Foto: (c) Dan Mullen, algunos derechos reservados (cc by-nc-nd)



Yüklə 124,04 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix03.07.2017
ölçüsü124,04 Kb.

Agrimonia gryposepala

Foto: 


(c) Dan Mullen, algunos derechos reservados (CC BY-NC-ND)

 

Ver todas las fotos etiquetadas con Agrimonia gryposepala en Banco de Imagénes »



Descripción de EOL 

Ver en EOL (inglés) →

National distribution 

Canada


Origin

Origin : Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence

Confidence: Confident

Sinónimos: 

Sinónimos: 

Agrimonia parviflora 

var.


 macrocarpa

¿Tienes alguna duda, sugerencia o corrección acerca de este taxón? 

Envíanosla

 y con gusto la

atenderemos.

1


United States

Origin


Origin : Native

Regularity

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently

Currently: Present

Confidence

Confidence: Confident

Diagnostic description 

Species is difficult to identify in vegetative state. Agrimonia rostellata Wallr. in vegetative form looks

similar and occurs in similar habitats (M. McHale, pers. comm.).

Type information 

Type collection

Type collection  for Agrimonia parviflora var. macrocarpa Focke

Catalog Number:

Catalog Number: US 1394380

Collection:

Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany

Verification Degree:

Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined

Preparation:

Preparation: Pressed specimen

Collector(s):

Collector(s): H. von Türckheim

Year Collected:

Year Collected: 1889

Locality:

Locality: Coban., Alta Verapaz, Guatemala, Central America

Elevation (m):

Elevation (m): 1311

Habitat 


Comments

Comments : Agrimonia gryposepala occurs in a wide variety of habitats across its range in North

America. These include: mesic to moist edges of forests and woods; woodlands (California Natural

Diversity Database); deciduous or mixed forests, and thickets in lowland to montane zones (Maine

Natural Areas Program, G. Douglas pers. comm., E. Punter pers. comm., S. Young pers. comm.);

clearings, openings in deciduous forest, and 2nd growth woods (J. Labrecque pers. comm., M. McHale

pers. comm.); moist soil along streams in canyons or ravines and in the understory of ponderosa pine

woodlands at 4100 to 8000 ft (D. Ode pers. comm., Arizona Heritage Data Management System); river

floodplains, alluvial, and gallery forest (Minnesota Natural Heritage); savannas and upland prairies (T.

Smith pers. comm.); marshes, bogs, low meadows, and pastures (J. Amoroso pers. comm.); pastured

woods, on wooded bluffs, roadsides, and pastures (Mason and Iltis 1958, Pennsylvania Natural Diversity

Inventory, K. Westad pers. comm.); moist drainage bottoms and draws in bur oak, paper birch, or

ponderosa pine thickets (W. Fertig pers. comm.).

Number of occurrences 

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences

Estimated Number of Occurrences : 81 to >300

Comments


Comments : 1000's of populations exist rangewide. British Columbia: 21-100 (G. Douglas pers. comm.);

Manitoba: 5? (E. Punter pers. comm.); Ontario: 1000's (M. Oldham pers. comm.); Quebec: >30 (J.

Labrecque pers. comm.); Delaware: 4 (Delaware Natural Heritage Program); Georgia: at least 1*; Kansas

0 (C. Freeman pers. comm.); Kentucky: at least 4*; Louisiana: 1 known (Louisiana Natural Heritage

1

2

1



1

Program); North Dakota: at least 2*; Massachusetts: at least 13*; Missouri: 6 (T. Smith pers. comm.);

Ohio: perhaps 1000's? (A. Cusick pers. comm.); Rhode Island: at least 2*; South Carolina: at least 6*;

Tennessee: at least 3*; Virginia: at least 43*; Wisconsin: 100's or 1000's (K. Westad pers. comm.); West

Virginia: at least 18*; Wyoming: 4 (W. Fertig pers. comm.). A * indicates a minimum number of

populations based on the number of counties for which the species is recorded according to state

distribution maps. 

A very common woodland, scrubland, and old field plant in southern Ontario (M. Oldham pers. comm.). 

There were about 90 specimens of A. gryposepala in the Wisconsin state herbarium in 1958 (Mason and

Iltis 1958) but this species is likely under-collected (K. Westad pers. comm.). 

Three of the four presumed extant sites in Wyoming were discovered during a general floristic survey in

1983-84 (W. Fertig pers. comm.). 

There are only six herbarium specimens of this species that were collected in Manitoba up to the late

1970's. Some of these populations may now be extirpated (E. Punter pers. comm.). 

This species is likely under-collected in Quebec (J. Labrecque pers. comm.). 

Only one historical record of this species in Kansas exists. Unsubstantiated occurrences also appear in

the literature but efforts to locate populations have been unsuccessful (C. Freeman pers. comm.). 

Species is largely untracked, and too common and widespread to be able to choose an "exemplary"

population (A. Cusick pers. comm., M. Oldham pers. comm., S. Young pers. comm.).

Barcode data: agrimonia gryposepala 

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this

species.

3


National nature serve conservation status 

Canada


Rounded National Status Rank

Rounded National Status Rank: 

NNR

 - Unranked



United States

Rounded National Status Rank

Rounded National Status Rank: 

N5

 - Secure



Trends 

Global Short Term Trend

Global Short Term Trend : Relatively stable (=10% change)

Comments


Comments : Agrimonia gryposepala is, in general, a common and widespread species across its range,

and therefore is not tracked by any of the Natural Heritage Programs (U.S.A.) or Conservation Data

Centres (Canada) that responded to this survey. Because it is not tracked, trends at the state and local

level are largely unknown. Since the species is widespread and common in many areas of it's range, is

known to occur in second growth habitat, and is not threatened by collecting or any other major threat,

it is assumed in general to be in a stable state at this time. 

This species is reported to be stable in Illinois (B. McClain pers. comm.), Maine (Maine Natural Areas

1

1



Program), New Jersey (New Jersey Natural Heritage Program), New York (S. Young pers. comm.), Ohio (A.

Cusick pers. comm.), Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania Natural Diversity Inventory), and Vermont (R. Popp

pers. comm.).

Threats 


Comments

Comments : There is evidence of collecting Agrimonia gryposepala from the wild in Illinois (W. McClain

pers. comm.) and New Mexico. McClain stated that the evidence is indirect, but obtained from a reliable

source. A website for a company selling herbal products apparently largely obtained through

wildcrafting listed Agrimonia gryposepala for sale in single extract form. The company may now be out

of business as there is no telephone number listed under the company name in the current telephone

directory. Agrimonia gryposepala has been seen in nurseries but extent of cultivation, and whether this

might involve wild-collection, is unknown (S. Young pers. comm.). 

While this species has historically been used for medicinal purposes, it is unlikely to become a popular

herb and therefore come under collection pressure unless future research uncovers previously

unknown medicinal properties that are therapeutically more specific or can provide stronger evidence

of its value. A person highly knowledgable with the herbal medicinal industry says that he has never

seen this plant in a product (M. McGuffin pers. comm.). 

Threats to this species and/or its habitats include clearing of woodlots and forests (W. McClain pers.

comm., J. Amoroso pers. comm.), grazing in wood lots, riverbank clearing, fragmentation of habitat (E.

Punter pers. comm.), increasing deer population, competition by invasives (Connecticut Natural

Diversity Database), conversion of bogs to wet meadows (J. Amoroso pers. comm.), and general

development and habitat destruction (W. Fertig pers. comm., K. Westad pers. comm.). The main threats

in Wyoming result from habitat loss and degradation associated with gold mining, logging, grazing,

recreation, and home construction (W. Fertig pers. comm.). 

A. gryposepala is considered a threatened species in North Dakota, as it occurs in woodlands and

riparian areas which now cover less than one percent of the state (Bry).

Management 

Biological Research Needs

Biological Research Needs : Manitoba: need to determine range in province and factors threatening

its occurrence (E. Punter pers. comm.).

Economic uses 

Uses


Uses : MEDICINE/DRUG

Production Methods

Production Methods : Wild-harvested

Comments


Comments : The plant is purportedly useful for its therapeutic properties; it "builds up blood", "cools

the liver", and acts as an antidiarrheal, gastro-intestinal aid, and as a mild astringent to mucous

membranes (Moerman, Medicinas del Bosque).

References

1.  © 

NatureServe



some rights reserved

2.  © 

Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany



some


1

1

1



rights reserved

3.  © 


Barcode of Life Data Systems



some rights reserved



Document Outline

  • Agrimonia gryposepala
    • Descripción de EOL Ver en EOL (inglés) →
    • National distribution 1
      • Canada
      • United States
    • Diagnostic description 1
    • Type information 2
    • Habitat 1
    • Number of occurrences 1
    • Barcode data: agrimonia gryposepala 3
    • National nature serve conservation status 1
      • Canada
      • United States
    • Trends 1
    • Threats 1
    • Management 1
    • Economic uses 1
    • References


Yüklə 124,04 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə