Flora and vegetation survey by astron environmental services



Yüklə 9,38 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə5/20
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü9,38 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   20

AB
AB
Pt
Pt
Aw
Aw
Lw
Lw
Pt
Pt
Aw
Aw
Pt
Pt
Pt
Pt
Lw
Lw
Pt
Pt
Pt
Pt
Pt
Pt
Pt
Pt
Aw
Aw
Ad
Ad
Pt
Pt
Pt
Pt
Planted
Planted
Pt
Pt
Pt
Pt
Pt
Pt
Pt
Pt
Pt
Pt
Pt
Pt
WN11
WN09
WN08
WN07
WN06
WN05
WN04
WN03
WN02
WN01
Aw
AB
AB
Ad
AF
AB
LW
Aw
Lw
Lw
Aw
AB
Aw
Aw
AB
AB
AB
Ad
Ad
AB
Ad
Aw
Aw
Ad
Aw
Ad
AB
Ad
AB
356000
358000
360000
62
74
00
0
62
76
00
0
0
200
400
600
800
Metres
Figure 5: Vegetation mapping, quadrat locations and 2013 conservation significant flora locations for the survey area
Author: V. Clarke
Date:  02-12-2013
Datum:  GDA 1994
Projection:  MGA Zone 50  
Drawn: H. Thornton
21097-13-GDR-1RevA_131202_Fig5
Cristal Mining Pty Ltd
Wonnerup North Mineral Sands Project Flora and Vegetation Assessment
Legend
Project Boundary
Trip 1 Quadrat Locations
Trip 2 Quadrat Locations
Conservation Significant Flora
Priority 3
Priority 4
DRF
Astron (2013)
AB - Woodland dominated by marri (Corymbia calophylla) on flats and low rises.
AF - Woodland dominated by marri (Corymbia calophylla) and peppermint (Agonis flexuosa) on  the terraces and valley floors of the low undulating Abba Plains.
Ad - Woodland dominated by marri (Corymbia calophylla), peppermint (Agonis flexuosa), sheoak (Allocasuarina fraseriana) and Christmas tree (Nuytsia floribunda) on the mild slopes of the low undulating Abba Plains.
Aw - Dominated by tall shrubland of Melaleuca viminea and woodland of flooded gum and paperbark (Eucalyptus rudis,Melaleuca rhaphiophylla) with the occasional marri (Corymbia calophylla) located on the broad depressions of the
Lw  - Dominated by an open woodland of Paperbark (Melaleuca rhaphiophylla) and sedgelands of Cyperaceae and Restionaceae species on broad depressions.
Planted - Planted (non-native) vegetation
Pt - Paddock Trees
Vegetation Mapping
Mattiske Havel (1998)
AB
AF
Ad
Aw
LW
Lw

Cristal Mining Australia Limited 
Wonnerup North Mineral Sands Project – Flora and Vegetation Assessment, October 2013 
 
Page | 29 
4.2.2.2
 
Groundwater Dependent Vegetation in the Survey Area 
Within the survey area there are no high value-GDEs identified such as caves, Reedia swamps, nor 
habitat for significant fauna, such as the orange-bellied and whitebellied frogs (Geocrinia vitellina 
and  G. alba), which are listed as ‘vulnerable’ under the EPBC  Act.  However, according to the 
compiled list of southwest flora rated for their ecohydrological tolerance/dependence (Boggs and 
Froend 2010) a number of species recorded are rated as being in one of the four classes: 
1.
 
tree and shrub species tolerant of excessive wetness 
2.
 
tree and shrub species optimum on moist sites but intolerant of extremes 
3.
 
wide tolerances with maximum development on dry sites 
4.
 
without clear-cut site preferences. 
The comprehensive list denotes those taxa recorded during the survey (Appendix B). 
4.2.3
 
Vegetation Condition 
Vegetation  condition was  assessed  using  the vegetation condition scale provided in Bush Forever 
(Government of Western Australia 2000). In small and linear remnants, vegetation condition is often 
a fine mosaic of condition, and Ruabon Road was a good example where vegetation condition could 
quickly transition from ‘excellent’ to ‘degraded’ or ‘completely degraded’ and back again over a 20 m 
walk.  Small patches of historic disturbance exist within a matrix of reasonably intact remnant 
vegetation. 
The vegetation within the private properties, including the Abba River has been primarily parkland 
cleared and used for cattle grazing over a long period of time. The condition is predominantly 
‘completely degraded’ according to the Bush Forever scale (Government of Western Australia 2000). 
In addition, the private properties include a number of individual trees remaining in the paddocks, 
which are described as ‘paddock trees’ and not given a condition rating as they are not considered to 
constitute ‘remnant  vegetation’.  Some paddock trees are planted eucalypt species  from eastern 
Australia. 
Some very limited areas of remnant within the private property on Wonnerup South Road has been 
fenced off from stock and have been less degraded; these small areas (<1 ha) were assessed as being 
in ‘good to degraded’ condition. 
The remnant vegetation along Wonnerup South Road is a fine mosaic of relatively intact remnant in 
good to degraded condition; to completely degraded (cleared). The intact areas are still degraded to 
some extent with high weed invasion but there remains a suite of representative taxa typical of the 
mapped vegetation complex. Vegetation condition mapping is presented in Figure 5. 
4.2.4
 
Weeds 
Thirty-eight weeds were recorded during the field survey. Four of these are declared pest plant 
species  under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007:  bridal creeper (*Asparagus 
asparagoides),  narrowleaf  cotton bush (*Gomphocarpus fruticosus), apple of Sodom (*Solanum 
linnaeanum), and arum lily (*Zantedeschia aethiopica).  Generally, areas that remained intact had 
low weed densities and occurrence but areas that were on the grazed private properties or were 
historically cleared or degraded, had a variety of weeds that had the potential to further degrade 
those areas (where native vegetation remained). 
 

Cristal Mining Australia Limited 
Wonnerup North Mineral Sands Project – Flora and Vegetation Assessment, October 2013 
 
This page has been left blank intentionally  

D
D
CD
E
CD
Pt
Pt
Pt
Pt
CD
Pt
Pv
CD
CD
CD
CD
D
Pt
D
D - G
CD
E
D
Pt
Pt
Pt
VG
CD
Pt
Pt
Pt
Pt
G
D
VG
Pt
Pv
G
G
D
Pt
Pt
Pt
D
G
CD
Pt
D
VG - G
Pt
G
D - G
Pt
D - CD
CD
G - VG
CD
VG
D
D - CD
D - G
G
D - G
CD
D
D - G
355000
355500
356000
356500
357000
357500
358000
358500
359000
359500
62
74
50
0
62
75
00
0
62
75
50
0
62
76
00
0
62
76
50
0
62
77
00
0
62
77
50
0
0
150
300
450
600
Metres
Figure 6: Vegetation Condition Mapping
Author: V. Clarke
Date: 02-12-2013
Datum:  GDA 1994
Projection:  MGA Zone 50  
Drawn: H. Thornton
21097-13-GDR-1RevA_131202_Fig6
Cristal Mining Pty Ltd
Wonnerup North Mineral Sands Project Flora and Vegetation Assessment
Legend
Project Boundary
Vegetation Condition
E - Excellent
VG - Very Good
VG - G - Very Good to Good
G - VG - Good to Very Good
G - Good
D - G - Degraded to Good
D - Degraded
D - CD - Degraded to Completely Degraded
CD - Completely Degraded
Pt - Paddock Trees
Pv - Planted

Cristal Mining Australia Limited 
Wonnerup North Mineral Sands Project – Flora and Vegetation Assessment, October 2013 
 
This page has been left blank intentionally  

Cristal Mining Australia Limited 
Wonnerup North Mineral Sands Project – Flora and Vegetation Assessment, October 2013 
 
Page | 31 
5
 
Evaluation of Potential Impacts 
5.1
 
Vegetation Clearing  
The area of proposed surface disturbance is predominately within cleared exotic pasture (87.5% or 
454.5 ha). The remaining 12.5% of the proposed surface disturbance area is comprised of remnant 
vegetation (9.2 % or 45 ha), scattered/clumped paddock trees (3% or 16 ha) and non-native planted 
vegetation (0.3 % or 2 ha) (Figure 5). Table 6 presents the approximate amount and percentage of 
each of vegetation mapped unit that would be cleared as part of the project. The clearing would be 
progressive and staged over the mine life (in the order of 8 years). 
The majority of the woodland/forest vegetation that would be cleared is fragmented and degraded 
due to agricultural land use. The main areas of woodland vegetation that would be cleared for the 
project are as follows (Figure 5): 

 
the woodland patch (Ad [Abba]) in the northern extent of the project mining area 
(approximately 18.5 ha)  

 
the woodland patch (AB [Abba]) in the south-western extent of the project mining area 
(approximately 5.8 ha would be impacted of the 8 ha patch)  

 
the tall shrubland and woodland (Aw [Abba]) fringing the Abba River (approximately 9.5 ha)  

 
the woodland and open woodland along Ruabon Road (approximately 0.5 ha).  
As described in Section 4.2.2.1, all areas of native vegetation remaining on the Busselton Plain are 
deemed to be ‘regionally significant natural areas’ according to the criteria outlined in the Level of 
Assessment for Proposals Affecting Natural Areas within the System 6 Region and Swan Coastal Plan 
Portion of the System 1 Region (EPA 2006). As outlined in Table 6, the area remaining of the pre-
European extent of the vegetation complexes is critically low (i.e. less than 14% for Ad [Abba] and 
less than 2% for other vegetation complexes). None of the vegetation complexes are known to be 
represented in existing conservation reserves (Havel and Mattiske 2002; Table 6).  
The  understorey  condition and floristic composition of the vegetation communities within the 
agricultural land is  degraded  to the degree that the vegetation patches mapped as ‘degraded’, 
‘degraded to completely degraded’ or ‘completely degraded’ (Figure 6) are considered to have little 
or no conservation value as representatives of Abba vegetation complexes. The proposed clearing of 
the vegetation in ‘degraded’, ‘degraded to completely degraded’ or ‘completely degraded’ condition 
is considered to have a low impact on the regional conservation of the vegetation complexes.  A 
portion of the remnant in the north of the project mining area is recognised as ‘degraded to good’ 
condition and a priority plant, Tripterococcus paniculatus P4, was recorded in this remnant. 
The tall shrubland and woodland fringing the Abba River (although degraded) provides an ecosystem 
function by stabilising the banks of the Abba River. However, the clearing impacts on the riparian 
vegetation have been mitigated by reducing vegetation clearing (Aw [Abba] 9.5 ha – Table 6) and 
restoration of the riparian vegetation is proposed (Sections 6.1.1 and 6.1.4). In addition, the river 
crossings would be constructed as a box culvert or spiral pipe design to maintain flows in the Abba 
River.  
Patches of vegetation which are in ‘degraded to good’ condition or better (Figure 6) are of greater 
conservation value. Relatively intact vegetation occurs in the project area within the road reserve 
along Ruabon Road and three priority plants were recorded in the road reserve (Section 5.7). Up to 
two individuals of Jacksonia gracillima P3 may potentially be impacted through vegetation clearing 
proposed within the road reserve.  An additional, potentially undescribed species (Lepyrodia  aff. 

Cristal Mining Australia Limited 
Wonnerup North Mineral Sands Project – Flora and Vegetation Assessment, October 2013 
 
Page | 32 
riparia) was collected from close proximity to the south side of Ruabon Road and has been 
submitted to the WA Herbarium due to its atypical features. Of the three individuals noted within 
the project area; two are likely to be cleared through the clearing associated with the proposed 
widening of Ruabon Road. 

Cristal Mining Australia Limited 
Wonnerup North Mineral Sands Project – Flora and Vegetation Assessment, October 2013 
 
Page | 33 
Table 6 Approximate vegetation areas to be cleared by the project.
 
Vegetation 
Approximate 
area (ha)
1
 
Percentage 
of total 
project 
area 
Condition 
(Figure 6) 
Information on extent (Havel and 
Mattiske, 2002) 
Assessment of 
potential impacts 
on vegetation 
complexes 
Pre-European 
area 
remaining (%) 
Proportion of 
the complex 
within existing 
reserves (%) 
AB (Abba) – located on the flats and low rises of the Abba Plains, 
dominated by woodland and open forest of Marri (Corymbia 
calophylla). 
14 
3.0 
Degraded to 
completely 
degraded 


Low; potential for 
impacts from 
direct clearing 
AF (Abba) – located on the terraces and valley floors of the low 
undulating Abba Plains, dominated by woodland of Marri 
(Corymbia calophylla) – Peppermint (Agonis flexuosa) and a tall 
shrubland of Myrtaceae  – Proteaceae species. 
2.5 
0.5 
Completely 
degraded 
>1% 
(8 ha of 1,901 
ha remain) 

Low; potential for 
impacts from 
direct clearing 
Ad (Abba) – located on the mild slopes of the low undulating Abba 
Plains, dominated by woodland of Marri (Corymbia calophylla) – 
Peppermint (Agonis flexuosa) – sheoak (Allocasuarina fraseriana
– WA Christmas tree (Nuytsia floribunda). 
18 
3.5 
Excellent to 
completely 
degraded 
14 

Low; potential for 
impacts from 
direct clearing 
Aw (Abba) – located on the broad depressions of the low 
undulating Abba Plains, dominated by tall shrubland of Melaleuca 
viminea and woodland of flooded gum and paperbark (Eucalyptus 
rudis – Melaleuca rhaphiophylla) with the occasional Marri 
(Corymbia calophylla). 
9.5 

Degraded to 
completely 
degraded 
2% 
(140 ha of 
9,111 ha 
remain) 

Low; potential for 
impacts from 
direct clearing 
Lw (Ludlow) – located on the fringes of the RFA area, near Ludlow. 
The vegetation complex is dominated by an open woodland of 
paperbark (Melaleuca rhaphiophylla) and sedgelands of 
Cyperaceae and Restionaceae species on broad depressions. 

0.2 
Very good 


Low; potential for 
impacts from 
direct clearing 
SUBTOTAL 
45 
9.2 
 
Paddock Trees 
16 
3.0 
Non-native planted vegetation 
2.0 
0.3 
Cleared Pasture 
454.5 
87.5 

Cristal Mining Australia Limited 
Wonnerup North Mineral Sands Project – Flora and Vegetation Assessment, October 2013 
 
This page has been left blank intentionally  

Cristal Mining Australia Limited 
Wonnerup North Mineral Sands Project – Flora and Vegetation Assessment, October 2013 
 
Page | 34 
Ruabon Road is proposed to be widened by up to a maximum of 3.2 m (or approximately 1.6 m 
either side on average) to provide the main access to the Project and to accommodate increased 
traffic generated by the high mineral concentrate haulage. Some tree trimming may be required for 
line of sight along Ruabon Road (between Bussell Highway and the entrance to M70/360).  
The intersection between Ruabon Road and the Bussell Highway and the entrance to M70/360 
would also be upgraded in accordance with the City of Busselton and Main Roads Western Australia 
requirements. The intersection upgrade would require some minor disturbance to dampland areas 
that exist near the Bussell Highway intersection (mapped as Lw [Ludlow] – Figure 5), some of which 
is ‘completely degraded’ with parts remaining in relatively ‘good’ to ‘very good’ condition away from 
the existing road and not likely to be impacted by the proposed clearing.  
In total, the planned road works would require disturbance to approximately 0.5 ha of vegetation 
immediately adjacent to the existing Ruabon Road. The impacts of the road widening are considered 
to be minimal as a linkage of continuous vegetation would be retained in the road reserve along 
Ruabon Road. Also, where possible, this clearing would occur on the southern side of Ruabon Road, 
which has generally been mapped as being more degraded than the northern side of the road 
(immediately adjacent to the existing road).  
No TECs or PECs have been mapped within the project area and none would be adversely impacted 
by the proposed clearing. The nearest TECs/PECs are associated with the Ruabon Townsite Nature 
Reserve which is located over 2 km north-east of the mining tenement boundary.  
Cristal Mining commits to avoid or mitigate impacts from vegetation clearing as described in Section 
6. It would be possible to compensate for the residual impacts by providing an offset strategy which 
specifically benefits the vegetation complexes that would be impacted by the project.  
5.2
 
Potential Impacts Associated with Groundwater Drawdown 
The Atlas of Groundwater Dependent Ecosystems (BoM 2014) indicates the potential occurrence of 
groundwater dependent ecosystems in the locality. RPS  (2014a)  has undertaken a groundwater 
impact assessment for the project. RPS (2014a) describes how a perched superficial aquifer occurs 
across the site and is typically up to 3.5 m below ground level.  
The botanical assessments recorded a number of species across the project area which are known to 
occur on moist sites (Section 4.2.2.2). It is considered that some of the existing vegetation in the 
surrounding the project area is likely to be at least partially groundwater dependent, in particular 
the: 

 
the tall shrubland and woodland (Aw [Abba]) fringing the Abba River  

 
vegetation growing in association with wetlands or seasonal damplands (mapped as Lw 
(Abba) (Figure 5))  

 
the woodland patch (AB (Abba)) in the south-western extent of the project mining area 
(approximately 5.8 ha would be impacted of the 8 ha patch) 

 
the wetland vegetation on the north and south along Ruabon Road near the Bussell Highway 
intersection (approximately 0.5 ha).  
Abstraction of groundwater would occur to enable mining  resulting in a localised groundwater 
drawdown  effect.  RPS  (2014a)  describe  that groundwater drawdown on the superficial aquifer 
would be localised (e.g. a drawdown of 1  m not predicted to extend more than 100 m past the 
mining tenement boundaries) and temporary in duration (the drawdown would occur when mining 
is taking place in a particular area, but would rapidly diminish once mining progresses to the next 
area). 

Cristal Mining Australia Limited 
Wonnerup North Mineral Sands Project – Flora and Vegetation Assessment, October 2013 
 
Page | 35 
Placement of saturated sand residues behind the active mining area would result in localised 
groundwater mounding. RPS  (2014a)  describe that a  maximum water level increase of 3.5 m is 
predicted in the immediate pit area, with an increase in water level of 1 m not predicted to extend 
more than 50 m past the mining tenement boundaries.  The predicted mounding effects would also 
be temporary, with groundwater levels generally expected to recede back to the pre-mining range 
within six to twelve months of any particular area being mined. 
Potential local and temporary impacts on groundwater dependant vegetation (i.e. a decline in tree 
health)  may occur as a result of drawdown  or raising of  the superficial aquifer.  Trees within the 
mining tenement and within 100 m of their boundaries could potentially be affected, particularly 
when groundwater drawdown occurs during the dry times of the year (summer). In order to 
minimise these effects,  Cristal Mining has  committed  to the mitigation  measures described in 
Section 6. In the event that the monitoring indicates that the condition of the adjoining remnant 
vegetation is adversely affected, or is likely to be if no action is taken, Cristal would implement 
appropriate mitigation strategies or contingency measures. These may include use of water-filled 
trenches or spears to locally raise groundwater levels near the vegetation. 
RPS  (2014a)  state that there would be nil  to  negligible groundwater drawdown extending to the 
Ludlow State Forest (greater than 625 m past the mining tenement boundary), Tuart Forest National 
Park (greater than 875 m past the mining tenement boundary) and Vasse-Wonnerup System Ramsar 
Site  (greater than 1,750  m past the mining tenement boundary). Given  there would be nil  to 
negligible groundwater drawdown  extending to these reserves,  no  groundwater dependent 
ecosystems in these areas would potentially be impacted. 
Yüklə 9,38 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   20




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə