Flora and vegetation survey by astron environmental services



Yüklə 9,38 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə3/20
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü9,38 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   20

1.3.4
 
Flora 
A total of 1,387 vascular plant taxa are recorded for the Busselton Plain (Webb et al 2009). Of these, 
1,132 (82%) are native taxa. The most diverse plant families are the Orchidaceae, Cyperaceae, 
Fabaceae, Myrtaceae, Asteraceae, Restionaceae, Proteaceae and Stylidiaceae. The Busselton Plain, 
with more than a third of the taxa of the Swan Coastal Plain bioregion, is clearly an area of species 
richness (Webb et al 2009). The high plant species richness for this portion of the Swan Coastal Plain 
is attributed to an increased rainfall and associated soil moisture. 
1.3.5
 
Weeds 
Of the 1,387 vascular plant taxa recorded for the Busselton Plain, 255 (18%) are weeds (Webb et al 
2009). The incidence of weeds is an artifact of a long history of clearing with grass and fodder 
species introduced to support the main historic land use of cattle grazing. 

Cristal Mining Australia Limited 
Wonnerup North Mineral Sands Project – Flora and Vegetation Assessment, October 2013 
 
Page | 10 
There are 65 plants listed as declared pests  under the  BAM Act with over half of these recorded 
from the Swan Coastal Plain (Department for Agriculture and Food Western Australia 2013). 
 
 

Cristal Mining Australia Limited 
Wonnerup North Mineral Sands Project – Flora and Vegetation Assessment, October 2013 
 
Page | 11 
2
 
Methodology 
2.1
 
Desktop Assessment 
Database searches were conducted  to identify listed ecological communities and flora species 
within, or in close proximity to, the survey area. These species and communities may be listed under 
the Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 and/or the EPBC Act; Table 1. 
Table 1: Database searches conducted. 
Database 
Search focus 
Search area 
Protected Matters 
Search Tool (Department of 
Sustainability, Environment, Water, 
Population and Communities (DSEWPaC) 
2013a). 
MNES including both listed 
ecological communities and flora 
species. 
-33.65056 ;115.46167 
 (with 10 km radius) 
Flora Data (Threatened and Priority 
Flora Database (TPFL), the WA 
Herbarium database (WAHerb) and the 
Threatened and Priority Flora Species 
List for Western Australia (DEC 2013a). 
Threatened and priority flora. 
Coordinate point location 
115°27' 42'' E,33°39' 02'' S 
Search radius: 10km 
Threatened Ecological Communities 
Database (DEC 2013b). 
Threatened and priority ecological 
communities. 
Coordinate point location 
115°27' 42'' E,33°39' 02'' S 
Search radius: 10km 
FloraBase (DEC 2013c). Advanced 
Access. 
Flora collections including 
conservation listed flora species. 
Wonnerup, Western 
Australia. 
NatureMap (DEC 2013d). 
Threatened and priority ecological 
communities and conservation 
listed flora; all flora records. 
115°27' 42'' E,33°39' 02'' S; 
Radius 10 km. 
2.2
 
Literature Review 
Reports relevant to the survey area were reviewed for both a regional perspective and a local (site 
specific) perspective. The main contextual report for the survey area is: 

 
Webb, A, Keighery, BJ, Keighery, GJ, Longman, V 2009, The flora and vegetation of the 
Busselton Plain (Swan Coastal Plain): a report for the Department of Environment and 
Conservation as part of the Swan Bioplan Project. Dept. of Environment and Conservation, 
Perth, Western Australia. 
Cristal Mining provided flora and vegetation survey reports, which have been undertaken within the 
vicinity of the survey area. These reports were reviewed prior to the field survey and include: 

 
Onshore Environmental (2013) Flora and Vegetation Survey, Wonnerup South Road – Road 
Verge. Unpublished report to Cristal Mining Limited. 

 
Ekologica (2012).Vegetation, Flora and Wetland Survey at the Wonnerup South Mineral 
Sands Deposit. Unpublished report to Cristal Mining Limited. 

 
Onshore Environmental (2009) Flora and Vegetation Survey, Location 7 (Wonnerup)
Unpublished report to Bemax resources Incorporating Cable Sands. 

Cristal Mining Australia Limited 
Wonnerup North Mineral Sands Project – Flora and Vegetation Assessment, October 2013 
 
Page | 12 
2.3
 
Field Survey 
The field survey was undertaken in accordance with the requirements for a desktop and level  2 
assessment outlined in the EPA Position Statement 3: Terrestrial Biological Surveys as an Element of 
Biodiversity Protection (2002), and EPA Guidance Statement No. 51: Terrestrial Flora and Vegetation 
Surveys for Environmental Impact Assessment in Western Australia (2004). 
Information acquired during the desktop study assisted in the design of the field survey. Pre-survey 
planning involved the examination of 1: 5,000 scale colour aerial photography of the survey area. 
The number and location of sample sites were determined based on the following criteria: 

 
the inclusion of at least one, and where possible, a duplicate sample site in each of the 
mapped vegetation complexes 

 
the inclusion of target areas that are prospective for listed ecological communities and flora 
species identified during the desktop study 

 
the availability of reasonably intact remnant vegetation for the placement of quadrats. 
The first phase of the field survey was conducted over two days from 7-8 June 2013. The second, 
spring survey was undertaken over four days from 3-6 October 2013. Both surveys were undertaken 
by  Astron Principal Botanist, Vanessa Clarke. Ms Clarke has over ten years’ experience in botany, 
primarily on the Swan Coastal Plain and Southwest;  conducting  flora and vegetation survey and 
identification both as a consultant, and as a former employee of State conservation departments. 
Ms Clarke holds the following licences for collection flora for scientific purposes, and rare flora: 

 
SL9822 Expiry 4 December 2013 

 
17-1314 Expiry 31 July 2014. 
A total of sixteen 10 by 10 metre (m) quadrats and three relevés (also equating to 100 m
2
) were 
surveyed in areas of remnant vegetation within the survey area along with numerous mapping notes 
of habitat, vegetation condition and opportunistic  recording and collections.  The corners of each 
quadrat were aligned with the aid of an optical square and measuring tapes and each corner was 
marked with a galvanised steel fence dropper. An electronic Geographical Positioning System (GPS) 
was used to record coordinates to relocate the quadrats for the spring survey. The potential to use 
permanent quadrats was limited due to the degraded condition or linear nature of some roadside 
remnants or the parkland cleared remnant vegetation on the private properties.  
Relevé quadrats were utilised during the survey in areas where the vegetation was too small or 
linear; and usually too  degraded to support a 10 by 10  m  quadrat.  In addition, as areas were 
traversed, mapping notes were made on vegetation complex and condition as well as inventorying 
species that were not captured in the quadrat and relevé sites. 
The following information was collected at each quadrat: 

 
Location – coordinates measured using a handheld GPS (MGA50, GDA94).  

 
Recorder and date – a list of the personnel involved in sampling the quadrat and the survey 
date. 

 
Species – all vascular plant species present including introduced and priority flora species. 
To ensure a thorough search, each quadrat was traversed systematically. Species that could 
not be identified in the field were collected for later identification at the Western Australian 
Herbarium. 

Cristal Mining Australia Limited 
Wonnerup North Mineral Sands Project – Flora and Vegetation Assessment, October 2013 
 
Page | 13 

 
Per cent foliar cover – the percentage cover was estimated for each dominant stratum. 

 
Vegetation description – vegetation was described according to Keighery (1994) based on 
the Muir (1977) and Aplin (1979) vegetation classification systems and National Vegetation 
Information System (NVIS) level 5: association level. At this level, up to three dominant 
genera for each of the upper, mid and ground strata are categorised based on dominant 
growth form, cover and height (Executive Steering Committee for Australian Vegetation 
Information 2003). 

 
Vegetation condition – assessed according to the Vegetation Condition Classification of 
Government of Western Australia (2000) (Appendix A) including any disturbance such as 
fire, tracks or grazing impacts. 

 
Habitat – a broad description of the surrounding landscape based on landform, topography 
and soil according to the descriptions outlined in Keighery (1994). 

 
Photographs – a representative photograph was taken from the corner of each quadrat. 
2.3.1
 
Targeted Survey 
A list of conservation significant flora previously recorded within or adjacent to the survey area and 
within a 10 km radius of the survey area was compiled using the results of the literature review and 
database searches. The botanist familiarised herself with the identifying features of these species 
and their preferred habitat prior to the field visit. 
A targeted survey for listed threatened and priority flora was conducted by walking systematic 
traverses throughout the survey area. Where a conservation significant flora species was potentially 
observed, a GPS coordinate and an estimate of the number of plants were recorded. Specimens of 
each conservation significant flora species were collected for verification at the Western Australian 
Herbarium.  
2.3.2
 
Vegetation Description and Mapping  
The vegetation of the survey area has previously  been mapped at a broad scale into vegetation 
complexes (Mattiske and Havel 1998). Four A3 colour maps with aerial photography at 1: 5,000 scale 
with the  vegetation complexes  marked, were used in the field to ground truth and verify the 
mapping  boundaries. The vegetation descriptions recorded at each quadrat or relevé were 
compared against the vegetation complex  descriptions  that had been applied to each polygon to 
verify mapping in the field. Mapping boundaries were changed on aerial photographs in the field 
where required.  
An assessment of vegetation condition, using the scale provided in Bush  Forever (Government of 
Western Australia 2000), was made at each quadrat, relevé and during field traverses. The 
vegetation condition scale is provided in Appendix A. 
2.3.3
 
Floristic Analysis 
A dataset of 509 quadrats across the southern Swan Coastal Plain (Gibson et al. 1994) is the standard 
for comparison for 10 by 10 m quadrats for the survey area location. The Department of Parks and 
Wildlife (DPaW) was contacted to ascertain if any additional quadrat data was available but nothing 
additional was able to be provided. 
Quadrats were grouped on the basis of species composition using the similarity of profile analysis 
(SIMPROF) in Primer v6 (Clarke and Gorley 2006). First, similarity between all pairs of quadrats was 

Cristal Mining Australia Limited 
Wonnerup North Mineral Sands Project – Flora and Vegetation Assessment, October 2013 
 
Page | 14 
calculated using Bray-Curtis similarity. Then, quadrats were grouped using a statistical classification 
methodology, and the permutation test was used to test statistical significance of groups. Similarity 
of the quadrats to the community types defined by Gibson et al. (1994) was examined by analysing 
the data from this project with subsets of data in the dataset. The first subset included data from 
33°S to the southern-most quadrat at 33.8°S in all community types (104 quadrats). The second 
subset included data from 33°S to the southern-most quadrat in community types that are present 
in the vicinity of the project area (1b, 7, 10a, 10b, and 21b: 36 quadrats). 
2.3.4
 
Specimen Identification  
Plant specimens not able to be positively identified in the field were collected, given a unique 
collection number and pressed. Specimens were air-dried and identified by Astron botanist Vanessa 
Clarke  at the Western Australian Herbarium. Assistance was provided by specialist taxonomists 
where potential conservation significant taxa were collected. For example, Andrew Brown (Senior 
Botanist and orchid expert, DPaW) was provided photographs and pressed specimens of orchids to 
confirm their tentative identifications. Consultant Botanist, Mr Frank Obbens assisted with some 
cryptic species and a suite of sedges. Nomenclature is consistent with the WA Herbarium. 
Specimens were identified to the lowest possible classification (i.e. species, subspecies or variant) 
dependent on the availability of descriptive vegetative parts able to be collected. Given the timing of 
the survey, most plants were in flower but one Verticordia was sterile and unable to be identified 
(i.e. no flowering or fruiting material present).  Subsequent collections were made from a range of 
Verticordia individuals  growing  within the north side of Ruabon Road during the months of 
December and January. All were the P3 Verticordia attenuata.  One collection which has been 
submitted to the WA Herbarium due to its atypical features was tentatively named Lepyrodia aff. 
riparia. 
 
 

Cristal Mining Australia Limited 
Wonnerup North Mineral Sands Project – Flora and Vegetation Assessment, October 2013 
 
Page | 15 
3
 
Limitations 
No limiting factors caused a significant impact on the delivery of the scope of works. During the first 
season (June 2013) the survey area boundary was reduced to exclude a property that could not be 
accessed at the time of survey, along with Ruabon Road reserve. Given that a spring survey of these 
areas was  able to be undertaken, the bulk of the vascular plants of these areas were able to be 
identified and inventoried. 
The EPA (2004) lists a number of possible limitations and constraints that may affect the adequacy of 
a vegetation and flora survey.  These  potential limitations have been addressed in relation to the 
current survey in
 
Table 2. 
Table 2: Limitations of this assessment. 
Potential limitation 
Statement regarding potential limitations 
(i) Sources of information and 
availability of contextual information.  
Is the region well documented? 
Contextual information is available from the Regional Forest 
Agreement (Department of Conservation and Land Management 
1999) vegetation complex mapping for the Busselton area 
(Mattiske & Havel 1998). Two consultants’ reports to Cristal 
Mining were provided for review prior to field survey. In addition, 
The Flora and Vegetation of the Busselton Plain’ report (Webb et 
al. 2009) provided a great deal of information relevant to the 
survey area. 
Contextual information is therefore not a limiting factor for this 
survey.  
(ii) Scope.  
The level of survey and detail required 
to undertake the survey. Was there 
adequate time to complete the survey 
to the desired standard? 
There was adequate time to complete the first and second phases 
of the level 2 survey; to install quadrats; relevés; make traverses 
across the entire site and collect opportunistic records of flora 
throughout the survey area. Time was not considered a limiting 
factor.   
(iii) Proportion of flora collected and 
identified.  
Was the survey sampling, timing and 
intensity considered adequate? Was the 
survey conducted at what was 
considered an appropriate time of the 
year for plant collection? Were any 
taxonomic groups considered to be 
under-represented? 
Due to the timing of the survey, this first phase of survey (winter) 
may have recorded only 50-60% of the total flora for the survey 
area. The second phase survey (spring) allowed for 80-90% of the 
total flora to be recorded. 
Taxonomic groups recorded within the survey area were typical 
of the Wonnerup area but lack the diversity of more intact 
remnant areas, such as the adjacent Ruabon Reserve. 
The spring survey was undertaken following excellent seasonal 
condition and a good suite of geophytes and ephemerals were 
recorded suggesting appropriate spring survey timing.  
(iv) Completeness.  
Is there further work which may be 
required i.e. was the relevant area fully 
surveyed? 
The flora and vegetation assessment undertaken during June is 
considered the first phase of a level 2 survey. The second phase 
undertaken in spring (October) 2013 completes a dual season 
survey.   

Cristal Mining Australia Limited 
Wonnerup North Mineral Sands Project – Flora and Vegetation Assessment, October 2013 
 
Page | 16 
Potential limitation 
Statement regarding potential limitations 
(v) Mapping reliability.  
Were the aerial photographs, satellite 
images and site maps available 
considered adequate to fully understand 
the area surveyed? Was the mapping 
generated considered to have a high 
degree of reliability? 
Colour aerial photography at a scale of 1: 5,000 was used to assist 
in navigation and delineation of vegetation boundaries. The aerial 
photographs were of good resolution and assisted with the 
rectification of the vegetation complex mapping.   
The mapping was captured at a fine scale with all remnants 
traversed on foot. Some fine scale variation within vegetation 
condition rating was not able to be captured accurately due to 
the fine mosaic of degrading processes within roadside remnant 
vegetation.  
(vi) Timing.  
When was the survey conducted in 
terms of season, rainfall, severe weather 
events etc? Was the survey conducted 
at an appropriate time for access? 
The survey was undertaken during winter and spring 2013 and 
therefore the number of plant species inventoried for the survey 
area is comprehensive. 
Two wetland areas adjacent to Ruabon Road and Bussell Highway 
intersection were inaccessible due to the amount of water in 
both winter and spring and therefore quadrats were placed 
adjacent to the wetland (capturing more of a transitional zone) 
than within the wetland itself. 
(vii) Disturbance.  
Had the survey area been impacted by 
any disturbance which may have limited 
the survey, i.e. fire, flood, accidental 
human intervention etc? 
The flora and vegetation within the survey area has been 
degraded across the entire area. However, some areas of 
roadside remnant remain relatively intact with some parts of 
Ruabon Road (adjacent to Ruabon Reserve) maintaining excellent 
condition. 
The degraded nature of the remnant vegetation present has 
limited the total number of expected species for remnant 
vegetation in this area. The private properties have been cleared 
and grazed over a long history and the vegetation remaining is 
largely ‘parkland cleared’ or completely degraded. 
(viii) Intensity.  
In retrospect, was the intensity 
considered to be adequate? 
The intensity of the survey was considered adequate to compile a 
representative species list, verify the previous vegetation 
mapping and complete both phases of the Level 2 survey. 
Intensity was not considered a limiting factor of the survey.  
(ix) Resources. 
Were the appropriate tools and 
materials available to complete the task 
effectively? 
Resources were adequate to complete the survey and all 
appropriate tools and materials required to complete the tasks 
were available. 
(x) Access.  
Were there any factors limiting access to 
the survey area? 
The entire survey area was able to be traversed on foot. Access 
was not a limiting factor for the survey.  
(xi) Experience.  
Were personnel undertaking the field 
survey and plant identification trained 
and/or experienced in undertaking the 
required tasks?  
The botanist responsible for undertaking the first and second 
surveys for the flora and vegetation assessment has over 10 
years’ experience in conducting level 2 and conservation 
significant species targeted surveys. The botanist has extensive 
Swan Coastal Plain and Southwest experience; and is familiar with 
the flora of the region and with plant specimen identification. 
Where new or difficult taxa were found, assistance from the WA 
Herbarium, DPaW staff and a consultant Botanist was sought and 
provided.  
Experience was not a limiting factor. 
 
 

Cristal Mining Australia Limited 
Wonnerup North Mineral Sands Project – Flora and Vegetation Assessment, October 2013 
 
Page | 17 
4
 
Results 
4.1
 
Desktop Assessment 
4.1.1
 
Flora 
Twenty-five  plant taxa declared as rare flora under the state Wildlife Conservation Act 1950  are 
located within a 10 km radius of the survey area. All of these species are also listed as threatened 
under the Commonwealth EPBC Act. In addition, two priority one taxa, five priority two, 10 priority 
three and 11 priority four taxa are also found within the same radius. These taxa are listed according 
to state level of threat in Appendix C. 
It should be noted however, that many of these conservation listed taxa are restricted to particular 
habitats or soils and landforms not found within the survey area (i.e. Whicher Scarp and Busselton 
ironstone habitats) and are therefore not likely to occur within the survey area. 
Within the actual survey area boundary there are past records of two threatened and three priority 
flora taxa (Figure 3). However these are reasonably old records and the coordinate information does 
not match the described location (Table 3). These taxa were searched for but were not located 
within the survey area:  Grevillea elongata,  Hakea oldfieldii,  Schoenus pennisetis  and  Banksia 
squarrosa subsp. argillacea. 
Yüklə 9,38 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   20




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə