Foto: (c) Homer Edward Price, algunos derechos reservados (cc by)



Yüklə 236,21 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix07.08.2017
ölçüsü236,21 Kb.

Spanish stopper (

Eugenia foetida

)

Foto: 


(c) Homer Edward Price, algunos derechos reservados (CC BY)

Descripción de EOL 

Ver en EOL (inglés) →

Comprehensive description 

Eugenia foetida (the boxleaf stopper or Spanish stopper) is a small evergreen tree that typically grows

to about 6 m in height. It has smooth gray (sometimes mottled) bark and a straight trunk. It bears mildly

fragrant small, white flowers with many white threadlike stamens from mid-summer to early autumn

followed by black to dark brown fruits that are popular with birds (Elias 1980; Nelson 1994). This is the

dominant shrub on some of the Florida Keys (Elias 1980) and according to Little et al. (1974), is one of

the commonest and most widespread members of the family Myrtaceae (a major tropical plant family)

in the Greater Antilles.

National distribution 

United States

Origin


Origin : Native

Regularity

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently

Currently: Present

Confidence

Confidence: Confident

Morphology 

¿Tienes alguna duda, sugerencia o corrección acerca de este taxón? 

Envíanosla

 y con gusto la

atenderemos.

1

2

1



Eugenia foetida is a shrub or small tree, to about 8 m in height and 30 cm in diameter (usually smaller).

The leathery and aromatic leaves vary greatly in shape and size (Little et al. 1974), but are mostly 2 to 4

cm in length, are opposite, simple, entire, and elliptic to obovate in shape (Nelson 1994). The upper leaf

surface is dark green, the lower surface pale green with tiny blackish glandular dots (Little et al. 1974;

Nelson 1994). Flowers are small and white, mildly fragrant, with many white threadlike stamens. The

fruit is a rounded berry, 4 to 8 mm in diameter, which turns from reddish orange to black or brown at

maturity (Nelson 1994; Liogier and Liogier 1994).

Type information 

Holotype

Holotype for Eugenia mayana Standl.

Catalog Number:

Catalog Number: US 571749

Collection:

Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany

Verification Degree:

Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined

Preparation:

Preparation: Pressed specimen

Collector(s):

Collector(s): G. F. Gaumer

Year Collected:

Year Collected: 1895

Locality:

Locality: Izamal., Yucatán, Mexico, North America

Lookalikes 

In Florida, the few

 Eugenia species occurring there (none north of central Florida) are among the small

number of south Florida trees with opposite, evergreen leaves (Nelson 1994). There are just four native

Eugenia in south Florida: E. foetida and E. axillaris (both common and widespread), E. rhombea (only in

the Florida Keys), and 

E. confusa (only in extreme southern Florida) (Petrides 1988; Gann et al. 2008).

Eugenia foetida is the only Eugenia in Florida with a rounded (blunt) rather than tapered leaf apex

(Petrides 1988; Nelson 1994). According to Nelson (1994),

 E. foetida can be distinguished from the long-

stalked stopper (

Mosiera longipes) by the fact that M. longipes (which is listed as Threatened in the

state of Florida) has leaves mostly shorter than 2 cm. 

Eugenia rhombea has a yellow leaf edge and a

menthol odor; 

E. axillaris produces a skunky odor around the plant; and E. uniflora has edible orange-

red fruits, in contrast to the dark fruits of 

E. foetida and E. axillaris (E. confusa has red fruits) (Petrides

1988).

Habitat 


Little et al. (1974) report that 

Eugenia foetida is common in moist and dry limestone forests from sea

level to 300 feet altitude on the southwestern coast and foothills of Puerto Rico. It occurs in hammocks

(evergreen broadleaf forests) of southern Florida, primarily from Collier and Palm Beach Counties

southward and throughout the Keys, but extending northward along the east coast at least to Brevard

County; it is also found in pinelands of the lower Keys (Nelson 1994). For southern Floida, Gann et al.

(2008) report 

E. foetida from coastal berm, coastal strand, maritime hammock, rockland hammock, and

shell mound habitats.

Cuban cactus scrub flora associations 

The Cuban Cactus Scrub ecoregion is a semi-arid region lying in the rainshadow of upwind mountains

of the Caribbean Basin; the vegetation of this ecoregion is chiefly a thorny cactus scrub. The most

characteristic and abundant flora species correspond to the xeromorphous coastal and subcoastal

scrubland with abundant cacti succulents, also called coastal manigua. Associate evergreen shrubs and

3

1

1



4

,

5



small trees to Eugenia foetida include: Bourreria virgata, Capparis cynophallophora, Bursera glauca and

B. cubana. Cactus associate species include: Opuntia dillenii, O. triacantha, Harrisia eriophora, H. taetra,

Dendrocereus nudiflorus and Pilosocereus robinii.

Systematics and taxonomy 

Austin (2004) offers several possible origins for the somewhat cryptic common name "stopper" for

plants in the genus 

Eugenia: (1) The plants can grow in dense thickets near the coasts, "stopping" a

person's passage. (2) The fruits are loaded with tannins and can be used as a remedy for diarrhea,

"stopping" the problem. (3) Most implausibly (as Austin acknowledges), 

Eugenia species can be so

difficult to tell apart that they "stop" anyone trying to identify them. Although the true origin of the

common name "stopper" may remain a mystery, this is not the case for the name 

Eugenia. The genus

Eugenia was created by Linnaeus in 1753 to honor Prince Eugene of Savoy (1663-1736), who made a

collection of rare plants in his palace garden near Vienna in the early 1700s (Austin 2004).

National nature serve conservation status 

United States

Rounded National Status Rank

Rounded National Status Rank: 

N3

 - Vulnerable



References

1.  © 


Shapiro, Leo

some rights reserved



2.  © 

NatureServe

some rights reserved



3.  © 

Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany

some


rights reserved

4.  C.Michael Hogan. 2011. Cactus. Topic ed. Arthur Dawson. Ed.-in-chief Cutler J.Cleveland.

Encyclopedia of Earth. National Council for Science and the Environment. Washington DC

5.  © 


C.Michael Hogan



some rights reserved



1

2

Document Outline

  • Spanish stopper (Eugenia foetida)
    • Descripción de EOL Ver en EOL (inglés) →
    • Comprehensive description 1
    • National distribution 2
      • United States
    • Morphology 1
    • Type information 3
    • Lookalikes 1
    • Habitat 1
    • Cuban cactus scrub flora associations 4,5
    • Systematics and taxonomy 1
    • National nature serve conservation status 2
      • United States
    • References


Yüklə 236,21 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə