From mutations to disease mechanism in rett syndrome, breast cancer, and congenital hypothyroidism


  Multiplexed  ARMS-PCR  Approach  for  the  Detection  of  Common  MECP2



Yüklə 4,8 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə11/13
tarix05.05.2017
ölçüsü4,8 Kb.
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13

6.1.1.  Multiplexed  ARMS-PCR  Approach  for  the  Detection  of  Common  MECP2 
Mutations 
 
In  the  present  study,  we  have  described  the  development  and  validation  of  a 
multiplexed multiplex amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) - PCR assay for 
identification  of  seven  common  mutations  that  accounts  for  almost  65  per  cent  of  all 
MECP2  gene  mutations (RettBASE).  So far,  these  mutations could  be  investigated  using 
PCR-RFLP or DNA sequencing techniques. Although appropriate, DNA sequencing is not 
well suited for routine use in a clinical laboratory; it is cumbersome, time-consuming, and 
technically demanding. Carvalho et al. (2006) have described a multiplex minisequencing 
technique for the detection of most common 10 mutations. This assay allows detection of 
p.R106W,  p.A140V  and  p.G269fs  mutations  in  addition  to  our  assay.  However,  reagent 
and  equipment  costs  of  minisequencing  PCR  limit  the  implementation  of  this  assay  into 
research  laboratories.  Our  multiplex  ARMS-PCR  assay  offers  a  straightforward, 
inexpensive,  and  accurate  alternative  method.  Each  mutation-specific  primer  pair  was 
designed to produce a different-sized fragment, so that the mutation in the sample can be 
identified unambiguously after agarose gel electrophoresis. 
  

 
121 
The  seven  MECP2  mutations  included  in  this  assay  were  selected  based  on  their 
frequencies  in  RettBASE  database.  It  is  possible  that  the  prevalence  of  the  included 
mutations  may  vary  among  RTT  patients from  different  populations.  However,  the  assay 
could  be  improved  by  the  inclusion  of  primer  sets  for  detection  of  additional  pathogenic 
mutations. For example, Kim et al. (2006) and Yamada et al. (2001) did not identify the 
mutation  p.R106W  in  Korean  and  Japanese  patients,  respectively,  but  the  same  mutation 
accounted  for  5-6  per  cent  of  the  mutations  in  French  and  German  RTT  patients, 
respectively  (Bienvenu  et  al.,  2002;  Laccone  et  al.,  2001).  An  ARMS  assay  was  also 
designed and tested the for the p.R106W mutation, however, it could not be implemented 
to the panels. This mutation can be tested independently from the multiplex assay.  
 
A  well-designed  ARMS  multiplex  requires  compatible  primer  sequences  in 
appropriate  concentrations.  Optimization  of  the  PCR  reaction,  started  with  equimolar 
primer concentrations (10 pmol), revealed uneven amplification of the products, with some 
of the alleles barely visible. This problem was overcome by increasing the concentration of 
primers  for  the  ‘weak’  loci  and  decreasing  for  the  ‘strong’  loci.  The  specificity  of  the 
primer sets used was also found to be highly critical to ensure clear discrimination between 
target  and  non-target  genomic  sequence  to  avoid  any  ambiguity  of  detection.  Primer 
dimers and nonspecific allelic noise was observed with primers for p.T158M and p.R168X 
mutations. These nonspecific bands could be eliminated by introducing a mismatch at the 
3′ end of the allele-specific primers. As for any multiplex PCR, we recommend that users 
optimize  the  conditions,  especially  the  primer  concentrations  for  each  set,  in  their 
laboratory. 
 
In conclusion, the multiplex ARMS test is an efficient and cost-effective screen for 
molecular genetic testing of patients with RTT. It is a simple and reliable test that does not 
require  any  specialized  equipment  and  can  be  completed  in  1–2  days  upon  receiving  the 
sample.  
 
 
 
 

 
122 
6.1.2.  The Effect of DNA Concentration on Reliability and Reproducibility of SYBR 
Green Dye-based Real Time PCR Analysis to Detect the Exon Rearrangements 
 
Up  to  date  more  than  200  different  mutations  of  MECP2  have  been  reported  in 
patients  with  classical  and  atypical  RTT  (RettBASE).  MECP2  exon  rearrangements  are 
very  frequently  observed  and  identified  in  2.9-  14  per  cent  of  patients  with  RTT. 
Previously,  the  identification  of  MECP2  gene  rearrangements  was  carried  out  by 
traditional  methods  including  Southern  blotting,  fluorescent  in  situ  hybridization  (FISH), 
and  Long-Range  PCR  and  subsequent  DNA  sequencing  analysis.  So  far,  no 
rearrangements of the MECP2 gene have been identified by FISH and these approaches are 
time-consuming  and  may  suffer  from  a  limited  sensitivity  (e.g.,  the  size  of 
rearrangements).  To  overcome  these  problems,  rapid  and  sensitive  PCR  based  assays 
including  quantitative  fluorescent  PCR  (QF-PCR),  robust  dosage  PCR  (RD-PCR),  and 
multiple  ligation-dependent  probe  amplification  (MLPA)  have  been  developed.  In  these 
methods,  end-point  PCRs  are  accomplished  in  20–25  cycles,  when  amplification  is 
supposed to be in its exponential phase such that a linear relationship between quantities of 
template DNA and PCR products is maintained. These assays should be considered semi-
quantitative since the actual amplification profile of the reaction is based on a theoretical 
assumption.  Real-time  PCR  was  specifically  developed  to  quantify  specific  DNA  targets 
through  the  monitoring  of  product  formation.  This  technology  has  been  successfully 
applied  for  the  detection  of  hemizygous  deletions  or  duplications  in  different  genetic 
disorders.  Recently,  quantitative  real-time  PCR  assays  based  on  SYBR  Green  I  dye  and 
TaqMan  probe  has  been  developed  for  the  detection  of  deletions/duplications  of  the 
MECP2 gene (Ariani et al., 2004; Laccone et al., 2004). 
 
Several studies have shown that DNA extraction methods, presence of inhibitors and 
inefficient homogenization of the sample may lead to false negative results. This may lead 
to reduced efficiency of real time PCR reaction and underestimation of the quantity of the 
target  DNA  upon  reaction.  The  purpose  of  our  study  was  to  analyse  the  effect  of  DNA 
concentration  on  reliablity  and  reproducibility  of    SYBR  green  dye-based  real  time  PCR 
analysis to detect the exon rearrangments. 
 

 
123 
We have tested normal DNA samples along with duplication and deletions using six 
different DNA concetrations (ranging from 0.1 to 200 ng) in triplicate measurements. The 
expected copy number ratio (± 2SD) was obtained in all cases when DNA concentration is 
between  1  to  50  ng.  The  ratio  was  out  of  expected  range  in  six  and  four  of  15 
measurements  with  0.1  and  100  ng  DNA,  respectively,  and  led  to  misgenotyping  of  the 
samples. Expected copy number could never be obtained with 200 ng DNA. These results 
suggested that Real Time PCR analysis might not be reliable for determination of the exon 
copy number with DNA in the range of 1-50 ng.        
 
The  effect  of  the  DNA  concentration  on  the  amplification  efficiency  and  specifity 
could  be  observed  in  amplification  curve  and  melting  curve  analysis.  Using  high  DNA 
concentrations (100–200 ng) resulted in inhibition of the amplification and/or nonspecific 
product  formation  in  some  cases.  For  dilute  DNA  samples  several  hypotheses  have  been 
proposed to explain misgenotyping. The first issue is the apparent labiality (instability) of 
the DNA upon prolonged storage periods at low concentrations. Ellison et al. (2006) has 
shown  that  plastic  tube  had  a  strong  effect  on  measured  DNA  concentration  at 
concentrations below 100 genome equivalents. Teo et al. (2002) has observed fluctuations 
in the concentration of standard solutions even after short time storage in eppendorf tubes 
due  to  binding  of  DNA  to  the  tube  walls.  Secondly,  due  to  the  stochastic  distribution  of 
molecules  at  very  low  copy  number,  a  sampling  error  can  be  introduced  when  pipetting 
aliquots  of  DNA.  Measurement  variability  at  low  DNA  concentration  has  been 
demonstrated  by  the  observation  that  the  confidence  intervals  (representing  the 
measurement uncertainty) associated with amplification from low initial copy numbers of 
template are much greater than those with high initial copy numbers (Peccoud and Jacob, 
1996).  
 
Additionally,  we  have  compared  the  results  obtained  using  comperative  Ct  and 
standard  curve  methods.  A  paired  sample  t-test  showed  that  the  results  by  both  methods 
were significantly similar (P = 0.451>0.05). In addition, the Pearson correlation coefficient 
of 0.996 (P = 1E-6 <0.01) demonstrated the equivalence of both methods. 
 
Our  study  shows  that  data  obtained  by  the  standard  curve  method  and  by  the 
comperative  Ct  method  are  equally  reliable  and  correlate  extremely  well.  However,  the 

 
124 
comperative  Ct  method  appers  to  be  more  convenient  and  efficient  to  analyze  the  exon 
rearrangments  in  real  time  PCR  experiments.  First,  it  improves  the  productivity  by 
eliminating  the  time  and  effort  required  to  prepare  the  standards  and  set  up  the  standard 
curves. Second, the Ct method reduces the overall cost of assays by reducing the number 
of reactions run each time and thereby sparing expensive reagents. The only disadvantage 
of  comperative  Ct  method  is  use  of  a  single  calibrator  (reference)  DNA  sample  and  the 
contamination of target DNA with salt, phenol, chloroform and/or ethanol that may cause a 
low PCR efficiency and miscalculations. In case of  standard curve method, serial dilution 
of the reference sample will also dilute these inhibitors and decrease its effect on the PCR 
reaction, thereby increasing the PCR efficiency with each dilution step.  
 
6.2.  Methylation Analyses of the Putative Promoter Region of hHR23 Genes in 
Breast Tumor Tissues 
 
Carcinogenesis is a multistep process composed of genetic and epigenetic alterations 
involving  proto-oncogenes,  tumor  suppressor  genes,  cell-cycle  regulator  genes,  tissue-
invasion-related genes, or mismatch repair genes. Aberrant cytosine methylation of CpG-
rich  sites  was  regarded  as  an  epigenetic  mechanism  for  the  transcriptional  silencing  of 
several  repair  genes (BRCA1,  hMLH1,  O6-MGMT,  TDG, and  WRN)  in  different types  of 
cancer  including  breast carcinoma.  Recently,  Peng  et  al.  (2005)  has  shown  that  hHR23B 
gene, a key component in nucleotide excision repair pathway, was epigenetically silenced 
in  Interleukin-6-responsive  Multiple  Myeloma  KAS-6/1  cells  lines.  This  latter  finding 
prompted  us  to  investigate  the  methylation  status  of  hHR23B  and  its  homolog  hHR23A 
gene in tumor tissues. Additionally, the following cellular functions of both hHR23A and 
hHR23B make them candidate tumor susceptibility genes: (1) hHR23A/B were also shown 
to  participate  not  only  in  NER  but  also  in  base  excision  repair  (BER)  pathway;  (2)  The 
hHR23B
KD
  cell  lines  and  hHR23A/B  KO  mice  exhibit  severe  UV  sensitivity  and  NER 
deficiency; (3) hHR23A/B are involved in induction and stability of the damage-signaling 
tumor-suppressor  protein  p53; and  (4)  hHR23B was  shown  to  be  required for  genotoxic-
specific activation of p53 and apoptosis.  
 
In  this  study,  we  have  analyzed  the  methylation  status  of  5’  flanking  regions 
(including  the  CpG  islands  and  putative  promoter  sequence)  of  hHR23A  and  hHR23B 

 
125 
genes in primary breast tumor, tumor adjacent tissues, and normal breast tissues in order to 
investigate their possible involvement in breast carcinogenesis. 
 
First of all, we have characterized the CpG islands and the putative promoter region 
in  the  5'  flanking  region  of  the  hHR23A  and  hHR23B  genes  using  web-based  analysis. 
MethPrimer  and  PROSCAN  softwares  revealed  two  CpG  islands  (at  positions  -580/-454 
and -341/-55 nts) and a putative eukaryotic Pol II promoter region within the second CpG 
island  (position  -48  to  -298  nts)  with  a  score  of  98.79.  The  promoter  region  lacks  the 
CCAAT  and  TATA-like  elements,  a  common  feature  of  the  house-keeping  genes.  The 
analysis  revealed  potential  binding  sites  for  the  transcription  factor  Sp1  (two  sites), 
ATF/CREB, Elk-1 and two M22 motifs (5’-TGCGCANK-3’). The analysis of 5’ flanking 
region  of  hHR23B  gene  revealed  a  CCAAT  and  TATA-  box  lacking  putative  Pol  II 
promoter sequence (from position -14 to -264 nts with a score of 217.35) containing four 
Sp1 binding sites. 
 
The  lack  of  TATA  and  CAAT  boxes,  the  presence  of  high  C+G  content  and  Sp1 
binding sites in the hHR23A and hHR23B promoters are typical features of house-keeping 
genes.  Yang  et  al.  (2007)  has  shown  that  three  transcription  factor  binding  motifs,  Sp1, 
Elk-1,  and  M22  are  preferentially  found  in  promoters  that  lack  TATA  elements.  TATA-
less  promoters  are  generally  enriched  in  the  Sp1  motif  that  can  direct  weak  transcription 
initiation from Transcription Start Site in vitro from core promoters.(Smale and Kadonaga, 
2003).  Elk-1,  an  ETS  domain  transcription  factor  of  the  TCF  (ternary  complex  factor) 
subfamily, is known to be involved in the regulation of immediate-early genes such as c-
fos
 upon mitogen activation, and thus commonly implicated in cell proliferation. The M22 
motif  (5’-TGCGCANK-3’)  is  the  most  intriguing  one  because  its  potential  role  in 
regulation  of  TATA-independent  transcription  is  not  known.  The  ATF  family  of 
transcription  factors  can  form  either  homodimers  or  heterodimers  with  c-Jun  and 
subsequently  bind  to  the  cyclic  AMP  response  element  (CRE)  (5’-TGACGTCA-3’)  (van 
Dam  et  al.,  1993).  The  transcription  factor  ATF-2  is  a  nuclear  target  of  stress-activated 
protein kinases (such as p38), that are activated by various extra-cellular stresses, including 
UV  light,  osmotic  stress,  hypoxia,  and  inflammatory  cytokines  (Morrison  et  al.,  2003). 
ATF-2  plays  a  critical  role  in  hypoxia-  and  high-cell-density-induced  apoptosis,  growth 
control,  and  the  development  of  mammary  tumors.  The  ATF-2  mRNA  levels  in  human 

 
126 
breast cancers were lower than those in normal breast tissue (Maekawa et al., 2007). Since 
hHR23A  was  shown  to  interact  with  stress-related  factors  (eEF1A,  Hsp70,  and  Hsp71) 
(Chen and Madura, 2006), it might be a novel target of stress-activated protein kinases via 
the transcription factor ATF.   
 
The methylation status of the CpG islands was investigated by bisulfite-sequencing 
method.  Semi-nested  PCR  strategy  was  used  to  amplify  the  bisulfite  modified  DNA 
samples.  PCR  fragments  could  be  produced  in  38  samples  for  hHR23A  gene  and  58 
samples for hHR23B gene out of 61 samples tested. The failure in amplification might be 
due to poor-quality of DNA samples. It is known that the extraction of high-quality nucleic 
acid  from  formalin-fixed  tissues  might  not  be  possible  because  of  cross-linking  between 
proteins and DNA. The fixation and paraffin embedding processes might also damage the 
DNA.  Additionally,  formalin-fixed  tissues  undergo  degradation  possibly  because  of  an 
inadequate  neutralization  of  the  formalin,  eventually  resulting  in  acid  depurination.  The 
acid  is  known  to  depurinate  the  DNA  and  destroy  its  structure,  thus  preventing 
amplification (Goelz et al., 1985). In retrospective studies using fixed tissues, the primers 
must be carefully chosen to generate smaller amplification products, because larger DNA 
fragments are more difficult to amplify (Rivero et al., 2006). This is in accordance with our 
results that amplification of hHR23B gene was more successful than hHR23A gene (95% 
vs  62%)  since  the  hHR23B  primers  generated  smaller  PCR  products.  The  agarose  gel 
electrophoresis  showed  that  paraffin  embedded  tissue  DNAs  are  more  fragmented  when 
compared  to  DNAs  isolated  from  peripheral  blood  supporting  the  findings  of  poor 
preservation and high degradation of DNA extracted from fixed tissues. 
 
The methylation status of hHR23A and hHR23B genes could be determined in 35 of 
38 and 51 of 58 samples, respectively. Briefly, methylation analysis of 5’ flanking region 
of hHR23A gene revealed cytosine methylation in 12 tumor and 2 tumor adjacent tissues. 
Hypermethylation was observed in four tumors (from patients Rad21, 27T, 31T, and 32T) 
and  one  tumor  adjacent  tissue  sample  (Rad31N).  Two  patients  (Rad17  and  28T)  have 
single CpG methylation and seven patients (Rad4, 6, 15, 29T, 29N, 33T, and 48) have non-
CpG methylation. Cytosine methylation (CpG and non-CpG) in the upstream of hHR23B 
gene  was  observed  in  15  tumor  tissues.  CpG  methylation  was  observed  in  six  patients 
(Rad9,  13,  16,  20,  22,  and  27T)  and  non-CpG  methylation  was  also  present  in  three  of 

 
127 
them  (Rad9,  20, and  22).  Nine  patients  have  only  non-CpG  methylation.  The  methylated 
cytosine residues were within the Sp1 binding sites in patients Rad9, 17, 22, 27T, 32T, and 
50.  The  methylated  C*CpWGG  motif  was  present  in  four  samples  (Rad2,  9,  25T,  and 
30T).  
 
The  methylation  analysis  revealed  either  hypermethylation  or  cytosine  methylation 
of single CpG and non-CpG methylation in the putative promoter region of hHR23 genes. 
It  is  known  that  hypermethylation  of  CpG  island  in  the  promoter  region  is  generally 
associated  with  transcription silencing.  Intriguingly,  Pogribny  et  al.  (2000)  and  Veerla et 
al
. (2008) have shown that single CpG methylation could down regulate the expression of 
the p53 and IRF7 genes, respectively. It was also reported that methylation of single non-
CpG  dinucleotides  (CpA  or  CpC)  within  the  transcription  binding  site  could  affect  the 
expression pattern of the genes (Veerla et al. 2008). 
 
Until recently, a few studies reported cytosine methylation of non-CpG dinucleotides 
in genomic DNAs from human carcinomas and its involvement in the carcinogenesis. Two 
recent  studies  have  reported  non-CpG  methylation  pattern  in  B  cell-specific  B29  gene  in 
Primary Effusion Lymphoma, and p53 gene in non-small cell lung carcinoma (Malone et 
al
., 2001; Kouidou et al., 2005 and 2006). Analysis of the p53 exon 5 mutation spectrum in 
mutation  databases  for  lung  cancer  revealed  frequent  G:C  >  A:T  transitions,  several  of 
which  occur  at  non-CpG  methylated  sequences.  Additionally,  non-CpG  methylation  was 
observed  in  the  tissues  adjacent  to  the  tumor  in  the  lung,  which  indicates  that  non-CpG 
methylation may appear in the early stage of carcinogenesis and serve as a useful tool for 
early cancer detection (Kouidou et al., 2005). Thus, the findings of present study might be 
the additional support for the involvement of non-CpG methylation in carcinogenesis.  
 
A specific pattern of non-CpG methylation in the C*CpWGG motif was reported in 
plants  and  few  human  genes  including  p53  and  B29  genes.  The  cytosine  methylation  of 
C*CpWGG motif in the promoter region of p53 and B29 genes resulted in transcriptional 
silencing  (Malone  et  al.,  2001;  Agirre  et  al.,  2003).  We  have  identified  methylated 
C*CpWGG  motif  in  hHR23B  in  four  tumor  samples  (Rad2,  9,  25T,  and  30T).  The 
methylated  C*CpWGG  motif  was  at  positition  -212/-208  in  Rad2  and  30T  whereas 
C*CpWGG motif at positition -151/-147 was methylated in samples Rad9 and 25T. Based 

 
128 
on the above observations, we could speculate that the presence of methylated C*CpWGG 
motif  in  the  promoter  region  might  affect  the  transcription  of  the  hHR23B  gene  in  the 
tumor tissues.  
 
We have observed that the methylated cytosine residues were within the Sp1 binding 
sites in hHR23B gene in patients Rad9, 17, 22, 27T, 32T, and 50. The affected Sp1 binding 
site (at position -135/-126) is the same in five of them whereas the Sp1 site at position -
270/-261 was methylated in tumor sample Rad27T. Butta et al. (2006) has shown that the 
in  vitro  transcription  of  the  human  podocalyxin  (Podxl)  promoter  is  dependent  on  the 
presence of Sp1 sites. The progressive rise in the promoter activity directly correlates with 
the  number  of  recognition  sites  for  Sp1.  The  methylation  or  deletion  of  Sp1  element 
resulted in repression of Podxl gene (Butta et al., 2006). The findings of Butta et al. (2006) 
and  Veerla  et  al.  (2008)  prompted  us  to  speculate  that  the  cytosine  methylation  in  Sp1 
binding  site  might  interfere  the  binding  of  Sp1  and  down  regulate  the  transcription  of 
hHR23B in tumor tissues Rad9, 17, 22, 27T, and 32T.   
 
In  five  samples,  hHR23A  gene  was  partially  hypermethylated.  However,  the  extent 
and  the  position  of  the  methylation  site  were  different  in  each  sample.  The  down-stream 
region  (positions  +6/+117)  of  TSS  site  was  hypermethylated  in  tumor  adjacent  tissue 
Rad31N whereas hypermethylation spread to the upstream region (between -249/+117 nts) 
of  TSS  site  in  tumor  tissue  of  the  same  sample  (Rad31T).  The  upstream  region  was 
hypermethylated  in  sample  Rad21  whereas  both  upstream  and  downstream  regions  were 
hypermethylated  in  samples  Rad27T,  31T,  and  32T.  The  observed  non-uniformity  in 
hypermethylation pattern suggest that the methylation initiation site is probably similar in 
four samples and within downstream of TSS (position +1/+117) whereas it is different in 
sample  Rad21  probably  being  between  -249/-27  nts.  It  is  known  that  the  spreading  of 
methylation from the foci of methylated CpG sites is a common event in tumor tissues.     
  
Two samples have cytosine methylation within upstream region of hHR23A in both 
tumor  and  adjacent  tissues.  Patient  Rad29  has  CpC  methylation  at  position  -114/-113  in 
tumor adjacent tissue (Rad29N) whereas CpT and CpA di-nucleotides were methylated at 
positions  -133/-132  and  +11/+12  in  the  tumor  tissue  (Rad29T).  The  region  between 
nucleotide  positions  +6/+117  was  hypermethylated  in  tumor  adjacent  tissue  Rad31N 

 
129 
whereas  hypermethylation  spread to  the  region  between  -249/+117  nts in  tumor tissue  of 
the same sample (Rad31T). The observation of cytosine methylation in tissues adjacent to 
tumor is consistent with previously reported findings (Kouidou et al., 2005). The cytosine 
methylation pattern in samples Rad25T, 27T, 28T, 30T, 32T, and 33T was not present in 
corresponding tumor adjacent tissues suggesting that the observed de novo methylation is 
specific  to  tumor  formation.  Additionally,  cytosine  methylation  was  not  observed  in  five 
DNA samples isolated from peripheral blood tissue.  
 
We  could  not  obtain  statistical  differences  among  patients  when  compared  with 
respect to the presence, type, and position of methylation in hHR23A or hHR23B.  On the 
other hand, correlations based on histopathological features of the samples implicate some 
preliminary  features.  For  example,  in  all  patients  (Rad21,  27T,  31T,  and  32T)  showing 
hypermethylation  of  hHR23A  gene,  lymph  node  metastasis  (LNM)  was  positive  and 
showed  high  grade  (III)  and  stage  (pT2Nx)  tumor  progression.  The  Estrogen  Receptor 
(ER)  expression  was  positive  in  all  samples.  c-erbB-2  expression  was  negative  in  tumor 
samples Rad27T, 31T, and 32T, however,it was expressed in tumor tissue Rad21 showing 
different  methylation  initiation  site  in  the  upstream  region  of  TSS.  Among  the  patients 
(Rad9, 17, 22, 27T, 32T, and 50) presenting methylated cytosine residues within the Sp1 
binding sites in hHR23B gene, there is no uniformity in histopathological features of tumor 
tissues.  However,  the  bisulfite  sequencing  revealed  that  three  of  them  (samples  Rad17, 
27T, and 32T) have cytosine methylation in both hHR23A and hHR23B genes. The sample 
Rad27T  showed  hypermethylated  region  (between  nts  -226/+117)  in  hHR23A  and 
methylated  cytosine  residue  within  the  Sp1  binding  site  (-270/-261)  in  hHR23B  gene. 
Similarly,  upstream  region  (between  -121/+117  nts)  of  hHR23A  gene  was 
hypermethylated along with the cytosine residue within the Sp1 binding site (-135/-126) in 
hHR23B  gene  in  patient  Rad32T.  Sample  Rad17  has  CpC  methylation  at  position  -116/-
115  and  methylated  cytosine  residue  within  the  Sp1  binding  site  (-135/-126)  in  hHR23A 
and hHR23B genes, respectively. Among the patients (Rad2, 9, 25T, and 30T) having the 
methylated  C*CpWGG  motif  in  the  hHR23B  promoter  region,  the  histological  grade  of 
tumor showed differences according to the position of methylated C*CpWGG motif. The 
tumor grade was II in samples Rad2 and Rad30T whereas the grade is higher in samples 
Rad9 and Rad25T.    
 

 
130 
The methylated cytosine residues were not seem to be within the conserved motifs or 
transcription  binding  sites  in  samples  Rad4,  6,  15,  17,  28T,  29T,  29N,  33T,  and  48  for 
hHR23A  and  Rad13,  14,  16,  20,  46,  and  51  for  hHR23B  genes.  Bisulfite  sequencing  of 
HHR23A and hHR23B revealed no methylation in 21 and 36 tissue samples, respectively. 
There was no significant histopathological difference among these samples.     
 
In  conclusion,  there  are  no  known  reports  investigating  the  role  of  methylation  of 
hHR23A and hHR23B genes in the tumor tissues (breast cancer). The observations of the 
hypermethylation of hHR23A gene and the presence of methylated conserved motifs and 
transcription  binding  sites  in  hHR23B  gene  among  tumor  tissues  suggested  the 
involvement  of  methylation  of  hHR23  genes  in  the  breast  carcinogenesis.  However,  the 
expression  pattern  of  methylated  hHR23  genes  should  be  investigated  in  fresh  or  frozen 
tumor  tissues.  If  the  promoter  methylation  correlates  with  loss  of  protein  expression, 
methylation  status  of  hHR23  genes  could  be  a  marker  in  breast  carcinomas.  It  is  known 
that  the  genetic  and  epigenetic  alterations  that  initiate  and  drive  cancer  can  be  used  as 
targets for detection of neoplasia in bodily fluids. Several studies showed that tumor cell-
specific aberrant promoter hypermethylation can be detected in nipple aspirate and ductal 
lavage  from  breast  cancer  patients  and  the  results  were  concordant  between  tumor  and 
circulating DNA methylation (Dulaimi et al., 2004; Mirza et al., 2007). Hypermethylation- 
based screening of serum, a readily accessible bodily fluid and pre-invasive method, may 
enhance early detection of breast cancer. 
 
Yüklə 4,8 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə