  and  pairs  retain 

strong pair bonds for the duration of their 

reproductive lives (>4‐5yrs for females).  A 

hollow‐nester,  requiring  suitably  sized 

hollows for breeding. 

 

Threats 

Loss of both breeding and feeding habitat; 

illegal harvesting of nestlings for cage‐bird 

trade;  competition  for  nesting  hollows 

with  other  cockatoo  species  and  feral 

Honeybees (Apis mellifera). 



 

References 

BirdLife International (2009) Species factsheet: Calyptorhynchus latirostris. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 

16/2/2010  

Cale, B. (2003) Carnaby’s Black‐Cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus latirostris) Recovery Plan 2002‐2012 for Carnaby’s Black‐

Cockatoo Recovery Team.  Department of Conservation and Land Management, Perth, Western Australia. 

Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (2010) Calyptorhynchus latirostris in Species Profile and 

Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, Canberra. 

http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat.‐ Accessed 23/2/2010 



Species Profile  ▪

 

 FITZGERALD BIOSPHERE PLAN 



Western Bristlebird  ▪  Dasyornis longirostris   



 

(Dasyornidae)



 

Conservation Status

 

 



IUCN Red List 2010:  Vulnerable

 

 



Environment Protection & Biodiversity 

Conservation Act 1999:  Vulnerable



 

 



Western Australian Wildlife 

Conservation Act 1950:  Vulnerable



 

 

Photo:


 

© Ray Smith 



Description 

A medium‐sized (c.17cm) ground‐dwelling 

bird with short wings and long, graduated 

tail.    Colouration  is  generally  rufous‐

brown  with  fine  dark‐brown  scalloping.  

The underparts brownish‐grey.  An elusive 

species and often difficult to observe. 

 

Distribution and Habitat 

Endemic to south‐west WA and occurs in 

two  disjunct  areas:  from  Two  Peoples’ 

Bay  NR  to  Cheynes  Beach  and  in  the 

Fitzgerald River NP as far east as East Mt 

Barren.    Not  recorded  between  these 

populations, 

which 

are 


themselves 

fragmented. 

Favours  diverse  areas  of  closed  coastal 

heathland,  usually  with  abundant  sedges 

and low eucalypt thickets.  May reoccupy 

burnt  areas  2‐3  yrs  post‐fire  but  in  drier 

areas it may take 11‐14 yrs. 

 

Biology and Ecology 

Ground‐foraging 

species 


with 

diet 


consisting 

mainly 


of 

seeds 


and 

invertebrates.    Weak  flier  and  generally 

terrestrial  but  will  occasionally  make 

short flights. 

Song  is  distinctive  and  antiphonal,  i.e. 

‘male’  call  is  answered  by  ‘female’  call.  

Little  is  known  of  breeding  biology  but 

pairs appear to hold territories together. 

 

Threats 

Stochastic  events  especially  extensive  or 

high  frequency  wildfires;  reduction  of 

floristic diversity through ‘dieback’ caused 

by  Phytophthora  cinnamomi  pathogen; 

predation 

by 

feral 


predators; 

fragmentation of existing habitat. 

 

References 

BirdLife International (2009) Species factsheet: Dasyornis longirostris. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 

23/2/2010 

Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (2010) Dasyornis longirostris in Species Profile and Threats 

Database, Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, Canberra. 

http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat ‐ Accessed  23/2/2010

 

Gilfillan, S., Comer, S., Burbidge, A., Blyth, J. & Danks, A. (2009) South Coast Threatened Birds Recovery Plan 2009‐2018 for 



South Coast Threatened Birds Recovery Team.  Department of Environment and Conservation, Perth, Western 

Australia. (Unpublished) 



Species Profile  ▪

 

 FITZGERALD BIOSPHERE PLAN 



Chuditch  ▪  Dasyurus geoffroii 

 

 

 



 

(Dasyuridae) 



(Western Quoll) 

Conservation Status 

 



IUCN Red List 2010:  Near Threatened

 

 



Environment Protection & Biodiversity 

Conservation Act 1999:  Vulnerable



 

 



Western Australian Wildlife 

Conservation Act 1950:  Vulnerable



 

 

Photo:



 

© Cameron Tiller (DEC) 



Description 

Australia’s  largest  carnivorous  marsupial, 

with mature adults attaining the size of a 

small  domestic  cat  and  weighing  up  to 

1.3kg.    Pelage  reddish‐brown  with  white 

spots.    Long  tail  graduates  to  black  at 

distal end. 

 

Distribution and Habitat 

Formerly  occupied  up  to  70%  of 

Australian  mainland  but  since  mid‐20

th

 

century  has  been  confined  to  south‐



western  WA.    Has  been  translocated  to 

various  sites  between  Cape  Arid  and 

Kalbarri  NPs  and  ranges  widely  so  exact 

distribution  difficult  to  assess.    However, 

appears to occur patchily throughout the 

south‐west  land  division  and  appears  to 

utilise  a  wide  range  of  habitats  from 

sclerophyll  woodlands  to  beaches  and 

deserts.    Riparian  systems  may  hold 

higher than normal densities. 

 

Biology and Ecology 

Opportunistic  omnivore  and  consumes 

large invertebrates as well as small birds, 

mammals  and  reptiles.    Plant  material 

(e.g.  Zamia  (Macrozamia  riedlei)  seed 

pulp)  occasionally  eaten  and    may  also 

scavenge from humans.  Mainly terrestrial 

and  nocturnal  but  will  occasionally  climb 

trees and forage diurnally. 

Males  and  females  reach  sexual  maturity 

in  first  year  and  rarely  live  longer  than 

four  years.    Both  sexes  are  promiscuous.  

Young spent first 2 months in pouch, after 

which they reside in a den. 

 

Threats 

Loss/alteration  of  habitat  including  den 

sites  (e.g.  hollow  logs);  high  wildfire 

frequency; 

competition 

with 


and 

predation by feral predators; conflict with 

humans  (e.g.  illegal  hunting,  poisoning 

etc).


 

References 

Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (2010) Dasyurus geoffroii in Species Profile and Threats 

Database, Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, Canberra. 

http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat.‐ Accessed 23/2/2010 

Morris, K.., Burbidge, A. & Hamilton, S. (2008) Dasyurus geoffroii. IUCN 2009. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 

2009.2. http://www.iucnredlist.org ‐ Accessed 23/2/2010. 

Orell, P. & Morris, K. (1994) Chuditch Recovery Plan (1992‐2001) for Chuditch Recovery Team.  Department of 

Conservation and Land Management, Perth, Western Australia. 



Species Profile  ▪

 

 FITZGERALD BIOSPHERE PLAN 



Malleefowl  ▪  Leipoa ocellata 



 

 

 

(Megapodiidae)



Conservation Status 

 



IUCN Red List 2010:  Vulnerable 

 



Environment Protection & Biodiversity 

Conservation Act 1999:  Vulnerable 

 

Western Australian Wildlife 



Conservation Act 1950: Vulnerable 

 

Photo:



 

© Alan Danks 



Description 

Large,  ground‐dwelling  bird  up  to  60cm 

long  and  2.5kg  in  weight.    Adult  birds 

have  grey  necks  with  black  medial  stripe 

and  upperparts  are  chestnut  brown  with 

mottled 


brown, 

black 


and 

white 


ocellations on the wings. 

 

Distribution and Habitat 

In  Australia,  occurs  in  a  wide  distribution 

(approximately  900,000  km²)  from  the 

Great Dividing Range in the east to Shark 

Bay  in  the  west.    In  WA,  occurs  south‐

west of a line from Carnarvon to Eyre Bird 

Observatory,  often  patchily  especially  in 

remnant  bush  in  the  Wheatbelt.    Absent 

from far south‐west. 

In 

WA, 


occurs 

mainly 


in 

arid 


mallee/shrubland habitats on sandy soils.  

Abundant  leaf‐litter  is  key  for  the 

construction of mounds for reproduction. 

 

Biology and Ecology 

Generalist  forager  and  will  consume 

invertebrates,  a  variety  of  plant  material 

(especially seeds) as well as fungi but may 

also  utilise  artificial  sources  of  food  (e.g. 

spilt  grain).    Terrestrial  and  usually 

forages around dawn and dusk. 

A mound‐nester and builds mounds 4‐5m 

in diameter and 1m high.  Pairs may raise 

8‐10  chicks  per  year.    Sexually  mature  at 

4‐5  yrs  and  the  average  lifespan  may  be 

c.15 yrs. 

 

Threats 

Loss  of  habitat  and  fragmentation 

through land clearance; predation by feral 

predators;  large‐scale  or  high  frequency 

of  wildfire;  competition  with  grazing 

herbivores; 

increased 

risk 

of 


predation/mortality  from  foraging  from 

artificial  food  sources  (e.g.  spilt  grain 

along roadsides). 

 

References 

BirdLife International (2009) Species factsheet: Leipoa ocellata. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 23/2/2010 

Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (2010) Leipoa ocellata in Species Profile and Threats 

Database, Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, Canberra. Available from: 

http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat.‐ Accessed 23/2/2010 

Short, J. & Parson, J. (2008) Malleefowl Conservation – informed and integrated community action.  A final report to WWF 

Australia and Avon Catchment Council. 

 


Species Profile  ▪


Каталог: images -> user-images -> documents
images -> Мп г. Белгорода «Стоматологическая поликлиника №2» Информированное добровольное согласие на стоматологическое эндодонтическое лечение
images -> Задачами модуля являются
images -> Сагітальні аномалії прикусу. Дистальний прикус. Етіологія, патогенез, клініка та діагностика дистального прикусу
images -> Мп г. Белгорода «Стоматологическая поликлиника №2» Информированное добровольное согласие на проведение ортодонтического лечения
images -> Мп г. Белгорода «Стоматологическая поликлиника №2» Информированное добровольное согласие на пародонтологическое лечение
images -> Yazılım Eleştirisi
documents -> Fitzgerald biosphere recovery plan a landscape approach to threatened species and ecological communities for recovery and biodiversity conservation


Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
  1   2   3   4


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə