Flora and vegetation of aviva lease area



Yüklə 1,38 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə3/13
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü1,38 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   13

5.3 

Significant Flora 

A number of range extensions were recorded. Most of these were additions to the known extent of a 

distribution and not a new disjunct population. Two prominent examples include - Eremaea ebracteata 

var.  ebracteata  and  Olearia revoluta.  Eremaea ebracteata var.  ebracteata  is usually found in the 

northern part of the Irwin district (Hnatuik 1993), so this recording is a 100 km range extension south, 

although possible as the southern extent of this species was not defined. Previously, Olearia revoluta (a 

daisy) had been recorded by the Western Australian Herbarium as occurring to the east of Geraldton. 

This collection represents a range extension of approximately 60 km to the south west. However, this 

species is expected to occur in these parts (Blackall and Grieve 1982). 

5.4 

Vegetation 

A total of 24 plant communities were recorded in the Aviva survey area and in the mapped areas of 

Lake Logue Nature Reserve (Figures 1 and 2, Mattiske Consulting Pty Ltd 2006, Mattiske Consulting 

Pty Ltd 2009). The remaining areas consist mainly of cleared paddocks, with localised remnant trees. 

Listing of species in each community is in Appendix E.  

 

C1 -  

Low open Forest of Casuarina obesa over  Tecticornia indica subsp.  bidens  and mixed 

invasive herbs on flats on white/grey sand. 

 

E1 -  

Low Woodland of Eucalyptus  todtiana  and  Nuytsia floribunda  over  Adenanthos cygnorum 

subsp. cygnorum, Eremaea beaufortioides var. lachnosanthe, Melaleuca leuropoma, Banksia 

sphaerocarpa var. sphaerocarpa and Hibbertia hypericoides on sand.  


 

14. 


 

 

 



URS0808/195/08 

 

M



ATTISKE 

C

ONSULTING 



P

TY 


L

TD

 



 

 

E2 -  

Low Woodland of Eucalyptus accedens and Eucalyptus eudesmioides over Hibbertia spicata 

subsp. spicata, Allocasuarina campestris and Melaleuca leuropoma on sandy gravel.  

 

E3 -  

Woodland and Open Woodland of Eucalyptus  camaldulensis  var. obtusa  over  Melaleuca 



viminea  subsp.  viminea, Acacia saligna, Melaleuca lateriflora  subsp.  acutifolia  and 

Macrozamia fraseri on sandy loam.  

 

E4 –  

Open Low Woodland of Eucalyptus todtiana and Nuytsia floribunda over Banksia menziesii 

and Stirlingia latifolia on sandy drainage lines.  

 

E5 -  

Open Low Woodland of Eucalyptus todtiana, Nuytsia floribunda over Banksia menziesii and 



Conospermum triplinervium on sandy uplands.  

 

E6 -  

Open Low Woodland of Eucalyptus todtiana and Nuytsia floribunda over mixed low shrubs 

and herbs on sandy lowlands.  



 

E7- 

Low Woodland of Eucalyptus camaldulensis var. obtusa  over Melaleuca rhaphiophylla and 

mixed herbs with occasional Casuarina obesa on flats on white/grey sand. 

 

E8- 

Low Woodland of Eucalyptus camaldulensis var. obtusa  and Banksia prionotes over mixed 

shrubs over *Bromus sp. and *Ehrharta sp. on lower and mid-slopes on white/grey sand. 

 

F1- 

Tall Shrubland of Melaleuca rhaphiophylla over Tecticornia indica subsp. bidens and other 

shrubs and sedges on minor flowlines on grey/white sand. 

 

F2- 

Low Open Shrubland of Tecticornia indica subsp.  bidens  with mixed herbs and grasses on 

flats on grey/white sand. 

 

H1 -  

Mixed Heath of Melaleuca leuropoma  with emergent Banksia  species with occasional 

Eucalyptus todtiana and Actinostrobus arenarius on sand with exposed lateritic rises.  

 

H2 -  

Heath or Low Shrubland of  Conospermum triplinervium, Verticordia nitens, Adenanthos 

cygnorum subsp. cygnorum, Stirlingia latifolia and Jacksonia floribunda on sand. 

 

H3 - 

Heath or Scrub of Melaleuca leuropoma, Banksia sphaerocarpa  var. sphaerocarpa, 

Dryandra nivea subsp.  nivea, Eremaea beaufortioides  var.  lachnosanthe  and  Hibbertia 

subvaginata on lateritic rises. 

 

H4 -  

Mixed Heath of Proteaceae and Myrtaceae spp. with occasional Eucalyptus todtiana on sand.  

 

H5 -  

Mixed Heath or Shrubland of Xanthorrhoea drummondii, Allocasuarina  humilis  and 

Hibbertia spp. and Proteaceae spp. on lateritic uplands.  

 

S1 - 

Open Scrub of Acacia blakelyi  and  Hakea psilorrhyncha  over  Gahnia trifida, Melaleuca 

leuropoma, Conostylis aculeata subsp.  breviflora, *Ursinia anthemoides, *Trifolium 

campestre and *Vulpia bromoides on rehabilitated land. 

 

S2 - 

Open Scrub of Acacia blakelyi with occasional Eucalyptus todtiana over annual grasses and 

herbs. 


 

S3- 

Tall Open Shrubland of Banksia prionotes over mixed shrubs and herbs; Acacia blakeyi in 

high numbers within fire disturbed areas on crests of dunes, mid-  slopes and swales on 

white/grey sand. 

 

T1 -  

Scrub or Thicket of Banksia attenuata, Banksia menziesii over  Banksia sphaerocarpa  var. 



sphaerocarpa, Adenanthos cygnorum, Banksia hookeriana  and  Conospermum triplinervium 

on sand.  



 

15. 


 

 

 



URS0808/195/08 

 

M



ATTISKE 

C

ONSULTING 



P

TY 


L

TD

 



 

 

T1(d)

Significantly Disturbed T1 community 

 

T2 -  

Thicket or Scrub of Acacia blakelyi over Melaleuca leuropoma, Banksia sphaerocarpa var. 



sphaerocarpa, Verticordia densiflora var. densiflora on sand.  

 

T3 -  

Thicket or Scrub of Melaleuca hamulosa, Melaleuca concreta, Viminaria juncea and Kunzea 

recurva on sand or loam flats.  

 

T4 - 

Thicket or Scrub of Melaleuca rhaphiophylla  and  Melaleuca lanceolata  over sedges and 

rushes on low-lying sandy loams. 



 

T4(d) - 

Significantly Disturbed T4 community 



 

T5 - 

Scrub or Thicket of Banksia attenuata and Banksia menziesii over Eremaea beaufortioides, 



Hibbertia hypericoides, Melaleuca systena, Stirlingia latifolia and herbs with occasional 

Xylomelum angustifolium on slopes and swales and flats on white/grey sand. 

 

All of these communities extend outside the project area; however the extent of these communities in 



the region have been modified by agricultural activities and mining activities. The condition of the 

vegetation (based on the Bush Forever condition ratings) ranges from completely degraded in the 

pastures to excellent in the bushland areas. 

5.5 

Conservation Status of Vegetation 

5.5.1 

Threatened Ecological Community 

The database query of DEC revealed one Threatened Ecological Community as occurring in the region. 

This TEC is the Ferricrete Floristic Community -  Rocky Springs type. Community 72 Ferricrete 

Floristic Community is listed as Vulnerable by the Department of Environment and Conservation 

(2006), however is not listed under the EPBC Act 1999. Five examples of this TEC were listed and all 

occurring approximately 1.5 km from the CWC along Rocky Springs Road. Neither of the proposed 

Aviva projects directly impact of these TEC’s however, there is debate as to whether groundwater 

drawdown will affect these communities.  

 

The H1 heath community included pockets of lateritic rises, and therefore has some species in common 



with the only known Threatened Ecological Community in the Eneabba area, the Ferricrete Floristic 

Community  -  Rocky Springs type. Community 72 Ferricrete Floristic Community is listed as 

Vulnerable by the Department of Environment and Conservation (2006).  This Threatened Ecological 

Community is not currently listed under the Commonwealth EPBC Act 1999. On the basis of database 

search and a comparison with regional datasets (Department of Environment and Conservation 2009a), 

the majority of the flora recorded on the Rocky Springs Ferricrete communities are represented either 

on the northern Swan Coastal Plain or in the adjacent regions. 

 

Twenty-nine of the sixty taxa recorded within the local TEC Ferricrete Community (Hamilton-Brown et 



al. 2004) were recorded within the survey area (Appendix F).  The majority of these species occur more 

widely, and therefore the significance of the latter is difficult to assess in view of the lack of regional 

studies on the Rocky Springs TEC. The project as proposed does not impact directly on the Rocky 

Springs TEC (Figure 1). 

 

Table 3: 

Threatened Ecological Communities found in the Eneabba area   

 

General Description 



DEC (2006) Category 

Status (EPBC Act 

1999 Category) 

72. Ferricrete Floristic Community 

Vulnerable 

 


 

16. 


 

 

 



URS0808/195/08 

 

M



ATTISKE 

C

ONSULTING 



P

TY 


L

TD

 



 

 

As indicated by Blandford (pers. comm.), the ferricrete layer extends well beyond the designated Rocky 



Springs TEC location.  The latter raises two critical issues, firstly it raises questions on how the TEC 

was defined and secondly what is the actual extent of the TEC as interpreted by the Department of 

Environment and Conservation (2009b).  Currently the data available on the TEC is relatively restricted 

(Hamilton-Brown  et al. 2004) and as there are four communities between the located TEC and the 

exposed ferricrete (located east of the designated TEC site there is confusion over the significance of 

the TEC). 



5.5.2 

Communities of Regional and Local Significance 

Half of the communities described as occurring in the Coolimba Power Station Project and Central 

West Coal Project have either regional or local significance as they are known habitats for Rare and 

Priority Species (EPA 2004)  or may reduce the local extent of these communities below 30 %. The 

direct impact on these communities and each community’s significance is summarized below (Table 4).  

Both the Coal West Project and Coolimba Power Station Project will reduce communities E5, E6, H1, 

H5, S1, and T2 to 30 % or less of their immediate distribution.    

 

Table 4:   Summary of Vegetation types to be directly impacted within the survey area by the 

proposals (CWC- Central West Coal, CPP – Coolimba Power Project) 

 

Type 

Significance 

Total area 

surveyed (ha) 

Percent cleared  

Percent outside of 

Direct Impact 

CPP 

CWC 

C1 


 

5.848 


100 



CL/D 

 

1713.986 



25.28 

48.892 


25.828 

E1 


Local 

38.943 


20.504 


79.496 

E2 


Local 

18.13 


100 



E3 

 

5.414 



100 



E4 

Local 


89.328 

9.883 


32.907 

57.21 


E5 

Local 


18.426 

77.24 



22.76 

E6 


Local 

47.868 


72.691 


27.309 

E7 


 

9.059 


100 



E8 

 

9.209 



100 



F1 

 

17.662 



100 



F2 

 

5.769 



100 



H1 

Local 


52.855 

93.278 



6.722 

H2 


Local 

163.261 


41.431 


58.569 

H3 


Local 

625.22 


0.963 

67.872 


31.165 

H4 


 

121.861 


0.353 


99.647 

H5 


Local 

17.898 


88.694 


11.306 

S1 


Local 

6.24 


100 


S2 


 

18.928 


52.007 


47.993 

S3 


 

62.85 


100 



T1 

Regional 

720.431 

4.384 


23.555 

72.061 


T1(d) 

 

9.318 



100 



T2 

Local 


32.538 

79.635 



20.365 

T3 


 

35.552 


9.002 


90.998 

T4 


 

70.915 


6.675 


93.325 

T4(d) 


 

23.534 


100 



T5 

 

151.272 



100 



Total 

 

2118.443 





 

17. 


 

 

 



URS0808/195/08 

 

M



ATTISKE 

C

ONSULTING 



P

TY 


L

TD

 



5.6 

Groundwater Dependent Ecosystems 

An assessment was undertaken on the potential Groundwater Dependent Ecosystems (GDE) in and near 

the project area.  The heath and scrub communities (H2, H3 and T1) that dominate the vegetation of the 

survey area are largely characterised by shallow-rooted species or shrubs that are primarily reliant on 

the soil moisture levels being maintained by rainfall events.  The two communities that may be 

susceptible to groundwater drawdown are summarized below: 

  

T4 -  


Thicket or Scrub of Melaleuca rhaphiophylla  and  Melaleuca lanceolata  over sedges and 

rushes on low-lying sandy loams.  This vegetation type was recorded in the northern part of 

the survey area (within the northern  part of Project Area and within Lake Logue Nature 

Reserve).  This community is dominated by Melaleuca spp. , which have both deep roots 

and shallower lateral roots, and so should be able to access soil  moisture from the 

unsaturated above the groundwater table. This suggests that this community should display 

facultative dependence on groundwater. 

 

E3 -  



Woodland and Open Woodland of  Eucalyptus camaldulensis  var.  obtusa  over  Melaleuca 

viminea  subsp.  viminea, Acacia saligna, Melaleuca lateriflora  subsp.  acutifolia  and 

Macrozamia fraseri on sandy loam.  This plant community was recorded in the southern 

part of the survey area and outside of the Project Area.  It is considered that paperbark 

swamps (Melaleuca  spp.) and River Red Gums (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) probably 

exhibit an facultative dependence on groundwater (Murray et al. 2003), which means that 

the presence or absence of groundwater is not critical to the presence of species within an 

ecosystem but that factors such as landscape position more strongly influence the sources 

of water used by the species.  

 

The community types H4, T1 and T5 (Mattiske Consulting Pty Ltd 2009) dominate the south-eastern 



corner of the Lake Logue Nature Reserve.  The Eucalyptus camaldulensis  var.  obtusa  woodlands 

around Lake Indoon have already been subjected to various periods of varying drought. 

 

The other key area appears to be the nearby Rocky Springs Ferricrete TEC.  This TEC occurs outside 



the Project Area.  On the basis of the high proportion of plant root systems in the upper 30 to 40cm of 

the surface and the absence of deep tap rooted species, it appears that the vast majority of the plant 

species within the different communities are reliant on soil moisture from rainfall events.  This 

proposition was discussed with Doug Blandford and after reviewing the soil profiles in nearby areas it 

was decided that the plants would be largely reliant on the soil moisture in the sandy and sandy-clay 

environments and that therefore the risk to the flora and vegetation within the Rocky Springs Ferricrete 

TEC was very low.  

 

To extend this interpretation to the flora and vegetation on the other sections of the survey area, the 



lifeforms of the respective plant species was extracted from Paczkowska and Chapman (2000) and the 

West Australian Herbarium (2009).  This lifeform data is presented in Appendix B and as such reflects 

the high proportion of annual and perennial herbs and shrub species that are unlikely to be dependent on 

soil moisture from deeper sources and ground water. 



6. 

DISCUSSION 

The survey effort was undertaken in the spring months of 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008 by experienced 

botanists familiar with the Kwongan flora near Eneabba. The specific work undertaken by Mattiske 

Consulting Pty Ltd in the spring months of 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008 included a search for rare and 

priority flora, defining and mapping the plant communities present, assessing the condition of the plant 

communities and reviewing the local and regional conservation value of the flora and vegetation.  

Detailed recordings were undertaken at representative plant communities.  The survey effort over 

multiple seasons and with average rainfall (Table 1) meets the standards for the EPA Guidance 

Statement 51.  

 


 

18. 


 

 

 



URS0808/195/08 

 

M



ATTISKE 

C

ONSULTING 



P

TY 


L

TD

 



 

 

Flora  

 

A total of 512 taxa (including subspecies and varieties) from 182 genera and 64 families were recorded 



within the Aviva Project area. An additional 48 families, 123 genera and 261 taxa were found in the 

southern section of the Lake Logue Nature Reserve and near Lake Indoon. The dominant families in the 

Aviva Project area were Myrtaceae (106 taxa), Proteaceae (96 taxa), Papilionaceae (51 taxa) and 

Haemodoraceae (31 taxa).  The range of taxa recorded reflects the diversity of flora species in the 

Eneabba area.   

 

None of the introduced taxa are listed by the Department of Agriculture and Food as Declared Pests 



pursuant to Section 37 of the Agriculture and Related Resources Protection Act 1976 [WA].  

 

Previous records from Department of Environment and Conservation databases indicate that there are 



potentially twelve Rare, four Priority 1, sixteen Priority 2, thirty eight Priority 3 taxa and seventeen 

Priority 4 contained in the local area.  Of these database records, seven are listed as Endangered and, 

four Vulnerable under the  EPBC Act 1999. Mattiske Consulting Pty Ltd fieldwork recorded, two 

Declared Rare, one  Priority 1, ten Priority 2, 13 Priority 3 and seven Priority 4 of these taxa. Seven 

taxa, consisting of one Priority 1, five Priority 2 and one Priority 3 taxa were not previously recorded in 

the. In addition to these records, one Priority 1, two Priority 2, three Priority 3 and two Priority 4 taxa 

were found in Lake Logue reserve. 

 

A total of one Declared Rare, seven Priority 2, ten Priority 3, and seven Priority 4 taxa will be directly 



impacted.  

 

If proposed infrastructure corridor was to go ahead as is, Tetratheca nephelioides, will be significantly 



affected at a taxon level. It has been proposed that the corridor is moved to farmland south of the 

population, and from a species-conservation point of view, this should be the preferred option. The next 

option would be to locate the proposed infrastructure facilities south of the track and north of the 

fenceline to minimize the impact on the conservation areas.  State Ministerial approval will be required 

to take this species if the current route is used. 

 

The status and position of some of the Declared Rare Eucalypt species will have to be confirmed, and if 



necessary Federal Approval sought, and relevant protection from indirect impacts given.  Many of the 

records summarized on the Figures rely on older records and therefore are less reliable in terms of 

location accuracy. 

 

All Priority taxa have uncertain status in terms of plant numbers and therefore should be avoided if 



possible. However, the known locations and distribution of some taxa may be more affected than others 

may by both the proposed projects. These taxa fall into three categories; taxa that are at their northern 

extent, taxa that are at their southern extent, or taxa that are locally uncommon.  

 

The taxa Schoenus griffinianus (P3),  Lepidobolus quadratus  ms (P3), Banksia chamaephyton (P4), 



Grevillea rudis (P4) are all at their northern extent in the Coolimba Power Station Project and the 

Central West Coal Project.  Removal of these populations without some mitigation can reduce the 

genetic diversity and therefore the ability of the taxa as a whole to withstand disturbances. If these 

species can not be avoided, measures to protect the species genetic diversity will be required (either 

ensure seed/specimens of local provenance can be incorporated successfully into rehabilitation, or 

establishment of the status or these taxa, including conservation estate offset of found populations).  

 

The taxa at their southern extent include Calytrix purpurea (P2), also a range extension of 70 km south, 



Hemiandra  sp. Eneabba (H. Demarz 3687) (P3), and , Stylidium aeonioides (P4). The recording of 

Calytrix purpurea  (P3), represents a population outlier of 70 km. These locations will have to be 

avoided until the status of the taxon in the local area can be confirmed. The other taxa at their southern 

extent will be exposed to the same risks as taxa at their northern extents and so will require mitigating 

measures of some kind.  

 


 

19. 


 

 

 



URS0808/195/08 

 

M



ATTISKE 

C

ONSULTING 



P

TY 


L

TD

 



 

 

The taxa that are locally uncommon include Acacia flabellifolia (P3),  Calytrix eneabbensis (P4), and 



Verticordia aurea (P4). Some taxa are at more risk than others from the direct impact. Taxa such as 

Comesperma rhadinocarpum (P2)  has a distribution stretching from Geraldton to Perth, therefore the 

effect of the population removal will not be as great as Calytrix eneabbensis (P4), and Verticordia 



aurea  (P4). These taxa are only found in the local area and should be avoided or have appropriate 

mitigating measures put in place. The taxon Acacia flabellifolia (P3) has not been found in the Eneabba 

area before, although it has been found from Arrino, north of Three Springs to Watheroo. Therefore this 

taxon’s location should be avoided. 

 

The differences between the  range of Priority flora on the nearby Eneabba Plains and the proposed 



mining operational area indicate that there is significant variation in these communities.  This variation 

may in part reflect also the differences in sampling regimes between the different areas. The latter is not 

surprising in view of the different fire regimes and the high diversity of species in the Eneabba area. 

 

Some range extensions did occur. These extensions again reflect the significant variation in flora in the 



Eneabba area. Other Rare and Priority flora species also occur outside the direct impact area. These 

species maybe exposed to impacts such as Phytophthora  Dieback, weeds, inappropriate fire regimes, 

emissions and groundwater. For example, Banksia elegans (P4) are highly susceptible to Phytophthora 

Dieback and requires some time in between fires to resprout, as to not diminish the lignotuber (Patrick 

and Brown 2001).   As long as areas outside of the footprint are given protection from indirect impacts 

such as Phytophthora  Dieback, weeds, inappropriate fire regimes, emissions and groundwater 

drawdown, these species should be protected. 

 



Yüklə 1,38 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   13




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə