Flora and vegetation survey by astron environmental services



Yüklə 9,38 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə2/20
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü9,38 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   20

List of Appendices 
Appendix A: Bushland vegetation condition scale  
Appendix B: Southwest species rated according to ecohydrological tolerances 
Appendix C: Summary of conservation listed flora within survey area vicinity 
Appendix D: Database search results (flora, TEC/PECs, MNES) for desktop assessment 
Appendix E: Species list for the survey area 
Appendix F:Survey site data 
Appendix G: Survey species matrix by site  
Appendix H: Threatened Flora Report Forms (copies) for conservation significant flora recorded 
during the 2013 survey 
Appendix I: Floristic analyses of quadrat data 
Appendix J: EPA checklist for documents submitted for EIA on marine and terrestrial biodiversity 
 

Cristal Mining Australia Limited 
Wonnerup North Mineral Sands Project – Flora and Vegetation Assessment, October 2013 
 
This page has been left blank intentionally  

Cristal Mining Australia Limited 
Wonnerup North Mineral Sands Project – Flora and Vegetation Assessment, October 2013 
 
Page | 1 
1
 
Introduction 
1.1
 
Project Background 
Cristal Mining Australia Limited (Cristal  Mining)  propose to develop a mineral sands mining 
operation approximately 44 kilometres (km) south of Bunbury, Western Australia; herein referred to 
as the Wonnerup North Mineral Sands Project (the project) (Figures 1 and 2). The project details and 
site plan is shown in Figure 3.  
Astron Environmental Services (Astron) was engaged by Cristal Mining to undertake a two-season 
flora and vegetation assessment within the project boundary.  
1.2
 
Scope and Objectives 
Astron was provided with the following scope of works for the flora and vegetation assessment: 

 
characterise the flora and vegetation associations within relevant areas to the proposed 
project and its impacts  

 
demonstrate how a level 2 flora and vegetation survey effort or greater has been conducted 
for the proposed project 

 
describe the survey area and methodologies, including reference to timing, duration, survey 
effort, any survey limitations and the nomenclature used 

 
map and describe significant flora species, vegetation and vegetation condition 

 
define the extent and abundance of conservation significant flora already known to occur in 
the leases (i.e. Grevillea elongata, Hakea oldfieldii, Schoenus pennisetis and Banksia 
squarrosa subsp. argillacea) (Note these species do not occur within the Cristal Mining lease 
area but are historic records from the vicinity of the project area (DEC 2013c) 

 
demonstrate that conservation significant flora known to occur nearby do not occur in the 
leases or if they do define their extent and abundance, i.e. Acacia flagelliformis, Eucalyptus 
rudis subsp. cratyantha, Verticordia densiflora var. pedunculata and Verticordia attenuata 

 
provide a comprehensive list of flora species identified 

 
provide an assessment of threatened, priority or other significant flora/ecological 
communities (threatened and priority ecological communities) known or reasonably 
expected to occur in the area (as defined in Guidance Statement No. 51, including matters of 
national environmental significance (MNES) relevant to flora listed under the 
Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act)) 

 
document the occurrence of environmental and declared weeds (now declared pests) 

 
evaluate the impact of the proposal on flora species and vegetation communities, including 
reference to the extent of regional clearing of the vegetation complex/type and ecological 
linkage 

 
identify and assess the potential impacts of the proposed project on the health of 
groundwater dependent ecosystems (trees and understorey species) 

 
consider cumulative flora impacts of the proposed project with other approved 
developments. 

Cristal Mining Australia Limited 
Wonnerup North Mineral Sands Project – Flora and Vegetation Assessment, October 2013 
 
Page | 2 
The assessment is required to consider the following State Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) 
policies and guidance relating to the assessment of terrestrial flora and vegetation: 

 
EPA Position Statement No. 2, Environmental Protection of Native Vegetation in Western 
Australia (EPA 2000) 

 
EPA Position Statement No. 3, Terrestrial Biological Surveys as an Element of Biodiversity 
Protection (EPA 2002) 

 
EPA Guidance Statement No. 51, Terrestrial Flora and Vegetation Surveys for Environmental 
Impact Assessment in Western Australia (EPA 2004) 

 
EPA Environmental Protection Bulletin No. 8 - South West Regional Ecological Linkages (EPA 
2009) 

 
EPA Checklist for ‘Documents Submitted for EIA on Marine and Terrestrial Biodiversity’ 
(Appendix 2 of the EPA’s Draft Environmental Assessment Guideline No.6 on Timelines for 
Environmental Impact Assessment of Proposals) (EPA 2010). 
This  report  contains the results of the initial winter survey (June 2013) and the spring survey 
(October 2013). In addition, Project specific information including the evaluation of potential 
impacts; and where impacts may exist the mitigation and management proposed by Cristal Mining is 
described (Sections 5 and 6).  
 
 

!
!
!
!
!
!
!
Ruabon    Roa
d
R
IV
ER
RIV
ER
RIVER
VA
SSE
RIV
ER
Tuart Forest
National Park
G e o g r a p h e   B a y
I N D I A N   O C E A N
SA
BIN
A
Ludlow
State Forest
Coolilup
State Forest
Ludlow
State Forest
Sabina State Forest
Millbrook
State Forest
Jarrahwood
State Forest
Ruabon Townsite
Nature Reserve
Whicher
National Park
Boyanup
State Forest
Tuart Forest
National Park
Tuart Forest
National Park
Fish Road
Nature Reserve
Millbrook
State Forest
Capel
Nature Reserve
Waneragup
Lake
HIG
HW
AY
WE
STE
RN
BYPASS
RIVER
CA
PEL
BUS
SEL
L
HIG
HW
AY
BUSSELLTON BY
PAS
S
AB
BA
Wo
nne
rup
Sou
th
Roa
d
Mineral Separation Plant
Koombana
Bay
BY
PA
SS
BUNBURY
WONNERUP NORTH
MINERAL SANDS PROJECT
WONNERUP EXTENSION
(WONNERUP SOUTH)
 Ro
ad
RIV
ER
PR
ES
TO
N
BR
OO
K
G
YN
U
D
U
P
Koomb
ana
Dr
B
WONNERUP MINERAL
SANDS MINE
W H
I C H
E R
S C
A R
P
W
H I
C H
E R
SC
A R
P
BOYA
NUP 
BUSS
ELTON
 RAILW
AY
LUDL
OW
Eaton
Capel
Gelorup
BUNBURY
Stratham
Busselton
Peppermint Grove
BU
SS
ELL
    
 HI
GH
WA
Y
VASSE      HIG
HWAY
Sue

Goodw
ood   
 Road
Boyanup    R
oad    West
SO
UTH
AUSTR
ALIND
M70/360
M70/569
M70/785
3600
00
3600
00
3800
00
3800
00
6280000
6280000
6300000
6300000
CMA-13-01_FR 201A
Source: Commonwealth of Australia, Department of 
           Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population 
           and Communities, 2013; WA Department of Environment 
           and Conservation, 2013; Department of Mines and 
           Petroleum, 2013 
0
8
Kilometres
MGA 94 ZONE 50
LEGEND
Mining Tenement
Proposed Mineral Concentrate Transport Route
Vasse-Wonnerup Ramsar Wetland
National Park/Conservation Area/Reserve
State Forest
FIGURE 1
Regional Locality Plan
W O N N E R U P   N O R T H   P R O J E C T
WA
NT
SA
PERTH
WONNERUP
NORTH PROJECT
"

Cristal Mining Australia Limited 
Wonnerup North Mineral Sands Project – Flora and Vegetation Assessment, October 2013 
 
This page has been left blank intentionally  

Lyle     Road
Wo
nn
eru
p
Sou
th
Roa
d
Ruabon
Road
RIV
ER
RIV
ER
RI
VE
R
RIVER
VASS
E
R
IV
ER
Geographe Bay
I N D I A N       O C E A N
Ludlow SF
Busselton
B
WONNERUP EXTENSION
(WONNERUP SOUTH)
WONNERUP
MINERAL SANDS MINE
WONNERUP NORTH
MINERAL SANDS PROJECT
Ludlow SF
Sue
s    
Roa
d
BUS
SEL
L    
HIG
HW
AY
BOYANU
P BUSS
ELTON R
AILWAY
AB
BA
LUDL
OW
SA
BIN

M
AL
BU
P
M70/360
M70/569
M70/785
Millbrook
State Forest
Millbrook
State Forest
Millbrook
State Forest
Millbrook
State Forest
Millbrook
State Forest
Millbrook
State Forest
Millbrook
State Forest
Ludlow SF
Tuart Forest NP
Ludlow SF
Ruabon Townsite
Nature Reserve
Sabina
Nature Reserve
Tuart Forest NP
Coolilup SF
Tuart Forest NP
350
00
0
350
00
0
360
00
0
360
00
0
6270000
6270000
6280000
6280000
FIGURE 2
Locality Plan
Aeiral View
W O N N E R U P   N O R T H   P R O J E C T
CMA-13-01_FR 202A
0
2
Kilometres
Source: Commonwealth of Australia, Department of 
           Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population 
           and Communities, 2013; WA Department of Environment 
           and Conservation, 2013; Department of Mines and 
           Petroleum, 2013 and Google Earth Image, 2013
GDA 1994 MGA ZONE 50
LEGEND
Mining Tenement
Approved Wonnerup Mineral Sands Mine
Approximate Extent of Project Mining Area
Vasse-Wonnerup Ramsar Wetland
National Park/Conservation Area/Reserve
State Forest
High Voltage Electricity Transmission Line
Electricity Transmission Line

Cristal Mining Australia Limited 
Wonnerup North Mineral Sands Project – Flora and Vegetation Assessment, October 2013 
 
This page has been left blank intentionally  

!
<
!
<
!
<
Lyle    Road
Wo
nn
eru
p    
Sou
th  
  R
oad
Ruabon
Road
Tuart Forest
National Park
Ludlow 
State Forest
Main
Access Road
!
Secondary 
Access Road
!
AB
BA
RIV
ER
ABB
A
RIV
ER
Te
al
e
Ro
ad
Tua
rt  
    
    
   D
riv
e
Process Water Dam
Thickener
Wet Separation Plant
!
!
!
WONNERUP
MINERAL SANDS MINE
WONNERUP NORTH
MINERAL SANDS PROJECT
WNPB1
WPB1
BUS
SEL
L    
HIG
HW
AY
Tuart Forest 
National Park
Tuart Forest    National Park
Ludlow 
State Forest
M70/360
M70/569
WNPB2
356
00
0
356
00
0
358
00
0
358
00
0
360
00
0
360
00
0
6274000
6274000
6276000
6276000
FIGURE 3
Site Plan - Project Details
W O N N E R U P   N O R T H   P R O J E C T
CMA-13-01_FR 203A
0
1
Kilometres
Source: Commonwealth of Australia, Department of 
           Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population 
           and Communities, 2013; WA Department of Environment 
           and Conservation, 2013; Department of Mines and 
           Petroleum, 2013 and Google Earth Image, 2013
LEGEND
Mining Tenement
Approved Wonnerup Mineral Sands Mine
Project Maximum Disturbance Boundary
Approximate Extent of Project Mining Area
Perimeter Topsoil Stockpile/Auxillary Infrastructure
Proposed Project Infrastructure
Cristal Production Bore
Vasse-Wonnerup Ramsar Wetland
National Park
State Forest
High Voltage Electricity Transmission Line
Electricity Transmission Line
MGA 94 ZONE 50
!
<

Cristal Mining Australia Limited 
Wonnerup North Mineral Sands Project – Flora and Vegetation Assessment, October 2013 
 
This page has been left blank intentionally  

Cristal Mining Australia Limited 
Wonnerup North Mineral Sands Project – Flora and Vegetation Assessment, October 2013 
 
Page | 6 
1.3
 
Existing Environment 
1.3.1
 
Physical Environment 
1.3.1.1
 
Geology, Landforms and Soils 
The survey area is located on the Busselton Plain, which is a portion of the Swan Coastal Plain, 
between Dunsborough and the Capel River, and is part of the larger Perth Basin. The Perth Basin sits 
between ancient Precambrian rock expressed as the Darling Plateau to the east and the Leeuwin and 
Northampton Blocks to the west (Tille and Lantzke 1990). The Busselton Plains are one of the six 
major landforms of the Swan Coastal Plain which are Quaternary sediments of alluvial and Aeolian 
origin deposited in a series of zones roughly parallel to the coast (Government of Western Australia 
2000). 
The Busselton Plain (from west to east) is comprised of: 

 
Quindalup Dunes and mark the current coastline 

 
Spearwood Dunes, which are the second series of dunes deposited by retreating coastlines 
with Tamala limestone at depth 

 
Bassendean Dunes, which are the oldest of the Aeolian landforms and consist of low dunes 
interwoven with wetlands  

 
Pinjarra Plain, which is composed of alluvial and colluvial deposits eroded from the 
Blackwood and Darling Plateaus 

 
The Ridge Hill Shelf, found at the base of the Whicher Scarp and laid down early in the 
development of the Swan Coastal Plan, is heavily dissected by stream action (Webb et al 
2009). 
The survey area is within the Bassendean Dunes. 
1.3.1.2
 
Hydrology 
The survey area is within the Busselton Coast Water Management Area; and in the Wonnerup sub 
management  area of the Vasse Wonnerup Estuary  Catchment  (Department of Environment and 
Conservation (DEC) 2013d). The survey area is intersected from west to east by the Abba River with 
the Lower Sabina River to the south of the survey area. 
The Vasse-Wonnerup System Ramsar wetland is approximately 3 km north-east of the survey area. 
1.3.1.3
 
Climate 
Wonnerup experiences a Mediterranean climate, characterised by hot, dry summers and cold, wet 
winters. Peak rainfall is received during the winter months from June to August. Data collected by 
the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) for 2013 (BOM 2013) (Figure 4) shows higher rainfall than the 
long-term average was received in each month preceding the  winter 2013 survey and in the two 
months  preceding  the  spring  survey  exceptional high rainfall was recorded (collected from  the 
Busselton weather station (site 9515)). 

Cristal Mining Australia Limited 
Wonnerup North Mineral Sands Project – Flora and Vegetation Assessment, October 2013 
 
Page | 7 
 
Chart 1: Long-term rainfall data compared to 2013 data (BOM 2013). 
1.3.1.4
 
Land Tenure and Surrounding Land Use 
The survey area is mainly comprised of privately-held land historically used for farming cattle. The 
survey area included two areas of road reserve, along Wonnerup South and Rueben Roads, which 
has  areas  which were  cleared and areas  with  remnant  vegetation.    Ruabon Road is a nominated 
‘flora road’ in the Department of Parks and Wildlife (DPaW) Flora Road Program; a program which 
has been developed by DPaW to encourage road managers to protect and conserve roadside 
vegetation of high conservation value (DPaW 2013a). 
The local area is predominantly cleared with land utilised for a range of agricultural practices and 
sand mining,  undertaken by a number of operators within the vicinity. Within the local area, 
remnant  vegetation is conserved in conservation estate areas including the Sabina,  Ruabon,  Fish 
Road, and Whicher Nature Reserves; and Ludlow and Coolilup State Forests. 
1.3.2
 
Biological Environment 
The survey area has been previously mapped at three broad levels:  
1.
 
Australia wide 
The national and regional planning framework for the systematic development of a comprehensive, 
adequate and representative national reserve system is provided by the Interim Biogeographic 
Regionalisation for Australia (IBRA version 7). IBRA is endorsed by all levels of government as a key 
tool for identifying land for conservation under Australia's Strategy for the National Reserve System 
2009-2030  (Commonwealth of Australia  2010).  The  survey  area is mapped as IBRA Swan Coastal 
Plain region; Perth subregion (SWA02). 
2.
 
Western Australia 
The pre-European vegetation extent for Western Australia was mapped and described (Beard 1990) 
according to broad botanical provinces with regions and districts defined within these broad 
provinces. The survey area is within the Southwest Botanical Province, in the Drummond Botanical 
Subdistrict of the Darling Botanical District  (Beard 1990). The survey area occurs  within the 

Cristal Mining Australia Limited 
Wonnerup North Mineral Sands Project – Flora and Vegetation Assessment, October 2013 
 
Page | 8 
Bassendean Dunes (Beard 1981) and is mapped as vegetation units 1136 (medium woodland; marri 
with some jarrah, wandoo, river gum, and casuarina) and 949 (low woodland; banksia) at a scale of 
1: 1,000,000. 
3.
 
Southwest Western Australia 
Smith (1973 and 1974) mapped and described the Busselton and Collie remnant vegetation based on 
late 1960 aerial photography and ground-truthing in 1971 and 1972. The mapping documented the 
broad dominant structural plant communities of these areas. Later, vegetation complex mapping of 
the Swan Coastal Plain was undertaken at a scale of 1: 250,000 (Heddle et al 1980). The mapping 
identified 29 vegetation complexes based on dominant species and vegetation structure in relation 
to landforms, soils and climatic conditions. Using these associations the extent of the vegetation 
complexes were projected over cleared land within their study area. However, this  vegetation 
complex mapping did not extend over the entire Busselton Plain area, which was later mapped at a 
scale of 1: 50,000 (Mattiske and Havel 1998) and utilised quadrat and field-based work to validate 
the mapping. On the Busselton Plain, 11 vegetation complexes are now recognised. Five vegetation 
complexes have been mapped across the Survey area (Mattiske and Havel 1998) and each of these 
units  are  described within  the more recent assessment of reservation and pre-European status 
(Havel and Mattiske 2002) in Section 4.1.2. 
1.3.3
 
Groundwater Dependent Vegetation 
Groundwater dependent vegetation (GDEs) are ecosystems that are dependent on groundwater for 
their survival at some stage or stages of their lifecycle (Eamus 2009). They  include wetland and 
riparian vegetation that includes phreatophytic flora  and  can be divided (Clifton and Evans 2001; 
Hatton and Evans 1998) into six general types:  

 
wetlands  

 
terrestrial vegetation  

 
river baseflow systems  

 
cave and aquifer systems  

 
terrestrial fauna  

 
estuarine/near-shore marine systems. 
Of the ecosystems that are dependent on groundwater, their degree of dependence may vary from 
total dependence (such as some wetlands or cave systems), to opportunistic dependence in times of 
drought (such as some areas of terrestrial vegetation). 
Eamus et al. (2006) identified three primary classes based on type of groundwater reliance: 
1.
 
Aquifer and cave ecosystems 
2.
 
All ecosystems dependent on the surface expression of groundwater  
i.
 
river base flows 
ii.
 
wetlands, swamplands 
iii.
 
seagrass beds in estuaries 
iv.
 
floodplains 
v.
 
mound springs 

Cristal Mining Australia Limited 
Wonnerup North Mineral Sands Project – Flora and Vegetation Assessment, October 2013 
 
Page | 9 
vi.
 
riparian vegetation 
vii.
 
saline discharge to lakes 
viii.
 
low lying forests 
3.
 
All ecosystems dependent on the subsurface presence of groundwater, often accessed via 
the capillary fringe (non-saturated zone above the water table) when roots penetrate this 
zone: 
i.
 
river red gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) forests  
ii.
 
banksia woodlands 
iii.
 
riparian vegetation in the wet/dry tropics. 
Riparian vegetation dependent on the subsurface presence of groundwater is considered to be a 
GDE. Riparian vegetation is generally determined, in the southwest of WA, to be vegetation 
associated with major or mid-order drainage lines, and dominated most commonly by Eucalyptus 
rudisMelaleuca rhaphiophylla and M. preissiana
Phreatophytes include plant species that rely on groundwater sources for water intake; essentially 
the water requirements of phreatophytes are greater than can  be provided from the surface soil 
profile (eg riparian vegetation) or they are dependent on free water availability (eg wetland species). 
They frequently show low tolerance to extended water stress due to a lack of physiological and/or 
morphological adaptation to drought, and respond to significant water deficit by a decline in health 
and eventual death. 
Facultative phreatophytes can switch their water source from groundwater in times of drought to 
water in the soil surface profile in times of rain (Grierson 2010). 
Vadophytes are plants that rely on moisture in the soil surface profile, and are independent of 
groundwater. They include species that are commonly associated with drainage lines and seasonal 
damplands. 
GDE and presence of phreatophytic species cannot be directly correlated as some phreatophytic 
species are dependent on free water availability (i.e. wetland species), and do not access 
groundwater. Therefore only some phreatophytic species are indicative of groundwater 
dependence. 
Yüklə 9,38 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   20




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə