From mutations to disease mechanism in rett syndrome, breast cancer, and congenital hypothyroidism



Yüklə 4,8 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə3/13
tarix05.05.2017
ölçüsü4,8 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   13

1.2.  Rett Syndrome 
 
Rett syndrome (RTT; OMIM 312750) is an X-linked dominant postnatal progressive 
neurodevelopmental  disorder  and  the  second  most  common  cause  of  mental  retardation 
affecting females (Rett, 1966; Hagberg et al., 1983).  
 
1.2.1.  Historical Background 
 
In  1965,  Dr.  Andreas  Rett,  an  Austrian  physician,  investigated  two  disabled  girls 
having abnormal hand movements like winging, washing and clapping. One year later, he 
reported  22  girls  with  these  abnormal  clinical  features  (Rett,  1966).  However,  the  report 
would  not  be  recognized  in  the  medical  community  for  17  years.  In  1983,  Dr.  Bengt 
Hagberg, a Swedish neurologist, and his colleagues reported the clinical description of 35 
cases  (Hagberg  et  al.,  1983).  He  recognized  that  his  patients  showed  overlapping 
phenotype  with  Dr.  Rett’s  and  called  the  disease  as  Rett  Syndrome  to  honor  the  first 
description by Dr. Rett.  
 
1.2.2.  Clinical and Neuropathological Charecteristics 
 
After  normal  development  up  to  the  age  of  6  to  18  months,  RTT  patients  show  a 
regression of motor and mental abilities. The clinical manifestations in the classical form 
of RTT are characterized by cognitive deterioration with autistic features, loss of acquired 
skills such as language and hand usage, stereotypical hand wringing movements, and gait 
ataxia  (Weaving  et  al.,  2005).  Behavioral  abnormalities  include  teeth  grinding,  night 
laughing or crying, screaming fits, low mood, and anxiety episodes elicited by distressful 
external  events  (Mount  et  al.,  2001).  Patients  suffer  generalized  rigidity,  dystonia,  and 
worsening  of  scoliosis.  Autistic  features  include  expressionless  face,  hypersensitivity  to 
sound,  lack  of  eye-to-eye  contact,  indifference  to  the  surrounding  environment,  and 
unresponsiveness to social cues (Segawa and Nomura, 2005). Most girls with RTT suffer 

 
 

breathing  anomalies,  including  breath-holding,  aerophagia,  forced  expulsion  of  air  and 
saliva, apnea, and hyperventilation. 
 
Patients  with  RTT  develop  postnatal  microcephaly.  The  major  morphological 
abnormalities detected in the central nervous system (CNS) are an overall decrease in the 
size  of  the  brain  and  of  individual  neurons.  Autopsy  studies  revealed  a  12–34  per  cent 
reduction in brain weight and volume in patients with RTT, the effect most pronounced in 
the  prefrontal,  posterior  frontal,  and  anterior  temporal  regions  (Armstrong  et  al.,  2005). 
The RTT brain shows no obvious degeneration, atrophy, or inflammation, and there are no 
signs  of  gliosis  or  neuronal  migration  defects  (Jellinger  et  al.,  1988;  Reiss  et  al.,  1993). 
These  observations  indicate  that  RTT  is  a  disorder  of  postnatal  neurodevelopment  rather 
than  a  neurodegenerative  process.  In  addition,  dendritic  spines  of  the  RTT  frontal  cortex 
are  sparse  and  short,  with  no  other  apparent  abnormalities  (Belichenko  et  al.,  1994). 
Although  neuronal  size  is  reduced  in  the  cortex,  thalamus,  basal  ganglia,  amygdala,  and 
hippocampus, there is an increase in neuronal cell packing in the hippocampus (Kaufmann 
and Moser, 2000). 
 
Neurophysiological  studies  of  mouse  models  and  patients  with  RTT  revealed  that 
both the CNS and the autonomous nervous system contribute to the pathophysiology of the 
disease.  Altered  somatosensory  evoked  potentials  and  abnormal  electroencephalogram 
(EEG)  findings  of  focal,  multifocal,  and  generalized  epileptiform  discharges  and  the 
occurrence  of  rhythmic  slow  theta  activity,  all  suggest  altered  cortical  excitability  in  the 
RTT  brain.  Electrocardiographic  recordings  (ECG)  demonstrate  long  corrected  QT 
intervals  and  suggest  perturbation  of  the  autonomic  nervous  system  (Glaze  et  al.,  2005). 
Mouse models reveal abnormalities in long-term potentiation (LTP) and impaired synaptic 
plasticity.  LTP  is  reduced  in  Mecp2
_/Y
  and  Mecp2
308/Y 
cortical  slices  whereas  LTP  is 
enhanced in hippocampal slices of mouse with MeCP2 overexpression (MECP2
Tg
) (Asaka 
et  al
.,  2006;  Moretti  et  al.,  2006;  Collins  et  al.,  2004).  In  addition,  reduced  spontaneous 
activity in cortical slices of null mice was observed due to a decrease in the total excitatory 
synaptic  drive  and  an  increase  in  the  total  inhibitory  drive  (Dani  et  al.,  2005).  Synaptic 
outputs  in  glutamatergic  neurons  showed  50  per  cent  reduction  and  100  per  cent 
enhancement in Mecp2
-/Y
 and MECP2
Tg
, respectively (Chao et al., 2007). 
 

 
 

Altogether,  these  findings  indicate  that  MeCP2  is  essential  in  modulating  synaptic 
function  and  plasticity,  and  that  MeCP2  function  is  critical  in  regulating  the  number  of 
excitatory synapses during early postnatal development (Chahrour and Zoghbi, 2007). 
 
1.2.3.  Phenotypic Variability in RTT 
 
Atypical  variants  of  RTT  are  also  commonly  observed,  and  five  distinct  categories 
have  been  delineated  on  the  bases  of  clinical  criteria:  Infantile  (early)  seizure  onset, 
congenital  forth,  ‘forme  fruste’,  preserved  speech  variant  (PSV),  and  late  childhood 
regression form (Hagberg et al., 2002). These variants range from milder forms with a later 
age  of  onset  to  more  severe  manifestations.  ‘Forme  fruste’  comprises  the  most  common 
group  (with  80  per  cent)  of  atypical  variants.  These  patients  have  surprisingly  well 
preserved, yet somewhat dyspraxic, hand function, as well as absence of the classic hand 
wringing stereotypies (Hagberg, 2002). The PSV variant is characterized by the ability of 
patients  to  speak  a  few  words,  although  not  necessarily  in  context.  PSV  patients  have  a 
normal  head  size  and  are  usually  overweight  and  kyphotic  (Zappella  et  al.,  2001).  Early 
seizure onset type and congenital forth are the more severe variants of RTT. Early seizure 
onset  type  is  characterized  by  a  lack  of  early  normal  period  due  to  presence  of  seizures 
whereas congenital forth patients lack the early period of normal development (Chahrour 
and Zoghbi, 2007). A definite loss of acquired hand skill is not found in congenital forth 
cases, instead an improvement with age in their most primitive early bilateral hand use is 
seen  (Hagberg  et  al.,  2002).  Classical  and  atypical  RTT  phenotypes  vary  in  severity  and 
onset between different patients and in the same patient over time.  
 
1.2.4.  Genetic Basis of RTT 
 
RTT  has  an  incidence  of  1/10,000  to  1/22,000  female  live  births  (Percy,  2002). 
However, since more than 99 per cent of RTT cases are sporadic, it was very hard to map 
the  disease  locus  by  traditional  linkage  analysis.  Using  information  from  rare  familial 
cases, exclusion mapping identified the Xq28 candidate region, and subsequent screening 
of  candidate  gene,  methyl-CpG-binding  protein  2  (MECP2;  MIM#  300005),  revealed 
mutations in RTT patients (Amir et al., 1999). Several recent studies identified mutations 
in the CDKL5 gene (OMIM 300203) encoding cyclin-dependent kinase like 5 in patients 

 
 

with  an  atypical,  early  onset  seizure  variant  of  RTT  (Weaving  et  al.,  2005;  Evans  et  al., 
2005;  Scala  et  al.,  2005).  The  disruption  of  NTNG1  gene,  encoding  the  axon  guiding 
molecule Netrin G1, by a balanced chromosome translocation was described in one female 
patient with atypical RTT and early-onset seizures (Borg et al., 2005). However, this might 
be an isolated case because NTNG1 screening in a cohort of MECP2 and CDKL5 mutation-
negative patients with RTT failed to identify any pathogenic mutations in this gene (Archer 
et al
., 2006). 
 
RTT  was  initially  thought  to  affect  exclusively  females  and  germline  MECP2 
mutations  were  considered  to  be  lethal  in  males.  Recently,  several  investigators  have 
reported  MECP2  mutations  in  males  with  classic  RTT,  nonfatal  nonprogressive 
encephalopathy,  nonspecific  X-linked  mental  retardation  (MRX),    language  disorder,  or 
schizophrenia (Orrico et al., 2000; Cohen et al., 2002; Kleeftra et al., 2004; Masuyama et 
al
.,  2005).  Males  with  MECP2  mutations  fall  into  three  main  categories:  boys  with  Rett 
syndrome; boys with severe encephalopathy and infantile death; and boys with less severe 
neurological and/or psychiatric manifestations. Boys in the first category  have a 47,XXY 
karyotype or are somatic mosaic and carry the same MECP2 mutations that cause classic 
Rett  syndrome  in  girls.  Males  in  the  second  group  carry  MECP2  mutations  identical  to 
those found in females; these mutations are generally thought to disrupt DNA binding or 
nuclear localization of the MECP2 protein. In the third group are boys with mutations that 
are  not  found  in  girls  with  Rett  syndrome,  presumably  because  their  effects  are  mild  in 
heterozygosity.  Recent  data  indicate  that  increased  MECP2  gene-dosage  can  disrupt 
normal  brain  function.  Interestingly,  submicroscopic  duplications  in  Xq28  region 
encompassing the MECP2 gene were identified in a boy with severe mental retardation and 
clinical  features  of  Rett  syndrome,  several  patients  with  severe  mental  retardation  and 
progressive  spasticity,  and  male  with  non-specific  X-linked  mental  retardation  (Meins  et 
al
., 2005; van Esch et al., 2005; de Gaudio et al., 2006; Friez et al., 2006).  
 
1.2.5.  MECP2 Gene 
 
The  MECP2  gene  is  located  on  chromosome  Xq28  and  consists  of  four  exons  that 
code for two different isoforms of the protein, due to alternative splicing of exon 2. Two 
MeCP2  isoforms  differ  only  in  their  N-terminus.  The  first  identified  isoform,  MeCP2-e2 

 
 
10 
(MeCP2A, 486 amino acids) uses a translational start site within exon 2, whereas the new 
isoform, MeCP2-e1 (MeCP2B, 498 amino acids) is derived from an mRNA in which exon 
2  is  excluded  and  starts  from  ATG  located  within  exon  1.  MeCP2-e1  isoform  is  more 
abundant  and  contains  24  amino  acids  encoded  by  exon  1  and  lacks  the  9  amino  acids 
encoded by exon 2 (Dragich et al., 2007; Kriaucionis and Bird, 2004; Mnatzakanian et al., 
2004).  In  addition,  MECP2  has  a  large,  highly  conserved  3’-untranslated  region  that 
contains  multiple  polyadenylation  sites,  which  can  be  alternatively  used  to  generate  four 
different  transcripts.  Expression  studies  in  mice  showed  that  the  longest  transcript  is  the 
most abundant  in  brain, with  higher  expression  during  embryonic  development, followed 
by postnatal decline, and subsequent increase in expression levels later in adult life (Pelka 
et  al
.,  2005;  Shahbazian  et  al.,  2002b).  Although  the  MeCP2  is  almost  ubiquitously 
expressed,  it  is  relatively  more  abundant  in  the  brain,  primarily  in  mature  postmigratory 
neurons  (Jung  et  al.,  2003).  MeCP2  protein  levels  are  low  during  embryogenesis  and 
increase  progressively  during  the  postnatal  period  of  neuronal  maturation  (Balmer  et  al., 
2003; Cohen et al., 2003; Kishi and Macklis, 2004; Mullaney et al., 2004; Shahbazian et 
al
.,  2002b).  Both  MeCP2  isoforms  are  nuclear  and  colocalize  with  methylated 
heterochromatic foci in mouse cells. Since MeCP2 is expressed in mature neurons and its 
levels increase during postnatal development, it may play a role in modulating the activity 
or  plasticity  of  mature  neurons.  Consistent  with  this,  MECP2  mutations  do  not  seem  to 
affect the proliferation or differentiation of neuronal precursors.  
 
MeCP2  is  a  member  of  the  family  of  related  proteins  that  bind  specifically  to 
symmetrically  methylated  CpG  dinucleotides  via  a  conserved  methyl  binding  domain 
(MBD)  (Bird,  2002).  Besides  a  methyl  binding  domain  (MBD,  residues  78–162),  the 
protein  includes  a  transcription  repression  domain  (TRD,  residues  207–310)  involved  in 
transcriptional  repression  through  recruitment  of  co-repressors and  chromatin  remodeling 
complexes,  two  nuclear  localization  signals  (NLS,  residues173-193  and  255–271),  and  a 
63 residue group II WW binding domain in C-terminal (from 325 to 388) (Figure 1.3). The 
C-terminus facilitates MeCP2 binding to naked DNA and to the nucleosomal core, and it 
also  contains  evolutionarily  conserved  poly-proline  runs  that  can  bind  to  group  II  WW 
domain splicing factors (Buschdorf and Stratling, 2004). 

 
 
11 
 
Figure 1.3.  The MECP2 gene (a) and its protein product (MeCP2A) with conserved 
domains (b).  
 
1.2.6.  CDKL5 Gene 
 
CDKL5  gene, previously known as serine/threonine kinase 9 (STK9), is located on 
chromosome  Xp22.  Alterations  in  this  gene  were  originally  found  to  cause  early-onset 
epilepsy  and  infantile  spasms  with  severe  mental  retardation  (Grosso  et  al.,  2007).  The 
observation that mutations in MECP2 and CDKL5 cause similar phenotypes in early onset 
seizure variant of RTT suggested that these genes might participate in the same molecular 
pathways.  Mari  et  al.  (2005)  showed  that  MECP2  and  CDKL5  have  an  overlapping 
temporal and spatial expression profile during neuronal maturation and synaptogenesis and 
that  they  physically  interact.  The  interaction  was  shown  to  require  a  portion  of  the  C 
terminal domain of MeCP2, suggesting that mutations in this region might be involved in 
RTT  onset  owing  to  loss  of  interaction  between  the  two  proteins.  Furthermore,  it  was 
shown that the kinase activity of CDKL5 can cause both autophosphorylation and MeCP2 
phosphorylation,  and  this  latter  activity  is  eliminated  in  pathogenic  CDKL5  mutants 
(Bertani et al., 2006). Phosphorylation of MeCP2 has a crucial role in the regulation of its 
target gene expression (Mari et al., 2005).  
 
1.2.7.  MECP2 Mutation Profile 
 
Mutations in the MECP2 gene are associated with several disorders that include Rett 
syndrome  (RTT),  Angelman  syndrome  like  phenotype,  autism,  and  even  mild  forms  of 

 
 
12 
mental retardation (Amir et al., 1999; Couvert et a., 2001; Watson et al., 2001). MECP2 
mutations can be identified in 70–90 per cent of classical sporadic RTT cases, however, in 
only 29-45 per cent of atypical RTT and familial cases (Webb and Latif, 2001; Schanen et 
al
., 2004, Fukuda et al., 2005).  
 
Up  to  date  more  than  200  different  mutations  of  MECP2  have  been  identified  in 
patients  with  classical  and  atypical  RTT.  Most  mutations  are  de  novo  that  arise  in  the 
paternal germline and often involve a C to T transition at CpG dinucleotides (Trappe et al., 
2001;  Wan  et  al.,  1999).  Among  200  different  mutations  of  MECP2  eight  missense  and 
nonsense  mutations  (p.R106W,  p.R133C,  p.T158M,  p.R168X,  p.R255X,  p.R270X, 
p.R294X, and p.R306C) are known to account for almost 70 per cent (RettBASE). 
 
Among those mutations, the great majority (80 per cent) represent single nucleotide 
changes, with the remainder small-scale deletions (17 per cent) or insertions (3 per cent). 
Most missense mutations are tightly clustered at the methyl-CpG binding domain (MBD). 
Deletion/insertion mutations leading to loss of the open reading frame occur throughout the 
gene,  but  are  clustered  in  the  C-terminal  coding  region,  which  contains  a  poly-histidine 
repeat (RettBASE). 
 
With  the  use  of  quantitative  experimental  methods  in  recent  years,  MECP2  exon 
deletions were identified in 2.9-14 per cent of cases with RTT (RettBASE). On the other 
hand, duplication was reported in only one female patient with PSV  variant of RTT who 
was found to carry three copies of the MECP2 exon 4  (Ariani et al., 2004). Regardless of 
the mechanism, mutations within the MECP2 lead to loss of function or a protein product 
with diminished stability.  
 
A  wide  spectrum  of  phenotypic  variability  is  observed  in  patients  with  MECP2 
mutations and considered with respect to the mutation type, location in the gene, and the 
X-chromosome  inactivation  (XCI)  pattern.  Genotype–phenotype  correlations  in  females 
with  Rett  syndrome  have  yielded  conflicting  results.  In  general,  female  patients  with 
mutations  in  MECP2 that  truncate  the protein  towards  its  C-terminal end  (late-truncating 
mutations)  have  a  milder  phenotype,  and  less  typical  of  classical  Rett  syndrome  when 
compared  to  patients  who  have  missense  or  N-terminal  (early  truncating)  mutations 

 
 
13 
(Charman  et  al.,  2005).  Patients  with  mutations  upstream  of  or  within  the  TRD  domain 
show greater clinical severity (Jian et al., 2005). In addition, p.Arg133Cys mutation causes 
an overall milder phenotype while the p.Arg270X mutation, which is predicted to result in 
a  truncated  protein,  is  associated  with  increased  mortality  (Kerr  et  al.,  2006;  Jian  et  al., 
2005).  
 
It  has  been  suggested  that  genetic  background  and/or  non-random  X-chromosome 
inactivation in the brain influences the biological consequences of mutations in MECP2. In 
females, only one of the two X chromosomes is active in each cell and the choice of which 
X chromosome is active is usually random, such that half of the cells have the maternal X 
chromosome  and  the  other  half  have  the  paternal  X  chromosome  active.  Therefore,  a 
female with a MECP2 mutation is typically mosaic, whereby half of her cells express the 
wild-type MECP2 allele and the other half express the mutant MECP2 allele. Occasionally, 
cells  expressing  the  wild-type  MECP2  allele  divide  faster  or  survive  better  than  cells 
expressing  the  mutant  allele,  which  therefore  results  in  a  nonrandom  pattern  of  XCI  and 
amelioration  of  the  RTT  neurological  phenotypes.  Depending  on  the  extent  of  such 
favorable skewing, some patients can be mildly affected or are even asymptomatic carriers 
of  MECP2  mutations  (Weaving  et  al.,  2005).  The  best  examples  for  illustrating  the 
dramatic  effects  of  XCI  patterns  in  RTT  are  monozygotic  twins  who  manifest  very 
different  phenotypes  (Dragich  et  al.,  2000).  In  addition,  skewed  XCI  patterns  occur  in 
brain regions of female mice heterozygous for a mutant MECP2 allele, where phenotypic 
severity correlates with the degree of skewing (Young and Zoghbi, 2004).  
 
1.2.8.  MeCP2 Function 
 
1.2.8.1.    Transcription  Regulation  and  Chromatin  Remodeling.  Findings  of  extensive 
research suggests that MeCP2 acts as a transmitter of epigenetic information by binding to 
methylated  CpG  dinucleotides,  recruiting  complexes  that  include histone deacetylase and 
methyltransferase, and leading to local transcriptional repression. The function of MeCP2 
as  a  transcriptional  repressor  was  first  suggested  based  on  in  vitro  experiments  in  which 
MeCP2 specifically inhibited transcription from methylated promoters (Nan et al., 1997). 
When MeCP2 binds to methylated CpG dinucleotides of target genes via its MBD, its TRD 
recruits  the  corepressor  Sin3A  and  histone  deacetylases  (HDACs)  1  and  2  (Jones  et  al., 

 
 
14 
1998;  Nan  et  al.,  1998).  The  transcriptional  repressor  activity  of  MeCP2  involves 
compaction of chromatin by promoting nucleosome clustering, either through recruitment 
of  HDAC  and  histone  deacetylation  or  through  direct  interaction  between  its  C-terminal 
domain and chromatin (Figure 1.4) (Nikitina et al., 2007). 
 
According  to  the  dominant  model  of  MeCP2  action,  target  genes  are  silenced  by 
MeCP2 binding to the promoter. However, combined ChIP–chip promoter and expression 
profiling analysis reveals that 62.6 per cent of MeCP2-bound promoters (including BDNF
are  transcriptionally  active  (Yasui  et  al.,  2007).  These  studies  clearly  demonstrate  that 
MeCP2  promoter  occupancy  does  not  correlate  with  transcriptional  silencing  of  target 
genes but rather functions as a modulator of gene expression depending on the physiologic 
state  of  the  organism.  Metaphorically  speaking,  MeCP2  may  be  best  thought  of  as  the 
dimmer that regulates the amount of light rather than the switch that turns the lamp on and 
off (Chahrour and Zoghbi, 2007). Extensive studies of the binding of MeCP2 (or the MBD 
alone)  to  DNA  in  vitro  have  revealed  that  the  affinity  for  methylated  DNA  is  not  strong 
and is only ~3-fold weaker for unmethylated DNA (Fraga et al., 2003). 
 
Transcriptional  profiling  indicates  that  MeCP2  is  not  a  general  transcriptional 
repressor  in  vivo  but  has  a  more  subtle  effect  involving  a  subset  of  genes  (Tudor  et  al., 
2002;  Ballester  et  al.,  2005).  Also,  the  finding  that  MeCP2-induced  repression  is  only 
partially  alleviated  by  inhibiting  HDACs  suggests  that  its  activity  is  not  restricted  to 
HDAC  recruitment  (Yu  et  al.,  2000).  Furthermore,  there  is  evidence  that  MeCP2  is 
responsible for the formation of large chromatin loops (Horike et al., 2005) (Figure 1.5). 
Nikitina et al. (2007) has shown that MeCP2 dependent chromatin loop formation occurs 
in two steps: a methylation-independent interaction between chromatin and the C terminus 
that  is  required  for  the  second,  methylation-specific,  interaction  between  DNA  and  the 
MBD  domain.  The  yellow  and  blue  arrows  in  Figure  1.5  indicate  MeCP2-interacting 
sequences. When MeCP2 is present, it interacts with sequences that are near the imprinted 
DLX5 and DLX6 genes and define the boundaries of an 11-kb chromatin loop. This leads 
to  an  integration  of  DLX5  and  DLX6  into  a  loop  of  silent,  methylated  chromatin,  and 
represses  their  expression  (Figure  1.5a).  In  neurons  that  are  deficient  for  MeCP2,  the 
chromatin in this region is structured into a distinct conformation that corresponds to active 
chromatin  loops,  which  are  bordered  by  sequences  (indicated  by  long  purple  and  orange 

 
 
15 
arrows) that interact with chromatin factors. Therefore, in MeCP2- deficient neurons, the 
expression of DLX5 and DLX6 is no longer repressed (Figure 1.5b) (Bienvenu and Chelly, 
2006). 
 
 
Figure 1.4.  Mechanisms of methylation dependent (a) and independent (b) transcription 
regulation and chromatin remodeling (Bienvenu and Chelly, 2006). 
 
 
1.2.8.2.  RNA Splicing. Recent studies suggest that the function of MeCP2 might be more 
complex  than  previously  anticipated.  For  instance,  purified  recombinant  MeCP2  was 
shown  to  have  a  high-affinity  RNA  binding  activity  that  is  mutually  exclusive  to  its 
methyl-CpG-binding  properties  and  does  not  require  the  methyl-CpG-binding  domain 
(Jeffery et al., 2004).   

 
 
16 
 
Figure 1.5.  Regulation of imprinted regions through formation of a silent chromatin loop. 
(a) transcriptionally inactive and (b) active conformation (Bienvenu and Chelly, 2006). 
 
 
Interestingly,  although  the  biological  significance  of  a  MeCP2–RNA  complex 
remains to be elucidated, recent data indicated that MeCP2 interacts with the RNA-binding 
Y  box-binding  protein 1  (YB1)  and  regulates  splicing  of  reporter  minigenes  (Figure  1.6) 
(Young  et  al.,  2005).  Importantly,  aberrant  RNA-splicing  patterns  of  several  genes 
including Dlx5 were identified in Mecp2 null mice (Young et al., 2005). The finding that 
MeCP2 regulates transcription and splicing of some of its targets suggests the existence of 
multiple layers of epigenetic regulation (Moretti and Zoghbi, 2006). 
 
 
Figure 1.6.  Regulation of alternative splicing by MeCP2; a) RNA splicing in the presence 
of MECP2 and b) aberrant splicing in the absence of MECP2 (Bienvenu and Chelly, 2006). 
 
 

 
 
17 
Yüklə 4,8 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   13




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə