Homeopathic proving



Yüklə 0,62 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/12
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü0,62 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   12

 


HOMEOPATHIC PROVING 
OF 
 
Tea Tree 
Melaleuca Alternifolia (Mel-alt) 
 
 
 
 
The students of  
The Sydney College of Homeopathic Medicine 
 
Co-ordinated by 
ALASTAIR GRAY and Dr CAROL PEDERSEN 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 
 
Prologue 
 
Introduction 
 
This Remedy 
 
1.
 
The choice of this remedy 
 
2.
 
Methodology Employed in the Proving of Tea Tree 
 
3.
 
Traditional Use/Modern use 
 
4.
 
Toxicology of Tea tree 
 
5.
 
The substance; Tea Tree 
 
6.
 
Themes from the proving of Tea Tree  
 
The Proving 
 
7.
 
Primary Core Symptoms only 
 
12. 
The Full Proving Document both Primary and Secondary Symptoms 
 
8.
 
The Chronology of the Major Provers 
 
The Rubrics 
 
9.
 
The Rubrics 
 
Epilogue 
 
     15.  Thanks and Acknowledgments 
 
 
 
 

 

 

HOMEOPATHIC PROVING 
OF 
 
Tea Tree 
Melaleuca Alternifolia (Mel-alt) 
 
 
THIS REMEDY  
 
 
Researched by:   
 
Dr Carol Pederson 
Compiled by :   
 
Pam Sutton and Alastair Gray 
 
SUBSTANCE PROVED:   
Melaleuca alternifolia; Medicinal Tea tree Oil  
GENUS: 
 
Melaleuca alternafolia 
SPECIES: 
 
Myrtaceae 
COMMON NAMES: 
 
Tea tree, Paperbark 
 
 
1. 
The choice of this remedy 
 
The  medicine  for  the  proving  of  2001  at  the  Sydney  College  of  Homeopathic  Medicine  was  double  blind.  
Neither the principal of the college nor myself as co-ordinator of the proving were aware of what the proving 
substance was.  It was chosen, selected, distributed and prepared by a third party.   
 
 
2.         Methodology of the trial 
 
See the introduction of this book. 
 
Blinding 
 
 The  trial  was  truly  double  blind  in  that  neither  the  participants,  control  group,  coordinator,  supervisor,  or 
principal of  the  college  knew  the  actual  substance being  proved.    It  was  only  unblinded  after  five  weeks  of 
trialing the medicine. 
 
Pharmacy 
 
The  medicine  selected  for  proving,  Tea  Tree,  was  prepared  according  to  Hahnemannian  guidelines  as  laid 
down  in  the  Organon  of  Medicine.    The  whole  plant  was  chosen  not  just  the  oil,  which  has  the  recognised 
toxicological effect. 
 
Homeopathic Remedy 
 
Julia Twohig and Brauers Biotherapeutics. Thanks to Julia Twohig for having the remedy made, and ensuring 
the pharmacy was impeccable. The medicine can be ordered from Brauers Biotherapeutics  Tanunda South 
Australia  1300308108 
  
Prover Population 
 
There were a total of 23 participants. There were 17 women and 6 men ranging in age from 27 to 
58 years. Twelve provers received verum and there were 11 supervisors for those provers.  
 


6c 


6c 


6c 


6c 


30c 


30c 


30c 


30c 

 



30c 
10 

6c 
11 

6c 
12 

30c 
13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


 
There were no dropouts from this homeopathic drug proving. 
  
 
3. 
 
Traditional and modern use of Tea Tree 
 
• 
Aboriginal 
• 
White European 
• 
Wartime 
• 
Medicinal and other 
• 
Modern use 
• 
What it’s used for now in cosmetics 
• 
Antiseptics 
 
History 
 
The  Australian  aborigines  have  used  tea  tree  oil  for  thousands  of  years  to  cure  headaches,  pain,  colds  and 
also as an insect repellent. 
 
It is generally thought botanist Sir Joseph Banks, on Captain James Cook’s ship Endeavour, which landed in 
Sydney’s Botany Bay in 1770, named the paperbark trees around the bay “tea trees”; he possibly even drank 
a brew made from the leaves.   
 
In  1922  Technological  Museum  chemist  Arthur  Penfold  documented  the  oil’s  antiseptic  qualities  in  a  paper 
presented  to  the  Royal  Society  of  New  South  Wales  –  rating  it  far  stronger  than  any  of  the  “medical” 
antiseptics of the time.   In fact it was found to have a Redealwalker co-efficient of 11-13, meaning tea tree 
oil is 11 to 13 times stronger than carbolic acid for killing bacteria and fungi.  All this, and it didn’t harm the 
skin!  
 
Tea  tree oil  was  standard Army-issue  during  World War  II  because  of  its  antiseptic qualities,  particularly  in 
the  presence  of  pus  and  fungi.    Athlete’s  foot  was  rife  in  the  damp,  dark  war  conditions  but  tea  tree  oil 
healed  many  a  soldier’s  tinea.    During  this  time,  all  tea  tree  oil  supplies  were  commandeered  by  the 
Australian Defence Force and people working within the tea tree industry were exempt from military service!   
 
Not  only  was  it  helping  heal  the  front-line  wounded,  but  also  the  oil  was  added  to  machine  cutting  oils  in 
munition factories to reduce injury infection rates. 
 
It is generally thought the post-war introduction of new synthetic drugs brought about the demise in the use 
of the “medicine kit in a bottle”. However, the Government had a large part to play essentially using up all 
available  supplies.    Hence,  with  the  discovery  of  penicillin  and  other  antibiotics,  tea  tree  oil  was  largely 
forgotten  and  relegated  to  the  folk  medicine  cabinets  –  until  recently  that  is,  with  many  people  (both 
scientists and the general public) rediscovering the benefits of natural remedies. 

 

 
Since  the  1930s  there  have  been  many  scientific  documents  presented  by  various  research  institutions  to 
attest to the oil’s efficacy in treating a wide range of conditions – from ringworm and thrush to tonsillitis and 
large diabetic ulcers. 
 
In 1985, a study treating Candida albicans, proved the oil’s ability rapidly and successfully to cure the 
leucorrhea and vaginal infections.  
 
A comparative study between tea tree oil (5%) and benzoyl peroxide (5%) to treat acne showed the tea tree 
oil significantly reduced the lesions and produced fewer unwanted side effects. 
 
After it was discovered in the 1990s that tea tree oil – in concentrations as low as 1% - killed Legionella 
bacteria (responsible for causing a type of pneumonia) often transmitted through air conditioning units, tea 
tree oil is now dissolved in liquid carbon dioxide and used in these systems to control bacteria and fungi. 
4.Toxicology of Tea Tree 
 
• 
The properties of the oil 
• 
Adverse reactions and poisonings 
• 
Modern trials 
 
Poisonings: 
 
Several cases of melaleuca oil poisoning have been documented. 
A 17-month-old boy ingested less than 10mls of oil and developed ataxia and drowsiness. 
Confusion and inability to walk after ingesting less than 10mls of 100% oil was reported in a 23-month-old 
boy.  He was asymptomatic within 5 hours of ingestion.  
 
However, there have been several cases of melaleuca oil poisonings in animals when the oil was applied 
topically to cats and dogs. Typical physical signs were depression, weakness, difficulty in coordination and 
muscle tremors.  
 
Interesting notes: 
 
Since 1990 US Patents have been granted to more than 15 treatments containing melaleuca oil. 
 
 
5. 
Tea Tree – the substance 
 
Description 
 
Melaleuca is of Greek origin: mela (black) and leuca (white), which refers to the flaky bark of some species, 
revealing blackened lower bark and white upper bark, probably resulting from fire. Alternifolia = alternating 
leaves; ternifolia = leaves in 3. 
 
While a few melaleuca species are medium to large-sized trees, most are small to medium shrubs.  Peak 
flowering time for most species is spring, with the occasional spasmodic flowering out-of-season.  
 
The stamens make more of a visual impact than the small and inconspicuous petals, with the most common 
colours being red, pink, mauve, purple and yellow.  The flower clusters occur either at branch terminals or in 
short spikes along the branches. 
 
After flowering, woody seed capsules develop.  These three-celled pods are usually tightly closed unless 
stimulated by fire or the plant dies, at which stage the capsules burst open, shedding the small seeds. 
 
Tea tree oil itself is clear, colourless to pale yellow, and has more than 100 constituents, though the main 2 
are Terpinen-4-ol (35-40%) and Cineole (2-15%).  It is the presence of Terpinen-4-ol which gives the oil its 
nutmeg-like aroma.  
 
Distribution: 
 
Though Melaleuca species are found worldwide, the only place where Melaleuca Alternafolia is found naturally 
is in a small area of northern New South Wales.  They are popular in landscape design in both Australia and 

 

overseas. Range:    Australia - New South Wales, Queensland. An evergreen shrub growing to 6m by 4m. It 
is hardy to zone 9. It is in leaf all year, in flower in June. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and 
female organs) and are pollinated by insects.  
 
Habitat; 
 
Melaleuca  are  often  found  around  swamps  or  along  watercourse  edges,  and  also  found  in  open  forest, 
woodlands  or  shrublands.  The  plant  prefers  light  (sandy),  medium  (loamy)  and  heavy  (clay)  soils  and 
requires  well-drained  soil.  The  plant  prefers  acid and  neutral  soils.  It  cannot  grow  in  the  shade.  It requires 
moist soil. Habitats and Possible Locations; Woodland, Sunny Edge. 
 
Commercial Applications: 
 
Melaleuca Alternafolia is the most common species in commercial enterprise and is used extensively in 
producing tea tree oil, with the last 10-15 years seeing a significant increase in both commercial operations 
and domestic usage. Large commercial plantations produce about 100 tonnes of tea tree oil annually. 
 
It’s been said that thousands of trees will be needed for future harvests, as they have just 1-2% yield by 
weight (leaves and branches) after distillation.  At more than $60 a kilogram, much of Australia’s tea tree oil 
is sold to the United States. 
 
Tea tree oil is used in a wide range of products, particularly personal grooming items, such as hair shampoos 
and conditioners, soap, creams, gels, lotions, toothpaste, liniments, balms, insect repellents and germicides.  
It’s also hailed as an effective treatment for skin complaints such as acne, impetigo, psoriasis, dandruff and 
boils, and has been noted to relieve pain from haemorrhoids, scalds and burns.  It is the predominant active 
ingredient in many natural head lice treatments and is also known to deter ticks and leeches. 
 
Clinical Features 
 
Tea  tree  oil  has  many  unique  properties.  It  is  a  broad-spectrum  anti-microbial,  killing  many  bacteria, 
including some strains of staphylococcus and streptococcus.  It does this by damaging the bacteria’s cellular 
membrane and subsequently denaturing the cell contents. 
 
The oil has excellent solvent properties, deeply penetrating the skin into infected tissue, acting solely on the 
source of infection, and leaving the surface clean and healthy. It dissolves pus and still works effectively in 
its presence and also acts as a mild anti-inflammatory. 
 
According  to  microbiologist  Professor  Tom  Riley  and  PhD  student  Christina  Carson  of  the  University  of 
Western  Australia,  tea  tree  oil  is  an  extremely  effective  antiseptic  and  disinfectant  and  is  useful  in  treating 
acne. There is also limited clinical evidence about its effectiveness at treating vaginal infections.  
 
The  other  area  of  growing  interest  is  the  oil’s  apparent  effectiveness  in  treating  the  increasing  numbers  of 
hospital-acquired infections due to methicillin-resistant strains of S. aureaus (MRSA).   
 
 Professor  Riley  says  despite  increasing  interest  in  using  tea  tree  oil  therapeutically,  the  industry  suffers 
because of a “paucity of information in appropriate peer-reviewed journals”.  He says this is the main reason 
why  the  US  Government  has  knocked  backed  industry  submissions  to  the  FDA  to  register  tea  tree  oil  for 
over-the-counter sales. He cites one of the main reasons was due to lack of published in vitro efficacy data.  
 
However,  the  conclusions  drawn  from  published  research  to  date  all  point  to  the  oil  as  having  significant 
antimicrobial activity – albeit in a laboratory setting.  Riley points out the next step is to conduct randomized 
clinical trials - which though expensive - “the potential benefits to the industry should justify the expense”. 
 
“It has a good future, if managed properly,” Riley says. “Some manufacturers claim it is useful for every type 
of complaint, making it sound a bit like snake oil.  But with proper research we can confirm its great value for 
specific treatments.”  
 
Dr James Rowe, of Technical Consultancy Services says “unlike antibiotics there is no evidence of genetically-
acquired  immunity  and  the  oil  is  effective  in  the  presence  of  blood,  pus,  necrotic  tissue  and  mucous 
discharge” 
 

 

It  is  interesting  to  note  the  oil’s  beneficial  components  vary  considerably  between  batches,  creating 
difficulties for scientists to determine its full application potential. 
 
A  complex  mixture  of  more  than  100  identified  components,  tea  tree  oil  consists  predominately  of 
monoterpenes,  sesquiterpenes  and  terpene  alcohols;  germicidal  effects  are  mainly  due  to  terpinene-4-ol.  
Antimicrobial  action  increases  in  line  with  increased  concentrations  of  terpinene-4-ol;  however  above  40%, 
there appears to be no further measurable increase in antimicrobial activity.  
 
Also important is the oil’s cineole levels, with human skin testing studies showing high levels of cineole which 
seem  to  point  to  increased  skin  irritation  incidences.  The  conclusions  drawn  from  these  data  have  major 
implications for the industry, says Dr Ian Southwell, who headed this research project.
 
 
 
Dr  Southwell  says  previously  oils  with  a  5-10%  cineole  component  were  acceptable,  but  now  buyers  want 
these levels as low as 5% or even 3%, as the increased levels are associated with increased irritancy. 
 
Oil  quality  is  of  great  concern,  as  the  varying  concentrations  of  terpinene-4-ol  make  it  difficult  to  monitor 
each batch during production.  Other factors to consider include the leaves’ age and time of extraction, the 
extraction method itself and the storage conditions.    
 
Pure tea tree oil is a clear, mobile liquid,  relatively stable at room temperature, making it easy to determine 
whether impurities are present, or the oil has been contaminated by weeds during harvest or during the 
distillation process.   
 
It is highly concentrated oil and may cause irritation if used directly on skin undiluted.  However, it may be 
diluted  up  to  approximately  200-1  and  still  be  effective.    As  well,  there  is  a  low  incidence  of  allergic  skin 
reactions  to  tea  tree  oil.    To  investigate  this  further,  200  healthy  individuals  underwent  two  different  tests 
(prick and patch) using 10 tea tree oils to determine the type, ratio and significance of any reactions.  The 
volunteers were also exposed to other allergens – such as grass and dust-mite - to determine their general 
overall allergic response. 
 
Some research conclusions suggest that oxidation of the oil, not the fresh tea tree oil itself, is responsible for 
allergic reactions.  Oils stored in clear bottles (as opposed to brown bottles) showed marked changes; while 
other factors include exposure to heat, light and air. 
 
Edible Uses; None known.  
 
Medicinal Uses: Alterative; Antibacterial; Antiseptic; Aromatherapy; Diaphoretic; Expectorant.  
 
Tea  tree,  and  in  particular  its  essential  oil,  is  one  of  the  most  important  natural  antiseptics  and  it  merits  a 
place in every medicine chest. It is useful for treating stings, burns, wounds and skin infections of all kinds.  
 
An  essential  oil  obtained  from  the  leaves  and  twigs  is  strongly  antiseptic,  diaphoretic  and  expectorant.  It 
stimulates  the  immune  system  and  is  effective  against  a  broad  range  of  bacterial  and  fungal  infections. 
Internally, it is used in the treatment of chronic and some acute infections, notably cystitis, glandular fever 
and  chronic  fatigue  syndrome.  It  is  used  externally  in  the  treatment  of  thrush,  vaginal  infections,  acne, 
athlete's foot, verrucas, warts, insect bites, cold sores and nits. It is applied neat to verrucas, warts and nits, 
but is diluted with a carrier oil such as almond for other uses. 
 
The  oil  is  non-irritant.  Another  report  says  that  high  quality  oils  contain  about  40%  terpinen-4-ol,  which  is 
well tolerated by the skin and 5% cineol which is irritant. However, in poor quality oils the levels of cineol can 
exceed  10%  and  in  some  cases  up  to  65%.The  essential  oil  is  used  in  aromatherapy.  Its  keyword  is 
'Antiseptic'. 
 
Other Uses - Essential oil; Wood.  
 
An  essential  oil  is  obtained  from  the  leaves.  It  is  strongly  germicidal  and  is  also  used  in  dentistry, 
deodorants, soaps, mouthwashes etc.  
 
Wood - very durable in wet conditions and in damp ground. 
 
Cultivation details 
 

 

Requires  a  fertile,  well-drained  moisture  retentive  lime-free  soil  in  full  sun.  Prefers  a  soil  that  does  not 
contain much nitrogen. Plants are shade tolerant and succeed in most soils and aspects except dry conditions 
when they are grown in Australian gardens. 
 
This species is not very cold hardy and is only likely to succeed outdoors in the very mildest parts of Britain. 
It tolerates temperatures down to at least -7°C in Australian gardens but this cannot be translated directly to 
British gardens because of our cooler summers and longer,  colder and wetter winters.  
 
Seed takes about 12 months to develop on the plant; the woody seed capsules persist for 3 or more years. 
 
Any pruning is best done after the plants have flowered with the intention of maintaining a compact habit. 
 
Hybridizes  freely  with  other  members  of  this  genus.  Plants  in  this  genus  are  notably  resistant  to  honey 
fungus. 
 
Propagation 
 
Seed  -  surface  sow  in  spring  or  autumn  on  to  a  pot  of  permanently  moist  soil  in  a  warm  greenhouse. 
Immerse in 5cm of water and do not water from overhead. Grow on until the seedlings are 0.5cm tall then 
remove  from  the  water  and  pot  up  a  week  later.  Seedlings  are  liable  to  damp  off  when  grown  this  way; 
sowing the seed thinly, good ventilation and hygeine are essential for success. Grow the plants on for at least 
their  first  winter  in  a  greenhouse  and  then  plant  them  out  in  late  spring  or  early  summer,  after  the  last 
expected frosts. Consider giving the plants some protection from the cold for their first few winters outdoors. 
Cuttings of half-ripe lateral shoots with a heel, July/August in a frame.  
 
Melaleuca  alternifolia  is  a  member  of  the  Myrtaceae  family  in  company  with  Callistemons  (Bottlebrushes), 
Eucalypts  and  Leptospermums  (Tea  Trees).  There  are  about  220  Melaleuca  species  with  215  native  to 
Australia and the others scattered through New Guinea, Indonesia and South-east Asia. As with many native 
plants, Western Australia has the lion’s share of Melaleucas. Many of these western species are outstanding 
plants with great horticultural potential. 
 
Melaleuca alternifolia is an eastern species and occurs on the North Coast and adjacent ranges of New South 
Wales.  It  develops  into  a  tall  shrub  with  papery  bark  and  white  spring  and  summer  flowers.  The  common 
name,  Snow-in-Summer  refers  to  the  flowers.  Melaleuca  alternifolia  shares  this  name  with  Melaleuca 
linariifolia another eastern species. 
 
Melaleuca  alternifolia  has  aromatic  foliage  and  valuable  oil  is  extracted  from  the  leaves.  Tea  Tree  Oil  has 
great germicidal properties and is used in a range of products. Antiseptics, deodorants, shampoos (for dogs 
and  humans)  and  soaps  are  some  of  the  products  incorporating  Tea  Tree  Oil.  Large  Melaleuca  alternifolia 
plantations have been established on the North Coast of New South Wales. We are not sure why it is called 
Tea Tree Oil, as this is the common name of Leptospermums. Horticulturally speaking, Melaleuca alternifolia 
will cope with dry and wet situations. It develops into a tall upright shrub and is covered in white flowers in 
the warmer months. A wide range of native insects visits the flowers. The papery bark is another feature. It 
is propagated from seed from cuttings. Its close cousin is the Manuka in New Zealand 
 
 
6. 
THEMES FROM THE PROVING OF TEA TREE 
 
What is there  
 
Irritable 
Nose and cold symptoms 
 
What is not there 
 
No Male symptoms 
 
Symptoms 
 
Tea Tree cured  
• 
shame, guilt, ashamed feeling and depression 
 

Yüklə 0,62 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   12




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə