From mutations to disease mechanism in rett syndrome, breast cancer, and congenital hypothyroidism



Yüklə 4,8 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə2/13
tarix05.05.2017
ölçüsü4,8 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   13

LIST OF FIGURES
 

 
xiv 
 
 
Figure 1.1.   Schematics of epigenetic modifications (a) and reversible changes in 
chromatin organization (b) that influence the gene expression.................  

 
Figure 1.2.   DNA methylation can silence genes by either direct (a) or indirect 
mechanisms (b) ......................................................................................  

 
Figure 1.3.   The MECP2 gene (a) and its protein product (MeCP2A) with conserved   
domains (b) ............................................................................................  
11 
 
Figure 1.4.   Mechanisms of methylation dependent (a) and independent (b)      
transcription regulation and chromatin remodeling .................................  
15 
 
Figure 1.5.   Regulation of imprinted regions through formation of a silent chromatin    
loop (a) Transcriptionally inactive (b) active conformation  ....................  
16 
 
Figure 1.6.   Regulation of alternative splicing by MeCP2; (a) RNA splicing in the 
presence of MeCP2 and (b) aberrant splicing in the absence of MeCP2 ..  
16 
 
Figure 1.7.   MeCP2 target genes and their relevance with the disease  .......................  
20 
 
Figure 1.8.   A schematic diagram of a normal female breast  .....................................  
21 
 
Figure 1.9.   Simplified multi-step model of breast cancer progression based on 
morphological features ...........................................................................  
24 
 
Figure 1.10. View of breast carcinogenesis from a DNA methylation standpoint  .......  
25 
 
Figure 1.11. Model for mechanism of global genome nucleotide-excision repair and 
transcription-coupled repair  ...................................................................  
30 
 

 
xv 
Figure 1.12. Schematic representations of conserved domains in hHR23A (a) and     
hHR23B (b) proteins ..............................................................................  
31 
 
Figure 1.13. Thyroid hormone cascade  ......................................................................  
36 
 
Figure 1.14. Alignment of the TTF2 forkhead DNA-binding domain with selected     
human FOX representatives  ...................................................................  
38 
 
Figure 1.15. Three-dimentional structure of the forkhead domain of FoxC2 (mouse) .  
39 
 
Figure 1.16. Nucleotide sequence of the human TTF2 gene and deduced amino acid 
sequence  ................................................................................................  
41 
 
Figure 4.1.   Schematic representation of primer positions on MECP2 gene nucleotide 
sequence  ................................................................................................  
63 
 
Figure 4.2.   Semi-nested PCR strategy showing the primers and PCR cycling      
conditions used to investigate the methylation status of hHR23 genes  ....  
69 
 
Figure 5.1.   PCR-RFLP analysis for the detection of the common MECP2 mutations        
in patients R17 (a), R24 (b), R6 (c), R29 (d), and R16 (e)  ......................  
73 
 
Figure 5.2.   Schematic representation of the MeCP2 (a) and MECP2 gene (b) showing   
the position of the mutations identified in this study ...............................  
75 
 
Figure 5.3.   SSCP gels showing altered migration patterns for patients R3 (a), R2 (b),     
R8 (c), R46 (d), and R47 (e) with novel MECP2 gene mutations ............  
76 
 
Figure 5.4.   Chromatograms showing sequencing profiles of sense (left panel) and 
antisense (right panel) strands of MECP2 gene for the novel mutations 
identified in the present study  ................................................................  
77 
 

 
xvi 
Figure 5.5.   A representative Real Time analysis for a healthy female (a), R5 with       
exon 3 deletion (b), and R19 with exon 3 duplication (c), respectively  ...  
80 
 
Figure 5.6.   The plots of quantitative Real Time PCR and QF-PCR analyses results  .  
82 
 
Figure 5.7.   A representative QF-PCR analysis for a healthy female (a), R5 with          
exon 3 deletion (b), and R19 with exon 3 duplication (c), respectively  ...  
83 
 
Figure 5.8.   QF-PCR analysis of patient R33  ............................................................  
84 
 
Figure 5.9.   X chromosome inactivation analysis of patients with skewed (a),           
random (b), and non-informative (c) XCI pattern, respectively ...............  
84 
 
Figure 5.10. Agarose gel electrophoresis showing the prenatal diagnosis performed           
in the families of the patient R29 with p.T158M (a), patient R42 with 
p.L386Hdel12 (b), and patient R69 with p.R255X mutations (c)  ............  
86 
 
Figure 5.11. Agarose gel electrophoresis of multiplex ARMS PCR assay products ....  
89 
 
Figure 5.12. A representative multiplex ARMS-PCR assay analysis  ..........................  
89 
 
Figure 5.13. Evaluation of the multiplexed ARMS-PCR assay using RTT patient     
samples with known mutations  ..............................................................  
90 
 
Figure 5.14. The summary of the Real Time PCR analysis of MECP2 exon 3 
rearrangements using 0.1 – 200 ng DNA ................................................  
95 
 
Figure 5.15. The profile of the amplification products of sample R5 with different 
concentrations of template DNA  ............................................................  
95 
 
Figure 5.16. Melting curve analysis for PCR products of sample R5 using 0.1, 10, 50,    
200 ng DNA  ..........................................................................................  
95 
 

 
xvii 
Figure 5.17. MethPrimer program output showing the CpG islands and the        
investigated region at 5’ of the hHR23A gene  ........................................  
97 
 
Figure 5.18. MethPrimer program output showing the CpG island and the          
investigated sequence in 5’ flanking region of hHR23B gene .................  
97 
 
Figure 5.19. Agarose gel electrophoresis showing the quality of the genomic DNAs 
isolated from paraffin embedded tissues .................................................  
98 
 
Figure 5.20. Methylation analysis of 5’ flanking region of the hHR23A gene  ............   100 
 
Figure 5.21. Bisulfite sequencing of 5’flanking region of hHR23A gene in tumor    
adjacent tissue of patient Rad31  .............................................................   101 
 
Figure 5.22. Bisulfite sequencing of 5’flanking region of hHR23A gene in tumor        
tissue of patient Rad31 ...........................................................................   102 
 
Figure 5.23. Chromatogram showing the bisulfite sequencing of 5’flanking region            
of hHR23B gene in the tumor tissue of patient Rad22  ............................   104 
 
Figure 5.24. Methylation analysis of 5’ flanking region of the hHR23B gene  ............   106 
 
Figure 5.25. Axial postcontrast CT image of the patient reveals a slightly enlarged    
thyroid gland (arrows) in the paratracheal region with absent contrast 
enhancement (a). Comparative imaging of the thyroid gland (arrows) in          
a healthy 9-yr-old child (b)  ....................................................................   111 
 
Figure 5.26. DNA sequencing profile of the TTF-2 gene showing mutation in   
homozygous condition in the patient (a). Her unaffected mother is 
heterozygous for the mutation (b) ...........................................................   111 
 
Figure 5.27. Alignment of the TTF-2 forkhead DNA-binding domain with selected      
FOX proteins between species (a) and within human proteins (b) ...........   112 

 
xviii 
Figure 5.28. Two per cent agarose gel showing AlwNl digestion results for the patient    
and her family members .........................................................................   113 
 
Figure 5.29. Sau3AI (upper panel) and Alul (lower panel) digestion analyses for the   
patient and her parents (C: normal individual) ........................................   114 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
xix 
LIST OF TABLES 
 
 
Table 1.1.   The list of methylated genes in breast cancer ...........................................  
26 
 
Table 3.1.    Sequence of the primers used for exon amplification of the MECP2            
gene sequence ........................................................................................  
48 
 
Table 3.2.    Primers used in X chromosome inactivation analysis  .............................  
49 
 
Table 3.3.    Sequences and PCR conditions for the primers used in quantitative Real   
Time PCR analysis .................................................................................  
49 
 
Table 3.4.     Sequence of the primers used in quantitative fluoresent multiplex  PCR 
analysis ..................................................................................................  
49 
 
Table 3.5.    Sequence of the primers used in methylation analyses of the putative  
promoter region of hHR23A and hHR23B genes  ...................................  
50 
 
Table 3.6.    Sequence of the primers used for exon amplification of the TTF2 gene  ..  
50 
 
Table 3.7.    Sequence of the primers used for exon amplification of the BChE gene  .  
51 
 
Table 4.1.    The list of the MECP2 gene mutations analyzed by PCR-RFLP method .  
58 
 
Table 4.2.    Primer sequences and concentrations used in the two panels for      
multiplexed ARMS-PCR assay  ..............................................................  
64 
 
Table 5.1.    The age, gender, and clinical and genetic features of the first group of           
47 patients  .............................................................................................  
78 
 
Table 5.2.   Quantitative Real Time PCR and QF-PCR analyses result........................  
81 
 

 
xx 
Table 5.3.    Mean Phenotypic Severity Scores of the female patients of first group  ...  
87 
 
Table 5.4.    Ct values obtained from real time PCR analysis on different amounts             
of DNA ..................................................................................................  
92 
 
Table 5.5.    Methylation analysis results for the 5’ flanking region of hHR23A  .........  
99 
 
Table 5.6.    Results of methylation analysis for 5’ flanking region of hHR23B ..........   105 
 
Table 5.7.    The histopathological and epigenetic findings of the tumor tissue         
analyzed in this study .............................................................................   107 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
xxi 
LIST OF SYMBOLS / ABBREVIATIONS 
 
 

 
 
Arginine 
T4 
 
 
Thyroxine 

 
 
Tryptophan 

 
 
Stop 
 
5meC   
 
5- methyl cytosine  
APS   
 
Ammoniumpersulfate  
ARMS  
 
Amplification refractory mutation system 
AS 
 
 
Angelman syndrome 
BChE   
 
Butyrylcholinesterase 
BDNF  
 
Brain-derived neurotrophic factor 
BER   
 
Base excision repair 
Bp 
 
 
Base pair 
BSA   
 
Bovine serum albumine 

 
 
Cysteine 
cAMP   
 
Cyclic adenosine 5’-monophosphate 
CDKL5 
 
cyclin-dependent kinase like 5 
cDNA   
 
Complementary deoxyribonucleic acid 
CH 
 
 
Congenital hypothyroidism 
CNS   
 
Central nervous system 
CT 
 
 
Computed tomography  
CREB   
 
Cyclic AMP-responsive element binding 
CRH   
 
Corticotropin-releasing hormone 
DCIS   
 
Ductal carcinoma in situ 
DLX5   
 
Distal-less homeobox 5 
DNA    
 
Deoxyribonucleic acid 
DNMT  
 
DNA methyltransferase 
dNTP   
 
Deoxynucleosidetriphosphate 
ECG    
 
Electrocardiography  
EEG    
 
Electroencephalogram 

 
xxii
H 
 
 
Histone  
FHD   
 
Forkhead domain 
Fkbp5   
 
FK506-binding protein 5 
GG-NER 
 
Global genome nucleotide excision repair 
GST   
 
Glutathione S-transferase 
HATs   
 
Histone acetyltransferases  
HDACs  
 
Histone deacetylases 
IDC   
 
Invasive (infiltrating) ductal carcinoma 
ILC 
 
 
Invasive lobular carcinomas 
KD 
 
 
Knockdown 
KO 
 
 
Knockout 
LCIS   
 
Lobular carcinoma in situ 
LTP    
 
Long-term potentiation  
MBD   
 
Methyl binding domain 
MDM2 
 
Mouse double minute 2 
MECP2 
 
methyl-CpG-binding protein 2  
Mecp2  
 
mause methyl-CpG-binding protein 2  
Mecp2
_/_
 
 
Mecp2
-null female 
Mecp2
_/y 
 
Mecp2
-null male 
MgCl
2
  
 
Magnesium Chloride 
mM   
 
Milimolar 
mRNA  
 
Messenger ribonucleic acid 
MRX    
 
X-linked mental retardation  
NER   
 
Nucleotide excision repair 
NIS 
 
 
Sodium iodide transporter 
NLS   
 
Nuclear localization signals 
Nm 
 
 
nanometer 
OD
260   
 
Optical density at 260 nm 
PAGE  
 
Poly acrylamide gel electrophoresis 
PChE   
 
Pseudocholinesterase 
PCR    
 
Polymerase chain reaction 
PRNP   
 
Prion protein 
PSV    
 
Preserved speech variant 

 
xxiii
QF-PCR 
 
Quantitative fluorescent multiplex PCR 
RBC   
 
Red blood cell 
RNA    
 
Ribonucleic acid 
ROS   
 
Reactive oxygen species 
Rpm   
 
Revolution per minute 
RTT   
 
Rett syndrome 
SDS   
 
Sodium dodecyl sulfate 
Sgk1   
 
Serum glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 
SSCP   
 
Single strand conformation polymorphism 
STI1   
 
Stress-induced
 
phosphoprotein 
STK9   
 
Serine/threonine kinase 9 
T3 
 
 
Triiodothyronine 
TBE   
 
Tris-base- boric Acid- Edta 
TC-NER 
 
Transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair 
TE 
 
 
Tris-Edta 
TEMED 
 
N,N,N',N'-Tetramethylethylenediamine 
TFC   
 
Follicular cells 
TFIIH   
 
Transcription factor IIH 
TG 
 
 
Thyroglobulin 
TPO   
 
Thyroid peroxidase 
TRD   
 
Transcription repression domain 
 
TSHR   
 
TSH receptor 
TTF   
 
Thyroid transcription factors 
UBA   
 
Ubiquitin-associated 
UBE3A 
 
Ubiquitin ligase E3A   
UBL   
 
Ubiquitin-like 
UV 
 
 
Ultraviolet 
 
XCI   
 
X-chromosome inactivation 
XPC   
 
Xeroderma pigmentosum group C 
YB1   
 
Y box-binding protein 1 
 

 
 

1.  INTRODUCTION 
 
 
1.1.  Epigenetics 
1.1.1.  Epigenetics 
 
Epigenetics  refers  to  stable  and  heritable  changes  in  gene  expression  that  are  not 
directly attributable to DNA sequence alterations. These changes may affect the expression 
of a gene or the properties of its product. Epigenetic mechanisms provide an “extra” level 
of transcriptional control and include DNA methylation, histone modifications, chromatin 
configuration  changes,  imprinting, and  RNA-associated  silencing  (Rodenhiser and  Mann, 
2006). The human genome contains approximately 23 000 genes that should be expressed 
in specific cell types at precise times and this is known to be achieved via two pathways. 
The first pathway is the immediate control by transcriptional activators and repressors that 
have various nuclear concentrations, covalent modifiers, and subunit associations. It is the 
traditional model of genetics in which the regulation of transcription and messenger RNA 
(mRNA) stability are directly influenced by the genomic DNA sequence and any sequence 
changes  present.  The  second  pathway  is  the  epigenetic  regulation  by  altering  chromatin 
structure through covalent modification of DNA and histones. The epigenetic pattern can 
be transmitted from parent cell to daughter cell maintaining a specific epigenotype within 
cell lineages. Thus, the phenotype is a result of the genotype, the specific DNA sequence, 
and the epigenotype. 
 
1.1.2.  DNA Packaging   
 
DNA is wrapped around clusters of globular histone proteins to form nucleosomes.  
Nucleosomes consist of short segments of a 146-bp DNA wrapped tightly around a set of 
conserved  basic proteins  known  as  histones  (H2A,  H2B,  H3, and  H4)  (Margueron  et  al., 
2005). Each nucleosome consists of histone octamers (2 of each protein), and these basic 
histone proteins allow interaction with acidic DNA. These repeating nucleosomes of DNA 
and histones are organized into chromatin (Figure 1.1). The structure of chromatin is not 
static, and influences the gene expression. Transcriptionally inactive DNA is characterized 
by  a  highly  condensed  conformation  and  is  associated  with  regions  of  the  genome  that 

 
 

undergo late replication during S phase of the cell cycle. Transcriptionally active DNA has 
a more open conformation, is replicated early in S phase, and has relative weak binding by 
histone  molecules  (Figure  1.1).  These  dynamic  chromatin  structures  are  controlled  by 
reversible epigenetic patterns of DNA methylation and histone modifications (Feinberg et 
al
.,  2004).  Enzymes  involved  in  this  process  include  DNA  methyltransferases  (DNMTs), 
histone 
acetyltransferases 
(HATs), 
histone 
deacetylases 
(HDACs), 
histone 
methyltransferases, and the methyl-binding domain proteins (Rodenhiser and Mann, 2006; 
Strachan et al., 2003). 
 
 
(a) 
 
(b) 
Figure 1.1.  Schematics of epigenetic modifications (a) and reversible changes in 
chromatin organization (b) that influence the gene expression (Rodenhiser and Mann, 
2006). 
 

 
 

1.1.3.  Epigenetic Modifications 
 
1.1.3.1.  CpG and non-CpG Methylation. DNA methylation refers to the covalent addition 
of  a  methyl  group  derived  from  S-adenosyl-L-methionine  to  the  fifth  carbon  of  the 
cytosine  ring  to  form  the  5-  methyl  cytosine  (5meC)  (Ehrlich  et  al.,  1981).  Across 
eukaryotic species, methylation occurs predominantly in cytosines located 5′ of guanines, 
known  as  CpG  dinucleotides.  In  the  mammalian  genome,  the  distribution  of  CpG 
dinucleotides  is  nonrandom  (Antequera  and  Bird,  1993).  They  are  greatly  under-
represented in the genome because of evolutionary loss of 5meCs through deamination to 
thymine. However, clusters of CpGs known as CpG islands are preserved in 1–2 per cent 
of the genome. Briefly, CpG islands are defined as the region of DNA ranging from 200 bp 
to  5  kb  in  size  and  with  greater  than  55  per  cent  GC  content.  More  than  40  per  cent  of 
mammalian genes have CpG islands (Bird et al., 2002). About 70 per cent of CpG islands 
are located in the promoter, the first exon, and the first intron of the genes, suggesting that 
they  are  important  for  gene  regulation.  Typically,  unmethylated  clusters  of  CpG 
dinucleotides  are  located  at  the  upstream  of  tissue  specific  genes  and  essential 
“housekeeping” genes that are required for cell survival and are expressed in most tissues. 
These  unmethylated  CpG  islands  are  targets  for  proteins  that  initiate  gene  transcription. 
However,  methylated  CpGs  are  associated  with  silent  DNA  and  cause  stable  heritable 
transcriptional silencing. The establishment and maintenance of DNA methylation patterns 
is  provided  by  DNA  methyltransferases  (DNMTs)  and  accessory  proteins  (Dnmt1, 
Dnmt3a, Dnmt 3b, Dnmt2, and Dnmt 3L) (Egger et al., 2004). Two mechanisms have been 
proposed  to explain  the inhibitory  effect  of CpG  methylation  on gene expression  (Figure 
1.2).  First,  it  might  inhibit  the  binding  of  transcription  factors  to  their  recognition  sites. 
Many factors are known to bind CpG-containing
 
sequences, and some of these fail to bind 
when the CpG is methylated (Bell and Felsenfeld, 2000). The second and more prevalent 
mechanism involves proteins with high affinity for methylated CpGs, such as the methyl-
CpG-binding  protein  MeCP2,  the  methyl-CpG-binding-domain  proteins  MBD1,  MBD2 
and  MBD4,  and  Kaiso.  These  proteins  induce  the  recruitment  of  protein  complexes  (co-
repressor  Sin3a  and  HDACs)  that  are  involved  in  histone  modification  and  chromatin 
remodeling.  

 
 

 
Figure 1.2.  DNA methylation can silence genes by either direct (a) or indirect mechanisms 
(b) (SZYF, 2006). 
 
Cytosine methylation of non-CpG (CpA, CpC and CpT) dinucleotides are commonly 
observed  in  embryonic  stem  cells  and  plants  (Ramsahoye  et  al.,  2000).  Grandjean  et  al
(2007)  has  reported  that  Cre-LoxP  recombination  as  well  as  other  non  homologous 
recombination  types  (Rassoulzadegan  et  al.,  2002)  are  strongly  inhibited  in  non-CpG 
methylated  regions.  It  is  also  consistent  with  previous  observations  that  showed  in  vivo 
involvement  of  extensively  non-CpG  methylated  oligo  C  sequences  in  inactivation  of 
transposons and integrated viral genomes (Dodge et al., 2002; Brooks et al., 2004).  
 
The  exact  mechanism(s)  responsible  for  de  novo  CpG  and  non-CpG  methylation 
process  is  only  partly  known.  Most  of  the  currently  available  information  concerns 
methylation in the symmetrical CpG dinucleotides. Much less is known of the somatic and 
germ line maintenance of the non CpG methylation pattern observed in animal and plant 
cells  (Finnegan  et  al.,  2000;  Chan  et  al.,  2005).  Recent  data  indicate  that  the  proteins 
Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b may be responsible for de novo methylation whereas Dnmt1 maintain 
established  patterns  of  methylation  (Okano  et  al.,  1999;  Oka  et  al.,  2005).  De  novo 
methylation of both CpG and non-CpG sites is believed to occur during embryogenesis by 
post  implantation  expression  of  DNMT3s  (Dnmt3b  or  3l)  (Grandjean  et  al.,  2007).  After 

 
 

the  repression  of  DNMT3 expression,  Dnmt1 maintains  the  methylation  of  CpGs  but  not 
on other methylated C residues, resulting in the loss of non-CpG methylation (Ramsahoye 
et al
., 2000). In tumor cells, de novo CpG and non-CpG methylation is observed and most 
likely the results of reactivation of DNMT3 expression (Oka et al., 2005; Kouidou et al., 
2005).  
 
1.1.3.2.    Histone  Modification.  In  addition  to  DNA  methylation,  changes  to  histone 
proteins  affect  the  DNA  structure  and  gene  expression  (Peterson  et  al.,  2004).  These 
modifications,  including  acetylation,  methylation,  phosphorylation,  ubiquitination,  and 
poly–adenosine  diphosphate  ribosylation,  ensure  that  DNA  is  accessible  for  transcription 
or  targeted  for  silencing.  Among  them,  acetylation  and  methylation  of  lysine  residues  in 
the  amino  termini  of  histones  H3  and  H4  are  highly  correlated  with  transcriptional 
activities.  HATs  add  acetyl  groups  to  lysine  residues  close  to  the  N  terminus  of  histone 
proteins,  neutralizing  the  positive  charge.  The  acetylated  N  termini  then  form  tails  that 
protrude from the nucleosome core. Because the acetylated histones are thought to have a 
reduced affinity for DNA and possibly for each other, the chromatin may be able to adopt a 
more  open  structure,  make  DNA  more  accessible  to  the  transcriptional  machinery,  and 
facilitate  localized  transcription.  HDACs  promote  repression  of  gene  expression, 
presumably  because  the  chromatin  can  become  more  condensed  upon  deacetylation. 
Changes in chromatin structure mediated by equilibrium between HAT and HDACs affect 
regulation of transcription (Strachan et al., 2003; Ausio et al., 2003) Histone methylation 
can be a marker for both active and inactive regions of chromatin. Methylation of lysine 9 
on  the  N  terminus  of  histone  H3  is  a  hallmark  of  silent  DNA  and  is  globally  distributed 
throughout  heterochromatic  regions  such  as  centromeres,  telomeres  and  silenced 
promoters. In contrast, methylation of lysine 4 of histone H3 denotes activity and is found 
predominantly at promoters of active genes. Combinations of acetylation, methylation, and 
other  posttranslational  processing  events  lead  to  enormous  variation  of  histone 
modifications (Egger et al., 2004). 
 
Epigenetic mechanisms are involved in control of gene expression, including tissue-
specific  expression,  imprinting,  silencing  of  repetitive  elements,  correct  organization  of 
chromatin  and  X-chromosome  inactivation.  Perturbations  in  the  patterns  of  DNA 
methylation  and  histone  modifications  can  lead  to  congenital  disorders,  multisystem 

 
 

pediatric  syndromes,  neurodevelopmental  disorders  (e.g.  Rett  Syndrome)  or  predispose 
people to acquired disease such as sporadic cancers and neurodegenerative disorders. 
 
Yüklə 4,8 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   13




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə