Fitzgerald biosphere



Yüklə 0,98 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə4/4
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü0,98 Mb.
1   2   3   4

 

 FITZGERALD BIOSPHERE PLAN 

20 


Daviesia obovata  

 

 



 

 

 



 

(Fabaceae) 



(Paddle‐leaved Daviesia) 

Conservation Status 

 



Environment Protection & Biodiversity 

Conservation Act (1999):  Endangered 

 

Western Australian Wildlife 



Conservation Act (1950):  Endangered 

 

Photo:



 

© Sarah Barrett (DEC) 



Description 

Distinctive,  erect,  slender  shrub  up  to 

1.5m  high.    Leaves  erect  and  paddle‐

shaped.  Flowers yellow and black.  Fruits 

woody. 

 

Distribution and Habitat 



Endemic to South Coast region of WA and 

known  from  11  small  populations  in 

Stirling Range NP and Fitzgerald River NP.  

Known  from  2  populations  in  Fitzgerald 

Biosphere,  on  Thumb  Peak  and  Mid  Mt 

Barren  in  Fitzgerald  River  NP,  comprising 

c.500  mature  plants.    Extent  of 

occurrence  is  approximately  500km²  and 

the  area  of  occupancy  is  estimated  at 

0.3km². 


Favours  stony  or  sandy  loam  but  also 

grows on hill‐slopes and outcrops. 

 

Biology and Ecology 

Flowers  Sep‐Oct.    May  mature  at  early 

age.  Presumed to be hermaphroditic and 

bee‐pollinated  as  for  other  Daviesia  spp. 

which  also  set  seed  around  3  months 

after  flowering.    Seed  high  in  starch  and 

oil  content  and  attractive  to  animals.  

May  resprout  after  fire  but  also  recruits 

from  seed.    Known  to  be  susceptible  to 

Phytophthora cinnamomi

 

Threats 



Phytophthora 

‘dieback’; 

insufficient 

intervals  in  wildfire  events  to  allow  seed 

bank  regeneration;  climate  change  and 

associated  modification  of  habitat;  small 

population  size  and  risks  associated  with 

low  genetic  diversity  and  environmental 

stochasticity. 

 

References 

Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (2010). Daviesia obovata in Species Profile and Threats 

Database, Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, Canberra. 

http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat ‐ Accessed 8/4/2010

 

Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC) (2008). Commonwealth Listing Advice on Daviesia obovata. Department 



of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. 

http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/17311‐listing‐advice.pdf ‐ Accessed 

8/4/2010

 


Species Profile  ▪

 

 FITZGERALD BIOSPHERE PLAN 

21 


Eremophila denticulata (subspecies denticulata)  

(Scrophulariaceae) 



(Fitzgerald Eremophila) 

Conservation Status 

 



Environment Protection & Biodiversity 

Conservation Act (1999):  Vulnerable 

 

Western Australian Wildlife 



Conservation Act (1950):  Vulnerable 

 

Photo:



 

© Damien Rathbone (DEC) 



Description 

Erect shrub to 2.5m high.  Leaves (50mm 

long)  and  stem  resinous.    Buds  are 

orange‐yellow  and  mature  flowers  are 

carmine‐red,  tubular  and  arranged  on  S‐

shaped  stalks.    Sepals  3.5‐9mm  long  and 

lower  corolla  lip  reflexed.    Fruits  ovoid  

(10‐11  x  8‐9mm)  with  1‐2  seeds.    Leaf 

margins  denticulate  and  prominently 

‘beaked’  fruit,  distinguishing  it  from  E. 



denticulata subsp. trisulcata

 

Distribution and Habitat 

The  nominate  form  is  known  from  4 

populations  to  the  south  and  east  of 

Ravensthorpe,  3  of  which  occur  in 

Fitzgerald Biosphere.  Approximate extent 

of  occurrence  is  70km²  with  c.5,000 

mature  plants,  although  this  is  likely  to 

fluctuate  with  fire  (S.  Barrett,  pers. 

comm.). 

Recorded  growing  on  both  alluvial  soils 

along  riverbanks  and  sandy  clay  loam 

plains  over  granite  geology.    Favours  tall 

open woodland over shrubland. 

 

Biology and Ecology 

Flowers Oct‐Jan.  Plants begin to senesce 

after  10  years.    Regenerates  in  large 

numbers from soil‐stored seed‐bank after 

fire.  Presumed  not  susceptible  to 



Phytophthora cinnamomi

 

Threats 

Grazing/trampling  by  native  and  feral 

herbivores;  competition  from  invasive 

weeds. 

 

References 



Craig, G.F. & Coates, D.J. (2001) Declared and Poorly Known Flora in the Esperance District, Wildlifre Management 

Program No 21.  Department of Conservation and Land Management, Perth, Western Australia. 

Robinson, C.J. & Coates, D.J. (1995) Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Albany District, Wildlife Management 

Program No 20.  Department of Conservation and Land Management, Perth, Western Australia. 

Threatened Species Scientific Committee (2008). Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Eremophila denticulata subsp. 

denticulata. Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. 

http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/64569‐conservation‐advice.pdf ‐ Accessed 

8/4/2010 



Species Profile  ▪

 

 FITZGERALD BIOSPHERE PLAN 

22 


Eremophila subteretifolia 

 

 

 

 

(Scrophulariaceae) 



(Lake King Eremophila) 

Conservation Status 

 



Environment Protection & Biodiversity 

Conservation Act (1999):  Endangered 

 

Western Australian Wildlife 



Conservation Act (1950):  Critically 

Endangered 

 

Photo:



 

© Sarah Barrett (DEC) 



Description 

Prostrate, mat‐like plant up to 10cm high 

and  1.5m  in  diameter.    Leaves  glossy 

green.    Flowers  erect  and  orange  in 

colouration. 

 

Distribution and Habitat 

Known  from  8  populations  in  Lake  King‐

Ravensthorpe  area,  1  of  which  occurs  in 

Fitzgerald  Biosphere,  with  an  extent  of 

occurrence of  approximately  530km²  and 



<50  mature  individuals.    .Area  of 

occupancy is estimated at 2ha. 

Grows in slightly saline, light, sandy loam 

over  clay  and  favours  open  woodland 

over  open  scrub  and  low  sedge  on 

margins  of  samphire  flats  and  salt  lakes.   

Grows under range of Eucalyptus spp. 

 

Biology and Ecology 

Flowers  Jul‐Mar  (possibly  throughout 

year).    Probable  disturbance  opportunist.  

Presumed  to  be  killed  by  fire  and 

regenerates from soil‐stored seed‐bank. 

 

Threats 

Inappropriate  fire  regimes  affecting 

recruitment  and  regeneration;  increased 

salinity  of  habitat;  modification/loss  of 

habitat  through  recreational  and  vehicle 

activity;  grazing  by  European  Rabbit 

(Oryctolagus  cuniculus);  mining  activity 

(specifically gypsum). 

 

References 

Graham, M & Mitchell, M. (2000) Declared Rare Flora in the Katanning District. Department of Conservation and Land 

Management, Perth, Western Australia. 

Phillimore, R., Stack, G. & Brown, A. (2002) Lake King Eremophila (Eremophila subteretifolia ms) Interim Recovery Plan 

2002‐2005. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Perth, Western Australia. 

Threatened Species Scientific Committee (2008). Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Eremophila sp. subteretifolia 

(K.R.Newbey 10924) WA Herbarium. Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. 

http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/82039‐conservation‐advice.pdf ‐ Accessed 

8/4/2010

 


Species Profile  ▪

 

 FITZGERALD BIOSPHERE PLAN 

23 


Eucalyptus burdettiana  

 

 



 

 

 



(Myrtaceae) 

(Burdett Gum) 

Conservation Status 

 



Environment Protection & Biodiversity 

Conservation Act (1999):  Endangered 

 

Western Australian Wildlife 



Conservation Act (1950):  Endangered 

 

Photo:



 

© Sarah Barrett (DEC) 



Description 

Multi‐stemmed  mallee  or  shrub  to  4m 

high.    Bark  dark‐grey  over  dark  orange.  

Mature  leaves  (6‐9  x  1‐1.7cm)  glossy 

green  to  blue‐green,  have  a  dense  vein 

network  and  numerous  small  oil  glands.  

Buds (4‐5 x 0.7‐1cm) have erect stamens.  

Flowers  usually  arranged  in  sessile 

clusters  of  7‐11  (on  flattened  peduncle 

with  unfused  hypanthia  and  long  horn‐

shaped opercula) and are cream to yellow 

in  colouration.    Valves  of  fruit  often 

united at tip and seeds black, irregular or 

ovoid  in  shape  or  sometimes  flat  or 

flanged. 

 

Distribution and Habitat 

Known  from  1  population  in  Fitzgerald 

River NP of 4,000 individuals. 

Favours shallow sandy soils over quartzite 

geology  and  grows  in  association  with 

other  mallee  species  (Eucalyptus  spp.).  

Occurs on slopes and ridges of mountains 

but 1 sub‐population on roadside verge. 

 

Biology and Ecology 

Flowers  intermittently  throughout  year, 

often  Jan‐Mar  and  July‐Aug.    Resprouts 

from lignotubers after fire or disturbance.  

Seedlings 

not 

observed 



to 

date.  


Susceptibility to Phytophthora cinnamomi 

unknown. 

 

Threats 

Inappropriate  fire  regimes;  modification 

of habitat. 

 

References 

Robinson, C.J. & Coates, D.J. (1995) Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Albany District, Wildlife Management 

Program No 20.  Department of Conservation and Land Management, Perth, Western Australia. 

Threatened Species Scientific Committee (2008). Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Eucalyptus burdettiana. 

Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. 

http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/13505‐conservation‐advice.pdf ‐ Accessed 

8/4/2010. 



Species Profile  ▪

 

 FITZGERALD BIOSPHERE PLAN 

24 


Eucalyptus coronata 

 

 



 

 

 



 

(Myrtaceae) 



(Crowned Mallee) 

Conservation Status 

 



Environment Protection & Biodiversity 

Conservation Act (1999):  Vulnerable 

 

Western Australian Wildlife 



Conservation Act (1950):  Endangered 

 

Photo:



 

© Sarah Barrett (DEC) 



Description 

Multi‐stemmed  mallee  or  shrub  to  2.5m 

high.    Leaves  blue‐green  and  12  x  3cm.  

Buds  5cm  long  and  3cm  in  diameter, 

strongly  ribbed  and  in  threes  on  broad 

flattened  stalk  1.5cm  long.    Fruits  are 

large  (5cm  long)  with  broad  disc  crown‐

like protruding valves. 

 

Distribution and Habitat 

Known  from  3  populations  in  Fitzgerald 

River  NP  with  an  estimated  2,000 

individuals 

occurring 

over 


47km², 

although  total  numbers  have  fluctuated 

with occurrence of wildfire. 

Favours  shallow  soils  over  quartzite 

geology  on  slopes  and  summits  of  peaks 

in the east of Fitzgerald River NP. 

 

Biology and Ecology 

Flowers  Jul‐Aug.    Resprouts  from 

lignotubers  following  fire.    Seedlings  not 

observed  to  date.    Susceptibility  to 



Phytophthora cinnamomi unknown. 

 

Threats 

Inappropriate  fire  regimes;  modification 

to  habitat  through  road  maintenance 

activity;  potential  risk  from  Phytophthora 

‘dieback’. 

 

References 

 

 

Robinson, C.J. & Coates, D.J. (1995) Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Albany District, Wildlife Management 

Program No 20.  Department of Conservation and Land Management, Perth, Western Australia. 

Threatened Species Scientific Committee (2008). Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Eucalyptus coronata. 

Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. 

http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/2308‐conservation‐advice.pdf ‐ Accessed 

8/4/2010 

 


Species Profile  ▪

 

 FITZGERALD BIOSPHERE PLAN 

25 


Eucalyptus nutans 

 

 



 

 

 



 

(Myrtaceae) 



(Bremer or Red‐flowered Moort) 

Conservation Status 

 



Environment Protection & Biodiversity 

Conservation Act (1999):  Not Listed 

 

Western Australian Wildlife 



Conservation Act (1950):  Vulnerable 

 

Photo:



 

© Sarah Barrett (DEC) 



Description 

Erect mallet to 10m high.  Leaves (52‐73 x 

34‐48mm)  ovate  or  orbicular  and  glossy 

dark  green.    Buds  (9‐15  x  4‐5mm) 

obtusely  conical  and  slightly  warty  with 

broad,  strap‐like  down‐curved  peduncle.  

Flowers  red  (rarely  cream).    Fruit  sessile 

and  four‐winged  with  descending  valves 

in  wheel‐like  arrangement.    Seed  black 

and compressed obovoid to ovoid. 

 

Distribution and Habitat 

Restricted  to  single  wild  population  near 

Bremer Bay in South Coast region of WA, 

with  c.20,000  plants  over  several 

hectares.    Has  been  cultivated  elsewhere 

in WA (e.g. Perth and Albany). 

Grows  on  gravelly‐clay  over  spongolitic 

marine  sediments  near  coast  at  Bremer 

Bay. 

 

Biology and Ecology 



Flowers Nov‐Apr.  Non‐lignotuberous and 

killed  by  fire.    Regenerates  from  canopy‐

stored seed (serotinous).  Hybridises with 

Eucalyptus  occidentalis.    Only  recently 

described  as  separate  species  from 



Eucalyptus  cernua.    Juvenile  period 

unknown. 

 

Threats 

Insufficient  intervals  in  wildfire  events  to 

allow 

seed 


bank 

regeneration.

 

References 

McQuoid, N.K. & Hopper, S.D. (2007) The rediscovery of Eucalyptus nutans F. Muell. from the south coast of Western 

Australia,  Journal of the Royal Society of Western Australia, 90: 41‐45. 


Species Profile  ▪

 

 FITZGERALD BIOSPHERE PLAN 

26 


Eucalyptus purpurata   

 

 



 

 

 



(Myrtaceae) 

Conservation Status 

 



Environment Protection & Biodiversity 

Conservation Act (1999):  Not Listed 

 

Western Australian Wildlife 



Conservation Act (1950):  Vulnerable 

 

Photo:



 

© Anne Cochrane (DEC) 



Description 

Erect  mallet  to  10m  high.    Bark  dull  grey 

over  cream,  smooth,  decorticating  into 

long  strips.    Flowers  cream.      Recently 

recognised  as  distinct  species  from 

Eucalyptus  argyphea  and  differs  by  red‐

purple new growth and smaller buds and 

fruits. 

 

Distribution and Habitat 

Restricted  to  single  population  in  4 areas 

around  Bandalup  Hill  near  Ravensthorpe 

with  an  extent  of  occurrence  of  16.5ha.  

Age  classes  of  this  population  vary  from 

c.19 to c.124 yrs. 

Grows  on  white  powdery  loam  over 

magnesite  geology  on  eastern/north‐

eastern slopes and ridges. 

 

Biology and Ecology 

Flowers  Nov.    Fire  sensitive  species  and 

regenerates  from  canopy‐stored  seed 

(serotinous). 

 

Threats 

Inappropriate 

fire 

regimes; 



habitat 

modification/loss  due  to  mining  activity.

 

References 

Department of Conservation and Land Management (2004) Proposed Change to the Database of Threatened Ecological 

Communities (TECs) – Eucalyptus purpurata woodlands on magnesite soils of the ridge‐tops and upper slopes of 

the Ravensthorpe Range.  Department of Conservation and Land Management, Perth, Western Australia.  

(Unpublished) 

Nicolle, D. (2002) Two new species of silver mallet (Eucalyptus – Myrtaceae) of very restricted distribution in south‐

western Western Australia. Nuytsia 15(1): 77‐83 

Western Australian Herbarium (1998) Florabase ‐ The Western Australia Flora, Eucalyptus purpurata D.Nicolle ‐ 

http://florabase.calm.wa.gov.au/browse/profile/20050 ‐ Accessed 8/4/2010 


Species Profile  ▪

 

 FITZGERALD BIOSPHERE PLAN 

27 


Grevillea infundibularis  

 

 

 

 

 

(Proteaceae) 



(Fan‐ or Funnel‐leaved Grevillea) 

Conservation Status 

 



Environment Protection & Biodiversity 

Conservation Act (1999):  Endangered 

 

Western Australian Wildlife 



Conservation Act (1950):  Vulnerable 

 

Photo:



 

© Sarah Barrett (DEC) 



Description 

Sprawling  or  decumbent  shrub  to  1m 

high.    Leaves  are  3cm  wide  and 

hemispherical  to  fan‐shaped,  almost 

lacking  stalks  with  the  leaf‐base  clasping 

the  stem  with  new  leaves  are  conical  in 

shape.    Leaves  denticulate  with  8  large, 

short‐pointed  teeth  on  each  leaf  and  are 

prominently  veined.    Flowers  bright  red 

and  irregular,  forming  small  terminal 

raceme.  Two forms may be distinguished 

which  differ  in  habitat  preferences  as 

dune  form  has  cuneate  (not  stem‐

clasping) leaves and a prostrate shape. 

 

Distribution and Habitat 

Endemic  to  central  coastal  region  of 

Fitzgerald River NP around Mid‐Mt Barren 

and  Thumb  Peak  with  2  populations 

comprising c.5,500 mature plants. 

Prefers  shallow  sandy  or  loamy  soils 

amongst  quartzite  boulders,  in  open 

shrub‐mallee. 

 

Biology and Ecology 

Flowers  irregularly  throughout  the  year.  

Susceptibility to Phytophthora cinnamomi 

unknown.    Killed  by  fire  and  regenerates 

from  soil‐stored  seed‐bank.    Juvenile 

period of 4 yrs. 

 

Threats 

Inappropriate  fire  regimes;  risk  from 



Phytophthora ‘dieback’. 

 

References 

Australian  Biological Resources Study (1995‐2000) Flora of Australia, Volumes 16, 17A & 17B, Commonwealth of Australia 

‐ http://www.anbg.gov.au/abrs/online‐resources/flora/stddisplay.xsql?pnid=2753 – Accessed 8/4/2010 

Barrett, S., Comer, S., McQuoid, N., Porter, M., Tiller, C. & Utber, D. (2009) Identification and Conservation of Fire 

Sensitive Ecosystems and Species of the South Coast Natural Resource Management Region.  Department of 

Environment and Conservation, South Coast Region, Western Australia. 

Robinson, C.J. & Coates, D.J. (1995) Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Albany District, Wildlife Management 

Program No 20.  Department of Conservation and Land Management, Perth, Western Australia. 

Threatened Species Scientific Committee (2008). Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Grevillea infundibularis. 

Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. 

http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/5772‐conservation‐advice.pdf ‐ Accessed 

8/4/2010 


Species Profile  ▪

 

 FITZGERALD BIOSPHERE PLAN 

28 


Hibbertia abyssa   

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Dilleniaceae) 



(Bandalup Buttercup)

Conservation Status 

 



Environment Protection & Biodiversity 

Conservation Act (1999):  Not Listed 

 

Western Australian Wildlife 



Conservation Act (1950):  Critically 

Endangered 

 

Photo:



 

© Damien Rathbone (DEC) 



Description 

Erect  shrub  up  to  1.2m  high  and  can  be 

single‐  or  multi‐stemmed.    Leaves  linear 

to  subulate  with  strongly  recurved 

margins  and  pungent  tips.    Young 

branchlets have distinct glabrous ribs but 

covered  in  dense  hairs  between  them.   

Flower bright yellow with five stamens on 

one  side  of  carpals  and  held  on  slender 

and glabrous stalks (6‐14mm long).  Sepal 

surface  has  hooked  and  branched  hairs.  

May  be  confused  with  similar  Hibbertia 



mucronata and H. atrichosepala

 

Distribution and Habitat 

Restricted  to  Bandalup  Hill  area  near  

Ravensthorpe  Range,  where  part  of  one 

population  was  cleared  in  2008  through 

mining activity. 

Occurs  in  shallow  red‐brown  light  clay  in 

open mallee‐shrubland. 

 

Biology and Ecology 

Flowering  recorded  in Oct,  Nov  and  Mar.  

Observations  suggest  that  it  regenerates 

after 


fire 

from 


soil‐stored 

seed.  


Susceptibility to Phytophthora cinnamomi 

unknown but other Hibbertia spp. can be 

susceptible. 

 

Threats 

Habitat  modification/loss,  dust  impacts 

and changes to hydrology through mining 

activity;  inappropriate  fire  regimes  and 

post‐fire  competition  from  invasive 

weeds; risk from Phytophthora ‘dieback’. 

 

References 

Luu, R., Rathbone, D., Barrett, S & Cochrane, A. (2010) Hibbertia abyssa Interim Recovery Plan 2010‐2015 (Draft).  

Department of Environment and Conservation, Perth, Western Australia. 

Wege, J. & Markey, A. (2009) A new, rare Hibbertia discovered on Bandalup Hill. Information Sheet 31/2009.  Department 

of Environment and Conservation, Perth, Western Australia. 

Wege, J.A. & Thiele, K.R. (2009) Two new species of Hibbertia (Dilleniaceae) from near Ravensthorpe in Western Australia.  

Nutysia 19(2): 303‐310. 


Species Profile  ▪

 

 FITZGERALD BIOSPHERE PLAN 

29 


Kunzea similis (subspecies mediterranea)  

 

 



(Myrtaceae)

 

Conservation Status 

 



Environment Protection & Biodiversity 

Conservation Act (1999):  Not Listed 

 

Western Australian Wildlife 



Conservation Act (1950):  Endangered 

 

Photo:



 

© Stephen Kern (DEC) 



Description 

Woody  shrub  to  3m  high  with  several 

stiffly  erect  main  stems,  moderately  to 

little branched.  Basal branches prostrate 

and  usually  without  flowers.      Young 

branches  densely  covered  in  silky  hairs.  

Flowers pink with prominent stamens and 

striking  pale  anthers.    Distinguished  from 

nominate  form  by  larger  bracteoles  (3.8‐

4.4mm)  and  with  (usually)  exposed  apex 

often longer than hypanthium. 

 

Distribution and Habitat 

Confined  to  1  population  on  Bandalup 

Hill,  east  of  Ravensthorpe  with  extent  of 

occurrence  of  21.9ha.    Surveys  in  2007 

found  c.350,000  mature  plants.    Mining 

has removed 6% of population. 

Favours  grey  loamy  sandy  soil  over 

laterite geology in open shrub mallee and 

dense heath. 

 

Biology and Ecology 

Flowers  Sep‐Nov.    Killed  by  fire  and 

regenerates  from  seed.    Pollinated  by 

native bees. 

 

Threats 

Habitat  loss/modification  through  mining 

activity.

 

 



References 

Department of Environment and Conservation (2008) SAP 2008

 

Kunzea similis subsp. mediterranea. Department of 

Environment and Conservation, Perth, Western Australia. (Unpublished) 

Toelken, H.R. & Craig, G.F. (2007) Kunzea acicularisK. strigosa and K. similis subsp mediterranea (Myrtaceae) – new taxa 

from near Ravensthorpe, Western Australia.  Nutysia 17: 385‐396. 

Western Australian Herbarium (1998) Florabase ‐ The Western Australia Flora ‐ Kunzea similis subsp. mediterranea 

Toelken & G.F.Craig ‐  http://florabase.calm.wa.gov.au/browse/profile/31151 ‐ Accessed 9/4/2010 



Species Profile  ▪

 

 FITZGERALD BIOSPHERE PLAN 

30 


Kunzea similis (subspecies similis)   

 

 



 

(Myrtaceae)

 

Conservation Status 

 



Environment Protection & Biodiversity 

Conservation Act (1999):  Not Listed 

 

Western Australian Wildlife 



Conservation Act (1950):  Vulnerable 

 

Photo:



 

© Sarah Barrett (DEC) 



Description 

Woody shrub to 1.5m.  Similar to K. similis 

(subsp.  mediterranea)  but  differs  with 

smaller  bracteoles  (3.2‐3.7mm)  hidden 

between flowers and usually shorter than 

hypanthium. 

 

Distribution and Habitat 

Restricted  to  single  location  in  Fitzgerald 

River  NP  at  East  Mt  Barren  near 

Hopetoun,  with  mature  population  of 

c.3,600. 

Favours  fine  sandy‐clay  soil  on  quartzite 

wave‐cut  bench  on  lower  slopes  of  East 

Mt Barren in low heath. 

 

Biology and Ecology 

Flowers  Sep‐Oct.    Killed  by  fire  and 

regenerates 

from 


seed. 

 

Poor 



regeneration after fire in 2006.  Presumed 

susceptible  to  Phytophthora  cinnamomi.  

Drought stress observed in February 2010 

(S. Barrett & S. Cowen pers. obs.). 

 

Threats 

Insufficient  intervals  in  wildfire  events  to 

allow  seed  bank  regeneration;  habitat 

modification 

through 

upgrade 


and 

maintenance 

of 

Hamersley 



Drive; 

drought. 

 

 

References 



Toelken, H.R. & Craig, G.F. (2007) Kunzea acicularisK. strigosa and K. similis subsp mediterranea (Myrtaceae) – new taxa 

from near Ravensthorpe, Western Australia.  Nutysia 17: 385‐396. 



Species Profile  ▪

 

 FITZGERALD BIOSPHERE PLAN 

31 


Lepidium aschersonii   

 

 



 

 

 



(Brassicaceae) 

(Spiny Peppercress) 

Conservation Status 

 



Environment Protection & Biodiversity 

Conservation Act (1999):  Vulnerable 

 

Western Australian Wildlife 



Conservation Act (1950):  Vulnerable 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Description 

Small,  erect,  perennial  herb  up  to  30cm 

with  intricate  branched,  erect  stems 

covered  in  deflexed  hairs.    Branches 

become  woodier  and  spinier  with  age  or 

in  dry  conditions.    Basal  leaves  (up  to 

12cm) are fleshy and pinnately lobed but 

rarely  persist  and  stem  leaves  are 

lanceolate  to  narrowly  tapering,  hairy, 

becoming  smaller  with  increasing  height.  

Flowers  small  with  four  sepals  0.8mm 

long  and  are  greenish  in  colour.    Fruit 

(3.5‐4.5 x 2.5‐3mm) ovate to obovate two 

chambered  pod  borne  on  2‐4mm  pedicel 

(hairy above, hairless below). 

 

Distribution and Habitat 

Occurs in fragmented populations in NSW 

and 


VIC 

where 


previously 

more 


widespread and was considered extinct in 

WA  (when  last  recorded  from  Pallinup 

River  in  1903)  until  1976  when  reported 

from Corackerup Creek. 

Wetland  species  in  eastern  states 

preferring  heavy  black  or  clay  soils  in 

swamps  and  salt‐marshes.    In  VIC  critical 

habitat  parameters  related  to  seasonal 

flooding events and waterlogged soils. 

 

Biology and Ecology 

Flowers  spring‐autumn.    Tolerant  of  a 

range  of  saline  conditions.    Highly 

productive  seeder  and  regenerates 

prolifically  during  drought  conditions, 

possibly  due  to    greater  soil  exposure.  

May  tolerate  some  levels  of  grazing 

pressure. 

 

Threats 

Modification/loss  of  habitat;  grazing  by 

feral/domestic  herbivores;  competition 

from 

invasive 



weeds; 

changes 


in 

hydrology. 

 

References 

Department of Sustainability and Environment (2009) Spiny Peppercress Lepidium aschersonii, Action Statement – Flora 

and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 No.111. Department of Sustainability and Environment, Melbourne, Victoria. 

Robinson, C.J. & Coates, D.J. (1995) Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Albany District, Wildlife Management 

Program No 20.  Department of Conservation and Land Management, Perth, Western Australia. 

Western Australian Herbarium (1998) Florabase ‐ The Western Australia Flora – Lepidium aschersonii Thell. 

http://florabase.calm.wa.gov.au/browse/profile/3019 ‐ Accessed 9/4/2010 

 

 



 

Photograph Needed Here 



Species Profile  ▪

 

 FITZGERALD BIOSPHERE PLAN 

32 


Marianthus mollis 

 

 



 

 

 



(Pittosporaceae)

 

(Hairy‐fruited Marianthus) 



Conservation Status 

 



Environment Protection & Biodiversity 

Conservation Act (1999):  Endangered 

 

Western Australian Wildlife 



Conservation Act (1950):  Vulnerable 

 

Photo:



 

© Stephen Kern (DEC) 



Description 

Low,  spreading  shrub  up  to  50cm  high.  

Stems  reddish‐brown  with  white  hairs 

when young but in mature plants are grey 

and hairless.  Leaves (2 x 1.1cm) also lose 

their  hairs  with  age  (except  on  margins 

and  mid‐rib)  and  are  almost  sessile.  

Flowers  usually  solitary,  deep  blue  in 

colouration with 3‐4 distinct lines on each 

petal and pale throat, and held on slender 

stalks (1.5‐2.5cm long) in leaf axils.  

 

Distribution and Habitat 

Confined to area of approximately 30ha in 

Ravensthorpe Range and eastwards along 

Rabbit  Proof  Fence,  possibly  sharing  the 

same  underlying  geological  feature.    6 

populations  comprise  >50,000  individuals 

and area of occupancy estimated at 12ha. 

Is  not  highly  specific  in  its  habitat 

requirements  but  favours  gravelly  sands 

over  laterite  or  ironstone  geology  and 

sand  over  laterite,  preferring  open 

mallee‐heath with disturbed areas of soil. 

 

Biology and Ecology 

Flowers  Aug‐Sep,  but  also  recorded 

flowering  in  summer.    Regenerates 

prolifically after fire from soil‐stored seed.  

Juvenile period is 3 yrs.  Since flowers are 

small,  self‐  or  insect‐pollination  is  most 

likely.    Seed  dispersal  by  animals.  

Probable  soil‐disturbance  opportunist.  

Susceptibility to Phytophthora cinnamomi 

unknown. 

 

Threats 

Impacts from mining industry (e.g. loss of 

habitat, soil compaction, dust, weeds and 

pathogen introduction, increased fire risk 

and  potential  for  introduction  of 

poisonous chemicals). 

 

References 

Barrett, S., Comer, S., McQuoid, N., Porter, M., Tiller, C. & Utber, D. (2009) Identification and Conservation of Fire 

Sensitive Ecosystems and Species of the South Coast Natural Resource Management Region.  Department of 

Environment and Conservation, South Coast Region, Western Australia. 

Hartley, R. & Barrett, S. (2005) Hairy‐fruited Marianthus (Marianthus mollis) Recovery Plan. Department of Conservation 

and Land Management, Perth, Western Australia. 


Species Profile  ▪

 

 FITZGERALD BIOSPHERE PLAN 

33 


Myoporum cordifolium  

 

 

 

 

(Scrophulariaceae) 



(Jerramungup Myoporum) 

Conservation Status  

 



Environment Protection & Biodiversity 

Conservation Act (1999):  Vulnerable 

 

Western Australian Wildlife 



Conservation Act (1950):  Endangered 

 

Photo:



 

© Sarah Barrett (DEC) 



Description 

Twiggy,  spreading  shrub  up  to  1m  high.  

Leaves very small (2mm), dark green and 

heart‐shaped.    Stem  warty  and  resinous.  

Flowers  solitary  and  white  with  corolla 

tubes  growing  up  to  5mm  long  with  5 

lobes,  which  have  prominent  purple 

spotting.  Fruit (1.5‐2.5 x 1‐2.2mm) brown 

or  green  and  ovoid‐oblong.    Seed  tiny, 

ovoid and white.  Unique habit and shape 

within genus Myoporum

 

 



Distribution and Habitat 

Occurs 


between 

Ongerup 


and 

Jerramungup  on  south  coast  of  WA.  

Extent  of  occurrence  is  approximately 

1,550km²  and  7  populations  comprising 

c.9,000  individuals  occur  in  Fitzgerald 

Biosphere. 

Favours  disturbed,  open  habitats  over 

sandy  loam  or  clay  loam  in  mallee  or 

moort  areas  where,  prior  to  disturbance, 

open  Eucalyptus  spp.  existed  over  an 

open  or  tall  shrub  understorey,  including 

road  verges.    Can  be  scattered  through 

mallee by flood events. 

 

Biology and Ecology 

Usually  flowers  Jun‐Nov  with  juvenile 

period of 3 yrs but observed flowering in 

February 2010 in Fitzgerald River NP, 2 yrs 

after  wildfire  (S.  Barrett,  S.  Comer  &  S. 

Cowen  pers.  obs.).    Short‐lived  (c.10  yrs) 

but  disturbance  opportunist  with  fire, 

flood or other disturbance (e.g. ‘chaining’ 

for 


fire 

management/suppression) 

stimulating  germination.    Longevity  of 

soil‐stored seed suggested to be >30 yrs. 

 

Threats 

Loss/modification of habitat through land 

clearance  or  road  maintenance  activity; 

competition  with  invasive  weeds;  grazing 

by 

European 



Rabbit 

(Oryctolagus 



cuniculus); disturbance events. 

 

References 

Barrett, S., Comer, S., McQuoid, N., Porter, M., Tiller, C. & Utber, D. (2009) Identification and Conservation of Fire 

Sensitive Ecosystems and Species of the South Coast Natural Resource Management Region.  Department of 

Environment and Conservation, South Coast Region, Western Australia. 

Chinnock, R.J. (2007) Eremophila and Allied Genera: a monograph of the plant family Myoporaceae – 30: Myoporum 



cordifolium, pp156‐159 – Rosenberg Publishing, Dural, New South Wales, Australia. 

Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (2010). Myoporum cordifolium in Species Profile and 

Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, Canberra. 

http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat ‐ Accessed 9/4/2010 

Threatened Species Scientific Committee (2008). Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Myoporum cordifolium. 

Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. 

http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/24223‐conservation‐advice.pdf ‐ Accessed 

9/4/2010 



Species Profile  ▪

 

 FITZGERALD BIOSPHERE PLAN 

34 


Ricinocarpos trichophorus 

 

 



 

 

(Euphorbiaceae) 



(Barrens Wedding‐bush) 

Conservation Status 

 



Environment Protection & Biodiversity 

Conservation Act (1999):  Endangered 

 

Western Australian Wildlife 



Conservation Act (1950):  Vulnerable 

 

Photo:



 

© Sarah Barrett (DEC) 



Description 

Erect, openly branching shrub up to 1.6m 

high.  Leaves (25‐80 x 1.5mm) dark green 

above  and  grey  below.    Stem  covered  in 

grey  felt‐like  hairs.    Buds  also  covered  in 

dense ferruginous hairs.  Flowers creamy‐

yellow to white, arranged in groups of 6‐

10 on a 2cm stalk  at the end of a branch. 

 

Distribution and Habitat 

Occurs  in  disjunct  populations  along  the 

south  coast  of  WA,  from  Fitzgerald  River 

NP  to  Lake  Tay  (east  of  Frank  Hann  NP) 

and  Mts  Beaumont  and  Heywood  north‐

east  of  Esperance.    5  populations  in 

Fitzgerald  Biosphere  comprising  4,500 

individuals. 

Favours 

sandy‐clay 

loam 

along 


breakaways  or  watercourses  among 

sandstone rocks. 

 

Biology and Ecology 

Flowers Mar‐May and Aug‐Nov.  Killed by 

fire  and  regenerates  from  soil‐stored 

seed.    Thought  to  take  four  years  to 

flower  and  seed  although  it  was 

reproductive  only  2  yrs  post‐fire  in 

Fitzgerald  River  NP  in  February  2010  (S. 

Barrett  &  S.  Cowen,  pers.  obs.).    Also 

observed  to  be  affected  by  drought. 

Susceptibility to Phytophthora cinnamomi 

unknown. 

 

Threats 

Loss/modification/fragmentation 

of 


habitat through land clearance; grazing by 

domestic 

and 

feral 


herbivores; 

competition 

with 

invasive 



weeds; 

inappropriate  fire  regimes;  risk  from 



Phytophthora ‘dieback’. 

 

References 

Threatened Species Scientific Committee (2008). Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Ricinocarpos trichophorus. 

Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. 

http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/19931‐conservation‐advice.pdf ‐ Accessed 

9/4/2010 

Western Australian Herbarium (1998) Florabase ‐ The Western Australia Flora ‐ Ricinocarpos trichophorus Muell.Arg.‐ 

http://florabase.calm.wa.gov.au/browse/profile/4702 ‐ Accessed 9/4/2010 



Species Profile  ▪

 

 FITZGERALD BIOSPHERE PLAN 

35 


Stylidium galioides 

 

 



 

 

 



 

(Stylidiaceae) 



(Yellow Mountain or Yellow Fitzgerald Triggerplant) 

Conservation Status 

 



Environment Protection & Biodiversity 

Conservation Act (1999):  Vulnerable 

 

Western Australian Wildlife 



Conservation Act (1950):  Vulnerable 

 

Photo:



 

© Sarah Barrett (DEC) 



 

Description 

Creeping to semi‐scandent perennial herb 

up  to  30cm  high  and  spreading  to  50cm 

diameter.    Leaves  (2.5‐40  x  0.7‐6mm)  in 

whorls of 8+ at base and on trailing stems, 

the  latter  of  which  may  be  rooted  at 

nodes.    Inflorescences  racemose  and 

flowers  pale‐yellow  and  clustered  at 

branch ends. 

 

Distribution and Habitat 

Restricted  to  3  populations  in  Fitzgerald 

River  NP  with  an  estimated  220  mature 

plants  occurring  over  approximately 

9km².  Populations believed to be stable. 

Favours  shallow  gravelly  soils  over  and 

among  quartzite  geology  on  slopes  and 

summits, in heath, mallee and shrubland. 

 

Biology and Ecology 

Flowers  Sep‐Jan.    Killed  by  fire  and 

regenerates 

from 

soil‐stored 



seed.  

Susceptibility to Phytophthora cinnamomi 

unknown.  Juvenile period is <4 yrs. 

 

Threats 

Inappropriate  fire  regimes;  modification 

of  habitat  due  to  recreational  activities; 

risk from Phytophthora ‘dieback’. 

 

References 

Barrett, S., Comer, S., McQuoid, N., Porter, M., Tiller, C. & Utber, D. (2009) Identification and Conservation of Fire 

Sensitive Ecosystems and Species of the South Coast Natural Resource Management Region.  Department of 

Environment and Conservation, South Coast Region, Western Australia. 

Threatened Species Scientific Committee (2008). Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Stylidium galioides. Department 

of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. 

http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/4666‐conservation‐advice.pdf ‐ Accessed 

9/4/2010 

Western Australian Herbarium (1998) Florabase ‐ The Western Australia Flora ‐ Stylidium galioides C.A.Gardner.‐ 

http://florabase.dec.wa.gov.au/browse/profile/7730 ‐ Accessed 9/4/2010 

 

 



Species Profile  ▪

 

 FITZGERALD BIOSPHERE PLAN 

36 


Thelymitra psammophila 

 

 



 

 

 



(Orchidaceae) 

(Sandplain Sun‐orchid) 

Conservation Status 

 



Environment Protection & Biodiversity 

Conservation Act (1999):  Vulnerable 

 

Western Australian Wildlife 



Conservation Act (1950):  Vulnerable 

 

Photo:



 

© Andrew Brown (DEC) 



Description 

Small,  herbaceous  perennial  up  to  25cm 

high.  Leaves narrow and up to 8cm long.  

Flowers  lemon‐yellow  and  18mm  wide 

with  2  to  4  on  each  plant  in  a  loose 

raceme.    Column  yellow  with  two 

triangular, brown, lateral lobes.  Backs of 

perianth segments tinged with red. 

 

Distribution and Habitat 

Restricted  to  12  populations  between 

Stirling  Range  NP  and  Ravensthorpe  with 

an extent of occurrence of 10,000km².  8 

populations occur in Fitzgerald Biosphere 

comprising c.400 individuals.  

Favours  wet  sandy‐clay  soils  in  open 

heath and sedge. 

 

Biology and Ecology 

Flowers Sep‐Oct.  Tuberous in association 

with a mycorrhizal fungus.  Presumed not 

susceptible  to  Phytophthora  cinnamomi.  

Vulnerable to fire during growing season. 

 

Threats 

Competition 

with 


invasive 

weeds; 


modification/loss  of  habitat  through 

change  of  land  use  or  clearance  for 

industry,  fire  suppression  and  road 

maintenance;  grazing  by  domestic  stock; 

drought  and  inappropriate  fire  regimes 

(including season). 

 

References 

Barrett, S., Comer, S., McQuoid, N., Porter, M., Tiller, C. & Utber, D. (2009) Identification and Conservation of Fire 

Sensitive Ecosystems and Species of the South Coast Natural Resource Management Region.  Department of 

Environment and Conservation, South Coast Region, Western Australia. 

Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (2010). Thelymitra psammophila in Species Profile and 

Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, Canberra. 

http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat ‐ Accessed 12/4/2010 

Graham, M. & M. Mitchell (2000). Declared Rare Flora in the Katanning District. Western Australia Department of 

Conservation and Land Management.. 

http://www.dec.wa.gov.au/pdf/nature/flora/flora_mgt_plans/katanning/katanning_drf_mp25.pdf ‐ Accessed 

12/4/2010 

Robinson, C.J. & Coates, D.J. (1995) Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Albany District, Wildlife Management 

Program No 20.  Department of Conservation and Land Management, Perth, Western Australia. 

Threatened Species Scientific Committee (2008). Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Thelymitra psammophila. 

Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. 

http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/4908‐conservation‐advice.pdf ‐ Accessed 

12/4/2010 


Species Profile  ▪

 

 FITZGERALD BIOSPHERE PLAN 

37 


Verticordia crebra 

 

 



 

 

 



 

(Myrtaceae) 



(Crowded or Twertup Featherflower) 

Conservation Status 

 



Environment Protection & Biodiversity 

Conservation Act (1999):  Vulnerable 

 

Western Australian Wildlife 



Conservation Act (1950):  Vulnerable 

 

Photo:


 

© Sarah Barrett (DEC) 



Description 

Small,  spreading  shrub  to  75cm.    Leaves 

15mm long, dark‐green and fine.  Flowers 

yellow  with  3mm  long  petals  and 

unusually prominent yellow style and are 

held  in  leaf  axis  towards  ends  of 

branches.  

Distribution and Habitat 

Endemic to Fitzgerald River NP and known 

from  4  populations  with  an  estimated 

total  population  of  7,000.    Approximate 

extent  of  occurrence  is  150km².    1 

population  not  surveyed  since  1981  and 

number of plants not recorded then. 

Prefers  heavy  red‐loam  over  spongolite 

on  or  above  breakaways  and  drainage 

lines  in  open  areas  surrounded  by  scrub 

and mallee. 

 

Biology and Ecology 

Flowers  May‐Oct.    Killed  by  fire  and 

regenerates 

from 

soil‐stored 



seed.  

Presumed 

to 

be 


susceptible 

to 


Phytophthora cinnamomi.  Juvenile period 

is 29 months. 

 

Threats 

Insufficient  intervals  in  wildfire  events  to 

allow  seed  bank  regeneration;  potential 

risk 


from 

Phytophthora 

‘dieback’; 

drought. 

 

References 

Barrett, S., Comer, S., McQuoid, N., Porter, M., Tiller, C. & Utber, D. (2009) Identification and Conservation of Fire 

Sensitive Ecosystems and Species of the South Coast Natural Resource Management Region.  Department of 

Environment and Conservation, South Coast Region, Western Australia. 

Environment Australia (EA) (2001). Threat Abatement Plan for Dieback Caused by the Root‐rot Fungus Phytophthora 

cinnamomi. 

http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/publications/tap/phytophthora.html ‐ Accessed 

12/4/2010 

Robinson, C.J. & Coates, D.J. (1995) Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Albany District, Wildlife Management 

Program No 20.  Department of Conservation and Land Management, Perth, Western Australia. 

Threatened Species Scientific Committee (2008). Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Verticordia crebra. Department 

of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. 

http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/55678‐conservation‐advice.pdf ‐ Accessed 

12/4/2010 


Species Profile  ▪

 

 FITZGERALD BIOSPHERE PLAN 

38 


Verticordia helichrysantha 

 

 



 

 

 



(Myrtaceae) 

(Coast Featherflower) 

Conservation Status 

 



Environment Protection & Biodiversity 

Conservation Act (1999):  Vulnerable 

 

Western Australian Wildlife 



Conservation Act (1950):  Vulnerable 

 

Photo:



 

© Sarah Barrett (DEC) 



Description 

Small,  sprawling  shrub  up  to  20cm  high.  

Leaves  small  (6mm  long),  linear  with 

revolute  margins.    Flowers  (7mm 

diameter)  pale‐yellow  with  minutely‐

dentate  oval  petals,  a  hairy  calyx  tube 

(3mm  long)  and  long,  prominent,  slightly 

hooked pale‐pink style (15mm long). 

 

Distribution and Habitat 

Known  from  5  current  populations  on 

south  coat  of  WA,  1  of  which  occurs  in 

Fitzgerald  Biosphere,  in  Fitzgerald  River 

NP, comprising c.35,000 plants. 

Occurs  in  grey‐brown  sandy  soils  over 

laterite  gravel  over  spongolite  geology  in 

low coastal heath. 

 

Biology and Ecology 

Flowers  Sep‐Oct.    Killed  by  fire  and 

regenerates 

from 


soil‐stored 

seed.  


However,  regenerates  poorly  after  other 

disturbance.  Presumed to be susceptible 

to  Phytophthora  cinnamomi.    Juvenile 

period is >4 yrs. 

 

Threats 

Modification/loss  of  habitat  through  land 

clearance, 

road 


maintenance 

and 


recreational  activities;  high  frequency 

wildfire  events;  risk  from  Phytophthora 

‘dieback’; drought. 

 

References 

Barrett, S., Comer, S., McQuoid, N., Porter, M., Tiller, C. & Utber, D. (2009) Identification and Conservation of Fire 

Sensitive Ecosystems and Species of the South Coast Natural Resource Management Region.  Department of 

Environment and Conservation, South Coast Region, Western Australia. 

Environment Australia (EA) (2001). Threat Abatement Plan for Dieback Caused by the Root‐rot Fungus Phytophthora 

cinnamomi.  

http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/publications/tap/phytophthora.html ‐ Accessed 

12/4/2010 

Robinson, C.J. & Coates, D.J. (1995) Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Albany District, Wildlife Management 

Program No 20.  Department of Conservation and Land Management, Perth, Western Australia. 

Threatened Species Scientific Committee (2008). Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Verticordia helichrysantha. 

Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. 

http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/8204‐conservation‐advice.pdf ‐ Accessed 

12/4/2010 


Species Profile  ▪

 

 FITZGERALD BIOSPHERE PLAN 

39 


Verticordia pityrhops   

 

 



 

 

 



(Myrtaceae) 

(Mount Barren Featherflower) 

Conservation Status 

 



Environment Protection & Biodiversity 

Conservation Act (1999):  Endangered 

 

Western Australian Wildlife 



Conservation Act (1950):  Endangered 

 

Photo:



 

© Saul Cowen (DEC) 



Description 

Erect, single stemmed shrub up to 150cm 

high.  Leaves 14mm, dark‐green and fine.  

Flowers  small  and  range  from  white  to 

bright  pink  in  colour  with  finely  fringed 

sepals and petals and a honey‐like scent. 

 

Distribution and Habitat 

Restricted  to  single  population  on 

southern  slopes  of  East  Mt  Barren,  near 

Hopetoun  in  Fitzgerald  River  NP.  

Approximately  3,000  mature  individuals 

occur in this area. 

Occurs  in  white  sandy  soil  over  and 

among  quartzite  geology  on  wave‐cut 

bench  approximately  100m  above  sea‐

level,  in  an  open  heath  and  shrubland 

community. 

 

Biology and Ecology 

Flowers  Feb‐Jun.    Killed  by  fire  and 

regenerates  very  slowly  from  soil‐stored 

seed,  e.g.  no  regeneration  seen  after 

2006 in fire age vegetation (S. Barrett & S. 

Cowen  pers.  obs.).    Juvenile  period  is  7 

yrs.    Presumed  to  be  susceptible  to 

Phytophthora cinnamomi

 

Threats 

High  frequency  wildfire  events;  habitat 

loss/modification  due  to  upgrade  of 

Hamersley  Drive;  risk  from  Phytophthora 

‘dieback’. 

 

References 

Barrett, S., Comer, S., McQuoid, N., Porter, M., Tiller, C. & Utber, D. (2009) Identification and Conservation of Fire 

Sensitive Ecosystems and Species of the South Coast Natural Resource Management Region.  Department of 

Environment and Conservation, South Coast Region, Western Australia. 

Robinson, C.J. & Coates, D.J. (1995) Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Albany District, Wildlife Management 

Program No 20.  Department of Conservation and Land Management, Perth, Western Australia. 

Threatened Species Scientific Committee (2008). Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Verticordia pityrhops. 

Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. 

http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/55798‐conservation‐advice.pdf ‐ Accessed 

12/4/2010 



Species Profile  ▪

 

 FITZGERALD BIOSPHERE PLAN 

40 


Eucalyptus acies mallee‐heath 

 

 



 

 

 



(Community)

 

(Central Barren Ranges – Fitzgerald River NP) 



Conservation Status 

 



Western Australian Wildlife 

Conservation Act (1950):  Vulnerable 

 

Photo:


 

© Sarah Barrett (DEC) 



 

Description 

Mallee‐heath  dominated  by  Eucalyptus 



acies  (Woolbernup  Mallee),  a  straggly 

shrub or low mallee (up to 3m high) with 

broad,  thick  sub‐opposite  leaves,  angular 

branchlets  and  rigidly  down‐curved 

inflorescences. 

 

Distribution and Habitat 

Restricted  to  Central  Barren  Ranges  in 

Fitzgerald  River  NP,  specifically  Thumb 

Peak, Mid‐Mt Barren and Woolbernup. 

Occurs on sandy skeletal soils on quartzite 

hills.    Associated  Declared  Rare  Flora* 

species 


are 

Coopernookia 

georgei 

(Endangered*), 



Daviesia 

obovata 

(Endangered*) 

and 


Grevillea 

infundibularis  (Vulnerable*).      E.  acies 

listed as Priority 4* (Rare). 

*

 WA Wildlife Conservation Act (1950) 



 

Biology and Ecology 

Community  considered  to  be  Vulnerable 

to 

infestation 



by 

the 


pathogen 

Phytophthora cinnamomi as is dominated 

by highly susceptible plant spp. 

Also  dominated  by  serotinous  obligate 

seeders and therefore sensitive to fire. 

 

Threats 

Inappropriate fire regimes; risk from 



Phytophthora ‘dieback’.

 

References 

Brooker, M.I.H, Slee, A.V. & Connors, J.R. (2002) EUCLID – Eucalypts of Southern Australia (second edition).  CSIRO 

Publishing, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. 

Shearer, B.L., Crane, C.E., Barrett, S. & Cochrane, A. (2007)  Phytophthora

 

cinnamomi invasion, a major threatening 

process to conservation of flora diversity in the South‐west Botanical Province of Western Australia. 

Western Australian Herbarium (1998) Florabase ‐ The Western Australia Flora ‐ Eucalyptus acies Brooker.‐ 

http://florabase.calm.wa.gov.au/browse/profile/5546 ‐ Accessed 12/4/2010 

Wilkins, P., Gilfillan, S., Watson, J. and Sanders, A. (ed). (2006) The Western Australian South Coast Macro Corridor 

Network – a bioregional strategy for nature conservation, Department of Conservation and Land Management 

(CALM) and South Coast Regional Initiative Planning Team (SCRIPT), Albany, Western Australia. 



 

Document Outline

  • Species Profiles_Title.pdf
  • Species Profiles_FinalDraft

Kataloq: images -> user-images -> documents
images -> Мп г. Белгорода «Стоматологическая поликлиника №2» Информированное добровольное согласие на стоматологическое эндодонтическое лечение
images -> Задачами модуля являются
images -> Сагітальні аномалії прикусу. Дистальний прикус. Етіологія, патогенез, клініка та діагностика дистального прикусу
images -> Мп г. Белгорода «Стоматологическая поликлиника №2» Информированное добровольное согласие на проведение ортодонтического лечения
images -> Мп г. Белгорода «Стоматологическая поликлиника №2» Информированное добровольное согласие на пародонтологическое лечение
images -> Yazılım Eleştirisi
documents -> Fitzgerald biosphere recovery plan a landscape approach to threatened species and ecological communities for recovery and biodiversity conservation

Yüklə 0,98 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə