Gurulmundi, barakula and binkey state forest



Yüklə 2,44 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/3
tarix06.09.2017
ölçüsü2,44 Mb.
  1   2   3

July 2014 

 

 



   

 

GURULMUNDI, 



BARAKULA AND 

BINKEY STATE FOREST 

SURVEY REPORT 

 

 



 

A



CKNOWLEDGMENTS

 

Protect the Bush Alliance would sincerely like to thank the following groups and individuals for 

their contributions towards the Gurulmundi, Barakula and Binkey Survey: 

• Gambling

 Community Benefit Fund, Birdlife Queensland, Wildlife Queensland, Birdlife 

Southern Queensland and National Parks Association of Queensland for supporting with funds 

the project under which the event was run. 

• The volunteers for their generous 

and enthusiastic support and expertise, including Paul 

Grimshaw, Ann Moran, Lee Curtis, Sheena Gillman, Barbara Odgers, Di Glynn, Maggie 

Overend, Fiona Lynch, Ric Thomsett and Jenni Timbs. 

• 

Martin Ambrose and Rod Hobson (NPRSR) for providing their time and equipment to assist in 



the delivery of the survey. 

This report was prepared by Tanya Pritchard, Survey Coordinator from the Protect the Bush 

Alliance. 

First published in June 2014 by: 

Protect the Bush Alliance 

PO Box 1040 

Brisbane Qld 4064 

www.ptba.org.au 

For bibliographic purposes, this report should be cited as:  

Pritchard, T. 2013, Gurulmundi, Barakula and Binkey Survey Report 2014. Protect the Bush 

Alliance, Brisbane. 

Any reproduction in full or in part of this publication must mention the title and credit the above-

mentioned publisher as the copyright owner. The contents of this publication are those of the 

author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Protect the Bush Alliance or their members. 

For copies of this report, please contact Protect the Bush Alliance at surveys@ptba.org.au  

Cover photos: Dragonfly, seedpod and aboriginal axe grinding site at Binkey State Forest 

 


 

C



ONTENTS

 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

 ................................................................................................................................ 1 

SUMMARY


 .................................................................................................................................................. 3 

1

 



INTRODUCTION

 ................................................................................................................................ 4 

 

BACKGROUND ............................................................................................................................... 4 



 

PROJECT DESCRIPTION .................................................................................................................. 4 

 

RATIONALE .................................................................................................................................... 4 



 

GOALS............................................................................................................................................ 5 

2

 

SITE DESCRIPTION



 ......................................................................................................................... 6 

 

SITE LOCATION .............................................................................................................................. 6 



 

WEATHER CONDITION .................................................................................................................. 6 

 

REGIONAL ECOSYSTEMS ............................................................................................................... 7 



3

 

SURVEY METHODOLOGY



 .............................................................................................................. 1 

4

 



RESULTS

 ............................................................................................................................................ 1 

 

FLORA ............................................................................................................................................ 2 



 

FAUNA ........................................................................................................................................... 2 

 

SCIENTIFIC AND FEATURE PROTECTION AREAS. ........................................................................... 3 



5

 

CONCLUSION



 .................................................................................................................................... 3 

6

 



RECOMMENDATIONS

 ..................................................................................................................... 4 

7

 

REFERENCES



 ................................................................................................................................... 4 

APPENDIX 1 

 SPECIES LISTS



 ............................................................................................................. 5 

1.1 BOTANICAL LIST .................................................................................................................................. 5 

1.2 BIRDS LIST.......................................................................................................................................... 12 

1.3 INVERTEBRATES ................................................................................................................................ 13 

1.4 INCIDENTAL FAUNA .......................................................................................................................... 14 

 


 

 



S

UMMARY

 

A flora and fauna survey of selected sites within the Gurulmundi, Barakula and Binkey State 

Forests in the Brigalow Belt Bioregion were conducted in autumn 2014. The surveys were 

coordinated by the Protect the Bush Alliance with volunteers from Birdlife Southern Queensland, 

Birds Queensland, National Parks Association of Queensland and with support from staff from 

the National Parks Recreation Sport and Racing (NPRSR). 

A total of 319 plant species were recorded from over eleven sites across the Gurulmundi and 

Binkey State Forests. Some incidental fauna records were also recorded from Barakula State 

Forests near the Ranger

s Station where the survey group was camped. Forty-three bird 



species and thirty-five invertebrates were observed and a small number of reptiles (8) and 

amphibians (5) were also recorded.  

The State Forests are threatened by a number of threatening processes, including mining, 

logging, grazing, fire, weed invasion and feral animal predation. It is recommended that the area 

be excluded from mining and logging activity to ensure the integrity of the ecosystems are 

preserved.  

Photo 1: Burnt forest in Barakula State Forest Photo: Lee Curtis 


 

1  I



NTRODUCTION

 

  B



ACKGROUND

 

The 2014 Gurulmundi, Barakula and Binkey State Forest survey was a collaborative flora and 

fauna survey with professional and amateur botanists, ornithologists and zoologists 

 working 



as volunteers for the Alliance 

 conducting fieldwork alongside rangers from the Parks and 



Wildlife Service to help discover more about the biodiversity in these very high conservation 

value reserves. The data obtained during the surveys provides a useful indicator of 

environmental quality and serves as a baseline for future monitoring and management of the 

reserve.


 

 

These State Forests are subject to a number of 



threatening activities including mining for gas

logging and grazing.  

 

P

ROJECT DESCRIPTION

 

The survey was organised by the Protect the Bush 

Alliance for the purpose of collecting scientific 

information on the biodiversity supported by the 

reserve to highlight the conservation values of the 

property and advocate for their protection from 

inappropriate and potentially damaging activities. 

The survey brought together a team of committed 

botanists, zoologists, ornithologists and ecologists to 

collect data over three days conducted in March 

2014.  

 

  R



ATIONALE

 

Gurulmundi, Barakula and Binkey State Forests are particularly important for connectivity, being 

located within one of the largest tracts of remnant vegetation within the Brigalow Belt Bioregion 

and therefore offering an important refuge from clearing and increasing mining pressure. The 

property also contains several valuable refugia sites 

 places that allow plants and animals to 



escape weather extremes, thereby allowing both species and their habitats to adapt to changes 

Photo 2: Gas well within Barakula State 

Forest   Photo: S. Gillman 


 

in climate. It is an inholding within a complex that includes Whetstone and Bringalilly State 



Forests and is connected through remnant vegetation to Wondul Range National Park. Its 

gazettal as a National Park will make management of the complex easier through integration of 

fire, weed and pest management strategies and reduced fencing requirements. 

Gurulmundi, Barakula and Binkey State Forests also have significant biodiversity values and are 

an important part of the state’s

 comprehensive, adequate and representative reserve system.  

In addition, there are known locations of threatened plant and animals species and the Alliance 

has identified the need to establish the possible presence of these species in areas that may be 

targeted for mining and other destructive land uses.   

  G



OALS

 

The intention of the survey effort was to highlight the conservation values of the property and 

build the case for its gazettal as a national park. As such, the goals of the survey were to: 

• collect data on the occurrence of as

 many species as possible, focusing on birds and flora 

• identify any rare and unique species that may be located in the pr

operties 

• raise awareness of the conservation values of this property

 

• bring specialists with considerable expertise to a rural community for scientific endeavour



 

• create a learning opportunity –

 as one of the best ways to learn about biodiversity is to get out 

into the field alongside experienced scientists  

• have fun –

 making an enjoyable stay for everyone in the bush, while collecting baseline 

biological information. 

Although this survey can give a snapshot of the biodiversity of an area, it is not designed to yield 

an exhaustive inventory. This is because of the limited time during which the sampling takes 

place and also because it is conducted only over two short time periods in the year, meaning 

that total seasonal variation cannot be accounted for. However, the sampling does provide a 

baseline against which results of future surveys can be compared and measured. 



 

2  S



ITE DESCRIPTION

 

  S



ITE LOCATION

 

Gurulmundi State Forest (

12405 ha) and Binkey State Forest (

4332ha) are located 

north of 

the town of Miles on the western edge of the Darling Downs

.

 It consists primarily of open 



forests of dry sclerophyll eucalypts with noted wildflower areas and isolated pockets of 

vulnerable communities. Map 1 displays the location.

 

 

Map 1: Location of Gurulmundi and Binkey State Forests 



  W

EATHER CONDITION

 

Gurulmundi, Barakula and Binkey State Forests, were in the throes of drought whilst this survey 

was being conducted and results may well have been skewed by this factor. The weather was 

sunny with clear skies, gentle winds, warm days and cooler evenings with recorded in the range 

of 18°C to 33°C (Bureau of Meteorology). Miles has a typical subtropical Brigalow Belt climate 


 

with hot wet summers and cool to cold dry winters. The highest point in Gurulmundi State Forest 



is at 480m with an average yearly rainfall of 352mm.  

  R



EGIONAL ECOSYSTEMS

 

Small sections within Gurulmundi, Barakula and Binkey State Forest are identified as 

‘Of 

concern’ under the 



Vegetation Management Act 1999 (Table 1). The rest of the primary 

vegetation is classed as Not-of-concern. 



Table 1: Of Concern Regional Ecosystems on Gurulmundi and Binkey 

Regional 

ecosystem 

Biodiversity 

status 

Description 

11.7.1 


Of concern 

Acacia harpophylla and/or Casuarina cristata 

and Eucalyptus thozetiana or E. microcarpa 

woodland on lower scarp slopes on lateritic 

duricrust. 

11.3.25 

Of concern 



Eucalyptus tereticornis or E. camaldulensis 

woodland fringing drainage lines 

11.3.2 

Of concern 



Eucalyptus populnea woodland on alluvial plains 

11.3.4 


Of concern 

Eucalyptus tereticornis and/or Eucalyptus spp. 

tall woodland on alluvial plains 

:- 

 

 



Photo 3: Leichhardt Creek in Binkey State Forest  

 

Map 2: Regional Ecosystems of Gurulmundi and Binkey State Forests

 


 

 



3  S

URVEY METHODOLOGY

 

The surveys were undertaken after a preparation period prior to the arrival of participants in 

Miles in March 2014. The survey was attended by 12 people over 3 days. 

11 survey sites were established over the property to represent the dominant regional 

ecosystem types along with numerous observations recorded throughout the property. The 

emphasis was on surveying for birds and plants for each of the 11 surveys sites as well as 

participants opportunistically collecting information on sightings of other fauna, or indications 

of their presence (such as tracks, scats, calls and digs). Incidental bird watching was 

conducted throughout the property. 

4  R

ESULTS

 

A total of 319 plant species were recorded from the surveys across the Gurulmundi and 

Binkey State Forests Property. Forty-three birds species were recorded. Opportunistic 

records of species including 35 invertebrates, 8 reptiles and 5 amphibians were logged. See 

Appendix 1 for the full list of species recorded. Incidental sightings were also recorded for the 

Barakula State Forest Ranger’s Station where volunteers camped during the survey

 

(Appendix 1.4). 



 

No threatened species were found on this survey 

though Wildnet records reveal the presence of 

five Vulnerable or Near Threatened fauna species 

for the area: the Vulnerable: Paradelma orientalis 

(brigalow scaly-foot), Nyctophilus corbeni 

(eastern long-eared bat), and the Near 

Threatened: Strophurus taenicauda (golden-tailed 

gecko), Lophoictinia isura (square tailed kite) & 

Chalinolobus picatus (little pied bat).

 

There are 



also four listed plant species under the Nature 

Conservation Act 1992, Micromyrtus carinata, 



Acacia curranii, Calytrix gurulmundensis and 

Cadellia pentastylis. 

During the survey the forest was in the throes of 

drought with results of the survey likely to have been skewed by the dry conditions.  

Photo 4: Feature Protection Area 26 highlighting the ‘Binkey 

Big Trees’ Photo: M.Cant 


 

 



  F

LORA

 

The remnant vegetation was found to be in good condition, with a diversity of native plant 

species with limited weed invasion though Mother-of-millions (Bryophyllum delagoense and 

Bryophyllum daigremontianum x Bryophyllum delagoense) is located in L (Leichhardt) Tree 

Creek on Binkey State Forest. There is a healthy layered structure and habitat trees with 

hollows present. A total of 319 plant species were recorded across the survey sites 

(Appendix 1.1) which included 17 weed species. Wildfire has occurred over sizable areas 

within the estate in recent years given its remoteness, combined with the few road networks, 

general inaccessible country and its tendency to attract lightning strikes. These often expand 

into sizable areas and hot fires over the summer season have resulted in damage to 

vegetation in some areas. 

  F

AUNA

 

Birds 

Forty-three bird species were identified during the survey (Appendix 1.2). This low number of 

sightings may have been due in part to the extremely dry conditions throughout the area.  

Reptiles and Amphibians 

Species observed at Binkey State Forest 

included the Open-litter Rainbow Skink Carlia 

pectoralis, Elegant Snake-eyed Skink 

Cryptoblepharus pulcher, Eastern Mulch Slider 

Lerista fragilis, Bynoe's Gecko Heteronotia 

binoei, Water Dragon Intellagama lesueurii. 

Incidental observations recorded from the 

rangers station in Barakula State Forest 

included the Salmon striped frog 



Limnodynastes salmini,

 

Desert Tree Frog 



Litoria rubella, Common Tree Frog Litoria caerulea, Emerald Spotted Treefrog Litoria peronei 

and the Cane Toad Rhinella marina. 



Invertebrates 

A good diversity of invertebrate species were recorded thanks to the expert knowledge of 

QPWS Ranger Rod Hobson. This included nine species of butterflies/moths, six 

dragonflies/damselflies, six spiders, nine grasshoppers/ crickets/katydids, a freshwater 

yabby, two molluscs, a Christmas beetle and a giant native cockroach.

  

Salmon striped frog Limnodynastes salmini 



Photo: S. Gillman  

 

Photo: Bruce Thomson 



 

 



  S

CIENTIFIC AND 

F

EATURE 

P

ROTECTION 

A

REAS

Contained within Binkey State Forest is the proposed Scientific Area (SA) 84: L-Tree Creek 

and the gazetted Feature Protection Area (FPA) 26: Tin Hut Creek. Both locations are on 

Binkey State Forest. SA84 was submitted to preserve an area of Spinifex (Triodia sp.) with 

an over story of small-fruited yellow-jacket (Corymbia bloxsomei). FPA26 is gazetted to 

preserve seven large Spotted Gums (Corymbia citriodora) with a historical continuous 

connection to early settlers (old homestead) and Indigenous peoples (Cant, 2001). These 

areas need to be protected from mining and logging operations. 

 

 

5  C



ONCLUSION

 

Though new locations of threatened species were discovered and the bird count was low the 

survey was considered as a success. All of the participants enjoyed themselves and learnt 

more about this unknown property.  

The condition of this property was noted as good to very good. Despite a large section of the 

property having being burnt before the survey, a good diversity of invertebrate species were 

recorded. It is hoped that future surveys will reveal a healthy diversity of litter-dwelling and 

Old Homestead, near Tin Hut Creek, Binkey State Forest

 


 

 



soil-dwelling vertebrate species, especially skinks, given that the ground-layer is still in good 

condition with previous cattle grazing having had minimal impact.  

The presence of gas wells and logging is of major concern and close monitoring of both 

these activities is recommended to observe the impacts. 



6  R

ECOMMENDATIONS

 

Not only are the Gurulmundi, 

Barakula and Binkey State Forests 

Property part of one the largest 

areas of remnant vegetation in the 

Brigalow Belt Region, they 

contains extensive areas of 

excellent condition, priority native 

vegetation and support a diversity 

of species of both plants and 

animals. With increasing mining 

interests within the region it is 

essential that these areas be preserved for future 

generations.  

As such, the three primary recommendations to come out of the survey are to:  

• 

advocate for Gurulmundi, Barakula and Binkey State Forests to be protected from mining 



and logging.  

• 

provide the survey information to rangers to assist with management of the reserve. 



• 

undertake further seasonal surveys for threatened species at an appropriate time of year.  

These State Forests contain significant biodiversity protected within an increasing 

fragmented landscape: their protection from destructive uses such as timber harvesting and 

mining is essential for ensuring the integrity is maintained into the long-term. 



Yüklə 2,44 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə