Foreaim third reportin period Scientific report



Yüklə 2,93 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/7
tarix08.08.2017
ölçüsü2,93 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7

FOREAIM Third reportin period
Scientific report
1
Project no. 510790
FOREAIM
Bridging restoration and multi-functionality in degraded forest landscape of
Eastern Africa and Indian Ocean Islands
Instrument: Specific Targeted Research Project
Thematic Priority : Integrating and Strengthening the European Research Area
Third reporting period of FOREAIM
Scientific report
Deliverables (list and CD-Rom)
Publishable results (list and CD-Rom)
Period covered: from 1
st
of June 2007 to 31
st
of May 2008
Date of preparation: August 2008
Start date of project: 1
st
of June 2005
Duration: 4 years
Project coordinator name: Jean-Marc Bouvet
Project coordinator organisation name: CIRAD

FOREAIM Third reportin period
Scientific report
2
Work package 1 – Traditional ecological knowledge, tree management
practices, uses and economic dependency of local population on forests and
tree based systems in the context of their degradation
In year 1 and 2 the team worked mainly on the two first objectives of the Wp1 characterizing the
determining factors of the forest and the stakeholders’ agro-ecological knowledge
Part of the results delivered to other Wps where on species
WP1 reports listed the preferred potential restoration indigenous species for various tree products
In Kenya, mostly for firewood, timber, construction poles and bees forage : Juniperus procera, Prunus
Africana, Zanthoxylum gilletti, Polycias fulva.
In Madagascar,: Dalbergia monticolaOcotea sp, Ramy Canarium sp, Pinus sp, Eugenia sp, Uapaca
sp, Prunus africanumEucalyptus robustaRavensara sp, Pandanus sp
In Uganda, firewood, timber, construction poles, fruits mainly Prunus africana and Maesopsis eminii
and also C. edulisAlbizia coriaria A. grandibacteta, Antialis toxicalia Milicia excelsa Ficus
natalensisCalliandra collyrthsus,
Moringa oleifera, Artocarpus heterophyllus, Mangifera indica
Persea Americana and Citrus Spp.
More details are provided in the specific deliverables of type D1.5
Prunus africana is the only tree retained in the three countries.
A lot of trees are multipurpose trees and some of the trees mentioned are yet incorporated on farm in
agroforestry production systems.
In year 3 , while continuing working on uses, practices, representations of stakeholders on trees and
forest (see deliverables of type D1.4 and D1.6), we focused on technologies of potential ecologic and
economic importance (see deliverables of type D1.5 and D1.7) which can be implemented not only
through WP7 but also through other projects after FOREAIM.
Uganda
The restoration of Mabira Forest reserve and surrounding areas can be achieved with the full
participation of all key stakeholders such as the local communities. The major strategies identified out
of WP1 activities of the FOREAIM project include: Promoting on farm tree planting, Large scale
nursery establishment, Enrichment planting in the forest, Zoning for easy monitoring, Eco-tourism
activities, Soil erosion control, Farming practices, Restoration of degraded sites and Controlling
invasive species.
Promote on farm tree planting
Incorporating indigenous species on farm will directly address tangible local needs from the forest,
reduce pressure on the most targeted species and allow substantial regeneration of the affected
resources. Encouraging farmers to propagate trees in the nursery from seed can enhance restoration
since wildings will be to some extent left intact with out destabilising the ecological functioning of the
forest.
Large scale nursery establishment
This is important to complement or buffer short falls in supply of indigenous species seedlings. This
could be done with intensification of indigenous tree seed technology research and development.
Collaboration from research and technology development institutions will discourage the disturbance
of forest habitats as a source of germplasm for on farm tree planting. Currently wildings of Prunus
africana and Maesopsis eminii are obtained from the forest and planted on farm.

FOREAIM Third reportin period
Scientific report
3
Enrichment planting in the forest-
Plant species used for charcoal, timber and medicine could be pioneered because they are highly
exploited for monetary benefits. Providing tree seeds of first growing indigenous species will be
important for arousing interest from the local inhabitants.
Collaboration from different stakeholders especially those in management, protection and research
should be enhanced to ensure adequate protection of the remaining resource.
Zoning for easy monitoring
Currently, there is a general feeling among the local populace that the government accrues more
benefit from the forest than the local people through timber selling. It is also not officially recognised
from the current management that licensed logging in the forest actually contributes to degradation.
Looking for a market of forest tree seedlings will motivate local people to establish small scale
nurseries as a direct or alternative source of income from forestry, other than the actual harvesting
from the forest. In Mabira forest, incidences of pest attack, invasive species weeds and diseases among
others are a common problem.
Eco-tourism activities
These activities mainly target the wealthier and interested resident of Kampala and Jinja and to some
extent foreign visitors. The most immediate communities to Mabira forest do not attach values to eco-
tourism activities unless they are physically involved in earning money from these activities.
Current documentation on eco-tourism in Mabira shows an almost equal share of benefits from these
activities. Fourty percent of all revenue collected from eco-tourism is supposedly returned to do
community work. This is generally not appreciated by individuals within the community since the
revenue does not directly contribute to their household incomes. Promoting conservation programmes
to such individuals is almost meaningless, since they look at the forest in terms of extracting products
to obtain income for sustainability of their families. Allowing local people to use dead wood and other
related resources in the forest can be a good incentive to encourage their participation in Management.
Soil erosion control
In places such as Najjembe and Nagojje sub-counties, opening up of the natural vegetation leaving the
soils almost bare is perpetual. This is common where sugar cane and tea out growing are expanding. In
the sugar cane fields, usually small un-sustained ridges are established on which sugar cane
germplasm is introduced to reduce or minimise recurrent erosion effects. If not improved, dwindling
soil fertility levels and crop yields is expected. The effect is likely to spread from the actual sugar cane
and tea fields to adjacent agricultural fields. Locally the solution will be to clear more forest land that
has maintained its nutrient recycling for agricultural purposes. In addition, the eroded soils end up in
water catchment areas causing siltation.
Farming practices
Agroforestry is a common technology on over 80% people’s farms. The technology is however
practiced with and without farmers’ awareness.
Generally, tree/shrub species (e.g. C. edulis in
Buwola parish) with potential to supply immediate frequent income (i.e. grows very first and locally
demanded) to a family are used. On some farms, forest trees such as Albizia coriaria A. grandibacteta,
Antialis toxicalia and Milicia excelsa are deliberately retained on farm. On others, first growing tree/
shrub species (e.g. Maesopsis eminii Ficus natalensisCalliandra collyrthsus and Moringa oleifera)
are incorporated with bananas and coffee. In most places fruit trees (Artocarpus heterophyllus,
Mangifera indica Persea Americana and Citrus Spp.) are common on farm and in others non fruit but
multipurpose trees are deliberately grown.
The technology has potential for complementing restoration practices especially if targeted species in
the forest are promoted for on farm purposes. Extensive community sensitization will be necessary to
create awareness and arouse interest about these species. Additionally, development of seed banks for
the promoted species will be required to sustain the technology.
Restoration of degraded sites

FOREAIM Third reportin period
Scientific report
4
In Nagojje sub-county, some restoration has been attempted by CIDEV through NACOBA. CIDEV
supplied seeds of C. deeratus and Arauricaria Sp. and about 4 ha of degraded sites have been replanted
with C. deeratus and 8 ha of Arauricaria Sp. have been established. Replanting C. deeratus contributes
to restoration because it is indigenous in the area and people need it for craft making. However,
introducing Arauricaria Sp and any other exotic species does not contribute to effective restoration.
Restoring degraded sites using exotic species can constrain the indigenous species abilities to
regenerate and generally distabilize the ecosystems functioning.
Indigenous species should be promoted since they are locally demanded and so planting in the
degraded sites would contribute to restoring what is actually used. If an exotic species is to be
introduced, adequate research on its likely behaviour (regeneration capacity, effect on other species,
possibility of pest and disease hostage) in a new environment should be conducted. Where possibilities
of community adoption are high, the people should be sensitized about the dangers of the technology
or species and how they can be minimised.
Controlling invasive species
In Mabira there are minimum efforts to control invasive species. Species such as Broussonetia
papyrifera are promoted in some places for fire wood because of its rapid growth abilities. In the tea
estates, for example, it is replacing Eucalyptus and other species for firewood, and pure stands are
established next to a strict nature reserve. Although it is periodically harvested, still little information
is known about its actual effect on the ecosystem functioning of the forest. In addition, it is not certain
whether the species has other useful roles to ecosystem functioning and the alternative importance to
the local people could subject to it.
Kenya
Forest and livelihood
Mau forest is facing challenges because most areas bordering communities are degraded and this is
likely to continue because of growing the
population, poverty, and land hunger. The
local community is highly dependent on the
continued presence and availability of forest
products and services for their livelihoods.
Charcoal making has been identified as the
main destructive use of the forest because
the indigenous species used take long to
mature and that alternative tree species on
farms are limited or not available and
therefore
there
is
need
to
encourage
commercial tree growing compatible with
the current land uses and livelihoods of the
people.
However, beyond the direct uses, the policy
and its application is considered as a major
factor of the future evolution of forest.
Fig 11 extracted from (Lang'at et al 2008)
The promotion of agroforestry and multiple purpose trees is a priority to most households. The tree
candidate species for intensification are: Grevillea robusta, Dombeya toridaPodocarpus latifolia,
Zanthoxyllum gilletti, Polycious fulva and medicinal plants like Prunus Africana, Dodalia abbysinica,
Neem. The medicinal plant trade is growing and there is potential for the local people to domesticate
these species as diversification of their income sources. Farmers with big land sizes should be
encouraged to intensify tree growing for target markets like timber, pole wood and firewood. The
potential species are Cypress, Eucalypts, and Acacia spp. Most charcoal produced and consumed in
Kenya are from unsustainable sources (indigenous forests and drylands) and is regarded as the most
Fig.11: Perceived threats to the forest, Itare
Poverty
19%
Charcoal burning
11%
Less policing by FD
16%
Unemployment
7%
Illegal harvesting
22%
Lack of reforestation
5%
less trees in farms
4%
High demand for
forest products
8%
Population
8%

FOREAIM Third reportin period
Scientific report
5
destructive use of the forest. The market for charcoal is immense and there is an opportunity for the
farmers to go into energy plantations. The potential tree species for charcoal production in the area are:
Croton megalocarpus, Eucalyptus camaldulensis, and Acacia mearnsii.
Stakeholders’ involvement in restoration activities
Forest department has been involved in forest restoration activities to a limited extent because of in
adequate capacity. Other stakeholders have been involved in reforestation. In the recent years this has
only been restricted to companies who are permitted to harvest from public forests. The companies are
involved in reforestation activities on areas harvested. Unfortunately this system has no developed
framework and reforestation by private companies is undertaken as a show of goodwill to Forest
Department by companies enjoying harvesting rights. A fundamental question other stakeholders are
asking is: how will these benevolent companies benefit from activities or are they being strategic in
their posturing so as acquire potential land leases in the areas they have helped reforest? If
reforestations on public lands are to be fair and equitable there should be a sound framework with
clear rules, roles and obligations of each stakeholder in reforestation.
The local community depends heavily on forest resources and if reforestation efforts exclude them,
efforts may not yield desirable results. The forest department seems to be completely detached from
the needs of the local people and in most cases the relationship with local people is antagonistic. If the
communities have to be involved in restoration work the communities and forest department have to
change their relations.
There is clear need for the development of a robust institutional framework which would cover both
the forest service (Forest Department), NGOs, local communities and private sector which should
bring all players together to improve the coordination in restoration degraded forests, management and
conservation of indigenous forests. With the trend towards community participation there is need for
flexible management approaches with broader representation.
Madagascar
Natural forests have decreased over the past 50 years due mainly to slash and burn practices. On the
opposite, Eucalyptus forests areas have increased during the same period of time to fill the socio
economical gap due to the loss of natural forest resources. Forest degradation is an iterative process
which is caused by the search of new fertile soils for agricultural processes. The more the farmers
burn, the more the fertility of the soil decreases, the less the agricultural production is. Therefore,
farmers use Eucalyptus planting (which is at the same time highly recommended by the forest
administration in the country) as an easy way of generating new incomes since eucalyptus plantations
do not require much care.
Communities’ practices as far as forest restoration or reforestation are concerned are based on looking
for coppices and replanting them next to the village. But most of their trials fail. They would rather
now grow eucalyptus and pines, although they think those species are not really adapted to the region.
For testing new species in their framing system, technical files describing 8 of the most used species of
Anosibe an’Ala (see D 1.6 deliverable) should b a useful tool.
The perception of the vegetation dynamism and soil fertility in the region by the local communities
(see D1.4 deliverables and next Fig. Vegetation dynamics ) will help WP7 and other projects to build
solutions with stakeholders
Developing restoration strategies

FOREAIM Third reportin period
Scientific report
6
At a regional level, multi uses of the different spaces must be considered : species exploitation or
collection in natural forests, fallows and swamps, tourism in primary forests, slash and burn
cultivation on fallows and primary forests, honey production on fallows and near the villages
At the village and farm scale, t
ypes of degradation and solutions, especially those put forward by
farmers, must be taken into account in restoration strategies so that participation by neighbouring
populations is effective and efficient.
The state restoration strategies are aimed at restoring the perception of a 'virgin forest', which in fact
does not exist. So, we propose to the development operators to abandon the idea of restoration of 'the
natural forest' as a whole. The natural dynamics of forest ecosystems combined with restoration
operations should lead to the establishment of a multifunctional landscape mosaic. The functions
assigned to each patch change in space and time according to the functions to be restored for the
stakeholders there and the potential of the environment (cf. Figure 1). Although the management of a
patch is performed with the aim of restoring function F1, the range of functions effectively restored
may be broader.
Fig. Diagram of multifunctional landscape mosaic (Rives, Sibelet, Montagne, 2008)
This aspect is clearly illustrated by plantations of eucalyptus. In some places, farmers plant eucalyptus
to restore the timber production function (the restoration objective of local stakeholders); this action
also restores soil protection function (functions effectively restored).
The diagram of multifunctional landscape mosaïc, showed ahead is a comprehensive model. For
becoming a prospective-model, it has to be rebuilt case by case with further collaboration with
stakeholders, especially in the next year of the project.
Accepting landscape mosaic that differs from so-called primary forest makes it possible to envisage
other solutions that are better suited to the local socioeconomic context and that can therefore be
handled by local stakeholders.
Time T2
Time T1
Crops
Improved fallow
Natural regeneration
Replanting with eucalyptus
Replanting with local
species
'Natural' forest

FOREAIM Third reportin period
Scientific report
7
Fig. Vegetation dynamics according to local communities
Evolution progressive vers
la formation primaire
Evolution régressive vers la
formation herbeuse
Savoka récent ou
ramarasana : 0 à 3ans
sans défrichement
Psidia altissima, Harungana
madagascariensis, Rubus
mollucanus, Lantana camara
Formation herbeuse
avec quelques arbres
Psidia altissima, Harungana
madagascariensis, Trema
orientalis, Clidemia hirta.
Défrichements successifs
régulier (tavy)
Savoka de 4 à 6 ans
Psidia altissima, Harungana
madagascariensis, Lantana
camara
Savoka plus de 7 ans
Harungana madagascariensis,
Trema orientalis, Croton
mongue
Défrichement
Pas de culture tavy
Pas de culture en
jachère
Défrichement
Forêts secondaires ou
ala voatrandraka
Forêts primaires ou
ala velona, kitroka
Aucune pression
anthropique (coupe, feu)
Culture sur brûlis ou tavy
Exploitation forestière
Abandon de culture
:
Evolution progressive
:
Evolution régressive

FOREAIM Third reportin period
Scientific report
8

FOREAIM Third reportin period
Scientific report
9
Work package 2 – Assessment of forest ecosystem degradation, and
community structure and species biology for the development of restoration
options
2.1 - Diversity and composition of species
Mau forest, Kenya
The diversity and composition of plant species in areas of various degrees of degradation and
succession in the Mau forests in Kenya have been described. Four stages, namely the heavily degraded
grass zone, initial recovery and advanced recovery transition zones, and the undisturbed natural forest
were described. Repeated measure Anova showed that plant species richness and abundance
significantly varied along the succession stages from heavily degraded to advanced recovery and the
natural forest (Fig. 1). The degraded zones had the lowest plant species richness and abundance. The
difference in total tree species richness between initial stage of recovery and advanced stage was not
significant. However, the species abundance differed significantly.
Lianas, herbs, ferns and tree
seedling species richness was significantly affected by season, with wet season having more species
than dry season. Species abundance of lianas, herbs, ferns, tree seedlings (Fig. 1d) and tree saplings
also varied with season. Canonical Correspondence Analysis showed that the most important
environmental variables to explain the differences in species composition were succession stage,
season and human disturbance, measured as length of paths crossing the plots. Succession stage had
the highest explanatory power for all the plant forms. The results suggest a strong relationship between
succession stage and plant species richness, abundance and composition in degraded forests.
a)
b)
gr
as
s z
on
e
tra
ns
itio
n
1
tra
ns
itio
n
2
un
at
fo
re
st
Succession zones
0
3
6
9
T
o
ta
l
tr
e
e
s
p
ri
c
h
n
e
s
s
gr
as
s z
on
e
tra
ns
itio
n
1
tra
ns
itio
n
2
un
at
fo
re
st
Succession zones
-4
7
18
29
40
T
o
ta
l
tr
e
e
c
o
u
n
t

Yüklə 2,93 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə