From mutations to disease mechanism in rett syndrome, breast cancer, and congenital hypothyroidism



Yüklə 4,8 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə5/13
tarix05.05.2017
ölçüsü4,8 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   13

 
Figure 1.11.  Model for mechanism of global genome nucleotide-excision repair and 
transcription-coupled repair (Hoeijmakers et al., 2001). 
 
 

 
 
31 
1.3.6.  hHR23 (RAD23) Genes 
 
Human  hHR23A  and  hHR23B  are  homologs  of  Saccharomyces  cerevisiae  Rad23 
and  Saccharomyces  pombe  Rhp23  genes.  hHR23A  and  hHR23B  have  been  mapped  to 
chromosome 19p13.2 and 9q31.2 encoding 363 and 409 amino acid proteins, respectively. 
An amino acid sequence comparison of
 
the Rad23Rhp23hHR23A and hHR23B showed 
the existence
 
of at least four distinct domains that are well conserved among
 
these proteins 
(van der Spek et al, 1996). First, they contain a novel domain near the N-terminus referred 
to  as  UBL  (ubiquitin-like)  domain  which  is  important  for  DNA  repair.  This  domain  can 
bind
 
to  the  26S  proteasome,  and  the  removal  of  it  from  the  yeast
 
Rad23,  prevented 
interaction with the proteasome and was associated
 
with increased sensitivity to UV light 
(Watkins et al, 1993;
 
Schauber et al, 1998). The second and fourth domains from the
 
amino 
terminus  are  Ub-associated  (UBA)  domains,  suggesting
 
the  involvement  of  hHR23  in 
certain  pathways  of  Ub  metabolism
 
(Hofmann  and  Bucher,  1996).  The  third  domain,  the 
stress-induced
 
phosphoprotein (STI1), has been found to be responsible
 
for binding the XP-
C protein (Masutani et al, 1997) (Figure 1.12). 
 
 
Figure 1.12.  Schematic representations of conserved domains in hHR23A (a) and hHR23B 
(b) proteins. 
   
XPC-hHR23  complex  is  the  initial  component  for  detecting  DNA  damage  in  GG-
NER pathway. Although both hHR23 proteins can bind to XPC at least in vitro (Sugasawa 
et al
., 1997), most XPC is complexed with hHR23B in vivo, and only a minor fraction of 
the complex contains hHR23A (Araki et al., 2001).   
 

 
 
32 
Studies  on  hHR23A/B  knock-out  (KO)  mice  have  shown  that  hHR23A  was  likely 
functionally redundant with hHR23B. hHR23B KO mice exhibit moderate UV sensitivity 
and NER deficiency, whereas hHR23A KO mice do not exhibit any observable defects in 
DNA  repair activity.  However,  when  both  hHR23A  and  hHR23B  were  deleted,  the  mice 
exhibited extremely severe phenotypes, impaired embryonic development and high rates of 
intrauterine  death.  Surviving  animals  displayed  retarded  growth,  male  sterility,  facial 
dysmorphology and DNA repair defects (Ng et al., 2003). Since these phenotypes were not 
observed in XPC KO mice, the hHR23A/B KO phenotype was not due to NER deficiency 
suggesting  that  hHR23A/B  proteins  have  additional  cellular  functions.  These  findings 
indicate also that the hHR23A does not completely duplicate the function of hHR23B and 
must  have  a  function  of  its  own.  However,  mHR23A  and  mHR23B  appeared  to  have 
redundant roles in NER. Over expression of hHR23A in the mHR23A/B double knock out 
cells  restored  not  only  the  steady-state  level  and  stability  of  the  XPC  protein,  but  also 
cellular NER activity to near wild-type levels (Okuda et al., 2004).  
 
Studies on hHR23A/B knockdown (KD) cell lines have shown that while hHR23A
KD 
cells  were  not  blocked  in  S  phase  after  UVC  irradiation,  many  hHR23B
KD
  cells  were 
hindered  in  getting  out  of  S  phase.  This  suggested  the  presence  of  unrepaired  UVC-
induced DNA damage in hHR23B
KD
 cells. Therefore, hHR23B
KD
 cells seemed to behave 
like  XP  cells.  hHR23B
KD
  cells  displayed  a  significant  sensitivity  to  UVC,  in  contrast  to 
hHR23A
KD
  cells,  which  strongly  tolerated  UVC  irradiation  (Biard  A,  2007).  This  also 
suggested that hHR23A and hHR23B displayed diverse biological functions leading cells 
to different outcomes.  
 
Intriguingly, only a minority of hHR23B and hHR23A is bound to XPC, suggesting 
that  both proteins  have  additional  functions  (Sugasawa  et  al.,  1996).  hHR23 proteins  are 
players for multiple mechanisms including DNA repair and proteasome-mediated protein- 
degradation and apoptosis (Kim et al., 2004; Glockzin et al., 2003).  
 
hHR23  proteins  connect  the  NER  and  ubiquitin/proteasome  mediated  protein 
degradation  pathways  via  UBA  and  UBL  domains.  The  ubiquitin-proteasome  pathway 
plays  a  key  regulatory  role  in  a  variety  of  cellular  events,  including  the  removal  of 
misfolded  proteins,  production  of  immunocompetent  peptides, activation or  repression  of 

 
 
33 
transcription, and regulation of cell cycle progression (Schubert et al., 2000; Yamaguchi et 
al
., 2000). Proteins are ubiquitylated and consequently delivered to the 26S proteasome for 
degradation.  Ubiquitin  receptor  family  can  directly  connect  ubiquitylated  proteins  to  the 
proteasome  via  their  UBA  and  UBL  domains  binding  the  ubiquitin  and  proteasome, 
respectively. However, depending on the levels of UBL/UBA containing proteins they can 
promote or inhibit the degradation of ubiquitylated substrates. The binding of UBL/UBA 
containing  proteins  to  the  ubiquitylated  substrates  inhibits  the  polyubiquitination  and 
prevent proteolysis by proteasomes (Ortolan et al., 2000).     
 
hHR23  proteins  regulate  the  induction  and  stability  of  XPC  via  inhibiting  the 
proteolysis  by  proteasomes.  In  the  absence  of  hHR23  proteins,  XPC  is  highly  unstable 
since it is ubiquitylated and degraded by 26S proteasome. Under normal conditions, XPC-
hHR23 complex results in a significant reduction of XPC proteolysis and consequently in 
increased  steady-state  levels  of  the  protein  complex.  This  correlates  with  proficient  GG-
NER  activity.  The  protecting  role  of  hHR23  is  performed  via  inhibition  of 
polyubiquitination (Schauber et al., 1998; Lommel et al., 2002; Ortolan et al., 2000). This 
hypothesis  was  supported  by  the  observation  of  presence  of  XPC-Ub  conjugates  and 
increased XPC stability in proteasome inhibitor treated mHR23A/mHR23B KO cells (Ng 
et al
., 2003).        
 
In  addition  to  NER,  XPC–hHR23B  complex  is  associated  with  the  base  excision 
repair  (BER).  The  XPC  protein  interacts  physically  and  functionally  with  the  thymine 
DNA glycosylase, the enzyme that recognizes cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers at the initial 
step  of  BER  (Shimizu  et  al.,  2003).  3-Methyladenine-DNA  glycosylase,  an  initiator  of 
BER  also  interacts  with  hHR23A  proteins,  suggesting  that  these  proteins are involved in 
BER (Miao et al., 2000). Hsieh et al. reported that hHR23A
KD
, but not hHR23B
KD
, cells, 
were  hypersensitive  to  the  treatment  of  methylmethane  sulfonate,  a  major  substrate  for 
BER (Hsieh et al., 2005). This suggests that hHR23A might be a player for the two major 
DNA repair pathways, BER and NER.  
 
Moreover,  multiple  engagements  between  hHR23/Rad23  and  cell  cycle  regulation 
are  present.  (1)  RAD23  has  a  partially  redundant  role  with  and  binds  to  RPN10  in  the 
G2/M transition (Lambertson et al. 1999). (2) RAD23 is involved in spindle assembly and 

 
 
34 
S-phase checkpoints (Clarke et al., 2001). (3) RAD23, together with DSK2, has a role in 
spindle pole duplication (Biggins et al., 1996). The link with spindle pole duplication was 
recently  strengthened  by  the  discovery  of  the  centrosome  factor  CEN2  as  the  third 
component of the XPC/HR23 complex (Araki et al., 2001). (4) hHR23 proteins themselves 
appear to be regulated in a cell-cycle-dependent manner with specific degradation during 
S- phase (Kumar et al., 1999). 
 
The damage-signaling tumor-suppressor protein p53 is partly regulated by hHR23A 
and  hHR23B.  hHR23A  and  a  minor  amount  of  hHR23B  form  a  complex  with  p53.  
hHR23A and B proteins downregulated the transactivating activity of p53 via inhibition of 
the CREB (cyclic AMP-responsive element binding) protein, which acts as a coactivator of 
p53 transcription (Zhu et al., 2001). Overexpression of hHR23A and B proteins has led to 
the accumulation of ubiquitinated p53 and blocked p53 proteasome degradation (Glockzin 
et  al
.,  2003).  These  paradoxical  effects  of  hHR23  proteins  on  p53  degradation  are 
consistent with suggestions that the effects of hHR23 on degradation are highly sensitive to 
stoichiometric  variation  (Raasi  and  Pickart,  2003;  Verma  et  al.,  2004).  Additionally, 
hHR23A  and  B  interact  with  mouse  double  minute  2  (MDM2)  protein.  MDM2  contacts 
with  20S  core  particle  of  the  proteasome  and  functions  to  antagonize  the  stabilizing 
function of hHR23 toward p53, directly promoting p53 recognition and degradation by the 
proteasome (Brignone et al., 2004; Sdek et al., 2005). 
 
Kaur  et  al.  (2007)  has  shown  that  hHR23B  was  required  for  genotoxic-specific 
activation  of  p53  and  apoptosis.  After  exposure  with  UV  or  chemical  agents  leading  to 
DNA  damage,  p53–Ub  conjugates  accumulate  in  chromatin  and  hHR23B  is  required  for 
induction and  maintenance  of  these  p53–Ub species. The  knockdown  of hHR23B blocks 
p53 stabilization and resulted in significant reduction in apoptosis and increase in viability 
when  compared  to  hHR23B  expressing  cells.  Robust  XPC  depletion  had  no  impact  on 
genotoxin-induced  apoptosis  suggesting  that  the  inhibition  of  apoptosis  due  to  hHR23B 
depletion could not be explained by a reduction in DNA repair efficiency. The hHR23B-
dependent  accumulation  of  p53–Ub  conjugates  after  DNA  damage  correlated  with  p53 
stabilization and apoptosis. p53–Ub conjugates could contribute to transcription-dependent 
functions  of  p53,  which  are  required  for  downstream  p53  activities  (induction  of  target 
genes p21 and bax) (Slee et al., 2004; Schuler and Green, 2005).  

 
 
35 
1.4.  Congenital Hypothyroidism (CH) 
 
1.4.1.  The Thyroid Gland 
 
All vertebrates possess a pair of thyroid glands, located in the anterior neck region. It 
consists of two lobes: one on either side of the trachea, and a connecting portion called the 
isthmus,  giving  the  entire  gland  an  H-shaped  appearance.  The  gland  varies  in  size  with 
sexual development, diet and age. The thyroid gland consists of a large number of round or 
oval follicles surrounded by connective tissue and blood vessels. Each follicle is lined by a 
cuboidal epithelial cell layer of one-cell thickness. The cavities of the follicles are filled in 
with  viscous  protein  material  called  colloid  in  which  the  thyroid  hormone,  thyroxine,  is 
stored. 
 
Normal  thyroid  function  is  essential  for  development,  growth  and  metabolic 
homeostasis. The primary function of the thyroid is the formation, storage, and secretion of 
thyroid  hormones  (Robbins  et  al.,  1980;  Kohn  et  al.,  1993).  Thyroid  hormone formation 
involves  a  coordinated  series  of  steps  controlled  by  hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid  axis 
(Figure 1.13). The TRH, released from hypothalamus, results in secretion of TSH from the 
anterior  pituitary  gland.  The  TSH  stimulates  the  follicular  cells  (TFC),  via  its  receptor 
(TSHr),  to  release  thyroid  hormones  into  the  circulation.  Thyroid  hormone  production 
involves  concentrative  iodide  uptake  by  the  sodium  iodide  transporter  (NIS),  as  well  as 
iodination  of  thyroglobulin  (TG)  by  the  thyroid  peroxidase  (TPO)  (Robbins  et  al.,  1980; 
Kohn et al., 1993).  
 
TG is synthesized as a 12S molecule (330 kDa), post-translationally glycosylated and 
transported to follicular lumen. The protein contains 70 tyrosine residues that are subject to 
iodination by TPO. The iodinated TG stored in follicles are degraded by lysosomes to form 
triiodothyronine  (T3)  and  thyroxine  (T4).  The  major  thyroid  hormone  secreted  by  the 
thyroid gland is thyroxine. To exert its effects, T4 is converted to triiodothyronine (T3) by 
the removal of an iodine atom. This occurs mainly in the liver and in certain tissues where 
T3 acts, such as in the brain (Robbins et al., 1980; Weiss et al., 1984; Ekholm, 1990; Kohn 
et al
., 1993; Dai et al., 1996).  
 

 
 
36 
 
 
Figure 1.13.  Thyroid hormone cascade. 
 
 
1.4.2.  Congenital Hypothyroidism 
 
Any  defects  in  thyroid  morphogenesis  and  hormone  synthesis  result  in  Congenital 
Hypothyroidism  (CH),  which  is  a  relatively  common  congenital  disorder  affecting  about 
1:3000 to 1:4000 live births (Toublanc, 1992). In about 10 per cent of all cases, CH is the 
consequence of defects in one of the steps of thyroid hormone synthesis, inborn errors of 
metabolism  referred  to  as  dyshormonogenesis.  A  heterogeneous  group  of  developmental 
abnormalities,  thyroid  dysgenesis,  accounts  for  about  85  per  cent  of  all  cases  with  CH 
(Gillam and Kopp, 2001). These anomalies include thyroid agenesis, ectopic thyroid tissue, 
cysts  of  the  thyroglossal  duct,  and  thyroid  hypoplasia.  In  the  vast  majority  of  all  cases, 
thyroid  dysgenesis  is  sporadic,  but  in  about  2  per  cent  it  is  a  familial  disorder,  an 
observation  supporting  the  possibility  of  a  genetic  etiology  (Castanet  et  al.,  2000).  The 
higher  prevalence  of  thyroid  dysgenesis  in  Hispanics  and  Caucasians  in  comparison  to 
Blacks, the  predominance  of  thyroid dysgenesis  in  females, and  the  higher  prevalence  of 
associated malformations also suggest the presence of genetic factors in the pathogenesis 
of CH (Devos et al., 1999; Castanet et al., 2001). More recently, the data from knockout 
mice  have  demonstrated  the  roles  of  several  genes  in  thyroid  organogenesis;  thyroid 
transcription  factors  (TTF-1  and  TTF-2),  paired  box  homoetic  gene  8  (Pax8),  and  TSH 
receptor (TSHR). Occasionally mutations in these genes have been reported in CH cases. 
 

 
 
37 
Thyroid  transcription factor  2  (TTF-2,  FKHL15,  or  Forkhead  Box  E1  FOXE1) is  a 
member  of  the  forkhead/winged  helix-domain  protein  family,  many  of  which  are  key 
regulators  of  embryonic  development.  TTF-2  regulates  the  transcription  of  target  genes 
such as TG and TPO by binding to specific regulatory DNA sequences in their promoters 
via  its  forkhead  DNA  binding  domain.  Homozygous  recessive  mutations  (p.S57N  and 
p.A65V)  in  TTF-2  result  in  a  syndromic  form  of  thyroid  dysgenesis,  Bamforth-Lazarus 
syndrome.  This  phenotype  includes  thyroid  agenesis,  cleft  palate,  choanal  atresia,  bifid 
epiglottis, and spiky hair (Bamforth et al., 1989; Clifton-Bligh et al., 1998; Castanet et al., 
2002).  Mice  homozygous  for a  disrupted  TTF-2  gene  die  within 48  hours  after  birth  and 
are  profoundly  hypothyroid.  They  exhibit  either  small  lingual  thyroid  or  have  complete 
thyroid agenesis, and also have severe cleft palates. Hair defects could not be tested since 
the mice die before hair formation (De Felice et al., 1998). 
 
1.4.3.  Forkhead Gene Family 
 
Forkhead  transcription  factors  are  key  regulators  of  embryogenesis  and  play 
important  roles  in  cell  differentiation  and  development.  The  name  derives  from  two 
spiked-head structures in embryos of the Drosophila fork head mutant, which are defective 
in  formation  of  the  anterior  and  posterior  gut  (Weigel  et  al.,  1989).  A  110-amino-acid 
DNA binding domain was evolutionarily conserved between forkhead genes (Figure 1.14). 
These genes have so far been found in animals, fungi and most of the metazoans. Among 
the organisms for which the genome sequences are completed, or nearly so, there is indeed 
a  correlation  between  anatomical  complexity  and  forkhead  gene  number:  four  in 
Saccharomyces and Schizosaccharomyces, 15 in Caenorhabditis, 20 in Drosophila, and 39 
in Homo sapiens (Carlsson and Mahlapuu, 2002). X-ray crystallography revealed that the 
3D structure of a forkhead domain (FoxA3) resembled the shape of a butterfly and the term 
“winged  helix”  was  used  to  describe  the  structure,  which  has  a  helix–turn–helix  core  of 
three  α-helices,  flanked  by  two  loops,  or  “wings”  (Figure  1.15)  (Clark  et  al.,  1993).  The 
term “Winged helix proteins” is often used synonymously with forkhead proteins. A large 
proportion  of  the  amino  acids  in  the  forkhead  domain  are  invariant  or  highly  conserved 
(Figure 1.14). Forkhead proteins bind DNA as monomers in contrast to other helix–turn–
helix proteins. Hence, the binding sites, which typically span 15–17 bp, are asymmetrical 
(Pierrou et al., 1994). 

 
 
38
 
Figure 1.14.  Alignment of the TTF2 forkhead DNA-binding domain with selected human FOX representatives.  At the bottom, the consensus 
line indicates; ‘*’ for identical or conserved residues in all sequences; ‘:’ for conserved substitutions; and ‘.’ for semi-conserved substitutions. 
The positions of predicted ‘helix’ and ‘wing’ segments are indicated at the bottom of the panel (Romanelli et al., 2003). 
 

 
 
39 
 
Figure 1.15.  Three-dimentional structure of the forkhead domain of FoxC2 (mouse) (van 
Dongen et al., 2000). 
 
1.4.4.  Human TTF-2 Gene 
 
Human  TTF-2  gene,  also  known  as  FKHL15  or  FOXE1,  has  been  mapped  on 
chromosome 9q22 (Chadwick et al., 1997). TTF-2 consists of a single exon encoding for a 
protein  (42  kDa)  of  367  amino  acids.  The  gene  encodes  a  forkhead  domain, two  nuclear 
localization  signals  (NLS),  a  polyalanine  tract,  and  a  transcription  repression  domain 
(Figure 1.16).  
   
The  sequencing  of  the  entire  coding  region  revealed  a  highly  polymorphic 
polyalanine stretch of 11 to 17 residues, but the most frequent stretch was 14 residues long 
(Figure  1.16)  (Macchia  et  al.,  1999;  Hishinuma  et  al.,  2001).  Reduced  polyalanine  tract 
length (11 and 12 residues) was found only in patients with thyroid dysgenesis (Hishinuma 
et  al
.,  2001).  Similarly,  alteration  of  polyalanine  stretch  lengths  has  been  found  in  a 
homeobox-containing  gene,  HOX  D13,  consisting  of  15  residues  (22-25  residues  were 
reported  in  normal)  in  patients  with  the  autosomal  dominant  disease,  synpolydactyly 
(Akarsu  et  al.,  1996).  Functional  analysis  was  performed  to  reveal  whether  reduced 
number of polyalanine tract of TTF-2 is responsible for thyroid dysgenesis. However, the 

 
 
40 
expression  study  showed  that  the  transcriptional  activities  of  TTF-2  with  reduced 
polyalanine-tract lengths were equal to that of TTF-2 with an unreduced polyalanine tract. 
These results suggested that the polymorphism of the polyalanine tract of TTF2 could not 
be  a  cause  of  the  developmental  defects  of  the  human  thyroid  gland  (Hishinuma  et  al., 
2001). 
 
TTF-2  protein  contains  two  short  stretches  of  basic  amino  acids  (RRRKR)  at  both 
ends of the forkhead domain (Figure 1.16). Sequence alignments of representative human 
FOX  protein  segments  show  that a  stretch  of  basic amino acids  is  present  in  most  of  the 
proteins  at  the  C-terminal  of  DNA-binding  domain  whereas  a  basic  stretch  at  the  N-
terminal of the DNA binding domain is less conserved (Figure 1.14). Previous studies have 
demonstrated  that  the  basic  stretches  at  the  C-terminal  of  the  forkhead  domain  are  bona 
fide
 NLSs in four FOX proteins (Brownawell et al., 2001; Berry et al., 2002). Romanelli et 
al.
 have shown that both stretches are bona fide NLSs and required for nuclear import via 
importin α-dependent pathway (Romanelli et al., 2003). 
 
Analysis  of  the  TTF2  amino  acid  sequence  identifies,  in  addition  to  the  FHD,  a 
second  domain  rich  in  alanine  and  proline  residues  that  has  been  found  in  other 
developmental  DNA  binding  proteins  responsible  for  transcriptional  repression  activity. 
The  analysis  of  the  activity  of  the  deletion  mutants  of  TTF-2  allowed  mapping  the 
repression domain in the region between amino acids 197 and 218 at the carboxyl terminus 
of the protein (Figure 1.16) (Perrone et al., 2000). Comparison of the amino acid sequence 
of TTF-2 repression domain with the sequences present in the database demonstrates that 
this  region  shows  41  per  cent  of  identity  with  HNF3γ  amino terminal.  HNF3γ  is  another 
member  of  the  forkhead  family  that  plays  an  important  role  in  the  tissue-specific  gene 
expression program both in early development and in the adult (Ang et al., 1993).  
 
TTF2 is a promoter-specific transcriptional repressor that displays both promoter and 
transcriptional  activation  domain  specifity.  TTF2  can  repress  Pax8  activity  on  TPO 
promoter,  but  not  on  NIS promoter.  Additionally,  TTF2  is  able to  repress  the  C-terminal 
activation domain of TTF1, while it has no effect on the N-terminal domain (Perrone et al., 
2000). These observations suggest that it is able to recognize specific promoter architecture 
and represses only a subset of the genes activated by TTF1 and Pax8, since all these factors 

 
 
41 
are involved not only in thyroid specific gene expression (Plachov et al., 1990; Zannini et 
al
.,  1992),  but  also  in  thyroid  development  (Kimura  et  al.,  1996;  Macchia  et  al.,  1998; 
Mansouri et al., 1998). 
  
 
 
Figure 1.16.  Nucleotide sequence of the human TTF2 gene and deduced amino acid 
sequence. The alanine stretch is underlined. The forkhead, two NLSs and transcription 
repression domains were boxed with black, blue and red color, respectively (Macchia et 
al
., 1999). 
 

 
 
42 
Yüklə 4,8 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   13




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə