From mutations to disease mechanism in rett syndrome, breast cancer, and congenital hypothyroidism



Yüklə 4,8 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə4/13
tarix05.05.2017
ölçüsü4,8 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   13

1.2.9.  Mouse Models of RTT 
 
To  unravel  the  molecular  changes  that  underlie  RTT,  several  mouse  models  with 
different  MECP2  mutations  were  generated.  Mecp2-null  male  (Mecp2
_/y
)  and  female 
(Mecp2
_/_
)  mice  generated  via  cre/lox  recombination  have  no  apparent  phenotype  until 
around  6  weeks.  There  follows  a  period  of  rapid  regression  resulting  in  reduced 
spontaneous  movement,  uncoordinated  gait,  irregular  breathing,  hind  limb  clasping  and 
tremors. Rapid progression of symptoms leads to death at 8 weeks of age (Guy et al., 2001; 
Chen et al., 2001). Detailed brain examination revealed that the brains of Mecp2 null mice 
are smaller in size and weight than brains of wild type littermates, but have no detectable 
structural  abnormalities,  except  for  smaller,  more  densely  packed  neurons  (Chen  et  al., 
2001). In addition, the olfactory neurons of Mecp2 null mice demonstrate a transient delay 
in differentiation, and abnormalities of axonal targeting, suggesting that Mecp2 mediates a 
crucial  function  in  the  final  stages  of  neuronal  development  (Matarazzo  et  al.,  2004). 
Recently, Pelka et al. (2006) reported a null mice with XO background (Mecp2
_/0
) showing 
similar  phenotypes  with  male  Mecp2
_/y
  mice.  This  finding  indicates  that  the  Y-
chromosome has no effect on the phenotypic manifestation in Mecp2 null mice (Pelka et 
al
., 2006). 
 
Shahbazian  et  al.  (2002)  reported  another  RTT  mouse  model  generated  with 
insertion of a stop codon in the Mecp2 gene at nucleotide position corresponding to amino 
acid  309.  This  mutation  results  in  a  truncated  protein  with  the  MBD,  TRD,  and  NLS 
domain and a lack of the C-terminal region, which is predicted to have similar effects of 
p.Arg294X  mutation  observed  in  RTT  patients.  Mecp2
308/Y 
mice  display  no  initial 
phenotype  until  6  weeks  of  age,  and  then  they  develop  progressive  neurological 
phenotypes,  including  motor  dysfunction,  forepaw  stereotypies,  hypoactivity,  tremor, 
seizures,  kyphosis,  social  behavior  abnormalities,  decreased  diurnal  activity,  increased 
anxiety-related  behavior,  and  learning  and  memory  deficits,  reminiscent  of  the  clinical 
picture  in  human  girls  with  RTT.  Female  mice  heterozygous  for  the  truncation  display 
milder  and  more  variable  features.  In  vivo,  the  truncated  protein  maintains  normal 
chromatin localization, but histone H3 is hyperacetylated in the brain, indicating abnormal 
chromatin architecture (Shahbazian et al., 2002; Moretti et al., 2005).     
 

 
 
18 
Collins et al. (2004) has developed a mouse model that transgenically over-expressed 
MECP2
  under  the  endogenous  human  promoter.  Initially,  MECP2
Tg
  mice  display 
increased synaptic plasticity, with enhancement in motor and contextual learning abilities. 
However,  at  20  weeks  of  age,  these  mice  developed  seizures,  hypoactivity  and  spasticity 
with several other progressive neurological abnormalities. 
 
The conditional inactivation of MeCP2 in only post-mitotic neurons of the forebrain 
caused delayed onset of symptoms similar to those shown by Mecp2 knockout mice. This 
finding  indicates  that  Mecp2  plays  an  essential  role  in  post-mitotic  neurons  (Chen  et  al., 
2001).  Additionally, the expression of Mecp2 in only post-mitotic neurons of Mecp2-null 
mice  was  shown  to  be  sufficient  to  restore  normal  neurological  function.  This  finding 
indicates  that  Mecp2  deficiency  in  peripheral  tissues  does  not  significantly  influence 
disease manifestations and suggests that Mecp2 plays no essential role in the early stages 
of brain development (Luikenhuis et al., 2004).  
 
1.2.10.  MeCP2 Target Genes and Their Relevance with Disease  
 
Although  biochemical  evidence  suggested  that  MeCP2  functions  as  a  global 
repressor of gene expression, transcriptional profiling failed to identify profound changes 
of  gene  expression  in  the  brain  of  Mecp2  knockout  mice  (Tudor  et  al.,  2002).  Using  the 
candidate gene approach or CGH analysis of samples from both human and mouse tissues, 
only a few number of putative MeCP2 targets that might be relevant to the pathogenesis of 
RTT was identified (Figure 1.7). 
 
The  first  gene  shown  to  be  repressed  by  MeCP2  was  brain-derived  neurotrophic 
factor  (BDNF),  encoding  a  protein  that  has  essential  functions  for  neuronal  plasticity, 
learning  and  memory  (Chen  et  al.,  2003).  In  basal  conditions,  BDNF  expression  is 
repressed  by  MeCP2  bound  to  its  promoter;  upon  membrane  depolarization, 
phosphorylated MeCP2 dissociates from the promoter and BDNF expression is induced by 
binding  of  CREB  (Moretti  et  al.,  2005  and  2006).  Conditional  deletion  of  Bdnf  in 
postmitotic  neurons  of  mice  mimicked  some  of  the  phenotypes  observed  in  Mecp2  null 
mice,  including  hind  limb  clasping,  reduced  brain  weight,  and  reduced  olfactory  and 
hippocampal neuronal sizes. However, Chang and colleagues reported that BDNF protein 

 
 
19 
levels are decreased rather than increased in brains of symptomatic Mecp2
-/Y
 mice. Since 
Bdnf  is  known  to  be  upregulated  in  response  to  neuronal  activity,  the  reduced  cortical 
activity  in  Mecp2  null  mice  is  expected  to  negatively  affect  Bdnf  expression,  hence 
masking  the  expected  upregulation  that  would  normally  result  from  loss  of  repression  in 
resting  cortical  neurons  that  lack  MeCP2  (Chang  et  al.,  2006).  Consistent  with  this  data, 
forebrain-specific deletion of Bdnf in Mecp2
-/Y
 mice resulted in earlier onset of locomotor 
dysfunction and reduced lifespan, while forebrain- specific overexpression of Bdnf in these 
mice improved locomotor function and extended their lifespan (Chang et al., 2006).  
 
Horike et al. (2005) reported the loss of imprinting of a maternally expressed gene, 
distal-less homeobox 5 (DLX5), in both Mecp2-null mice and in lymphoblastoid cell lines 
obtained from RTT patients. MeCP2 was shown to be essential for the formation of a silent 
chromatin structure at the Dlx5 locus by histone methylation and through the formation of 
a  chromatin  loop.  Dlx5  regulates  GABA  neurotransmission  and  osteogenesis;  therefore, 
alterations  in  Dlx5  expression  can  account  for  epilepsy,  osteoporosis  and  somatic 
hypoevolutism observed in RTT girls.  
 
MeCP2  was  shown  to  affect  the  expression  pattern  of  UBE3A  located  in  PWS/AS 
imprinted  region.  UBE3A  encodes  the  ubiquitin  ligase  E3A  and  imprinted  only  in  the 
brain.  Mutations  in  the  maternal  copy  of  the  gene  account  for  about  10  per  cent  of 
Angelman Syndrome (AS) cases. UBE3A mRNA and protein levels are slightly reduced in 
human and mouse MeCP2-deficient brains due to the overexpression of anti sense UBE3A 
(Makedonski  et  al.,  2005).  Since  maternal  mutations  in  UBE3A  (or  repression  of  the 
maternal  allele)  give  rise  to  AS,  it  is  speculated  that  deregulation  of  UBE3A  expression 
that results from MeCP2 loss of function might contribute to the clinical manifestations of 
Rett  syndrome,  such  as  mental  retardation,  seizures,  muscular  hypotonia  and  acquired 
microcephaly, that are common to both conditions (Makedonski et al., 2005).  
 
Chip  analyses  revealed  that  MeCP2  binds  to  promoter  region  of  the  corticotropin-
releasing  hormone  (CRH)  gene,  glucocorticoid-inducible  genes,  serum  glucocorticoid-
inducible kinase 1 (Sgk1) and FK506-binding protein 5 (Fkbp5) in wild type brain. It was 
shown that these genes are upregulated in Mecp2 null mice (Bale and Vale, 2004; Nuber et 
al
., 2005). Since the genes Sgk1, Fkbp5, and Crh are involved in regulation of behavioral 

 
 
20 
and physiological responses to stress it may be suggested that at least some RTT symptoms 
arise  from  the  disruption  of  MeCP2  regulation  on  stress-responsive  genes  (Nuber  et  al., 
2005).  
      
 
Figure 1.7.  MeCP2 target genes and their relevance with the disease. Loss of MeCP2 
affects the expression pattern of specific genes: BDNF, DLX5, Sgk1, Fkbp5 and antisense 
UBE3A (Mari et al., 2005). 
 
 
1.3.  Breast Cancer 
 
1.3.1.  Breast Tissue  
 
The  breast,  being  an  apocrine  gland,  is  composed  of  glandular,  fatty,  and  fibrous 
tissues positioned over the pectoral muscles of the chest wall and attached to the chest wall 
by  fibrous  strands  called  Cooper’s  ligaments.  A  layer  of  fatty  tissue  surrounds the  breast 
glands  and  extends  throughout  the  breast.  The  fatty  tissue  gives  the  breast  a  soft 

 
 
21 
consistency. The glandular tissues of the breast house the lobules (milk producing glands at 
the ends of the lobes) and the ducts (transporting milk from the milk glands to the nipple). 
Toward the nipple, each duct widens to form a sac (ampulla) (Figure 1.8). During lactation, 
the bulbs on the ends of the lobules produce milk. Once milk is produced, it is transferred 
through the ducts to the nipple.  
 
Figure 1.8.  A schematic diagram of a normal female breast (www.cancer.org/docroot/ 
CRI/content/CRI_2_4_1X_what_is_breast_cancer_5.asp). 
 
1.3.2.  Breast Cancer Risk 
 
Breast  cancer  is  the  most  common  malignancy  among  women  in  industrialized 
countries and diagnosed in 1 x 10
6
 women in the world each year. The highest age-adjusted 
incidence  rate  is  reported  for  North  America,  being  86.3  per  100,000  women  per  year, 
while  the  lowest  rate,  reported  in  China,  is  only  11.8.  The  average  incidence  is  63.2  for 
more developed countries and 23.1 for the less developed regions.  
 
Breast  carcinomas  originate  from  the  epithelial  cells  lining  the  ducts  or  lobules, 
therefore classified as ductal or lobular carcinomas. Ductal carcinoma is the most common 
type  of  breast  cancer,  accounting  for  85  to  90  per  cent  of  the  cases.  Lobular  carcinoma 
occurs  in  10  to  12  per  cent  of  the cases  (Feig  SA,  2000).  Ductal  breast malignancies  are 
divided into two categories, pre-invasive and invasive. Pre-invasive ductal cancer is called 

 
 
22 
ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). It is a very early stage of breast cancer and is the result of 
proliferation of the ductal luminal cells which fills the lumen but do not enter the basement 
membrane and the surrounding stroma. It accounts for 5 per cent of all breast carcinomas. 
Invasive  (infiltrating) ductal carcinoma (IDC) is  the most aggressive type with capability 
of metastasis. Invasive lobular carcinomas (ILC) only account for about 10 per cent of all 
breast cancers  and they  tend  to  be  somewhat less  aggressive  than  IDC. Unlike  IDC,  it  is 
now believed that lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) is not a precursor of invasive lobular 
carcinoma.  The  confusion  exists  because  LCIS,  while  it  has  the  word  carcinoma  in  its 
name,  does  not  behave  like  a  cancerous  condition.  LCIS  does  not  grow,  form  masses, 
transform  into  invasive  cancer,  or  metastasize.  Therefore,  it  does  not  represent  a  true 
malignancy. 
  
The  molecular  mechanisms  underlying  the  development  of  breast  cancer  are  not 
completely understood. However, it is generally believed that the initiation of breast cancer 
is a consequence of cumulative genetic damages leading to genetic alterations that result in 
activation  of  proto-oncogenes  and  inactivation  of  tumor  suppressor  genes.  These  in  turn 
are followed by uncontrolled cellular proliferation and/or aberrant programmed cell death, 
or  apoptosis.  Also,  the  role  of  reactive  oxygen  species  (ROS)  has  been  related  to  the 
etiology  of  cancer,  as  they  are  known  to  be  mutagenic,  and  therefore  capable  of  tumor 
promotion.  
 
The risk of developing breast cancer is increased if a family history of the disease is 
present.  The  epidemiological  studies  have  shown  that  12  per  cent  of  women  with  breast 
cancer had one and one per cent had two or more affected relatives. Therefore the genesis 
of most breast cancers can not be explained by heritage. Age and the duration of exposure 
to endogenous or exogenous steroid hormone levels are suggested as the best defined risk 
factors for breast cancer. Breast cancer is uncommon among women younger than 30 years 
of age but the incidence increases sharply with age. The rate of increase in breast cancer 
incidence  continues  throughout  life  but  slows  somewhat  between  ages  45  and  50  years. 
This finding strongly suggests the involvement of reproductive hormones in breast cancer 
etiology,  because  non-hormone-dependent  cancers  do  not  exhibit  this  change  in  slope  of 
the incidence curve around the time of menopause (Pike et al., 1993). Several reproductive 
factors that alter estrogen status affect the risk of breast cancer: early age at menarche and 

 
 
23 
late  age  at  menopause  are  associated  with  increased  risk  of  breast  cancer.  After 
menopause,  adipose  tissue  is  the  major  source  of  estrogen,  and  obese  postmenopausal 
women have both higher levels of endogenous estrogen and a higher risk of breast cancer 
(Harris et al., 1992; Huang et al., 1997). Postmenopausal hormone use increases the breast 
cancer  risk  depending  on  the  duration  of  use  and  whether  estrogen  alone  or  estrogen  in 
combination with progestin is taken (Ross et al., 2000).  
 
The age might be the driving force for the accumulation of mutational load due to the 
reactive  oxygen  species,  telomere  dysfunction,  and  increased  epigenetic  gene  silencing. 
Exposure  to  growth  factors  like  estrogen  increases  the  likelihood  of  occurrence  of  these 
changes  in  breast  epithelial  stem  cells  as  well  as  the  propagation  of  these  changes  by 
enabling the cells to divide. 
 
Hereditary (familial) form of the breast cancer represents 5-10 per cent of all cases. 
BRCA1,  BRCA2,  p53,  ATM,  CHECK2,  and  PTEN  are  the  major  breast  cancer 
susceptibility  genes  (Marcus  et  al.,  1996;  Miki et  al.,  1994;  Stratton  and  Wooster,  1995; 
Hill  et  al.,  1997,  Bell  et  al  1999,  Cantor  et  al  2001).  BRCA1,  BRCA2  and  ATM  genes 
maintain  genomic  stability  and  involved  in  repair  of  double-strand  breaks.  BRCA1  and 
BRCA2 play also role in transcription and cell cycle control acting as a tumor suppressor 
gene  (Venkitaraman,  2002).  p53  is  known  to  be  involved  in  cell  cycle  regulation,  DNA 
damage  repair,  apoptosis  and  inhibition  of  angiogenesis.  Therefore,  loss  of  functional 
protein eliminates the growth arrest in response to DNA damage and allows the replication 
of  mutated  DNA.  CHECK2,  a  G2  check  point  kinase,  is  involved  in  the  repair  of  DNA 
breaks.  PTEN  is  a  lipid  phosphatase  that  was  identified  as  a  candidate  tumor  suppressor 
gene. It is suggested to have an inhibitory role on PKB/Akt that is required for cell growth 
and  survival  (Downward  J,  1998).  It  is  also  found  to  inhibit  integrin-mediated  cell 
migration thus preventing metastasis (Tamura et al., 1998).  
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
24 
1.3.3.  Breast Carcinogenesis 
 
Breast cancer progression is a multi-step process encompassing progressive changes 
from  normal,  to  hyperplasia  with  and  without  atypia,  carcinoma  in  situ,  invasive 
carcinoma, and metastasis (Figure 1.9) ( Simpson et al., 2005).  
 
 
Figure 1.9.  Simplified multi-step model of breast cancer progression based on 
morphological features (Simpson et al., 2005). 
 
It has been suggested that a cell has to acquire six features to become malignant (IDC 
or  ILC):  (1)  limitless  replicative  potential,  (2)  self-sufficiency  in  growth  signals,  (3) 
insensitivity  to  growth-inhibitory  signals,  (4)  evasion  of  programmed  cell  death,  (5) 
sustained  angiogenesis  and  (6)  tissue  invasion  and  metastasis  (Hanahan  and  Weinberg, 
2000).  This  process  requires  complex  series  of  stochastic  genetic  events  including  gene 
amplifications,  gene  deletions,  point  mutations,  loss  of  heterozygosity,  chromosomal 
rearrangements, and overall aneuploidy. Some of the observed genetic lesions are loss of 
16q, 11q, 14q, 8p, 13q, gain of 17q, 8q, 5p, and amplifications on 17q12, 17q22–24, 6q22, 
8q22, 11q13, and 20q13. Besides the genetic alterations, epigenetic alterations are among 
the  most  common  molecular  alterations  in  human  neoplasia  (Baylin  and  Herman,  2000; 
Jones,  1996;  Jones  and  Laird,  1999).    Hypermethylation  and  global  hypomethylation  of 
more  than  25  genes  have  been  correlated  with  breast  carcinogenesis.  Abnormal 
methylation  of  each  gene  enables  cells  to  acquire  new  capabilities  needed  for 
tumorigenesis (Figure 1.10 and Table 1.1).   
 

 
 
25 
 
Figure 1.10.  View of breast carcinogenesis from a DNA methylation standpoint 
(Widschwendter and Jones, 2002). 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
26 
Table 1.1.  The list of methylated genes in breast cancer (Widschwendter et al., 2002). 
 

 
 
27 
Table 1.1.  The list of methylated genes in breast cancer (continued). 
 
 
1.3.4.  DNA Methylation and Genetic Instability 
 
The  genomic  instability  is  the  common  feature  of  all  cancer  types  and  DNA 
methylation might be responsible for these chromosomal instabilities. Methylation leads to 
instability  in  several  ways.  First,  5meCs  serve  as  sites  of  transition  mutations  by  the 
hydrolytic deamination of 5meC to thymine. For example, such mutations frequently occur 
in the tumor suppressor genes p53, Rb, and c-H-ras-1 (Magewu and Jones, 1994; Ghazi et 
al
., 1990). Secondly, epigenetic inactivation of certain critical genes in cancer by promoter 
methylation may predispose to genetic instability (Herman and Baylin, 2000). For instance, 
methylation of MLH1, a gene involved in mismatch repair, precedes the MIN + phenotype 

 
 
28 
in sporadic colon, gastric and endometrial cancers (Esteller et al. 1999). Furthermore, there 
is  a  striking  correlation  between  mismatch  repair,  genetic  instability  and  methylation 
capacity in colon cancer cell models (Lengauer et al., 1997, 1998). In addition, promoter 
CpG island methylation and resulting inactivation of the detoxifying π-class glutathione S-
transferase  (GST)  can  lead  to  accumulation  of  oxygen  radicals  and  subsequent  DNA 
damage  (Lee  et  al.,  1994,  Henderson  et  al.,  1998,  Matsui  et  al.,  2000).  A  p53-inducible 
gene,  14–3–3σ,  is  methylated  and  inactivated  in  many  breast  cancers.  Loss  of  its 
expression may also facilitate the accumulation of genetic damages (Ferguson et al., 2000). 
Apart  from  regional  hypermethylation  of  some  critical  tumor  suppressor  genes,  genome-
wide hypomethylation is an important feature in cancer and can also contribute to genetic 
instability (Schmutte and Fishel, 1999). 
 
Genomic integrity, senescence, and evasion of programmed cell death (apoptosis) are 
thought  to  be  important  barriers  to  the  development  of  malignant  lesions.  DNA  repair 
proteins  have  emerged  as  the  key  regulators  among  the  multitude  of  players  involved  in 
cell  cycle  control  and  apoptosis  by  inducing  apoptosis  in  stressed  or  abnormal  cells, 
thereby protecting the organism from cancer development.  
 
1.3.5.  DNA Repair System 
 
DNA  repair  enzymes  maintain  the  integrity  of  the  genetic  code  by  removing 
damaged  DNA  segments  and  minimizing  replication  errors.  DNA  damage  may  be  a 
consequence  of  normal  cellular  function  (e.g.  replication  errors,  oxidative  metabolism, 
reactive  metabolites  of  hormone  synthesis)  or  of  environmental  factors  such  as  radiation 
(UV) or xenobiotic chemicals (Mohrenweiser and Jones, 1998). Cells with damaged DNA 
may be removed by apoptosis, or programmed cell death. If DNA adducts escape cellular 
repair  mechanisms  and  persist,  they  may  lead  to  miscoding,  resulting  in  permanent 
mutations.  If  a  permanent  mutation  occurs  in  a  critical  region  of  an  oncogene  or  tumor 
suppressor  gene,  it  can  lead  to  activation  of  the  oncogene  or  deactivation  of  the  tumor 
suppressor  gene.  Multiple  events  of  this  type  lead  to  aberrant  cells  with  loss  of  normal 
growth control and ultimately to cancer.  
 

 
 
29 
Multiple  and  complementary  DNA  repair  systems  have  evolved  to  protect  the 
genome against the detrimental effects of DNA lesions. DNA repair may take place by one 
of several pathways, depending on the type of damage, including nucleotide excision repair 
(NER), base excision repair (BER), mismatch repair, or recombinatorial repair. Nucleotide 
excision  repair  (NER)  enzymes  are  responsible  for  removing  ‘bulky’  DNA  damage  that 
distorts  the  DNA  helix  such  as  UV  photoproducts  (thymine  dimers),  chemically  induced 
intra-strand crosslinks and bulky chemical adducts (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and 
aromatic amines). Two distinct sub-pathways are present in the mammalian NER system: 
i.e., global genome NER (GG-NER) that operates genome wide, and transcription-coupled 
NER (TC-NER) that is specialized to eliminate transcription-blocking lesions on the DNA 
strand  of  active  genes  (Figure  1.11).  The  NER  pathway  includes  several  steps:  (i)  DNA 
damage  recognition;  (ii)  assembly  of  repair  factors;  (iii)  incision  of  damaged  DNA;  (iv) 
repair synthesis to fill gapped DNA; and (v) DNA ligation. DNA damage is recognized by 
the Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group C (XPC)–hHR23B complex, followed by recruitment 
of  the  transcription  factor  IIH  (TFIIH)  complex  of  proteins.  The  TFIIH  complex  is 
composed  of  nine  subunits,  including  XPD  and  XPB  (de  Boer  and  Hoeijmakers,  2000). 
TFIIH unwinds the DNA duplex around the damaged site. Next, XPG binds to the TFIIH 
complex and DNA, followed by recruitment of the XPF–ERCC1 complex. XPG and XPF–
ERCC1 produce dual incisions of 30 and 50 nucleotides at damaged site. After release of 
the damaged DNA strand, the gap is filled by repair synthesis and ligation (Bradsher et al., 
2002).  
 
The in vitro and in vivo experiments suggest that XPC-hHR23B complex is the initial 
component  for  detecting  DNA  damage  and  plays  at  least  four  roles  in  DNA  damage 
recognition.  First,  XPC-hHR23B  can  discriminate  between  DNA  distortions  and  the 
Watson-Crick structure. Second, XPC-hHR23B may be the first NER factor to respond to 
DNA  damage  in  GGR.  Third,  XPC-hHR23B’s  presence  at  sites  of  DNA  damage  can 
induce a further bending of the DNA, which may enhance the binding of other downstream 
NER proteins to the site of DNA lesions (Sugasawa et al., 1998). Finally, XPC-hHR23B 
has a critical role in the recruitment of TFIIH, which is known to promote the opening of 
the  DNA  helix  in  the  vicinity  of  the  lesion,  presumably  to  assist  in  the  assembly  of 
subsequent NER factors for further processing of the lesion (Schaeffer et al., 1993; Feaver 
et al
., 1993; Drapkin et al., 1994). 

 
 
30 
Yüklə 4,8 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   13




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə