He addition of neurological criteria of death better known as brain death to cardio



Yüklə 81,11 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix15.03.2017
ölçüsü81,11 Kb.
#11541

540 

CANADIAN


 

JOURNAL


 

OF

 



ANESTHESIA

T

HE addition of neurological criteria of death 



– better known as brain death – to cardio-

respiratory criteria of death was a paradigm 

shift  which  evolved  when  patients  with 

acute brain injury could be resuscitated in emergency 

departments and intensive care units. Resuscitation of 

acute  brain  injury  led  to  progression  of  devastating 

brain edema, shift, and eventually massive increase in 

intracranial  pressure  that  would  stop  the  blood  flow 

at  the  entrance  of  the  skull  base.  Multiple  symposia 

were organized in Sweden, the United Kingdom, and 

Australia  that  tried  to  formulate  brain  death  on  the 

basis of neurological criteria. Brain death examination 

became a prerequisite to allow organ donation, and its 

concept  has  been  fully  accepted.  Despite  widespread 

acceptance of the criteria, there remained great vari-

ability  in  how  brain  death  criteria  were  codified  in 

different parts of the world. A review of the history of 

neurological death is presented by Baron et al. in this 

issue of the Journal.

1

The gold standard

A  seminal  paper  on  neurological  determination  of 

brain  death  was  written  by  the  Harvard  ad  hoc 

Committee.

2

 There was a desire in the 1960s to pro-



duce a brief but succinct document due to a pressing 

need in the critical care community for guidelines. To 

this  day,  the  Harvard  criteria  remain  an  example  of 

simplicity. The criteria were as follows: 

1.  Unreceptivity and unresponsiveness;

2.  No movement or breathing;

3.  No brainstem reflexes;

4.  Flat electroencephalogram;

5.  All  tests  repeated  at  least  24  hr  later,  with  no  

 

change,  and  exclusion  of  hypothermia  (body  



 

temperature  <  90°F  or  32.2°C)  or  central  

 

nervous system depressants.



Brain death criteria throughout the world

A  recent  survey  explored  the  international  prac-

tices for diagnosing brain death.

Original brain death 



documents  of  80  countries  throughout  the  world 

were obtained. The differences in criteria were stun-

ning. No differences appeared when the methods of 

examination  of  brainstem  reflexes  were  compared; 

however,  there  were  marked  differences  in  how  the 

apnea test was performed. The apnea test continued 

to concern physicians, although the procedure is sim-

ple and in most cases without complications. Testing 

the response with induced hypercarbia should remain 

standard  if  our  goal  is  to  document  total  brainstem 

destruction.  Confirming  apnea  with  a  PaCO

2

  target 



value was used in only 59% of all guidelines. In oth-

ers,  preoxygenation  with  100%  oxygen  followed  by 

a  ten-minute  disconnection  from  the  ventilator  was 

deemed  sufficient  (20  of  71  guidelines).  There  was 

no  evidence  that  deficient  criteria  for  apnea  testing 

was a result of failure to obtain timely arterial blood 

gases or a general reluctance to do the test. In Central 

and South American countries, it was noticeable that 

a  large  proportion  of  patients  were  either  examined 

with  disconnection  from  the  ventilator  only,  or  cri-

teria or guidelines for the apnea test were not stated. 

This is potentially concerning because apnea can only 

be determined after introducing acute hypocarbia to 

induce  maximal  stimulation  of  the  respiratory  cen-

tres. A ten-minute period of disconnection from the 

ventilator  in  a  patient  with  baseline  hypocarbia  (not 

uncommon when induced hyperventilation is applied 

to treat increased intracranial pressure) could poten-

tially  result  in  apnea,  with  PaCO

2

  failing  to  reach  a 



target value. 

The  number  of  physicians  required  to  diagnose 

brain death varies significantly throughout the world. 

In 44% of countries, one physician is required (includ-

ing  Canada);  in  34%,  two  physicians;  and  in  16%  of 

540 


EDITORIAL

 

CAN J ANESTH 2006 / 53: 6 / pp 540–543



The clinical criteria of brain death throughout the 

world: why has it come to this? 

Eelco F. M. Wijdicks 

MD

 



From the Division of Critical Care Neurology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.

Address correspondence to: Dr. Eelco F.M. Wijdicks, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Department of Neurology, W8B, Division of 

Neurological Intensive Care, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. Phone: 507-538-1036; Fax: 507-266-4419;  

E-mail: wijde@mayo.edu


EDITORIAL

 

541



countries, more than two physicians are required.

3

 In 



other jurisdictions, the number of physicians required 

to  diagnose  brain  death  is  unknown.  Further  results 

of this international survey showed that confirmatory 

tests  were  required  in  40%  of  80  nations  reporting, 

whereas  the  complexity  of  criteria  did  not  seem  to 

be influenced by cultural differences.

3

 There were no 



consistent  differences  between  Eastern  and  Western 

countries,  although  in  some  countries,  an  academic 

grade was needed to perform the apnea test (associate 

professor level). 

The type and need of confirmatory tests vary con-

siderably from one country to another. The choice of 

confirmatory tests seems to be arbitrary, with Sweden 

being  a  notable  exception.  In  Sweden,  a  cerebral 

angiogram  has  to  be  performed  twice,  with  an  ade-

quate period of observation in between, documenting 

an absence of blood flow to the brain. Although the 

electroencephalogram  is  commonly  recommended 

worldwide, in this issue Young et al.

make compelling 



arguments against its use, in favour of tests that dem-

onstrate the absence of intracerebral blood flow. 



Remaining concerns

It  is  apparent  that  for  at  least  half  of  the  surveyed 

nations  in  the  world,  and  several  jurisdictions  in  the 

United  States,  confirmation  of  brain  death  examina-

tion by a second physician is required. There is no data 

to support this practice, nor is there a suggestion for 

a requirement of more than two physicians. Requiring 

two physicians to determine brain death may lead to 

logistical  problems,  but  in  most  modern  intensive 

care units, this is achievable. Absent respiratory drive 

remains  essential  in  the  diagnosis  of  brain  death. 

There  is  insufficient  evidence  to  suggest  that  formal 

apnea testing can be deferred.

In  many  developed  countries,  prevailing  cultural 

and religious attitudes support the clinical determina-

tion of brain death. There is no evidence to suggest 

that  the  variability  in  international  guidelines  (such 

as multiple observations, multiple confirmatory tests, 

with multiple physicians) is related to these attitudes. 

More  strict  criteria  were  present  when  donation  was 

considered,  and  this  is  a  common  qualifier  in  many 

guidelines throughout the world. 

Despite national recommendations, significant vari-

ability  continues  to  exist  among  adult  hospital  poli-

cies in the United States,

5

 as similarly documented in 



Canadian adult and pediatric centres by Hornby et al.

6

 



in  this  issue.  It  is  likely  that  exaggerated  differences 

would  be  found  throughout  the  world  if  different 

hospital  policies  within  each  country  were  surveyed. 

There is also a lingering concern regarding the accu-

racy of brain death documentation. A study by Wang 

et  al.

from  the  University  of  California  examined 



patients  declared  brain  dead  at  Los  Angeles  County 

General  Hospital,  and  found  major  problems  with 

chart  documentation.  Corneal  reflex  was  not  docu-

mented in 43% of the cases, and motor examination 

was not documented in 34% of the patients. It remains 

unclear whether this is truly a problem of documenta-

tion or a lapse in performing a clinical examination of 

brain  death.  Organ  donation  procurement  organiza-

tions  may  play  an  important  role  in  checking  these 

examinations. 

When  reviewing  the  complex  guidelines  of  brain 

death determination and preparation for organ dona-

tion, one can only conclude that a consensus is need-

ed. The intensive care unit physician survey by Doig et 



al.

8

 confirms this need in the Canadian context. This 



would require a task force that reviews the data and 

provides evidentiary tables. The Canadian Council for 

the Donation and Transplantation has admirably taken 

the lead with their development of national guidelines 

for practice and documentation.

9

 Acceptance of uni-



form criteria of brain death would then lead to a more 

uniform  policy  for  brain  death  determination  and 

consistent  documentation.  There  is  no  satisfactory 

answer to the initial question posed in the title of this 

paper. Physicians from different countries have come 

to their own judgment in how to solidify the criteria. 

It must be driven by a concern regarding the accurate 

assessment of fatally injured patients. However, more 

physicians  and  more  confirmatory  tests  cannot  solve 

this  problem.  What  is  required  is  standardization  of 

policy,  appropriate  education  of  staff,  introduction 

of  checklists  in  intensive  care  units,  and  brain  death 

examination  by  designated,  experienced  physicians 

who  have  documented  proficiency  in  brain  death 

examination. 

Les critères cliniques 

de mort encéphalique à 

travers le monde : pour-

quoi en arriver là ? 

L’ajout des critères neurologiques aux critères cardio-

respiratoires  de  mort  –  mieux  connue  comme  mort 

encéphalique  –  a  été  un  changement  de  paradigme 

EDITORIAL

 

541



542 

CANADIAN


 

JOURNAL


 

OF

 



ANESTHESIA

évoluant avec la possibilité de réanimer dans les salles 

d’urgence  et  les  unités  de  soins  intensifs  les  patients 

atteints  de  lésion  cérébrale  aiguë.  Dans  ce  contexte, 

la  réanimation  a  mené  à  la  progression  de  l’œdème 

cérébral dévastateur, au déplacement et, finalement, à 

l’augmentation  massive  de  la  pression  intracrânienne 

pouvant bloquer le débit sanguin à l’entrée de la base 

du  crâne.  De  nombreux  symposiums  organisés  en 

Suède, au Royaume-Uni et en Australie ont tenté de 

formuler  ce  qu’est  la  mort  encéphalique  fondée  sur 

des critères neurologiques. La constatation de la mort 

encéphalique, dont le concept est pleinement accepté, 

est devenue un préalable nécessaire au don d’organe. 

Malgré  l’acceptation  généralisée  des  critères,  une 

grande variabilité demeure sur la façon de les codifier 

à travers le monde. Une revue historique des critères 

de mort neurologique est présentée par Baron et coll. 

dans le présent numéro du Journal.

1

La référence

Un  article  faisant  autorité  sur  la  détermination  de  la 

mort encéphalique a été publié par le Harvard ad hoc 



Committee.

2

 Dans les années 1960, on voulait produi- 



re un document, court mais complet, étant donné le 

besoin  pressant  de  lignes  directrices  dans  les  unités 

de soins intensifs. Jusqu’à aujourd’hui, les critères de 

Harvard demeurent un exemple de simplicité :

1. Absence de réceptivité et de réaction.

2. Absence de mouvement et de respiration.

3. Absence de réflexes du tronc cérébral.

4. Électroencéphalogramme plat.

5.  Aucune  modification  des  résultats  de  tous  les  

 

tests  répétés  24  h  plus  tard  et  exclusion  



 

d’hypothermie (température corporelle < 90 °F  

 

ou  32,2  °C)  ou  de  dépresseurs  du  système  



 

nerveux central.



Les critères de mort encéphalique dans le monde

Une récente enquête a exploré les pratiques interna-

tionales  de  diagnostic  de  mort  encéphalique.

3

  Des 



documents originaux sur le sujet ont été obtenus de 

80  pays.  Les  différences  de  critères  étaient  surpre-

nantes.  Alors  qu’il  n’y  avait  pas  de  différence  quand 

on  comparait  les  méthodes  d’examen  des  réflexes 

du tronc cérébral, elles étaient marquées pour le test 

d’apnée.  Ce  test  a  toujours  préoccupé  les  médecins, 

même si sa technique est simple et sans complications 

en général. Tester la réaction avec l’hypercapnie pro-

voquée devrait rester la norme si notre intention est 

de documenter la destruction totale du tronc cérébral. 

La  confirmation  de  l’apnée  avec  une  valeur  cible  de 

PaCO


2

 a été utilisée dans seulement 59 % de tous les 

documents.  Dans  20  cas  sur  71,  la  préoxygénation 

avec de l’oxygène à 100 %, suivie d’une interruption 

de dix minutes de la ventilation, a été jugée suffisante. 

On ne pouvait savoir si la déficience du test d’apnée 

était  le  résultat  d’un  échec  à  obtenir  la  gazométrie 

du sang artériel en temps opportun ou une résistance 

générale  à  faire  le  test.  Dans  les  pays  d’Amérique 

Centrale  et  du  Sud,  il  était  visible  qu’une  grande 

partie  des  patients  était  examinée  avec  interruption 

de  la  ventilation  seulement,  ou  les  critères  ou  les 

lignes de conduite pour le test d’apnée n’étaient pas 

déclarées. C’est assez inquiétant, car l’apnée ne peut 

être déterminée qu’après avoir introduit une hypocap-

nie pour induire une stimulation maximale des centres 

respiratoires.  Une  interruption  de  dix  minutes  de  la 

ventilation chez un patient qui avait une hypocapnie 

initiale  (fait  inusité  quand  l’hyperventilation  induite 

est  appliquée  pour  traiter  l’hypertension  intracrâni-

enne) peut potentiellement provoquer de l’apnée avec 

une PaCO


2

 qui ne peut atteindre une valeur cible.

Le nombre de médecins nécessaires pour diagnos-

tiquer  la  mort  encéphalique  varie  significativement  à 

travers le monde. Dans 44 % des pays, un médecin est 

nécessaire  (y  compris  au  Canada) ;  dans  34  %,  il  en 

faut deux et dans 16 %, plus de deux.

3

 Dans d’autres 



pays,  le  nombre  de  médecins  est  inconnu.  D’autres 

résultats  de  cette  enquête  internationale  ont  montré 

que des tests de confirmation étaient nécessaires dans 

40 % des 80 pays répondants, tandis que la complexité 

des  critères  ne  semblait  pas  être  influencée  par  les 

différences culturelles.

3

 Il n’y avait pas de différences 



consistantes entre les pays de l’Est et de l’Ouest, bien 

que dans certains pays, une qualification académique 

était  requise  pour  réaliser  le  test  d’apnée  (professeur 

agrégé).


Le  type  et  la  nécessité  des  tests  de  confirmation 

varient  considérablement  d’un  pays  à  l’autre.  Le 

choix  de  ces  tests  semble  arbitraire,  la  Suède  étant 

une  exception  notable.  En  Suède,  un  angiogramme 

cérébral  doit  être  fait  deux  fois,  entrecoupées  d’une 

période  suffisante  d’observation  pour  documenter 

l’absence  de  débit  sanguin  vers  le  cerveau.  Quoique 

l’électroencéphalogramme soit habituellement recom-

mandé  à  l’échelle  mondiale,  dans  le  présent  numéro 

Young  et  coll.

4

  présentent  des  arguments  probants 



contre son usage, en faveur de tests qui démontrent 

l’absence de débit sanguin intracérébral.



Préoccupations restantes

Il semble que pour au moins la moitié des pays son-

dés, et quelques États américains, la confirmation de 

l’évaluation  de  la  mort  encéphalique  par  un  second 

médecin  soit  requise.  Il  n’y  a  pas  de  données  pour 

appuyer cette pratique, ni de suggestion de l’exigence 

542 

CANADIAN


 

JOURNAL


 

OF

 



ANESTHESIA

EDITORIAL

 

543



d’avoir plus de deux médecins. La nécessité de deux 

médecins pour déterminer la mort encéphalique peut 

créer des problèmes logistiques, mais dans la plupart 

des unités de soins intensifs modernes, c’est faisable. 

L’absence de pulsion respiratoire demeure essentielle 

dans  le  diagnostic  de  mort  encéphalique.  La  preuve 

est insuffisante pour avancer qu’un test formel d’apnée 

pourrait être différé.

Dans de nombreux pays développés, les croyances 

culturelles et religieuses dominantes appuient la déter-

mination clinique de mort encéphalique. Il n’y a pas 

de  preuve  suggérant  que  la  variabilité  des  directives 

internationales  (comme  de  multiples  observations, 

différents tests de confirmation, plus d’un médecins) 

soit en lien avec ces attitudes. Des critères plus stricts 

étaient présents quand le don d’organe était considéré 

et  c’est  un  déterminant  fréquent  dans  de  nombreux 

guides de conduite dans le monde.

Malgré des recommandations nationales, une varia- 

bilité  significative  persiste  dans  les  politiques  hospi-

talières  pour  adultes  aux  États-Unis,

5

  comme  dans 



des centres canadiens pour adultes et enfants étudiés 

de façon similaire par Hornby et coll.

6

 dans le présent 



numéro.  Il  est  probable  que  des  différences  exces-

sives  seraient  trouvées  à  travers  le  monde  si  les 

multiples  politiques  hospitalières  de  chaque  pays 

étaient  étudiées.  Il  y  a  aussi  une  inquiétude  persis-

tante  quant  à  l’exactitude  de  la  documentation  de 

la  mort  encéphalique.  Une  étude  de  Wang  et  coll.

7

 

de  l’Université  de  Californie  a  vérifié  les  dossiers  de 



patients  pour  qui  une  mort  encéphalique  avait  été 

déclarée  au  Los  Angeles  County  General  Hospital  et 

ils ont trouvé des problèmes majeurs de contenu des 

dossiers.  Le  réflexe  cornéen  n’était  pas  documenté 

dans 43 % des cas et l’examen moteur non documenté 

chez 34 % des patients. Il n’est pas clair si c’était là un 

véritable problème de documentation ou un retard à 

réaliser un examen clinique de la mort encéphalique. 

Les services d’approvisionnement en organes peuvent 

jouer un rôle important en vérifiant ces examens.

En  passant  en  revue  les  recommandations  com-

plexes  sur  la  détermination  de  la  mort  encéphalique 

et la préparation au don d’organe, on peut seulement 

conclure  qu’un  consensus  est  nécessaire.  L’enquête 

menée auprès des médecins des unités de soins inten-

sifs par Doig et coll.

8

 confirme cette nécessité dans le 



contexte canadien. Il faudra une équipe spéciale pour 

revoir  les  données  et  fournir  des  tableaux  probants. 

Le  Conseil  canadien  pour  le  don  et  la  transplanta-

tion  a  admirablement  pris  l’initiative  en  élaborant 

des normes nationales de pratique et de documenta-

tion.


9

 Une acceptation de critères uniformes de mort 

encéphalique conduira ensuite à une politique plus uni-

forme sur la détermination de la mort encéphalique et 

sur une documentation régulièrement obtenue. Il n’y 

a  pas  de  réponse  satisfaisant  à  la  question  initiale  du 

titre de l’article. Les médecins de différents pays ont 

leur propre idée sur la façon de solidifier les critères. 

Ce doit être guidé par le souci d’une évaluation exacte 

des patients mortellement blessés. Cependant, plus de 

médecins et plus de tests de confirmation ne peuvent 

régler  le  problème.  Il  faut  une  normalisation  de  la 

politique,  une  formation  appropriée  du  personnel, 

l’introduction de liste récapitulative dans les unités de 

soins intensifs et l’examen de la mort encéphalique par 

des  médecins  désignés  et  expérimentés  qui  ont  une 

compétence reconnue pour la vérifier.

References

  1  Baron L, Shemie SD, Teitelbaum J, Doig CJ. Brief 

review: History, concept and controversies in the neu-

rological determination of death. Can J Anesth 2006; 

53: 602–9.

  2  Anonymous. A definition of irreversible coma. Report 

of the Ad Hoc Committee of the Harvard Medical 

School to Examine the Definition of Brain Death. 

JAMA 1968; 205: 337–40.

  3  Wijdicks EF. Brain death worldwide: accepted fact but 

no global consensus in diagnostic criteria. Neurology 

2002; 58: 20–5.

  4  Young B, Shemie SD, Doig CJ, Teitelbaum J. The role 

of ancillary tests in the neurological determination of 

death. Can J Anesth 2006; 53: 620–7. 

  5  Powner DJ, Hernandez M, Rives TE. Variability among 

hospital policies for determining brain death in adults. 

Crit Care Med 2004; 32: 1284–8.

  6  Hornby K, Shemie SD, Teitelbaum J, Doig C. Variability 

in hospital-based brain death guidelines in Canada. 

Can J Anesth 2006; 53: 613–19.

  7  Wang MY, Wallace P, Gruen JP. Brain death documen-

tation: analysis and issues. Neurosurgery 2002; 51: 

731–5; discussion 735–6.

  8  Doig CJ, Young K, Teitelbaum J, Shemie SD. Brief sur-

vey: Determining brain death in Canadian intensive 

care units. Can J Anesth 2006; 53: 609–12.

  9  Shemie SD, Doig C, Dickens B, et al. Severe brain injury 

to neurological determination of death: Canadian 

forum recommendations. CMAJ 2006; 174: S1–13.




Yüklə 81,11 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə