Fleppc gov. Regional Scientific Name Common Name Category List Distribution



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FLEPPC 2015 List of Invasive Plant Species 

1

Does not include Ficus microcarpa subsp. fuyuensis, which is sold as “Green Island Ficus”



Chinese privet is a FLDACS Noxious Weed except for the cultivar ‘Variegatum’



 

 

FLEPPC  

Gov. 

Regional 

Scientific Name 

Common Name 

Category 

List  Distribution

Abrus precatorius 

rosary pea 

I  

N 



C, S

Acacia auriculiformis  

earleaf acacia 

I  

 

C, S



Albizia julibrissin  

mimosa, silk tree 

I  

 

N, C



Albizia lebbeck 

woman’s tongue 

I  

 

C, S



Ardisia crenata (A. crenulata  misapplied) 

coral ardisia 

I  



N, C, S



Ardisia elliptica (A. humilis misapplied) 

shoebutton ardisia 

I  

N 



C, S 

Asparagus aethiopicus (A. sprengeri;  

asparagus-fern 

I  

 

N, C, S 



A. densiflorus misapplied) 

Bauhinia variegata  

orchid tree 

I  

 

C, S



Bischofia javanica  

bishopwood 

I  

 

C, S



Calophyllum antillanum  

Santa Maria, mast wood, Antilles calophyllum  I  

 

S 



(C. calaba misapplied) 

  

  

Casuarina equisetifolia 

Australian-pine, beach sheoak 

I  


P, N 

N, C, S


Casuarina glauca 

suckering Australian-pine, gray sheoak 

I  

P, N 


C, S

Cinnamomum camphora 

camphor tree 

I  

 

N, C, S



Colocasia esculenta 

wild taro 

I  

 

N, C, S



Colubrina asiatica 

lather leaf 

I  

N 



S

Cupaniopsis anacardioides 

carrotwood 

I  



C, S



Deparia petersenii  

Japanese false spleenwort  

 

N, C



Dioscorea alata 

winged yam 

I  



N, C, S



Dioscorea bulbifera 

air-potato 

I  



N, C, S



Dolichandra unguis-cati  

cat’s claw vine 

 

N, C, S



(=Macfadyena unguis-cati)

Eichhornia crassipes 

water-hyacinth 

I  



N, C, S



Eugenia uniflora 

Surinam cherry 

I  

 

C, S



Ficus microcarpa (F. nitida and 

laurel fig 

I  

 

C, S 



F. retusa var. nitida misapplied)

1

 



Hydrilla verticillata  

hydrilla 

I  

P, U 


N, C, S

Hygrophila polysperma  

green hygro 

I  

P, U 


N, C, S

Hymenachne amplexicaulis  

West Indian marsh grass 

I  

 

N, C, S



Imperata cylindrica (I. brasiliensis misapplied)  cogon grass 

N, U 



N, C, S 

Ipomoea aquatica  

water-spinach 

I  

P, U 


C

Jasminum dichotomum 

Gold Coast jasmine 

I  

 

C, S



Jasminum fluminense  

Brazilian jasmine 

I  

 

C, S



Lantana camara (= L. strigocamara) 

lantana, shrub verbena 

I  

 

N, C, S



Ligustrum lucidum  

glossy privet 

 

N, C



Ligustrum sinense 

Chinese privet, hedge privet 

I  

N

2



 

N, C, S


Lonicera japonica 

Japanese honeysuckle 

I  

 

N, C, S



Ludwigia hexapetala 

Uruguay waterprimrose 

 

N, C



Ludwigia peruviana 

Peruvian primrosewillow 

 

N, C, S



Lumnitzera racemosa  

kripa; white-flowered mangrove; black mangrove  I  

 

S

Luziola subintegra 



Tropical American water grass 

I   S


Lygodium japonicum  

Japanese climbing fern 

I  



N, C, S



Purpose of the List: To focus attention on —

4

the adverse effects of exotic pest plants on Florida’s biodiversity and native plant communities,



4

the habitat losses in natural areas from exotic pest plant infestations, 

4

the impacts on endangered species via habitat loss and alteration, 



4

the need for pest plant management, 

4

the socio-economic impacts of these plants (e.g., increased wildfires or flooding in certain areas), 



4

changes in the severity of different pest plant infestations over time, 

4

providing information to help managers set priorities for research and control programs.



Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council’s  

2015 List of Invasive Plant S

pecies

CATEGORY I

Invasive exotics that are altering native plant communities by displacing native species, changing community structures 

or ecological functions, or hybridizing with natives. This definition does not rely on the economic severity or geographic range 

of the problem, but on the documented ecological damage caused. 

FLEPPC List  

Definitions:

Exotic – a species introduced 

to Florida, purposefully or 

accidentally, from a natural 

range outside of Florida. 



Native – a species whose 

natural range includes Florida. 



Naturalized exotic – an exotic 

that sustains itself outside 

cultivation (it is still exotic; it 

has not “become” native). 



Invasive exotic – an exotic 

that not only has naturalized, 

but is expanding on its 

own in Florida native plant 

communities.

Abbreviations:

  

Government List (Gov. List):  



P = Prohibited aquatic plant  

by the Florida Department of  

Agriculture and Consumer 

Services 

N = Noxious weed listed 

by Florida Department of 

Agriculture & Consumer 

Services


U = Noxious weed listed by 

U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Regional Distribution:  

N = north, C = central,  

S = south, referring to each 

species’ current distribution in 

general regions of Florida (not 

its potential range in the state). 

Please refer to the map below.


Lygodium microphyllum 

Old World climbing fern 

I  

N, U 


C, S

Macfadyena unguis-cati (see Dolichandra unguis-cati) 

  

Manilkara zapota 

sapodilla 

I   S


Melaleuca quinquenervia 

melaleuca, paper bark 

I  

P, N, U 


C, S

Melinis repens (= Rhynchelytrum repens)  

Natal grass  

I   

 

N, C, S 



Mimosa pigra 

catclaw mimosa 

I  

P, N, U 


C, S

Nandina domestica 

nandina, heavenly bamboo 

I  

 

N, C



Nephrolepis brownii (= N. multiflora)   

Asian sword fern  

I    

 

C, S 



Nephrolepis cordifolia  

sword fern 

I  

 

N, C, S



Neyraudia reynaudiana  

Burma reed, cane grass 

I  



S



Nymphoides cristata 

crested floating heart 



C, S



Paederia cruddasiana  

sewer vine, onion vine 

I  



S



Paederia foetida  

skunk vine 

I  



N, C, S



Panicum repens  

torpedo grass 

I  

 

N, C, S



Pennisetum purpureum  

Napier grass, elephant grass 

I  

 

N, C, S



Phymatosorus scolopendria  

serpent fern, wart fern  

 



Pistia stratiotes  

water-lettuce 

I  

P  


N, C, S

Psidium cattleianum (= P. littorale) 

strawberry guava 

I  

 

C, S



Psidium guajava 

guava 


I  

 

C, S



Pueraria montana var. lobata (= P. lobata) kudzu 

I  


N, C, S


Rhodomyrtus tomentosa 

downy rose-myrtle 

I  



C, S



Rhynchelytrum repens (See Melinis repens

Ruellia simplex

1

  

Mexican petunia 

I  

 

N, C, S 



Salvinia minima   

water spangles   

 

N, C, S



Sapium sebiferum (= Triadica sebifera

popcorn tree, Chinese tallow tree 

I  



N, C, S



Scaevola taccada 

scaevola, half-flower, beach naupaka 

I  

N 



C, S 

(= Scaevola sericea, S. frutescens



Schefflera actinophylla  

schefflera, Queensland umbrella tree 

I  

 

C, S 



(= Brassaia actinophylla

Schinus terebinthifolius 

Brazilian-pepper 

I  

P, N 


N, C, S

Scleria lacustris 

Wright’s nutrush 

 

C, S



Senna pendula var. glabrata  

climbing cassia, Christmas cassia,  

I  

 

C, S 



(= Cassia coluteoides

Christmas senna 



Solanum tampicense (= S. houstonii) 

wetland nightshade, aquatic soda apple 

I  

N, U 


C, S

Solanum viarum  

tropical soda apple 

I  

N, U 


N, C, S

Sporobolus jacquemontii*  

West Indian dropseed 

 

C, S



(= S. indicus var. pyramidalis)

Syngonium podophyllum  

arrowhead vine 

 

N, C, S



Syzygium cumini 

jambolan-plum, Java-plum 

I  

 

C, S



Tectaria incisa  

incised halberd fern 

I  

 

S



Thespesia populnea 

seaside mahoe 

I  

 

C, S



Tradescantia fluminensis  

small-leaf spiderwort 

I  

 

N, C



Urena lobata  

Caesar’s weed 

I  

 

N, C, S



Urochloa mutica (= Brachiaria mutica) 

Para grass 

I  

 

C, S



Vitex rotundifolia* 

beach vitex 

I   N

CATEGORY II

Invasive exotics that have increased in abundance or frequency but have not yet altered Florida plant communities to the 

extent shown by Category I species. These species may become ranked Category I if ecological damage is demonstrated.

 

 

FLEPPC  

Gov. 

Regional 

Scientific Name 

Common Name 

Category 

List  Distribution

Adenanthera pavonina  

red sandalwood 

II  

 

S



Agave sisalana  

sisal hemp 

II  

 

C, S



Aleurites fordii (= Vernicia fordii)  

tung oil tree 

II  

 

N, C



Alstonia macrophylla  

devil tree 

II  

 

S



Alternanthera philoxeroides  

alligator weed 

II  



N, C, S



Antigonon leptopus  

coral vine 

II  

 

N, C, S



Ardisia japonica  

Japanese ardisia  

II   N

Aristolochia littoralis  

calico flower 

II  

 

N, C, S



New Category I Listings:

Sporobolus jacquemontii

(West Indian dropseed)

This weedy grass, a native of the 

West Indies and tropical America, 

was introduced into Florida in the early 

1900s. In the 1980s-1990s, it was 

becoming noticeable, especially in 

pastures where it crowds out forage 

grasses. It is not palatable for cattle 

and is very difficult to control. In recent 

years, this weed has been advancing 

into natural areas such as palmetto 

prairies and open flatwoods. West 

Indian dropseed is a close relative 

of, and very similar in appearance 

to, smut grass, Sporobolus 



indicus, leading to confusion with 

identification. The seedheads of both 

grasses can be affected by a smut 

fungus that leaves the seeds black and 

unfertile. Both grasses have spike-like 

seedheads. West Indian dropseed is 

taller, usually about 3-4 feet tall, with 

spreading seedhead branches. Smut 

grass is usually 1-2 feet tall with a 

tight cylindrical spike. Both species 

are very weedy, but West Indian 

dropseed is the one that has started 

invading native habitats. 

David Hall

Vitex rotundifolia

(Beach vitex)

Beach vitex is a deciduous shrub that 

can grow to 1.5 m (5’). The nodal 

rooting system can extend 10m (34’) 

with stems that can extend over 6m 

(20’) from the main taproot. Young 

stems are green with fleshy tips that 

become larger in diameter, brown, 

and woody with age. Vitex has simple 

aromatic leaves that are sometimes 

palmately trifoliate. Leaves are 2-6.5 

cm long and 1-4.5 cm wide. The 

flower is purple in color and appears in 

late spring to early summer. Vitex can 

be found on dunes, vacant lots, and 

along public right-of-ways. 

Rick O’Connor, Florida Sea Grant/

University of Florida

New Category II Listings:

Crassocephalum crepidioides

(redflower ragleaf)



Crassocephalum crepidioides is a 

member of the Aster family native to 

tropical Africa. This erect herb has a 

soft stem with lobed leaves and red 

flowers, with high seed production of 

more than 4000 per plant. Seeds are 

dispersed by the wind. First found 

FLEPPC 2015 List of Invasive Plant Species



 

 

FLEPPC  

Gov. 

Regional 

Scientific Name 

Common Name 

Category 

List  Distribution

1

Many names are applied to this species in Florida because of a complicated taxonomic and nomenclatural history. Plants cultivated in Florida, all 



representing the same invasive species, have in the past been referred to as Ruellia brittoniana, R. tweediana, R. caerulea, and R. simplex.

*Added to the FLEPPC List of Invasive Plant Species in 2015



Changes to the  

2015 List:

 

Asystasia gangetica 

Ganges primrose 

II  

 

C, S



Begonia cucullata 

wax begonia 

II  

 

N, C, S



Blechum pyramidatum (see Ruellia blechum)

Broussonetia papyrifera  

paper mulberry 

II  

 

N, C, S



Bruguiera gymnorrhiza  

large-leaved mangrove  

II 

 



Callisia fragrans  

inch plant, spironema 

II  

 

C, S



Casuarina cunninghamiana  

river sheoak, Australian-pine 

II  



C, S



Cecropia palmata 

trumpet tree 

II 

 

S



Cestrum diurnum 

day jessamine 

II  

 

C, S



Chamaedorea seifrizii 

bamboo palm 

II 

 

S



Clematis terniflora 

Japanese clematis 

II 

 

N, C



Cocos nucifera  

coconut palm  

II  

 

S



Crassocephalum crepidioides* 

redflower ragleaf, Okinawa spinach 

II 

 

C, S



Cryptostegia madagascariensis  

rubber vine 

II  

 

C, S



Cyperus involucratus  

umbrella plant 

II  

 

C, S 



(C. alternifolius misapplied) 

Cyperus prolifer 

dwarf papyrus 

II  

 

C, S



Dactyloctenium aegyptium  

Durban crowfoot grass  

II   

 

N, C, S



Dalbergia sissoo  

Indian rosewood, sissoo 

II  

 

C, S



Elaeagnus pungens 

silverthorn, thorny olive 

II  

 

N, C



Elaeagnus umbellata  

silverberry, autumn olive  

II   

 

N



Epipremnum pinnatum cv. Aureum  

pothos 


II  

 

C, S



Eulophia graminea 

Chinese crown orchid 

II  S

Ficus altissima  

false banyan, council tree 

II  

 

S



Flacourtia indica  

governor’s plum 

II  

 

S



Hemarthria altissima 

limpo grass 

II 

 

C, S



Heteropterys brachiata* 

red wing 

II 

 

S



Hibiscus tiliaceus (See Talipariti tiliaceum)    

Hyparrhenia rufa  

jaragua  

II   

 

N, C, S



Ipomoea carnea ssp. fistulosa (= I. fistulosa) 

shrub morning-glory 

II 



C, S



Kalanchoe pinnata (= Bryophyllum pinnatum)  life plant 

II 


 

C, S


Koelreuteria elegans ssp. formosana 

flamegold tree 

II  

 

C, S 



  (= K. formosana; K. paniculata misapplied)   

Landoltia punctata (= Spirodela punctata 

spotted duckweed  

II   

 

N, C, S



Leucaena leucocephala 

lead tree 

II  

N 



N, C, S

Limnophila sessiliflora 

Asian marshweed 

II 

P, U 


N, C, S

Livistona chinensis 

Chinese fan palm 

II 

 

C, S



Macroptilium lathyroides 

phasey bean 

II 

 

N, C, S



Melaleuca viminalis (= Callistemon viminalis) bottlebrush, weeping bottlebrush 

II 


 

C, S


Melia azedarach  

Chinaberry 

II  

 

N, C, S



Melinis minutiflora 

molasses grass 

II 

 

C,S



Merremia tuberosa  

wood-rose 

II  

 

C, S



Mikania micrantha  

mile-a-minute vine  

II  

N, U  


S

Momordica charantia 

balsam apple, balsam pear 

II 

 

N, C, S



Murraya paniculata 

orange-jessamine 

II  

 

S



Myriophyllum spicatum  

Eurasian water-milfoil 

II  



N, C, S



Panicum maximum (= Urochloa maxima, 

Guinea grass 

II 

 

N, C, S 



   Megathyrsus maximus)

Passiflora biflora 

two-flowered passion vine 

II  

 

S



Pennisetum setaceum 

green fountain grass 

II  S

Phoenix reclinata 

Senegal date palm 

II  

 

C, S



Phyllostachys aurea  

golden bamboo 

II  

 

N, C



Pittosporum pentandrum 

Philippine pittosporum, Taiwanese cheesewood  II 

 

S

Praxelis clematidea* 



praxelis 

II   C


Pteris vittata 

Chinese brake fern 

II  

 

N, C, S



Ptychosperma elegans 

solitaire palm 

II  

 

S



Rhoeo spathacea (see Tradescantia spathacea)

FLEPPC 2015 List of Invasive Plant Species



 

 

FLEPPC  

Gov. 

Regional 

Scientific Name 

Common Name 

Category 

List  Distribution

in the US in 1997 in Miami-Dade 

County, redflower ragleaf was 

documented in the panhandle in 

Escambia County in 2012. 

Patricia L. Howell

Heteropterys brachiata

(red wing)



Heteropterys brachiata or 

“redwing” is a liana (woody vine) 

in the Malpighiaceae family. It is 

native to Mexico, Central America 

and South America. Redwing 

seedlings dominate the understory 

of hardwood hammocks, and older 

plants twine up into the canopy 

where their flowers and fruits are 

present, but out of reach, in winter 

months. The fruits of redwing are 

deep red, wind-dispersed samaras; 

hence the name “redwing.” 

Jennifer Possley, Fairchild Tropical 

Botanic Garden

Praxelis clematidea

(Praxelis)



Praxelis clematidea is an Aster 

with lavender colored flowers from 

South America. Its short life cycle 

and propensity to be moved by 

vehicles contribute to its recent 

invasion in Central Florida. Look 

for young, light green plants with 

irregularly toothed leaves that 

soon flower, and then develop 

tough stems and bases. Flowers 

are a series of florets produced in 

heads, each producing a single, 

bristle-topped seed that is seated 

on a conical receptacle. This key 

character is easy to see because 

the phyllaries fall to reveal the 

receptacle when the head is in fruit.

Colette Jacono

Spermacoce verticillata

(scrubby false buttonweed)

A common weed of disturbed sites 

for over 80 years, Spermacoce 



verticillata is advancing into natural 

areas, especially in southern 

Florida. A member of the coffee 

family, Rubiaceae, plants are best 

known for their nearly woody

multiple branched structure, 

opposite, stalkless leaves often 

clustered in a whorl; and axillary, 

cylindrical heads of densely packed 

flowers. Distinguish this species 

from our natives by its tubular 

white flowers that are no longer 

than 1mm and fruits that are less 

than 1.5mm long. 



Colette Jacono

*Added to the FLEPPC List of Invasive Plant Species in 2015



Richardia grandiflora 

large flower Mexican clover 

II  

N, C, S


Ricinus communis 

castor bean 

II  

 

N, C, S



Rotala rotundifolia 

roundleaf toothcup, dwarf Rotala, redweed   

II 

 

S



Ruellia blechum (= Blechum brownei) 

green shrimp plant, Browne’s blechum  

II 

 

N, C, S



Sansevieria hyacinthoides  

bowstring hemp 

II  

 

C, S



Sesbania punicea 

purple sesban, rattlebox 

II  

 

N, C, S



Solanum diphyllum  

two-leaf nightshade 

II  

 

N, C, S



Solanum torvum  

susumber, turkey berry 

II  

N, U 


N, C, S

Spermacoce verticillata* 

shrubby false buttonweed 

II 

 

C, S



Sphagneticola trilobata (= Wedelia trilobata) 

wedelia 


II  

 

N, C, S



Stachytarpheta cayennensis (= S. urticifolia)  

nettle-leaf porterweed 

II  S

Syagrus romanzoffiana 

queen palm 

II 

 

C, S 



(= Arecastrum romanzoffianum

Syzygium jambos  

Malabar plum, rose-apple  

II 

 

N, C, S



Talipariti tiliaceum (= Hibiscus tiliaceus)  

mahoe, sea hibiscus  

II   

  

C, S



Terminalia catappa 

tropical-almond 

II  

 

C, S



Terminalia muelleri 

Australian-almond 

II 

 

C, S



Tradescantia spathacea 

oyster plant 

II  S 

(= Rhoeo spathacea, Rhoeo  discolor



Tribulus cistoides  

puncture vine, burr-nut 

II  

 

N, C, S



Vitex trifolia 

simple-leaf chaste tree 

II 

 

C, S



Washingtonia robusta 

Washington fan palm 

II 

 

C, S



Wedelia (see Sphagneticola above)  

   


Wisteria sinensis  

Chinese wisteria 

II  

 

N, C



Xanthosoma sagittifolium 

malanga, elephant ear 

II 

 

N, C, S



Citation example:  

FLEPPC. 2015. List of Invasive Plant Species. Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council. http://www.fleppc.org/list/list.htm 



The 2015 list was prepared by the FLEPPC Plant List Committee:

Stephen H. Brown, UF/IFAS Lee County Extension, Parks and Recreation Division, 3410 Palm Beach Blvd., Fort Myers, FL 

33916, (239) 533-7513, brownsh@ufl.edu



Janice Duquesnel, Florida Park Service, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, 77200 Overseas Highway, Islamorada, FL 

33063, (305) 664-8455, Janice.Duquesnel@dep.state.fl.us



David W. Hall, Private Consulting Botanist and Author, 3666 NW 13th Place, Gainesville, FL 32605, (352) 375-1370

Roger L. Hammer, Retired Naturalist and Author, 17360 Avocado Drive, Homestead, FL 33030, kaskazi44@comcast.net

Patricia L. Howell, Chair (2012-present), Broward County Parks, Natural Resource and Land Management Section, 950 NW. 

38th St., Oakland Park, FL 33309, (954) 357-8137, phowell@broward.org



Colette C. Jacono, Florida Museum of Natural History, PO Box 110575, Gainesville, FL 32611, (352) 318-2931, colettej@ufl.edu

Kenneth A. Langeland, Professor Emeritus, University of Florida/IFAS, Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants, 7922 NW. 71st Street, 

Gainesville, FL 32653, (352) 214-8918, gator8@ufl.edu



Chris Lockhart, Habitat Specialists, Inc., P. O. Box 243116, Boynton Beach, FL 33424,(561) 738-1179, chris@lockharts.org

Jean McCollom, Natural Ecosystems, 985 Sanctuary Road, Naples, FL 34120, (239) 304-1847, jeanm@naples.net

Gil Nelson, Florida State University/iDigBio, 157 Leonard’s Dr., Thomasville, GA 31792, gnelson@bio.fsu.edu

Jimi L. Sadle, Everglades National Park, 40001 State Road 9336, Homestead, FL 33034, (305) 242,7806, Jimi_Sadle@nps.gov

Jessica Spencer, US Army Corp of Engineers, 701 San Marco Boulevard, Jacksonville, FL 32207, (904) 232-1696, 

Jessica.E.Spencer@usace.army.mil



Arthur Stiles, Florida Park Service, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, 4620 State Park Lane, Panama City, FL 32408, 

(850) 233-5110, arthurstiles@dep.state.fl.us



Daniel B. Ward, Department of Botany, University of Florida, 220 Bartram Hall, Gainesville, FL 32611

Richard P. Wunderlin, Institute for Systematic Botany, Department of Cell Biology, Microbiology & Molecular Biology, University of 

South Florida, 4202 E. Fowler Ave., ISA 2015, Tampa, FL 33620, (813) 974-2359, rwunder@usf.edu

The Early Detection and Distribution Mapping System (EDDMapS) holds records of reported sighting of invasive species in 

Florida. Most records are from local, state, and federal parks and preserves; a few records document infestations in regularly 

disturbed public lands such as highways or utility rights-of-way. Natural area managers, veteran observers of Florida’s natural 

landscapes, and others submit these records, with many supported further by voucher specimens housed in local or regional 

herbaria for future reference and verification. New and updated observations can be submitted online at EDDMapS [www.

eddmaps.org/florida/]. All reports are verified by an expert. This database, along with other plant data resources such as the 

University of South Florida’s Atlas of Florida Vascular Plants [www.plantatlas.usf.edu], the Florida Natural Areas Inventory 

database [www.fnai.org], and The Institute for Regional Conservation Floristic Inventory of South Florida database [www. 

regionalconservation.org], provides important basic supporting information for the FLEPPC List of Invasive Plant Species. Greater 

success and accuracy in searching for plant information is likely if you search by scientific name rather than common name. 

Common names often vary in cultivation and across regions.

FLEPPC 2015 List of Invasive Plant Species



www.fleppc.org

The FLEPPC List of Invasive 

Plant Species is not a regulatory 

list. Only those plants listed 

as Federal Noxious Weeds, 

Florida Noxious Weeds, Florida 

Prohibited Aquatic Plants, or in 

local ordinances are regulated 

by law. FLEPPC encourages use 

of the Invasive Species List for 

prioritizing and implementing 

management efforts in natural 

areas, for educating lay audiences 

about environmental issues, and 

for supporting voluntary invasive 

plant removal programs. For more  

information on using the FLEPPC 

List of Invasive Plant Species, see 



Proper Uses of FLEPPC Invasive 

Plant Lists at  

www.fleppc.org/list/list.htm 



Use of the 

FLEPPC List 

NOTE: Not all exotic plants 

brought into Florida become 

pest plants in natural areas. The 

FLEPPC List of Invasive Plant 

Species represents only about 

11% of more than 1,400 exotic 

species that have been introduced 

into Florida and have subsequently 

established outside of cultivation. 

Most escaped exotics usually 

present only minor problems in 

highly disturbed areas (such as 

road-sides). And there are other 

exotics cultivated in Florida that 

are “well-behaved” — that is, they 

don’t escape cultivation at all.



 

 

FLEPPC  

 Gov. 

Regional 

Scientific Name 

Common Name 

Category 

List  Distribution

*Added to the FLEPPC List of Invasive Plant Species in 2015




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