Flora and vegetation of aviva lease area



Yüklə 1,38 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə2/13
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü1,38 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   13

2.3 

Landforms and Soils 

The Eneabba Plain was formed during the high seas level epoch of the Pleistocene when mineral rich 

beach sands were deposited on the shoreline of the time (Beard 1990).  The communities consequently 

are dominated by species that are able to tolerate the sandy soils. The flora in the area is dominated by 

taxa from the Proteaceae, Myrtaceae, Papilionaceae and Mimosaceae families. 

2.4 

Vegetation 

Both of the proposed Aviva projects lie within the Irwin Botanical District of the South-western 

Botanical Province as recognized by Diels (1906) and later developed by Gardner (1942) and Beard 

(1980, 1990). More recently, the vegetation of Western Australia has been assigned to bioregions under 

the Interim Biogeographical Regionalisation for Australia (IBRA) (Thackway and Cresswell 1995 and 

Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts 2004).  These subdivisions largely relied on 

the earlier physiographic work of Beard (1981). 

 

Historically, the area has been mapped by Beard (1979) at a scale of 1:250 000. At this scale both 



vegetation systems and their underlying communities were defined. Beard (1979) defines a vegetation 

system as “consisting of a particular series of plant communities recurring in a catenary sequence or 

mosaic pattern linked to topographic, pedological and/or geological features”. The two vegetation 

systems that occur in the project areas are the Eridoon and Tathra vegetation systems.  

 

The Eridoon system occupies “a flat coastal plain between coastal plain between the coastal limestone 



deposits and the Pleistocene shoreline”. It consists of yellow sand that has been blown into ridges, with 

lakes in swamps in the depressions. On the plains and slopes of dunes the vegetation consists of 

scattered Eucalyptus todtiana and other small trees, an open layer of tall shrubs and a closed heath layer 

of small shrubs, usually dominated by Conospermum  spp... On the sandhills the tree layer disappears 

and Banksia hookeriana and Xylomelum angustifolium become dominant. In winter wet depressions the 

height of the heath reduces to 30 cm with scattered Xanthorrhoea spp. , while in wet areas Melaleuca 



thyoides and Melaleuca lanceolata to Melaleuca rhaphiophylla dominate. Occasionally these areas also 

have Casuarina obesa and Eucalyptus camaldulensis (Beard 1979).  

 

The Tathra vegetation system occupies the Victoria and Dandaragan plateaux and their western slopes 



(Beard 1979). It is characterised by sandplain with Scrub heath assemblages. Due to the heterogeneous 

nature of the heath, Beard mostly limits his discussion of the sandplain to its physical structure. He 

describes it as consisting of dense layer of small shrubs (< 1 m), with emergent scattered shrubs of 1 –2 

m. In some places along the catena trees also emerge from this heath. For example Eucalyptus todtiana 

and various Banksia spp. are confined to valleys with deeper sand. Along with the sandplain there are 

also areas of Melaleuca thicket, woodlands, and low heath assemblages on lateritic outcrops on ridges 

(Beard 1979).  

 

At a finer scale than vegetation systems the following vegetation communities could possibly be 



directly or indirectly impacted by the proposed Coolimba Power Station and Central West Coal Mine. 

The type that covers the directly impacted area is Scrub heath of Shrubs associated with the Tathra 

vegetation system >1 m over mid dense mixed low shrubs. Surrounding areas include; mixed dwarf 

shrub heath on lateritic sandplains, mixed heath on deep sandy flats and in the Lake Logue and Lake 

Indoon area Melaleuca thyoides thicket with occasional Casuarina obesa (Beard  1979). 

2.5 

Declared Rare, Priority and Threatened Species 

Species of flora and fauna are defined as Declared Rare or Priority conservation status where their 

populations are restricted geographically or threatened by local processes.  The Department of 

Environment and Conservation recognises these threats of extinction and consequently applies 

regulations towards population and species protection. 

 


 

5. 


 

 

 



URS0808/195/08 

 

M



ATTISKE 

C

ONSULTING 



P

TY 


L

TD

 



 

 

Rare Flora species are gazetted under Subsection 2 of Section 23F of the Wildlife Conservation Act 



(1950) [WA] and therefore it is an offence to “take” or damage rare flora without Ministerial approval.  

Section 23F of the Wildlife Conservation Act (1950-1980) defines “to take” as “… to gather, pick, cut, 

pull up, destroy, dig up, remove or injure the flora or to cause or permit the same to be done by any 

means.” 


 

Priority Flora are under consideration for declaration  as ‘rare flora’, but are in need of further survey 

(Priority One to Three) or require monitoring every 5-10 years (Priority Four).  Appendix A1 presents 

the definitions of Declared Rare and the four Priority ratings under the Wildlife Conservation Act (1950) 

as extracted from the Department of Environment and Conservation (2009a) and Western Australian 

Herbarium 2009). 

 

Threats of extinction of species are also recognized at a Federal Government level and are categorized 



according to the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act  1999  [cth] (EPBC Act) 

(Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, 2009a).  Categories of threatened species 

are summarized in Appendix A2. 

2.6 

Threatened Ecological Communities (TEC’s) 

Communities in Western Australia can be listed as ‘Threatened Ecological Communities’ (TEC’s) 

(Department of Environment and Conservation 2006) once they have been defined by the Western 

Australian Threatened Ecological Communities Scientific Advisory Committee.  TEC’s are listed under 

four categories; Presumed Totally Destroyed (PD), Critically Endangered (CR), Endangered (EN) or 

Vulnerable (VU) (Department of Environment and Conservation 2009b). Appendix A3 presents a 

summary of the definitions of Threatened Ecological Communities as extracted from the Department of 

Environment and Conservation (2009b).  Some Western Australian TEC’s are also listed under the 

EPBC Act (Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts 2009b). 

 

Possible Threatened Ecological Communities can be listed as Priority Ecological Communities (PEC’s) 



by the Department of Environment and Conservation (2009c).  PEC’s are listed under five categories 

based on survey criteria and current knowledge, Priority 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 Department of Environment 

and Conservation (2009b). Appendix A4 presents a summary of the definitions of Priority Ecological 

Communities as extracted from the Department of Environment and Conservation (2009b). 



2.7 

Local and Regional Significance 

Flora or vegetation may be locally or regionally significant in addition to statutory listings by the State 

or Federal Government.  

 

In regards to flora; species, subspecies, varieties, hybrids and ecotypes may be significant other than as 



Declared Rare Flora or Priority Flora, for a variety of reasons, including:  

“. 


a keystone role in a particular habitat for threatened species, or supporting large populations 

representing a significant proportion of the local regional population of a species; 

Relic Status; 



anomalous features that indicate a potential new discovery; 

being representative of the range of a species (particularly, at the extremes of range, recently 



discovered range extensions, or isolated outliers of the main range); 

the presence of restricted subspecies, varieties, or naturally occurring hybrids;  



local endemism/a restricted distribution; 

being poorly reserved” (EPA 2004).  



 

 

6. 


 

 

 



URS0808/195/08 

 

M



ATTISKE 

C

ONSULTING 



P

TY 


L

TD

 



 

 

Vegetation may be significant because the extent is below a threshold level and a range of other 



reasons, including: 

“. 


scarcity; 

unusual species; 



novel combinations of species; 

a role as a refuge; 



a role as a key habitat for threatened species or large populations representing a significant 

proportion of the local to regional total population of a species; 

being representative of the range of a unit (particularly, a good local and/or regional example 



of a unit in “prime” habitat, at the extremes of range, recently discovered range extensions, or 

isolated outliers of the main range); 

a restricted distribution” (EPA 2004). 



 

Vegetation communities are locally significant if they contain Priority Flora species or contain a range 

extension of a particular taxon outside of the normal distribution. They may also be locally significant if 

they are very restricted to one or two locations or occur as small isolated communities.  In addition, 

vegetation communities that exhibit unusually high structural and species diversity are also locally 

significant. 

 

Vegetation communities are regionally significant where they are limited to specific landform types, are 



uncommon or restricted plant community types within the regional context, or support populations of 

Declared Rare Flora. 

 

Determining the significance of flora and vegetation may be applied at various scales, for example, a 



vegetation  community may be nationally significant and governed by statutory protection as well as 

being locally and regionally significant. 



3.

 

OBJECTIVES 

The specific objectives of the flora and vegetation survey were to:  

 

identify all vascular plant species present within the survey area; 



 

review the conservation status of the vascular plant species by reference to current literature 



and current listings by the Department of Environment and Conservation  (2009a) and Western 

Australian Herbarium (2009) and the Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the 

Arts web site under the EPBC Act (1999); 

 



assess the local and regional significance of the flora and vegetation; and  

 



produce a report summarizing the findings. 

 

The survey area includes the proposed Central West Coal Project (CWC), the Coolimba Power Project 



(CPP) and some surrounding areas. Mattiske Consulting Pty Ltd (2009) examined the flora and 

vegetation values of Lake Logue Nature Reserve in the south-east section initially and around Lake 

Indoon. These results are summarized in this report. 

4.

 

METHODS 

The flora and vegetation of the Aviva Project Survey area was described and collected systematically 

recording sites, during 2005, 2006, and 2008. The dates of these surveys include;   to   November 2005,   

January 2006,   –  October 2006,   to   November 2007,   –   November 2007,   April 2008,   July 2008,   –   

July 2008,  to   October 2008, and   to   October 2008At each vegetation site the following floristic and 

environmental notes were made: topography, percentage litter cover, soil ratio, percentage of bare 

ground, outcropping rocks and their type, pebble type and size, and time since fire.  

 


 

7. 


 

 

 



URS0808/195/08 

 

M



ATTISKE 

C

ONSULTING 



P

TY 


L

TD

 



 

The condition of each plant community was rated according to the scale used for assessing Bush 

Forever sites (Government of Western Australia 2000).  The scale is summarised in Table 2. For DRF 

searches of proposed infrastructure corridors, transects recording presence and absence of species were 

employed.  

 

The vegetation and flora values of the Lake Indoon were established with a baseline flora and 



vegetation survey in the southern area of Lake Logue Reserve (Mattiske Consulting Pty Ltd 2009). This 

consisted of systematically recording sites in October 2008. At each  vegetation site the following 

floristic and environmental notes were made: topography, percentage litter cover, soil ratio, percentage 

of bare ground, outcropping rocks and their type, pebble type and size, and time since fire. For each 

species recorded the average height and percent foliage cover for both alive and dead plants was noted. 

 

All plant specimens collected during the field surveys were dried and fumigated in accordance with the 



requirements of the Western Australian Herbarium.  The plant species were identified and then 

compared with pressed specimens housed at the Western Australian Herbarium. Where appropriate, 

plant taxonomists with specialist skills were consulted.  Nomenclature of the species recorded follows 

the Department of Environment and Conservation (2009a) and Western Australian Herbarium (2009). 



Table 2:   Condition rating scale from Bush Forever (Government of Western Australia 2000 

based on Keighery 1994) 

 

Rating 

Description 

Explanation 

Pristine 



Pristine or nearly so, no obvious signs of disturbance. 

Excellent 



Vegetation structure intact, disturbance affecting 

individual species and weeds are non-aggressive species. 

Very Good 



Vegetation structure altered obvious signs of 

disturbance.  Disturbance to vegetation structure covers 

repeated fire, aggressive weeds, dieback, logging, 

grazing.  

Good 


Vegetation structure significantly altered by very 

obvious signs of multiple disturbances. Retains basic 

vegetation structure or ability to regenerate it. 

 

Disturbance to vegetation structure covers frequent, 



aggressive wees at high density, partial clearing, dieback 

and grazing 

Degraded 



Basic vegetation structure severely impacted by 

disturbance.  Scope for regeneration but not to a state 

approaching good condition without intensive 

management.  Disturbance to vegetation structure 

includes frequent fires, presence of very aggressive 

weeds, partial clearing, dieback and grazing. 

Completely 



degraded 

The structure of the vegetation is no longer intact and the 

area is completely or almost completely without native 

species.  These areas often described as “parkland 

cleared” with the flora comprising weed or crop species 

with isolated native trees or shrubs. 

 

A Department of Environment and Conservation DRF, Priority Flora and TEC/PEC search was 



conducted of the local area. The NW and SE corners of this search were MGA94 50J 320730 mE 

6696510 mN and 50J 341800 mE 6675440 mN respectively. 



 

8. 


 

 

 



URS0808/195/08 

 

M



ATTISKE 

C

ONSULTING 



P

TY 


L

TD

 



5. 

RESULTS 

5.1 

Flora 

A total of 512 taxa (including subspecies and varieties) from 182 genera and 64 families were recorded 

within the Aviva survey area. An additional 48 families, 123 genera and 261 taxa were found in the 

southern section of the Lake Logue Nature Reserve and near Lake Indoon, Appendix B. The dominant 

families in the Aviva Project area were Myrtaceae (106 taxa), Proteaceae (96 taxa), Papilionaceae (51 

taxa) and Haemodoraceae (31 taxa). None of the 26 introduced species are listed by the Department of 

Agriculture and Food as Declared Plants pursuant to Section 37 of the Agriculture and Related 

Resources Protection Act 1976 [WA]. 

5.2 

Rare and Priority Flora 

Previous records from the Department of Environment and Conservation databases indicate that there 

are potentially twelve Rare, four Priority 1, sixteen Priority 2, thirty eight Priority 3 taxa and seventeen 

Priority 4 contained in the local area (Appendix C).  Of these database records, seven are listed as 

Endangered and, four Vulnerable under the EPBC Act. Mattiske Consulting Pty Ltd fieldwork 

recorded, two Declared Rare, one  Priority 1, ten Priority 2, 14 Priority 3 and seven Priority 4 of these 

taxa. Seven taxa, consisting of one Priority 1, five Priority 2 and one Priority 3 taxa were not previously 

recorded in the local area. In addition to these records, one Priority 1, two Priority 2, three Priority 3 

and two Priority 4 taxa were found in Lake Logue reserve.

 

 



5.2.1 

Rare Flora 

Four Declared Rare species either will be or have potential to be, directly affected by the Central West 

Coal Project or Coolimba Power Station Project.  These are listed and disused below. 

 



 

Tetratheca nephelioides Declared Rare 

This species is a caespitose, dwarf shrub which is found sandy and gravelly soils. There are eight 

records of this species in the Western Australian Herbarium (2009).  This species is restricted to 

areas in around South Eneabba Reserve (Western Australian Herbarium 2009, Butcher 2007). 

Mattiske Consulting Pty Ltd found five populations of this taxon in and around the proposed 

infrastructure route from the Coolimba Power Project in community T1. Of these, two entire, and 

one half, populations will be directly impacted. In numerical terms, of the plants found during the 

Mattiske Consulting Pty Ltd survey, 706 plants will be and 860 plants not be directly impacted 

(Figure 3, Appendix D). West Australian Herbarium records place known numbers at a 

conservative estimate of 200 plants (Western Australian Herbarium 2009). The removal of the 

recorded populations at this stage of knowledge of the taxon may significantly affect its’ overall 

population strength and genetic integrity. 

 



 



Eucalyptus crispata Declared Rare, Vulnerable 

The Yandanooka Mallee occurs between Yandanooka to Boothendarra on breakaways with sandy 

clay and lateritic soils (Brown et al. 1998).  There are twenty-three records of this species in the 

Western Australian Herbarium (2009).  This species has been historically recorded in the cleared 

agricultural areas to the south of the preferred infrastructure corridor and once in the corridor 

(Figures 1 and 2) within community T1. Although not located during field studies within the 

surveyed areas, if located in the future it should be avoided. 

 



 

Eucalyptus impensa Declared Rare, Endangered 

This low straggly mallee Eucalypt occurs near Eneabba on sandy and sandy -gravelly (lateritic 

soils).  There are seven records of this species in the Western Australian Herbarium (2009) and six 

populations known (Stack and Broun 2004).  

 

 


 

9. 


 

 

 



URS0808/195/08 

 

M



ATTISKE 

C

ONSULTING 



P

TY 


L

TD

 



 

 

This species has been historically recorded on the preferred infrastructure corridor in one location, 



in the cleared agricultural areas to the south of the preferred infrastructure corridor and in the native 

vegetation areas north of the proposed infrastructure corridor (Figures 1 and 2).  Although not 

located during field studies within the surveyed areas, if located in the future it should be avoided. 

This species is represented within the nearby reserve; although Ministerial approval would still be 

required to take the occurrences within the preferred corridor. 

 



 

Eucalyptus johnsoniana Declared Rare, Vulnerable 

This mallee Eucalypt occurs between Eneabba and Badgingarra on undulating sandplains, lateritic 

mesas and uplands in white or grey sand over laterite (DEWHA 2008).  There are forty-seven 

records of this species in the Western Australian Herbarium (2009) and 34 known populations 

(DEWHA 2008).  This species has been located twice on the preferred infrastructure corridor, in 

the cleared agricultural areas to the south of the preferred infrastructure corridor and in the native 

vegetation areas north of the proposed infrastructure corridor by government agencies (Figures 1 

and 2).  Although not located during field studies within the surveyed areas, if located in the future 

it should be avoided. This species is represented within the nearby reserve; although Ministerial 

approval would still be required to take the occurrences within the preferred corridor. 

 

The majority of the Rare flora species are also listed under the EPBC Act 1999 as either Endangered or 



Vulnerable (see Appendix C).  Therefore, there is a need to gain Federal Ministerial approval for any 

developments that may impact on listed threatened species. 



5.2.2 

Priority Flora 

The Priority Flora that will be directly impacted by the Coolimba Power Project and the Central West 

Coal Project are described below: 

 



 

Acacia lasiocarpa var. lasiocarpa (Cockleshell Gully variant) (P2) 

This species is a shrub to 50cm in height, producing yellow flowers in August.  It is usually found 

on grey-yellow sand with laterite, in open low heath.  There are five records of this species in the 

Western Australian Herbarium (2009), with the first collection dating

 

from 1973.  This species 



was recorded by Mattiske Consulting at four locations in the Central West Coal Project (within 

communities E4, E6, T1 and T2) and has been recorded at eight locations in South Eneabba 

Reserve (Figures 1 and 2).  This species has also been recorded at Lake Logue Reserve, but should 

not be affected by any groundwater drawdown. This species is restricted to the Eneabba area 

(Western Australian Herbarium 2009). 

 



 

Calytrix purpurea (P2) 

This species is a spreading shrub and it is usually found on grey-yellow sands with laterite and 

sandplains, in open low heath.  There are thirteen records of this species in the Western Australian 

Herbarium (2009).  This species was recorded at three locations in the Central West Coal Project 

(within communities E1 and T1), and in one location in South Eneabba Reserve in H2.  This 

species has not been recorded in the nearby Eneabba areas (Figures 1 and 2).  This species extends 

from Yandanooka north to Kalbarri.  This collection represents a range extension of 70 km south 

(Western Australian Herbarium 2009).  

 



 



Comesperma griffinii (P2) 

This species is an annual or perennial herb to 15cm in height, producing white flowers in October.  

It is usually found on yellow or grey sand.  There are four records of this species in the Western 

Australian Herbarium (2009), collected since 1978.  This species was recorded at one location in 

the Central West Coal Project (within community H5), and has been recorded at one location in 

the nearby Eneabba areas (Figures 1 and 2).  This species extends from the Eneabba to Geraldton 

and to the Avon Wheatbelt (Western Australian Herbarium 2009).  

 



 

Comesperma rhadinocarpum (P2) 

This perennial herb is found on sandy soils, and produces blue flowers from October to November.  

There are eight records of this species in the Western Australian Herbarium (2009), with the first 

collection in 1976. 



 

10. 


 

 

 



URS0808/195/08 

 

M



ATTISKE 

C

ONSULTING 



P

TY 


L

TD

 



 

 

This species was recorded at one location in the Central West  Coal Project (within community 



H3), and has been recorded at one location in the nearby Eneabba areas (Figures 1 and 2). This 

species extends from the Eneabba to Geraldton and to the Swan Coastal Plain and the Jarrah forest 

(Western Australian Herbarium 2009). 

 



 

Daviesia debilior subsp. debilior (P2) 

This species is an erect, spreading shrub to 0.3 to 0.6 m in height.  It is found on upland plains in 

sand, often over lateritic gravel and clay (Crisp 1982, West Australian Herbarium 2009).  There 

are 7 records of this species in the Western Australian Herbarium (2009).  This species was 

recorded by DEC at one location in the in the Central West Coal Project within a cleared area 

(Figures 1 and 2).  This is local to the Eneabba area (Western Australian Herbarium 2009) and 

known from 6 other locations in the area. 

 



 

Thryptomene sp. Eneabba (R.J.Cranfield 8433) (P2) 

This species forms an erect shrub to 150cm in height, and is found on white or yellow lateritic 

sand.  It produces pink flowers in November.  There are six records of this species in the Western 

Australian Herbarium (2009).  This species was recorded at one location in Central West Coal 

Project (within community E2) and was recorded at four locations in nearby Eneabba areas 

(Figures 1 and 2).  This species is restricted to the Eneabba area (Western Australian Herbarium 

2009). 

 



 

Verticordia argentea (P2) 

This is an erect open shrub to 2m in height, producing pink or white flowers from November to 

April.  It is found on white, grey or yellow sand on sandy ridges and undulating plains.  There are 

30 records of this species in the Western Australian Herbarium (2009).  This species was recorded 

at one locations in the Central West Coal Project (within community T2), and has been recorded at 

once in community E4 and four other locations in South Eneabba Reserve by Mattiske Consulting 

Pty Ltd.  There are approximately twenty eight locations in the nearby Eneabba areas (Figures 1 

and 2), including approximately 10 in South Eneabba Reserve.  This species is restricted to the 

Eneabba area (Western Australian Herbarium 2009). 

 



 

Acacia flabellifolia (P3) 

This species is an erect, spreading shrub to 1m in height.  It is found on rocky loam or lateritic 

gravelly soils on low hills and ridges.  There are 24 records of this species in the Western 

Australian Herbarium (2009).  This species was recorded at one location in the in the Central West 

Coal Project within the H1 community and in South Eneabba Reserve in community E2 by 

Mattiske Consulting Pty Ltd, and is significant because it has not been recorded in nearby Eneabba 

areas (Figures 1 and 2). This species extends from Eneabba to the Avon Wheatbelt area (Western 

Australian Herbarium 2009).  

 



 



Calytrix superba (P3) 

This species is a shrub and it is usually found on grey-yellow sands with laterite, in open low 

heath.  There are thirty-four records of this species in the Western Australian Herbarium (2009).  

This species was recorded at two locations in the Central West Coal Project (within communities 

H2 and T1), and two locations in Lake Logue Reserve. Also this species has been recorded at one 

location in T1 out of the project area, and thirteen in nearby Eneabba areas (Figures 1 and 2). This 

species is restricted to the Eneabba area (Western Australian Herbarium 2009). 

 



 

Desmocladus elongatus (P3) 

This species is a rhizomatous dioecious sedge-like perennial herb. It is found on gravelly white or 

grey sand over laterite.  There are twenty-eight records of this species in the Western Australian 

Herbarium (2009).  This species was recorded at two locations in the preferred corridor for the 

Coolimba Power Project and at a further seven populations in the adjacent South Eneabba Reserve 

on the fringes of the preferred corridor (Figure 2), and seven times in other vegetation. There are 

two government records from the local area. This species extends southwards from Eneabba to 

Badgingarra (Western Australian Herbarium 2009). 

 


 

11. 


 

 

 



URS0808/195/08 

 

M



ATTISKE 

C

ONSULTING 



P

TY 


L

TD

 



 

 



 

Grevillea biformis subsp. cymbiformis (P3) 

This is an erect open shrub and is found on white, grey or yellow sand on sandy ridges and 

undulating plains.  There are twenty-one records of this species in the Western Australian 

Herbarium (2009).  This species was recorded at two locations within the Central West Coal 

Project (within communities E1 and T1), and has been recorded at twenty three locations in the 

nearby Eneabba areas (Figures 1 and 2).  This species is restricted to the Eneabba area (Western 

Australian Herbarium 2009). This species may be susceptible to Phytophthora Dieback. 

 



 

Haemodorum loratum (P3) 

This species is a bulbaceous perennial herb growing to 120cm in height, but occasionally reaching 

2m.  It produces black, brown or green flowers in November.  It is found on grey or yellow sand or 

gravel (Western Australian Herbarium 2009).  There are sixteen  records of this species in the 

Western Australian Herbarium.  This species was recorded once in the Central West Coal Project 

by Mattiske Consulting Pty Ltd, which has since been vouchered at the State Herbarium (within 

community E4), and was recorded at four locations in the nearby Eneabba area and extends from 

the Eneabba to Perth. 

 



 



Hemiandra sp. Eneabba (H. Demarz 3687)  (P3) 

Current voucher descriptions describe this species as being a straggly herb to 90 cm high (West 

Australian Herbarium 2009).  One recording has been made by Government agencies in the H3 

community in the Central West Coal Project.  There are 15 records of this species in the Western 

Australian Herbarium (2009) and one in the area bounded by the database search.  This species 

extends  from 10 km south of Eneabba to Mt Adams, south east of Dongara (Western Australian 

Herbarium 2009).  This recording may represent the most southern extent of the species. 

 



 

Lepidobolus quadratus (ms) (P3) 

This species is a rhizomatous, caespitose sedge-like perennial herb.  It is found on sandy areas in 

dry kwongan areas.  There are thirty-three records of this species in the Western Australian 

Herbarium (2009).  This species was recorded at one location on the preferred corridor for the 

Coolimba Power Station Project (within community T1), and once adjacent to the infrastructure 

corridor, again in the T1 community.  This species has been four times by other authorities in the 

local area (Figure 1).  This species extends from the Cataby to Eneabba (Western Australian 

Herbarium 2009). These populations may represent the most northern extent of the species. 

 



 



Mesomelaena stygia subsp. deflexa (P3) 

 

This species is tufted sedge to 50 cm in height, producing brown or black inflorescences from 



March to October.  It is found on white, grey or lateritic sand, gravel and clay.  There are sixteen 

records of this species in the Western Australian Herbarium (2009).  This species was recorded at 

two locations in the Central West Coal Project (within communities T1 and H5), eight times 

within South Eneabba Reserve and has been recorded at eleven locations in the nearby Eneabba 

areas (Figures 1 and 2).  This species is restricted to the Eneabba area (Western Australian 

Herbarium 2009). 

 



 



Schoenus griffinianus (P3) 

This is a small tufted sedge to 10cm in height, found on white sand.  Inflorescences are produced 

from September to October.  There are twenty-four records of this species in the Western 

Australian Herbarium (2009).  This species was recorded at one location in the Central West Coal 

Project (within community E4), and has been recorded at eleven locations in the nearby Eneabba 

areas (Figures 1 and 2).  This species extends from the Eneabba area towards Perth (Western 

Australian Herbarium 2009). As the records around Eneabba represent the northern end of this 

species extent this species should be avoided if possible. 

 



 



Verticordia fragrans (P3) 

This openly-branched shrub grows to 3m in height and produces pink or white flowers from 

September to November.  It is found on white, grey or yellow sand or clay loam, in low-lying 

areas and sandplains.  There are twenty-three records of this species in the Western Australian 

Herbarium (2009).   


 

12. 


 

 

 



URS0808/195/08 

 

M



ATTISKE 

C

ONSULTING 



P

TY 


L

TD

 



 

 

This species was recorded by Mattiske Consulting Pty Ltd, once in the Central West Coal Project 



(within community H3), at two locations in South Eneabba Reserve and once in surrounding 

vegetation. It has also been recorded by government agencies in another thirteen locations in the 

nearby Eneabba areas (Figures 1 and 2).  This species is restricted between Badgingarra and 

Geraldton (Western Australian Herbarium 2009). 

 



 



Banksia chamaephyton (P4) 

This species is also known as the fishbone Banksia and is a low, lignotuberous shrub that grows to 

0.4 m high and 2 m wide. It flowers October to December and grows in grey or white sand over 

laterite (Western Australian Herbarium 2009). It was recorded by Mattiske Consulting Pty Ltd in 

one location along the proposed infrastructure corridor for the Coolimba

 

Power Station Project, as 



well as being recorded in two other locations in South Eneabba Reserve. It has been found in three 

locations by government agencies in the local area. This species ranges from Eneabba to Gingin 

(Western Australian Herbarium 2009), these populations maybe a part of the northern most extent 

of this species. 

 



 



Calytrix eneabbensis (P4) 

This species is a shrub and it is usually found on grey-yellow sands with laterite, in open low 

heath.  There are twenty-three records of this species in the Western Australian Herbarium (2009).  

This species was recorded at one location in the Central West Coal Project (within community 

T1), and has been recorded at ten locations in the nearby Eneabba areas. This species is restricted 

to the Eneabba area (Western Australian Herbarium 2009). 

 



 



Eucalyptus macrocarpa subsp. elachantha  (P4) 

The Small-leafed Mottlecah is a mallee that grows to 3m.  It is found on upland areas, often over 

laterite (West Australian Herbarium 2009).  There are 48 records of this species in the Western 

Australian Herbarium (2009).  This species was recorded by DEC at one location in the in the 

Central West Coal Project within a cleared area (Figure 1) and seven other locations. This species 

extends from Reagans Ford to just south of Geraldton (Western Australian Herbarium 2009).   

 



 



Georgeantha hexandra (P4) 

This species is a rhizomatous herb to 80cm in height, found in seasonally moist areas of deep sand 

within tall shrubland or low heath.  There are twenty-seven records of this species in the Western 

Australian Herbarium (2009).  This species was recorded at five locations in the Central West Coal 

Project and three locations in the proposed infrastructure corridor for the Coolimba Power Station 

Project (within communities E1, H2, H3 and T1), as well as four locations in Lake Logue Reserve.  

It should not be affected by changes in groundwater depth. This species was also recorded in 

twenty-seven sites in the nearby Eneabba areas and seven times by government agencies.  This 

species extends southwards from south of Arrowsmith River to Lancelin (Western Australian 

Herbarium 2009). 

 



 



Grevillea rudis (P4) 

This is a spreading shrub and is found on white, grey or yellow sand on sandy ridges and 

undulating plains.  There are fifty-four records of this species in the Western Australian Herbarium 

(2009).  This species was recorded by Mattiske Consulting Pty Ltd twice within the proposed 

infrastructure corridor for the Coolimba Power Project (within community T1) and once by 

government agencies in cleared vegetation in the Central West Coal  Project, five times by 

Mattiske Consulting Pty Ltd in South Eneabba Reserve and five times in Lake Logue Nature 

Reserve (Figures 1 and 2).  It has been recorded by government authorities in another five 

locations in the local area (Figure 1 and 2).This species extends from Eneabba to Badgingarra 

(Western Australian Herbarium 2009). These populations may represent the northern extent of this 

species. 


 

13. 


 

 

 



URS0808/195/08 

 

M



ATTISKE 

C

ONSULTING 



P

TY 


L

TD

 



 

 



 

Stylidium aeonioides (P4) 

This species is a rosette-forming perennial herb.  It produces yellow, cream or white flowers from 

September to November.  It is found on sand or loam over laterite on hillsides.  There are twenty-

six records of this species in the Western Australian Herbarium (2009).   

 

This species was recorded at one location in the Central West Coal Project (within community 



H5), and has been recorded once in nearby Eneabba areas (Figures 1 and 2).  This species extends 

from the Eneabba area south towards Cataby (Western Australian Herbarium 2009). 

 



 



Verticordia aurea (P4) 

 

This is an erect open shrub to 2m in height, producing pink or white flowers from November to 



April.  It is found on white, grey or yellow sand on sandy ridges and undulating plains.  There are 

20 records of this species in the Western Australian Herbarium (2009). 

 

 

This species was recorded by Mattiske Consulting Pty Ltd at two locations in the Central West 



Coal Project (within communities E1 and H3), and has been recorded at a location inside Lake 

Logue Nature Reserve and one location out of it in surrounding areas. Another fifteen locations 

have been recorded in the nearby Eneabba areas (Figures 1 and 2).  This species has a known 

distribution 15 km North of Eneabba to Lesueur National Park (Western Australian Herbarium 

2009). 

 

The list above describes the species that will be directly impacted by the Coolimba Power Project and 



Central West Coal Project (Appendix C). Other indirect impacts on the flora could be exposure 

Phytophthora Dieback, weeds, fire frequency, groundwater movement and emissions. Impacts such as 

weeds and emissions from the Coolimba Power Project should equally affect all flora, but the other two 

impacts, fire and Phytophthora Dieback are specific to plant species. The other Priority flora found to 

be occurring in the general area but are not directly impacted were examined for their susceptibility to 

other impacts. At this stage of research it appears that no species will be destroyed by a single fire but 

fire frequency will have to be monitored as some species maybe affected by inappropriate fire 

frequencies and regular intense fires. Phytophthora Dieback will affect some species and other species 

that make up habitats, so appropriate protocols will have to be in place.  




Yüklə 1,38 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   13




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə