From mutations to disease mechanism in rett syndrome, breast cancer, and congenital hypothyroidism



Yüklə 4,8 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə10/13
tarix05.05.2017
ölçüsü4,8 Kb.
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13

Sample 
Cytosine methylation 
Rad4 
*CpC at -165/-164,  
*CpA at +15/+16 
Rad6 
*CpA at -171/-170,  
*CpC at -2/-1 
Rad15 
*CpC at +80/+81 
Rad17 
*CpG at -116/-115 
Rad21 
Hypermethylation between -249/-27   
Rad27T 
Hypermethylation between -226/+117   
Rad28T 
*CpG at -191/-190 
Rad29T 
*CpT at -133/-132,  
*CpA at +11/+12 
Rad29N 
*CpC at -114/-113 
Rad31T 
Hypermethylation between -249/+117   
Rad31N 
Hypermethylation between +6/+117   
Rad32T 
Hypermethylation between -121/+117   
Rad33T 
*CpCCC at -305/-302,  
*CpC at -190/-189 
Rad48 
*CpC +84/+85 
*CpN indicates methylated cytosine. 
 

 
100 
 
 
Figure 5.20.  Methylation analysis of 5’ flanking region of the hHR23A gene.  (a) The 
distribution of CpG di-nucleotides in 5’ flanking region (-310 to +140) of hHR23A gene 
are depicted schematically. Methylation analysis was performed on a region covering the 
putative promoter sequence and 59 CpG di-nucleotides. (b) The results of methylation 
analysis of samples. Open circles indicate unmethylated CpGs, and filled circles 
methylated CpGs. 

, and 
 represent the methylated CpA, CpT, and CpC di-
nucleotides, respectively.       
 
 
 
 

 
101 
 
Figure 5.21.  Bisulfite sequencing of 5’flanking region of hHR23A gene in tumor adjacent 
tissue of patient Rad31. 

 
102 
 
Figure 5.22.  Bisulfite sequencing of 5’flanking region of hHR23A gene in tumor tissue of 
patient Rad31. 
 
 
 
 
 

 
103 
5.2.2.2.  hHR23B. Cytosine methylation (CpG and non-CpG) in the upstream of hHR23B 
gene  was  observed  in  15  tumor  tissues.  A  representative  result  for  bisulfite  sequencing 
analysis of hHR23B gene is given in Figure 5.23. Detailed results are given in Table 5.6 
and Figure 5.24. CpG methylation was observed in six patients (Rad9, 13, 16, 20, 22, and 
27T) and non-CpG methylation was also present in three of them (Rad9, 20, and 22). Nine 
patients have only non-CpG methylation. The methylated cytosine residues were within the 
Sp1 binding sites in patients Rad9, 17, 22, 27T, and 32T. C*CpWGG motif was present in 
four samples (Rad2, 9, 25T, and 30T).  
 
Bisulfite sequencing revealed that three tumor samples (Rad17, 27T, and 32T) have 
cytosine methylations in both hHR23A and hHR23B genes. The sample Rad27T showed 
hypermethylated  region  (between  nts  -226/+117)  in  hHR23A  and  methylated  cytosine 
residue  within  the  Sp1  binding  site  (-270/-261)  in  hHR23B  gene.  Similarly,  upstream 
region  (between  -121/+117  nts)  of  hHR23A  gene  was  hypermethylated  and  cytosine 
residue within the Sp1 binding site (-135/-126) in hHR23B gene in patient sample Rad32T. 
Sample Rad17 has CpC methylation at position -116/-115 and methylated cytosine residue 
within the Sp1 binding site (-135/-126) in hHR23A and hHR23B genes, respectively. The 
summary of the methylation status and the histopathology of the samples analyzed in this 
study are listed Table 5.7.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
104 
 
Figure 5.23.  Chromatogram showing the bisulfite sequencing of 5’flanking region of 
hHR23B gene in the tumor tissue of patient Rad22. 
 
 
 
 

 
105 
Table 5.6.  Results of methylation analysis for 5’ flanking region of hHR23B.  
Sample 
Cytosine methylation 
Rad2 
C*CpAGG at -212/-208 
Rad9 
C*CpAGG at -151/-147,  
GC*CpCCGCCCC (Sp1) at -135/-126,  
*CpG at -84/-83  
Rad13 
*CpG at -172/-171 
Rad14 
G*CpCC at -205/-202 
Rad16 
*CpG at -172/-171 
Rad17 
GC*CpCCGCCCC (Sp1) at -135/-126 
Rad20 
*CpG at -144/-143,  
C*CpCCA at -78/-73 
Rad22 
G*CAC at -78/-75,  
*CpG at -185/-184,  
GCCCCGCCC*CpA (Sp1) at -135/-126,  
GC*CpC at -58/-55,  
T*CpCCC at -43/-39,  
*CpG at -28/-27  
Rad25T 
C*CpAGG at -151/-147 
Rad27T 
GCCC*CpGCCCC (Sp1) at -270/-261 
Rad30T 
C*CpAGG at -212/-208 
Rad32T 
GCCCCGCC*CpC (Sp1) at -135/-126 
Rad46 
A*CpCCC at -78/-73 
Rad50 
GCCCCGCC*CpC (Sp1) at -135/-126 
Rad51 
G*CpAA at -235/-232 
*CpN indicates methylated cytosine. 
 

 
106 
 
 
Figure 5.24.  Methylation analysis of 5’ flanking region of the hHR23B gene. (a) 
Schematic representation of the hHR23B gene upstream region comprising 40 CpG di-
nucleotides. (b) The samples with cytosine methylation. Open circles indicate 
unmethylated CpGs, and filled circles methylated CpGs. 
 and 
 represent the 
methylated CpT and CpC di-nucleotides, respectively. 
 
 
 

 
107 
Table 5.7.  The histopathological and epigenetic findings of the tumor tissue analyzed in this study. 

Age 
Tissue type 
 
Histopathological 
type 
Stage 
LNM* 
(+/ -) 
Histological 
Grade  
ER  
C-erbB2 
Cytosine methylation 
Rad23A       Rad23B 
Rad 1 
73 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT4bN1 






Rad 2 
55 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT1N0 


90 per cent 

ND 

Rad 3 
50 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT2N2 




ND 
ND 
Rad 4 
59 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT3Nx 






Rad 5 
65 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT2N0 


60 per cent 



Rad 6 
42 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT1N1 


<5 per cent 



Rad 7 
82 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT1N0 


60 per cent 

ND 
ND 
Rad 9 
65 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT2N1 


70 per cent 

ND 

Rad 10 
49 
Primary tumor 
Invasive apocrin 
carcinoma  
pT1N0 




ND 

Rad 11 
64 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT1N1 


80 per cent 



Rad 12 
46 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT2N2 




ND 
ND 
Rad 13 
58 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT2N2 


60 per cent 

ND 

Rad 14 
52 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT2N1 


80 per cent 

ND 

Rad 15 
78 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT1Nx 


80 per cent 



Rad 16 
39 
Primary tumor 
ductal carcinoma in 
situ
 
 
 
 
10 per cent 

ND 

Rad 17 
81 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT2N0 


70 per cent 



Rad 18 
71 
Primary tumor 
Mixed IDC-ILC 
pT1N0 


90 per cent 

ND 

Rad 19 
79 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT4bN1 




ND 
ND 
Rad 20 
66 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT2N1 


90 per cent 

ND 

Rad 21 
43 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT2N2 


90 per cent 

Hyperm. 

   * Lymph Node Metastases; IDC: Invasive (or Infiltrating) Ductal Carcinoma; NA: not available; ND: not determined.  
 
 
 

 
108 
Table 5.7.  The histopathological and epigenetic findings of the tumor tissue analyzed in this study (continued). 

Age 
Tissue type 
 
Histopathological 
type 
Stage 
LNM* 
(+/ -) 
Histological 
Grade  
ER  
C-
erbB2 
Cytosine methylation 
Rad23A       Rad23B 
Rad 22 
60 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT3N0 




ND 

Rad 23 
63 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT2N3 


90 per cent 



Rad 25N 
45 
Normal 




 
 
ND 

Rad 25T 
 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT2N1 


60 per cent 

ND 

Rad 26N 
40 
Normal 




 
 
ND 

Rad 26T 
 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT1N0 


90 per cent 



Rad 27N 
37 
Normal 




 
 
ND 
ND 
Rad 27T 
 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT2N1 


20 per cent 

Hyperm. 

Rad 28N 
63 
Normal 




 
 


Rad 28T 
 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT3N2 






Rad 29N 
62 
Normal 




 
 


Rad 29T 
 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT2N(Mi) 


100 per cent 



Rad 30N 
75 
Normal 




 
 


Rad 30T 
 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT1N1 


 per cent80 



Rad 31N 
77 
Normal 




 
 
Hyperm. 

Rad 31T 
 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT2N(Mi) 


100 per cent 

Hyperm. 

Rad 32N 
81 
Normal 




 
 
ND 
ND 
Rad 32T 
 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT2N1 


90 per cent 

Hyperm. 

Rad 33N 
48 
Normal 




 
 


Rad 33T 
 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pTxNx 


NA 
NA 


Rad 43 
47 
Primary tumor 
Invasive Lobular 
pT2N1 


80 per cent 



Rad 44 
52 
Primary tumor 
Atypical medullar 
pT1N1 






   * Lymph Node Metastases; IDC: Invasive (or Infiltrating) Ductal Carcinoma; NA: not available; ND: not determined.  
 
 

 
109 
Table 5.7.  The histopathological and epigenetic findings of the tumor tissue analyzed in this study (continued). 

Age 
Tissue type 
 
Histopathological 
type 
Stage 
LNM* 
(+/ -) 
Histological 
Grade  
ER  
C-
erbB2 
Cytosine methylation 
Rad23A       Rad23B 
Rad 45 
61 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT2N0 


30 per cent 



Rad 46 
55 
Primary tumor 
Invasive Lobular  
pT2N0 


90 per cent 



Rad 47 
45 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT2N2 




ND 
ND 
Rad 48 
47 
Primary tumor 
ductal carcinoma in 
situ
 
 
 
 
 
 

ND 
Rad 49 
41 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT1N3 






Rad 50 
54 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT2N1 


80 per cent 

ND 

Rad 51 
53 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT1N1 


30 per cent 

ND 

Rad 52 
51 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT1N0 


30 per cent 



Rad 53 
48 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT1N0 


60 per cent 

ND 

Rad 54 
57 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT1N0 


70 per cent 



Rad 55 
79 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT2N1Mx 


70 per cent 



Rad 56 
63 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT1N0 


90 per cent 

ND 

Rad 58 
49 
Primary tumor 
Invasive Lobular 
pT2N2 


80 per cent 

ND 

Rad 59 
77 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT1N0 


NA 
NA 


Rad 62T  76 
Primary tumor 
IDC 
pT2Nx 


60 per cent 



Rad 62N   
Normal 




 
 


Rad 60 
 
Normal 




 
 


Rad 61 
41 
Normal 




 
 


Rad24 
 
Normal 




 
 


   * Lymph Node Metastases; IDC: Invasive (or Infiltrating) Ductal Carcinoma; NA: not available; ND: not determined.
 

 
110 
5.3.  Molecular Basis of Congenital Hypothyroidism 
 
In  the  present  study,  the  genetic  mechanisms  leading  to  congenital  hypothyroidism 
(CH) and prolonged paralysis after mivacurium in a patient was investigated. The patient 
was screened for the presence of mutations within the TTF2 and BChE genes responsible 
of hypothyroidism and neuromuscular block after anesthetic administration, respectively.    
 
5.3.1.  Clinical Features of the Patient 
 
The proband, a 3900-g female infant, was born to consanguineous parents by normal 
vaginal  delivery  at  40  wk  gestation  after  an  uncomplicated  pregnancy.  Postnatal 
examination  revealed  the  patient  to  be  hypotonic,  hypoactive,  hypothermic, and areflexic 
with  cleft  palate,  spiky  hairs,  and  bilateral  choanal  atresia,  subsequently  confirmed  by 
paranasal  sinus  tomography.  Meconium  staining  and  perinatal  respiratory  distress 
prompted  admission  to  neonatal  intensive  care  for  ventilatory  support.  Immediately  after 
birth,  the  patient’s  total  serum  T4  level  was  0.758  µg/dl  [normal  range  (NR),  6.1–14.9 
µg/dl],  and  TSH  was  greater  than  100  mIU/ml  (NR,  1.7–9.1 mIU/ml).  L-T4  replacement 
therapy was started, and the baby was discharged at age 2 months. The proband’s parents 
and older male sibling are biochemically euthyroid with no congenital anomalies.  
 
Thyroid  ultrasonography  and  gadolinium-enhanced  computed  tomography  (CT) 
examination of the proband indicated the thyroid tissue in a eutopic location (Figure 5.25). 
 
5.3.2.  Mutation Analysis of the TTF2 Gene 
 
Direct sequencing of coding exon of TTF-2  gene from the patient revealed a C

transition at nucleotide position 304 (Figure 5.26). The mutation leads to the replacement 
of  amino  acid  arginine  with  cysteine  at  codon  102  (p.R102C)  affecting  the  forkhead 
domain  of  the  protein.  The  arginine  residue  in  this  position  is  highly  conserved  in 
H.Sapiens,  M.Musculus,  R.Norvegicus,  C.Elegans
  and  among  human  forkhead  proteins 
(Figure 5.27). 
 

 
111 
 
Figure 5.25.  Axial postcontrast CT image of the patient reveals a slightly enlarged thyroid 
gland (arrows) in the paratracheal region with absent contrast enhancement (a). 
Comparative imaging of the thyroid gland (arrows) in a healthy 9-yr-old child (b) (Barış et 
al
., 2006). 
 
 
304 C
 T (R102C) 
 
(a) 
304 C
 T (R102C) 
 
 
(b) 
 
Figure 5.26.  DNA sequencing profile of the TTF-2 gene showing mutation in homozygous 
condition in the patient (a). Her unaffected mother is heterozygous for the mutation (b).  
 
 
The  presence  of  the  mutation  was  confirmed  by  restriction  enzyme  analysis.  The 
mutation creates a novel AlwNl site. Her unaffected consanguineous parents were found to 
be heterozygote (Figure 5.28) and 100 control chromosomes tested negative for the same 
mutation. 
 

 
112 
 
H.sapiens 
M.musculus 
R.norvegicus 
C.elegans 
 
(a) 
 
 
 
(b) 
 
Figure 5.27.  Alignment of the TTF-2 forkhead DNA-binding domain with selected FOX 
proteins between species (a) and within human proteins (b).  At the bottom, ‘*’ indicates 
conserved residues in all sequences. The arrow shows the Arg 102 residue (Barış et al., 
2006). 
 

 
113 
 
 
Figure 5.28.  Two per cent agarose gel showing AlwNl digestion results for the patient and 
her family members. 
 
 
5.3.3.  Functional Characterization 
 
Functional  analyses  performed  in  University  of  Cambridge  revealed  that  the 
mutation is highly deleterious, with the p.R102C mutant protein exhibiting negligible DNA 
binding and transcriptional activity (Barış et al., 2006). 
 
5.3.4.  Mutation Analysis of Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) Gene 
 
Patients with CH are candidates for multiple operations due to midline defects (cleft 
palate and choanal atresia). When our CH patient was a 3-month-old baby, a gastrostomy 
was  required  because  of  a  severe  nutritional  problem  secondary  to  cleft  palate.  After 
operations,  the  patient  showed  prolonged  neuromuscular  block  (paralysis)  for  four  hours 
after a single dose of mivacurium as a muscle relaxant. BChE activity was measured and 
the  proband  was  found  to  have  a  marked  decrease  in  BChE  activity  compared  with  her 
parents and brother. The enzyme activities were 408 IU/1 for patient, 4953 IU/l for mother, 
671 bp 
599 bp 

 
114 
4594 IU/1 for father and 6513 IU/1 for brother (normal 5400–13 200 IU/1) (Yıldız et al., 
2006). 
 
5.3.4.1.  PCR-RFLP.  The  patient  and  family  members  were  analyzed  for  the  presence  of 
two  most  common  BChE  variants;  p.Asp70Gly  (A-variant)  and  Ala539Thr.  Restriction 
analysis revealed that the patient, her consanguineous parents and unaffected brother were 
negative for these variants (Figure 5.29). 
 
 
Figure 5.29.  Sau3AI (upper panel) and Alul (lower panel) digestion analyses for the patient 
and her parents (C: normal individual) (Yıldız et al., 2006). 
 
 
 

 
115 
6.  DISCUSSION 
 
 
Epidemiological  studies  promise  to  provide  correlative  data  to  permit  researchers 
understand  the  etiology  of  human  diseases  and  develop  efficient  genetic  testing  assays. 
Additionally,  the  accumulated  data  of  genotyping,  expression  profiling  and  proteomics 
allows  disease  diagnosis,  to  understand  the  molecular  mechanisms  leading  to  the  disease 
pathogenesis,  and  to  develop  efficient  therapeutic  approaches.  In  the  framework  of  this 
thesis,  we  have  investigated  genetic  and  epigenetic  changes  and  provided  genotype-
phenotype  correlations  to  unravel  the  molecular  mechanisms  that  lead  to  three  different 
diseases, Rett Syndrome, breast cancer, and congenital hypothyroidism. To our knowledge, 
it is the first study on genetic basis of Rett Syndrome in our population. The results of this 
analysis  revealed  that  gene  dosage  can  be  a  mechanism  that  leads  to  this  devastating 
genetic/epigenetic disease. Investigation of epigenetic changes in two human repair genes 
has shown CpG and non CpG methylation in tumor samples of breast cancer patients that 
was  important  with  respect  to  the  available  literature.  Identification  of  the  causative 
mutation in the CH patient and its functional study with a collaborative work also helped to 
understand  the  genetic  mechanisms  and  provided  original  evidence  that  implicated 
differential  effects  of  TTF-2  mutations  on  downstream  target  genes  required  for  normal 
human thyroid organogenesis. These and other findings are discussed below in respective 
sections for each disease.  
 
6.1.  Molecular Basis of Rett Syndrome 
 
In  the  framework  of  this  study,  the  genetic  basis  of  Rett  Syndrome  (RTT)  was 
investigated  in  a  total  of  71  patients.  A  heterogeneous  spectrum  of  disease-causing 
mutations was identified in 68.2 per cent of a clinically well defined group of cases. Our 
results  showed  that  exon  duplication/deletions  that  could  not  be  detected  by  standard 
techniques contribute to 19.3 per cent of these MECP2 mutations. Only 12.5 per cent of the 
patients,  referred  for  differential  diagnosis,  were  positive  for  MECP2  gene  mutations 
suggesting  that  this  gene  does  not  represent  a  major  cause  of  the  disease among patients 
with Rett-like features. Comparison of the clinical severity scores of patients with respect 

 
116 
to  the  presence,  type  and  location  of  mutation  in  the  gene  MECP2,  in  addition  to  the 
pattern of XCI did not reveal a statistically significant correlation.  
 
The  molecular  analysis  revealed  18  different  mutations  in  30  of  44  (68.2  per  cent) 
female patients in the first group of classical/atypical RTT cases with detailed clinical data. 
Of the 30 patients with mutations, 10 had a missense, eight had a nonsense mutation, six 
had  small  nucleotide  deletion/insertions.  MECP2  exon  rearrangements  were  identified  in 
six  female  patients;  three  patients  with  exon  2-4  duplications  (R14,  R19,  R20)  and  three 
patients  with    exon  3  and/or  exon  4  deletions  (R5,  R23,  R30).  In  patient  R33,  exon 
duplication identified by Real Time analysis could not be verified by QF-PCR.  
 
The  deletions,  we  have  identified  in  three  classical  RTT  female  patients,  affect  the 
MBD and TRD domains of the MECP2 protein. For these patients, it is highly unlikely that 
the protein produced from the mutant allele (if any) would have residual function thus they 
can  be  expected  to  be  associated  with  severe  phenotypes.  Although  Archer  et  al.  (2006) 
noted  that  their  deletion  group  was  clinically  indistinguishable  from  other  mutation-
positive  RTT  patients,  the  patients  in  our  study  presented  higher  clinical  severity  scores 
than all other mutation-positive patients.  The differences in severity were not significant 
(8.33±0.58  vs  6.70±1.57,  p=0.066),  but  the  findings  were  in  accordance  with  the  data  of 
Hardwick et al. (2007) and Scala et al. (2007). When we performed statistical analysis of 
severity  scores  for  specific  clinical  features,  we  obtained  a  significant  difference  in  the 
field  of  ‘‘gait  function’’  (p=0.016),  since  none  of  patients  with  MECP2  exon  deletions 
have ever walked.  
 
The c.856delA and c.826-829delGTGG deletions identified in patients R3 and R49, 
respectively, present novel small deletions in exon 4. They cause a frame-shift introducing 
a premature stop codon at position 288 in TRD domain of the protein and probably alter 
the  ability  of  the  protein  to  recruit  co-repressor  complexes  and  affect  its  function  in  the 
process  of  transcription  repression.  The  third  novel  frame-shift  mutation  due  to  one-bp 
deletion (c.744delG), in patient R46, creates a stop codon at the beginning of TRD domain 
(p.Ser194fsX208) and causes lack of both TRD and NLS domains. It is known that MBD-
containing  mutant  proteins  without  TRD  might  accomplish  some  degree  of  silencing, 
either by recruiting the silencing complex by a TRD-independent mechanism or by directly 

 
117 
interfering  with  binding  of  transcription  factors  (Ballestar et  al.,  2000). However,  loss  of 
NLS  and  TRD  domains  in  the  case  of  p.Ser194fsX208  mutation  might  interfere  with 
proper localization to nucleus and its functioning. The novel deletions in the other patients 
(R2, R8, and R42) hypothetically affect the C-terminal domain of the protein and may give 
rise  to  nonfunctional  proteins.  The  c.  1156-1192del36  (p.Leu386Hisdel12)  mutation  in 
patients R2 and R42 are small deletions, however, the mutation in patient R8 causes in a 
frame-shifted protein starting from Lys345 residue (p.K345fs). Patient R8 is more severely 
affected  in  all  respects  compared  to  patient  R2  and  R42,  with  shorter  period  of  normal 
development,  earlier  appearance  of  epileptic  seizures,  abnormal  gait  function  with  a 
severity  score  of  9  versus  7  and  5,  in  accordance  with  previous  findings  for  C-terminal 
deletion mutations (Smeets et al., 2005).   
 
In this study, exon duplications were identified in two patients with early seizure and 
in one with congenital variant of RTT. Although the extent of the duplications and whether 
they are tandem repeats could not be investigated, we have shown the duplication of exons 
that are known to be the expressed. Thus, it is the first report implicating gene duplications 
as causative mutations in female atypical RTT cases. Previously, one female patient with 
PSV  variant  of  RTT.has  been  reported  to  carry  three  copies  of  exon  four  of  the  MECP2 
gene (Ariani et al., 2004). In addition to this finding, Meins et al. (2005) has shown that 
duplication in Xq28 causes increased expression of the MECP2 gene in a boy with features 
of Rett Syndrome. Collins et al. (2004) has developed a mouse model that transgenically 
over-expressed  MECP2  under  the  endogenous  human  promoter.  These  mice  developed 
seizures,  hypoactivity  and  spasticity  with  several  other  progressive  neurological 
abnormalities. These results support the possibility that duplication of MECP2 may lead to 
increased expression and  underlie  some cases  of  X-linked  delayed-onset  neurobehavioral 
disorders including Rett Syndrome. It can be suggested that gene duplications might cause 
a gain of function rather than a loss of function via (i) repressing its target genes strongly, 
(ii) preventing their derepression, and/or (iii) repress novel genes that are not the targets in 
normal cellular conditions. The latter mechanism may be more likely considering the fact 
that  all  of  our  patients  with  exon  duplications  present  additional  neurodevelopmental 
symptoms  leading  to  atypical  phenotypes.  Interestingly,  eye  contact  is  very  difficult  to 
obtain  in  these  patients  when  compared  to  that  of  patients  with  missense  mutation 

 
118 
(p=0.016).  Further  analysis  should  be  performed  to  unravel  the  pathogenic  mechanism 
caused by these duplications.   
 
Previous  studies  suggest  that  patients  with  missense  mutations  tend  to  have 
significantly milder disease than patients with truncating mutations (Cheadle et al., 2000; 
Colvin et al., 2004). On the basis of statistical analysis, no significant correlation could be 
inferred between the overall disease severity and the type of the mutation in our cohort of 
patients.  However,  the  patients  with  exon  deletions  or  nonsense  mutations  affecting  the 
TRD domain of the protein had higher clinical severity scores. Mutation negative patients 
and  patients  with  skewed  XCI  patterns  had  slightly  milder  phenotypes  whereas  mutation 
positive  patients  had  severe  problems  in  their  ability  in  purposeful  hand  movement  and 
walking skills.      
 
It  has  been  shown  that  there  is  a  tendency  for  skewing  of  XCI  in  lymphocytes  in 
RTT  patients  when  compared  with age-matched  controls.  Our  data  is  also  suggestive  for 
skewed  XCI  pattern  to  confer  a  protective  effect  on  the  phenotype  especially  for  severe 
mutations  that  lead  to  production  of  truncated  MECP2  protein.  Among  our  12  patients 
presenting  skewed  XCI  pattern  along  with  MECP2  mutations,  10  of  them  had 
nonsense/deletion/insertions, and only two of them had missense (p.R306C and p.T158M) 
mutations. Although we could not show that there is a statistically significant relationship 
between  severity  and  XCI  pattern  by  mutation,  patients  with  the  same  mutation  and 
different  XCI  status  had  clinical  variability.  In  this  situation,  each  individual  might  be 
expected  to  have  differences  in  inter-tissue  and  intra-tissue  XCI  status,  as  is  sometimes 
observed in mouse models (Young et al., 2004; Gibson et al., 2005). 
 
The MECP2 mutation detection rate was higher in the first group subjects (68.2 vs. 
12.5  per  cent).  Furthermore,  26  patients  of  this  group  were  diagnosed  using  a  stringent 
criteria  and  the  mutations  were  identified  in  79  per  cent.  Our  results  show  that  a  strict 
adherence  to  the  RTT  criteria  and  careful  evaluation  of  the  patients  improve  the  rate  of 
MECP2 mutation detection. The diagnosis of RTT is mainly based on clinical criteria and 
this is a critical step to decide or not to offer genetic testing. From a socio-economic point 
of  view,  the use  of  efficient  and  well  defined  clinical  criteria  is  very  important  since  the 

 
119 
cost of MECP2 testing is high. Currently, the cost varies from $300 to $600 and is higher 
than the official minimum wage in Turkey.  
 
Mutation analyses revealed a total of 31 pathogenic variations of which 15 of 31 (48 
.4  per  cent)  detected  by  PCR-RFLP,  10 of  31  (32.3  per  cent)  by  SSCP-DNA  sequencing 
and 6 of 31 (19.3 per cent) by quantitative PCR assay. Thus, the PCR-RFLP method can be 
used as a preliminary step to detect the most common mutations observed in MECP2 gene 
in Turkish RTT patients. Our results showed that exon duplication/deletions contribute to 
19.3  per  cent  of  MECP2  mutations,  and  these  rearrangements  escape  the  PCR-based 
screening  strategy.  Quantitative  analysis  of  this  gene  should  also  be  considered  in  RTT 
patients, in order to determine the actual significance of the MECP2 gene in the etiology of 
RTT. 
 
With  excluding  6  exon  duplication/deletions,  nearly  80  per  cent  (20  of  25)  of  the 
point  or  small  deletion/insertion  mutations  were  detected  in  the  exon  4  of  the  MECP2 
gene.  The  rest  of  the  mutations  (20  per  cent)  were  located  within  exon  3.  This  finding 
suggests  that  the  mutation  in  MECP2  exon  1  and  2  appears  to  be  rare  in  Turkish  RTT 
patients  and  an  initial  analysis  of  exon  4  would  provide  the  most efficient  approach  in  a 
mutation detection protocol. 
 
Huppke  et  al.  (2003)  recommend  using  a  cutoff  point  of  8  for  genetic  testing  to 
exclude girls with MECP2-negative results from the test.
 
However, the two patients with 
exon duplications (patients R19 and R20) and the patient R22 with p.R106W mutation had 
Huppke scores of 5-7, implicating that genetic diagnosis should be performed even when 
the scores are lower than 8. 
 
In  three  prenatal  diagnostic  tests  performed,  both  chorionic  biopsy  specimens  and 
parents  were  tested and  found  to  be  negative  for  the  index  patient’s  mutation. Germ  line 
mosaicism  of  MECP2  mutations  is  an  important  problem  in  genetic  counseling  for  both 
familial and sporadic RTT cases (Yaron et al, 2002). In the recent literature, Caselli et al
(2004)  reported  nine  cases  that  were  evaluated  for  prenatal  diagnosis.  Only  one  fetus 
carried  the  same  mutation  with  affected  sister  (1/9,  11  per  cent)  and  the  pregnancy  was 
terminated.  Although  the  majority  of  the  patients  have  de  novo  mutations,  the  prenatal 

 
120 
diagnosis  might  be  offered  for  the  family  with  RTT  daughter  and  the  parents  should  be 
informed about the possibility of germ line mosaicism. 
 
Pathogenic  sequence  variations  could  not  be  identified  in  14  of  44  (31.8  per  cent) 
sporadic female patients in the first group. These patients may have MECP2 mutations in 
the promoter region or introns introducing novel splice sites that could not be detected by 
PCR-SSCP analysis. RTT can be a genetically heterogeneous disorder, and other causative 
genes might exist. Several recent studies identified mutations in the CDKL5 gene (OMIM 
300203) encoding cyclin-dependent kinase like 5 in patients with an atypical, early seizure 
variant  of  RTT  (Weaving  et  al.,  2005;  Evans  et  al.,  2005;  Scala  et  al.,  2005).  Thus, 
mutation  screening  of  CDKL5  should  be  performed  in  MECP2  gene  mutation-negative 
patients with early-seizure variant of RTT. Finally, we suggest that quantitative analysis of 
MECP2
  has  to  be considered  in especially  RTT  variants  in  order  to determine the actual 
significance of the gene in the etiology of RTT.  
 
Yüklə 4,8 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə