Ijmbr 5 (2017) 1-7 issn 2053-180X



Yüklə 295,36 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix01.08.2017
ölçüsü295,36 Kb.

 

 

IJMBR 5 (2017) 1-7 



 

 

 

 

ISSN   2053-180X 

 

 



 

 

Ethanolic extracts of different fruit trees and their 



activity against Strongyloides venezuelensis 

 

Letícia Aparecida Duart Bastos



1

 , Marlene Tiduko Ueta

1

 , Vera Lúcia Garcia

2



Rosimeire Nunes de Oliveira

1

, Mara Cristina Pinto

3

, Tiago Manuel Fernandes Mendes

1

 

and Silmara Marques Allegretti

1

 

1



Biology Institute, Animal Biology Department, Campinas State University (UNICAMP), SP, Brazil. 

2

Multidisciplinary Center of Chemical Biological and Agricultural Research (CPQBA), Campinas State University 



(UNICAMP), Paulínia, SP, Brazil. 

3

São Paulo State University (UNESP), Araraquara, SP, Brazil. 



 

Article History 

 

ABSTRACT 

Received 05 December, 2016 

Received in revised form 02 

January, 2017 

Accepted 05 January, 2017

 

 



Keywords:  

Rodent parasite,  

Diagnostic test,  

Fruit trees,  

Anti-strongyloides 

activity,  

Anthelmintic effect. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Article Type: 

Full Length Research Article

 

 

Strongyloides venezuelensis and Strongyloides ratti 



are both rodents’ parasites 

that are important models both in an immunologic and biologic perspective, for 

the  development  of  new  drugs  and  diagnostic  tests.  This  study  was  aimed  at 

studying  the  anthelminthic  in  vitro  effect  of  ethanolic  extracts,  obtained  from 

several  species  of  Brazilian  fruit  trees,  against  S.  venezuelensis  parasitic 

females  in  an  attempt  to  search  for  new  therapeutic  alternatives.  Plant  leaves 

were  collected  in  the  Multidisciplinary  Center  of  Chemical,  Biological  and 

Agricultural  Research  (CPQBA)  at  Campinas  State  University  (UNICAMP),  in 

Paulínia, Brazil. Ethanolic extracts were obtained by mixing dried powdered plant 

leaves  (10  g)  with  150  mL  of  ethanol  for  10  min/16.000  rpm  in  a  mechanical 

disperser  (Ultra  Turrax  T50,  IKA  Works  Inc.,  Wilmington,  NC,  USA),  followed  by 

filtration. The residue was re-extracted with 100 mL of ethanol. The extracts were 

pooled  and  evaporated  under  vacuum  until  dry,  resulting  in  the  final  dried 

ethanolic  extracts.  Inhibitory  concentration  was  determined  using  Origin  7 

program.  Statistical  analysis  was  performed  using  SAS  program.  Significant 

differences between groups were calculated using one-way Analysis of Variance 

(ANOVA)  (p<0,0001).  The  correlation  between  time,  motility,  oviposition,  and 

mortality  with  the  extract  concentration  was  accessed  u

sing  Duncan’s  Multiple 

Range  Test.  Spondias  mombin  ethanolic  extract  and  aqueous  fraction  showed 

the  most  promising  results,  with  anti-Strongyloides  activity  and  100%  mortality 

rate after 72 h, for all tested concentrations. Overall, most of the extracts showed 

a satisfactory anthelmintic effect for at least one of the tested concentrations. 

©2017 BluePen Journals Ltd. All rights reserved 

 

 

INTRODUCTION 



 

Strongyloidiasis is an intestinal neglected disease caused 

by  the  nematode  Strongyloides  stercoralis  with  over  100 

million  estimate  cases  worldwide  (Bisoffi  et  al.,  2013). 

The risk of infection  is  greater  in  regions  with  hot  and 

 

 



 

*Corresponding  author.  E-mail:  sallegre@unicamp.br.  Tel:  (19) 

3521-6286/ 6303.

 

humid  climate,  in  people  who  work  with  soil  and/or 



belonging  to  less  favored  socioeconomic  groups  (Olsen 

et al., 2009).  

Although 

most 


infected 

individuals 

are 

either 


asymptomatic  or  have  few  symptoms,  an  important 

characteristic  of  S.  stercoralis  lies  on  the  ability  to 

replicate  inside  the  host  and  auto-infect  it.  Autoinfection 

may  lead  to  persistent  chronichyper  infections,  with  a 

wide  variation  of  chronic  hyper  manifestations,   which    


 

 

 



 

 

 



could evolve to a disseminated strongyloidiasis (Gryseels 

et  al.,  2006)  with  an  87%  mortality  rate  (Olsen  et  al., 

2009).  

Strongyloides  venezuelensis  and  Strongyloides  ratti

both 


rodents’

  parasites,  are  important  models  both  in  an 

immunologic  and  biologic  perspective,  for  the  develop-

ment  of  new  drugs  and  diagnostic  tests  (Nolan  et  al., 

1993; Olson and Schiller, 1978; Sato and Toma, 1990).  

Nowadays, strongyloidiasis treatment is performed with 

either albendazole (400 mg/kg) or ivermectin (200 µg/kg) 

(Olsen  et  al.,  2009;  WHO,  2012).  Thiabendazole, 

mebendazole  and  cambendazole,  have  been  used  for 

strongyloidiasis  treatment,  however  their  use  has  been 

dropped due to their toxicity and adverse effects, frequent 

treatment  fail  and  drug  resistance  (Bisoffi  et  al.,  2013; 

Legarda-Ceballos et al., 2016; Olsen et al., 2009).  

Due  to  high  prevalence  and  low  therapeutic  efficiency 

of  synthetic  drugs  currently  available  for  strongyloidiasis 

treatment,  there  is  a  need  for  new  therapeutic  alter-

natives.  Medicinal  plants  and  their  extracts  have  been 

used  in  the  treatment  of  several  diseases,  including 

parasite  infections,  making  them  a  viable  alternative  in 

the  search  for  new  drugs  against  S.  stercoralis  (Anthony 

et al., 2005).  

In  this  report,  the  anthelminthic  in  vitro  effect  of 

ethanolic  extracts,  obtained  from  several  species  of 

Brazilian  fruit  trees,  against  S.  venezuelensis  parasitic 

females  is  described;  in  an  attempt  to  search  for  new 

therapeutic alternatives. 

 

 

MATERIALS AND METHODS 



 

Vegetable material 

 

Plant leaves were collected in the Multidisciplinary Center 



of  Chemical  Biological  and  Agricultural  Research 

(CPQBA)  at  Campinas  State  University  (UNICAMP),  in 

Paulínia, SP.  24 plants  were used (Table 1). The criteria 

for selection of plant was to use only plants that bear fruit 

and were easy to cultivate.  

 

 



Ethanolic extracts and fractions  

 

The  ethanolic  extracts  were  obtained  by  mixing  dried 



powdered plant leaves (10 g)  with 150 mL of ethanol for 

10  min/16.000  rpm  in  a  mechanical  disperser  (Ultra 

Turrax  T50,  IKA  Works  Inc.,  Wilmington,  NC,  USA), 

followed  by  filtration.  The  residue  was  re-extracted  with 

100  mL  of  ethanol.  The  extracts  were  pooled  and 

evaporated  under  vacuum  until  dry,  resulting  in  the  final 

dried ethanolic extracts.  

The  extracts  with  better  results  were  then  fractioned. 

Briefly,  1.33  g  of  dry  extract  was  dissolved  in  50  mL  of 

distilled water with help of  a  sonicator,  transferred  to  a  

Int. J. Mod. Biol. Res.          2 

 

 



 

separation  funnel  and  then,  50  mL  of  acetone  were 

added.  The  process  was  repeated  and  instead  of 

acetone,  50  mL  of  dichloromethane  was  added.  The 

organic and aqueous fractions were separated and dried 

in a rotary evaporator. 

 

 

Drug control 



 

For  the  control  group  three  synthetic  compounds  were 

used,  albendazole  (generic  drug  EMS,  400  mg), 

cambendazole  (Cambem®,  UCI-farma,  180  mg)  and 

ivermectine (Ivermec®, UCI-farma, 6 mg). 

 

 



Biological models 

 

Strongyloides venezuelensis 

 

In  the  research,  a  S.  venezuelensis  strain  isolated  from 



wild  rodents  (Bolomys  lasiurus);  that  has  been  main-

tained  for  several  years  in  our  lab  at  UNICAMP  was 

used, through successive infections in Rattus norvegicus, 

Wistar  lineage.  The  experiments  were  approved  by  the 

Ethics  Commission  for  Animal  Use  (CEUA/UNICAMP, 

protocol  2174-1),  as  they  were  in  accordance  with  the 

ethical  principles  of  animal  experimentation  adopted  by 

CEUA.  


 

 

Parasite female recovery 

 

Fifteen days after infection, the rats were euthanized and 



15  cm  of  the  small  intestine  was  removed  and  slice 

longitudinally.  The  intestine  was  washed  with  sterile 

saline  solution  (0.15  mol/L)  and  placed  in  a  Petri  dish 

containing  RPMI  1640  (Nutricell

®

)  medium  (supple-



mented  with  0.05  g/L  of  streptomycin,  10.000  UI/ml  of 

penicillin,  0.3  g/L  of  L-Glutamine,  2.0  g/L  of  D-Glucose, 

2.0  g/L  of  NaHCO

3

  and  5,958  g/L  of  Hepes),  and  were 



kept  at  37°C  for  1  h.  Afterwards,  female  parasites  were 

collect and washed three times in RPMI medium to avoid 

later  contamination  during  the  in  vitro  assays.  Only 

parasitic  females  (pathenogenetic)  were  used  since  they 

are  the  main  parasitic  form  living  in  the  vertebrate  host 

and  for  their  ability  to  reproduce  inside  the  host  which 

may lead to a disseminated infection. Males only exist as 

a free-living form in the soil. 

 

 

In vitro assay 



 

Anthelminthic evaluation  

 

Both the extracts and synthetic drugs were diluted in 2% 



Phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution  and  tested  for

 

 

Bastos et al.          3 



 

 

 



Table 1. List of plants used and ethanolic extract yield. 

 

Family 



Species 

CPQBA plant code 

Yield (%) 

Anacardiaceae 



Spondias dulcis 

50 


21 

Spondias mombin 

17.3 



 

 

 

 



Arecaceae 

Butia capitata 

132 


12.4 

Celastraceae 



Salacia elliptica 

104 


22.4 

Fabaceae 



Inga cylindrica 

80 


9.9 

Jungladaceae 



Carya illinoensis 

31 


12.1 

Malpighiaceae 



Byrsonima crassifolia 

15 


7.6 

 

 

 

 

Myrtaceae 



Aceima smeithii 

12.7 



Eugenia brasiliensis 

38 


29 

Eugenia involucrata 

28 


8.3 

Eugenia uniflora 

60 


10.8 

Eugenia pyriformis 

18.7 



Hexachlamys edulis 

51 


19.6 

Myrcianthes pungens 

124 


10.4 

Psidium cattleianum 

53 


17.8 

 

 

 

 

Proteaceae 



Macadamia integrifolia 

103 


Sapindaceae 



Dimocarpus longan 

17 


12.5 

Litchi chinensis 

44 


14.7 

Sapotaceae 



Labramia bojeri 

115 


21.5 

Lucum acaimito 

66 


22.8 

Manilkara zapota 

16 


15.3 

Pouteria campechiana 

81 


13 

Tiliaceae 



Muntingia calabura 

36 


10.3 

Urticaceae 



Pourouma cecropiifolia 

69 


7.8 

 

 



 

three  concentrations,  0.05,  0.1  and  0.2  mg/mL.  The  in 



vitro  assay  was  performed  in  24  wells  plates  with  RPMI 

(Nutricell

®

) medium.  



Two  worms  were  kept  in  each  well  and  each  concen-

tration was tested three times (n = 6). A control group of 

RPMI  medium  and  2%  PBS.  The  plates  were  incubated 

at 37°C in a 5% CO

2

 atmosphere and observed at 2, 4, 6, 



24, 48 and 72 h, using an inverted microscope (DM-500-

Leica


®

).  Motility  (Absence,  low,  moderate  and  high), 

oviposition and mortality were observed.  

 

 



IC

50 

determination and statistical analysis  

 

Inhibitory  concentration  was  determined  using  Origin  7 



program.  Statistical  analysis  was  performed  using  SAS 

program.  Significant  differences  between  groups  were 

calculated  using  one-way  Analysis  of  Variance  (ANOVA) 

(p<0.0001).  The  correlation  between  time,  motility, 

oviposition,  and  mortality  with  the  extract  concentration 

was accessed using Duncan’s 

Multiple Range Test. 

RESULTS 

 

Plant yield 

 

The ethanolic extracts yield,  from  an  initial  10  g  mass, 



varied  between  1.3  to  29%  (P.  campechiana  and  E. 

brasiliensis, respectively) and its represented in Table 1. 

 

 



Effects on worm motility  

 

Worm  motility  was  compared  between  the  average  of 



each tested sample for its corresponding time. In Table 2, 

the  averages  of  the  extract  that  show  significant  effect 

(p<0.0001)  against  S.  venezuelensis  is  highlighted 

namely:  

 

S.  mombin,  Psidium  cattleianum,  Inga  cylindrica, 

Manilkara  zapota,  Eugenia  pyriformis,  Labramia  bojeri, 

Myrcianthes  pungens,  Byrsonima  crassifolia,  Eugenia 

brasiliensis,  Muntingia  calabura,  Carya  illinoensis, 

Hexachlamys  edulis,  Eugenia  uniflora  and  Pourouma 

cecropiifolia.


 

 

Int. J. Mod. Biol. Res.          4 



 

 

 



Table 2. 

Duncan’s Multiple Range Test –

 worms mean motility at different observation times: 1-6 h (T1), 12 h (T2), 24 h (T3), 48 h (T4), 

e 72 h (T5). Calculated according with the scale: 0, Absence; 1, low; 2, moderate; 3, high. 



 

Worm motility X observation time 

Extract 

Species 

Group mean 

T1 

T2 

T3 

T4 

T5 

EE 


Spondias mombin 

3.00 (a) 

2.38 (d,c) 

0.83 (l, k) 

0.00 (l) 

0.00 (m) 

FA 

Spondias mombin 

3.00 (a) 

3.00 (a) 

2.11 (f, h, e, g) 

1.00 (i, g, h) 

0.61 (k, j, i, h) 

FO 

Spondias mombin 

3.00 (a) 

2.77 (a, b) 

1.83 (h, g) 

0.00 (l) 

0.00 (m) 

EE 

Psidium cattleianum 

3.00 (a) 

1.55 (h, i) 

0.83 (l, k) 

0.55 (j, k) 

0.44 (k, j, l) 

EE 

Inga cylindrica 

1.83 (d) 

1.27 (i) 

1.00 (j, k) 

0.72 (i, j) 

0.16 (m, l) 

EE 

Manilkara zapota 

2.16 (c) 

2.22 (e, d, f) 

1.22 (j, k) 

0.66 (i, j, k) 

0.61 (k, j, i, h) 

EE 

Eugenia pyriformis 

2.50 (b) 

2.44 (b, d, c) 

1.77 (h) 

0.77 (i, j) 

0.55 (k, j, i, l) 

EE 

Labramia bojeri 

2.50 (b) 

1.88 (h, g, f) 

1.72 (h, i) 

0.61 (i, j, k) 

0.44 (k, j, l) 

EE 

Myrcianthes pungens 

3.00 (a) 

2.72 (b, a, c) 

2.22 (f, d, e, g) 

0.83 (i, j, h) 

0.33 (k, m, l) 

EE 

Byrsonima crassifólia 

3.00 (a) 

2.00 (e, g, f) 

1.22 (j, k) 

0.55 (j, k) 

0.27 (k, m, l) 

EE 

Eugenia brasiliensis 

2.50 (b) 

2.00 (e, g, f) 

1.38 (j, i) 

0.61 (i, j, k) 

0.50 (k, j, l) 

EE 

Muntingia calabura 

3.00 (a) 

2.88 (a) 

2.27 (f, d, e) 

1.27 (f, g) 

0.55 (k, j, i, l) 

EE 

Carya illinoensis 

2.50 (b) 

2.27 (e, d) 

2.00 (f, h, g) 

1.22 (f, g) 

0.77 (g, j, i, h) 

EE 

Hexachlamys edulis 

3.00 (a) 

2.00 (e, g, f) 

1.83 (h, g) 

1.16 (f, g, h) 

0.77 (g, j, i, h) 

EE 

Eugenia uniflora 

3.00 (a) 

2.33 (e, d) 

2.11 (f, h, e, g) 

1.27 (f, g) 

0.44 (k, j, l) 

EE 

Lucum acaimito 

3.00 (a) 

3.00 (a) 

2.61 (b, d, a, c) 

1.94 (c, b, d) 

1.00 (g, f, h) 

EE 

Pourouma cecropiifolia 

2.55 (b) 

2.38 (d, c) 

2.38 (f, d, e, c) 

2.27 (b) 

0.94 (g, i, h) 

EE 

Pouteria campechiana 

3.00 (a) 

3.00 (a) 

3.00 (a) 

2.00 (c, b, d) 

1.50 (c, e, b, d) 

EE 

Salacia elliptica 

3.00 (a) 

2.77 (b, a) 

2.50 (d, e, c) 

2.00 (c, b, d) 

1.16 (g, e, f) 

EE 

Macadamia integrifólia 

3.00 (a) 

3.00 (a) 

2.94 (b, a) 

2.22 (c, b) 

1.77 (c, b) 

EE 

Spondias dulcis 

2.94 (a) 

2.94 (a) 

2.94 (b, a) 

2.94 (a) 

1.83 (b) 

EE 

Dimocarpus longan 

3.00 (a) 

3.00 (a) 

3.00 (a) 

1.77 (e, d) 

1.38 (c, e, d) 

EE 

Litchi chinensis 

3.00 (a) 

3.00 (a) 

2.77 (b, a, c) 

1.83 (c, d) 

1.55 (c, e, b, d) 

EE 

Aceima smeithii 

3.00 (a) 

3.00 (a) 

2.50 (d, e, c) 

2.00 (c, b, d) 

1.61 (c, b, d) 

EE 

Eugenia involucrata 

3.00 (a) 

3.00 (a) 

3.00 (a) 

3.00 (a) 

3.00 (a) 

EE 

Butia capitata 

3.00 (a) 

3.00 (a) 

3.00 (a) 

3.00 (a) 

3.00 (a) 

DC 

Cambendazole 

3.00 (a) 

3.00 (a) 

2.55 (b, d, c) 

1.44 (f, e) 

1.33 (e, f, d) 

DC 

Albendazole 

3.00 (a) 

3.00 (a) 

3.00 (a) 

3.00 (a) 

3.00 (a) 

DC 

Ivermectin 

3.00 (a) 

3.00 (a) 

3.00 (a) 

1.94 (c, b, d) 

1.77 (c, b) 

CONT 

Control (RPMI) 

3.00 (a) 

3.00 (a) 

3.00 (a) 

3.00 (a) 

3.00 (a) 

 

EE, Ethanolic extract; FA, aquous fraction; FO, organic fraction; DC, drug control; Cont, RPMI control.  



Means with the same letters do not have significant differences between each other.

 

 



 

 

Worm mortality 

 

S.  mombin  ethanolic  extract  and  aqueous  fraction 

showed 


the 

most 


promising 

results, 

with 

anti-


Strongyloides activity and 100% mortality rate after 72 h, 

for all tested concentrations. Overall most of the extracts 

showed  a  satisfactory  anthelmintic  effect for  at least  one 

of the tested concentrations (Table 3): P. cattleianumM. 



zapota,  L.  bojeri,  M.  pungens,  B.  crassifolia,  E. 

brasiliensis  and  S.  mombin  aqueous  fraction  showed 

100%  mortality  at  0.2  e  0.1  mg/mL.  Litchi  chinensis, 



Aceima  smeithii,  Eugenia  involucrata,  Butia  capitata, 

ethanolic extracts did not show activity.  

With  the  purpose  of  isolating  and  identifying  the 

chemical  compounds  that  act  as  antheminthics,  S. 



mombin  extract,  was  submitted  to  a  liquid-liquid 

extraction,  resulting  in  an  organic  and  an  aqueous 

fraction.  The  results  showed  a  higher  efficiency  for  the 

organic  fraction  killing  100%  of  all  females  at  all  tested 

concentrations,  whilst  the  aqueous  fraction  only  showed 

activity  in  the  two  highest  concentrations  (0.2  mg/mL  e 

0.1 mg/mL).  

Cambendazole, albendazole and  ivermectin did not kill 

any  female  worm  during  the  observation  period  for  the 

tested concentrations. No correlation was found between 

the plant family and their anthelminthic activity. 


 

 

Bastos et al.          5 



 

 

 



Table 3. Total worm mortality at each of the tested concentrations for each extract: C1 (0.2 mg/mL); C2 (0.1 

mg/mL); C3 (0.05 mg/mL). 

 

Extract 

Species 

Mortality (%) 

IC50 (mg/kg) 

C1 

C2 

C3 

EE 


Spondias mombin 

100 


100 

100 


<0.05 

FA 


Spondias mombin 

100 


100 

0.07 



FO 

Spondias mombin 

100 


100 

100 


<0.05 

EE 


Psidium cattleianum 

100 


100 

0.07 



EE 

Inga cylindrica 

100 


83.33 

66.66 


<0.05 

EE 


Manilkara zapota 

100 


100 

0.07 



EE 

Eugenia pyriformis 

100 


66.66 

0.09 



EE 

Labramia bojeri 

100 


100 

0.07 



EE 

Myrcianthes pungens 

100 


100 

0.07 



EE 

Byrsonima crassifólia 

100 


100 

16.66 


0.07 

EE 


Eugenia brasiliensis 

100 


100 

0.07 



EE 

Muntingia calabura 

100 


83.33 

0.08 



EE 

Carya illinoensis 

100 


33.33 

33.33 


0.12 

EE 


Hexachlamys edulis 

100 


16.66 

0.13 



EE 

Eugenia uniflora 

100 


83.33 

0.08 



EE 

Lucum acaimito 

66.66 


33.33 

0.15 



EE 

Pourouma cecropiifolia 

100 


50 

>0.2 



EE 

Pouteria campechiana 

100 


0.15 



EE 

Salacia elliptica 

100 


0.15 



EE 

Macadamia integrifólia 

33.33 


>0.2 



EE 

Spondias dulcis 

16.66 



>0.2 


EE 

Dimocarpus longan 

50 


16.66 

0.2 



EE 

Litchi chinensis 



>0.2 


EE 

Aceima smeithii 



>0.2 


EE 

Eugenia involucrata 



>0.2 


EE 

Butia capitata 



>0.2 


DC 

Cambendazole 



>0.2 


DC 

Albendazole 



>0.2 


DC 

Ivermectin 



>0.2 


 

EE, Ethanolic extract; FA, aquous fraction; FO, organic fraction; DC, drug control.

 

 

 



 

DISCUSSION 

 

Strongyloidiasis is a silent, underdiagnosed and the most 



neglected  helminthic  disease  (Bisoffi  et  al.,  2013). 

Currently, there is no satisfactory drug in the treatment of 

this  parasite,  since  its  efficiency  varies  between  different 

patients (Bisoffi et al., 2013). Both efficient and inefficient 

treatment are often reported in the same regions with the 

same  treatment  scheme  (Panic  et  al.,  2014),  there  is, 

therefore  a  need  to  search  for  new  drugs.  The  use  of 

medicinal plants in the search of new drugs is increasing, 

and several plants have shown their anthelminthic activity 

(Muthee  et  al.,  2011).  Plants  active  compounds 

identification  has  been  increasing,  contributing  for  a 

higher  variability  and  availability  of  drugs  and  bringing 

highly accepted  therapeutic  alternatives  (de  Oliveira  et 

al.,  2014).  The  majority  of  published  studies  test  the  in 



vitro  activity  against  Strongyloides  larvae  (Keiser  et  al., 

2008;  Kotze  et  al.,  2004),  to  our  knowledge,  this  is  the 

first  in  vitro  study  investigating  the  anti-Strongyloides 

activity  against  adult  parasitic  females.  Our methodology 

was  derived  from  the  one  published  by  de  Oliveira  et  al. 

(2012),  where  Schistosoma  mansoni  was  used  as  an 

experimental  model,  and  provided  an  efficient  way  to 

perform in vitro tests with S. venezuelensis.  

Promising  results  of  some  plant  species  anti-parasite 

effect  against  parasites  such  as  S.  mansoni  (de  Oliveira 

et  al.,  2014;  de  Oliveira  et  al.,  2012)  and  Giardia 

duodenalis  have  been  described  (Machado  et  al.,  2011; 

Muthee et al., 2011). Their use as also been researched 

against  other  organisms,  such  as  fungus  (Wianowska  et 

al.,  2016),  virus  (Gonçalves  et  al.,  2005)  and   tumors  



 

 

 



 

 

 



(Atjanasuppat  et  al.,  2009).  Little  is  known  regarding  the 

pharmacologic  action  of  most  plants  used  in  this  paper. 

Among  the  tested  extracts,  S.  mombin  showed the  most 

promisingresults.  Several    other    authors    have  been 

exploring the activity of Smombin ranging from their use 

against  the  diarrhea  rotavirus  (Gonçalves  et  al.,  2005), 

against larvae and adult mosquitos (Ajaegbu et al., 2016; 

Eze  et  al.,  2014),  Candida  albicans  (Okwuosa  et  al., 

2012),  Leishmania  chagasi  (although  it  has  shown  low 

activity  against  L.  amazonensis  amastigote)  (Accioly  et 

al.,  2012;  Estevez  et al.,  2007),  anti-bacterial  activity  (da 

Silva et al., 2012), and activity against Eudrilus eugeniae 

(annelida, Oligochaeta) (Gbolade and Adeyemi, 2008). S. 

mombin  anthelminthic  activity  has  also  been  reported 

against  sheep  nematode  (Ademola  et  al.,  2005)  and 

against  small  ruminants  gastro-intestinal  parasites  in 

Benin (Attindéhou et al., 2012). It is also reported that S. 



mombin  as  anti-anemic  activity  in  rats  (Ayoka  et  al., 

2006),  showing  a  wide  variety  of  potential  uses  for  this 

plant. Several other extracts showed promising results, I. 

cylindrica  showed  the  best  results  after  S.  mombin  and 

may represent a potential drug candidate.  

Ivermectin and albendazole present irregular cure rates 

(55 - 100% and 38 - 87%, respectively) as well as several 

side  effects,  showing  a  need  for  new  drugs  to  be 

developed.  However  very  few  papers  have  been 

published,  and  even  fewer  with  promising  results 

(Boonmars et al., 2005; de Oliveira et al., 2014; Keiser et 

al.,  2008;  Kotze  et  al.,  2004;  Legarda-Ceballos  et  al., 

2016; Olounlade et al., 2012). In this paper, we show that 

the majority of the extracts had a higher in vitro efficiency 

than  the  drugs  currently  used  for  the  treatment  of 

strongyloidiasis,  with  emphasis  on  S.  mombin  and  I. 

cylindrica  that  showed  the  best  results.  S.  mombin 

organic  fraction  showed  great  potential  and  should  be 

further  studied  to  isolate  and  identify  their  active 

compounds,  which  are  responsible  for  the  anthelminthic 

activity  so  that,  hopefully,  a  new  drug  can  be  developed 

to fight against strongyloidiasis. 

 

 

REFERENCES 



 

Accioly  M.  P.,  Bevilaqua  C.  M.,  Rondon  F.  C.,  de  Morais  S.  M., 

Machado L. K., Almeida C. A., de Andrade Jr. H. F. & Cardoso R. P. 

(2012).  Leishmanicidal  activity  in  vitro  of  Musa  paradisiaca  L.  and 



Spondias  mombin  L.  fractions.  Vet.  Parasitol.  187(1-2):79-84.  doi: 

10.1016/j.vetpar.2011.12.029. 

Ademola  I.  O.,  Fagbemi  B.  O.  &  Idowu  S.  O.  (2005).  Anthelmintic 

activity  of  extracts  of  Spondias  mombin  against  gastrointestinal 

nematodes of sheep: studies  in vitro and in vivo. Trop. Anim. Health 

Prod. 37(3):223-235.  

Ajaegbu  E.  E.,  Danga  S.  P.,  Chijoke  I.  U.  &  Okoye  F.  B.  (2016). 

Mosquito  adulticidal  activity  of  the  leaf  extracts  of  Spondias  mombin 

L.  against  Aedes  aegypti  L.  and  isolation  of  active  principles.  J. 

Vector Borne Dis. 53(1):17-22.  

Anthony  J. P.,  Fyfe  L.  & Smith  H.  (2005).  Plant  active  components  -  a 

resource  for  antiparasitic  agents?  Trends  Parasitol.  21(10):462-468. 

doi: 10.1016/j.pt.2005.08.004. 

Int. J. Mod. Biol. Res.          6 

 

 

 



Atjanasuppat K., Wongkham W., Meepowpan P., Kittakoop P., Sobhon 

P.,  Bartlett  A.  &  Whitfield  P.  J.  (2009).  In  vitro  screening  for 

anthelmintic  and  antitumour  activity  of  ethnomedicinal  plants  from 

Thailand. 

J. 

Ethnopharmacol. 



123(3):475-482. 

doi: 


10.1016/j.jep.2009.03.010.

 

Attindéhou S., Houngnimassoun M. A., Salifou S. & Biaou C. S. (2012). 



Inventorying  of  herbal  remedies  used  to  control  small  ruminants? 

parasites in Southern Benin. Int. Multidispl. Res. J. 2(8):14-16. 

Ayoka  A.  O.,  Akomolafe  R.  O.,  Iwalewa  E.  O.,  Akanmu  M.  A.  & 

Ukponmwan  O.  E.  (2006).  Sedative,  antiepileptic  and  antipsychotic 

effects  of  Spondias  mombin  L.  (Anacardiaceae)  in mice  and  rats.  J. 

Ethnopharmacol. 103(2):166-175. doi: 10.1016/j.jep.2005.07.019. 

Bisoffi  Z.,  Buonfrate  D.,  Montresor  A.,  Requena-Mendez  A.,  Munoz  J., 

Krolewiecki A. J., Gotuzzo E., Mena M. A., Chiodini P. L., Anselmi M., 

Moreira J. & Albonico M. (2013). Strongyloides stercoralis: A plea for 

action. 


PLoS 

Negl. 


Trop. 

Dis. 


7(5):e2214. 

doi: 


10.1371/journal.pntd.0002214. 

Boonmars T., Khunkitti W., Sithithaworn P. & Fujimaki Y. (2005). In vitro 

antiparasitic  activity  of  extracts  of  Cardiospermum  halicacabum 

against third-stage larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis. Parasitol. Res. 

97(5):417-419. doi: 10.1007/s00436-005-1470-z. 

da  Silva  A.  R.,  de  Morais  S.  M.,  Marques  M.  M.,  de  Oliveira  D.  F., 

Barros  C.  C.,  de  Almeida  R.  R.,  Vieira  Í.  G.  Guedes,  M.  I.  (2012). 

Chemical  composition,  antioxidant  and  antibacterial  activities  of  two 

Spondias  species  from  Northeastern  Brazil.  Pharm.  Biol.  50(6):740-

746. doi: 10.3109/13880209.2011.627347. 

de Oliveira R. N., Rehder V. L., Oliveira A. S., Jeraldo V. de L., Linhares 

A. X. & Allegretti S. M. (2014). Anthelmintic activity in vitro and in vivo 

of Baccharis trimera (Less) DC against immature and adult worms of 

Schistosoma 

mansoni

Exp. 


Parasitol. 

139:63-72. 

doi: 

10.1016/j.exppara.2014.02.010. 



de Oliveira R. N., Rehder V. L., Oliveira, A. S., Junior I. M., de Carvalho 

J. E., de Ruiz A. L., Jeraldo V. de L., Linhares A. X. & Allegretti S. M. 

(2012).  Schistosoma  mansoni:  In  vitro  schistosomicidal  activity  of 

essential  oil  of  Baccharis  trimera  (less)  DC.  Exp.  Parasitol. 

132(2):135-143. doi: 10.1016/j.exppara.2012.06.005. 

Estevez  Y.,  Castillo  D.,  Pisango  M.  T.,  Arevalo  J.,  Rojas  R.,  Alban  J., 

Deharo  E.,  Bourdy  G.  &  Sauvain  M.  (2007).  Evaluation  of  the 

leishmanicidal  activity  of  plants  used  by  Peruvian  Chayahuita  ethnic 

group. 

J. 


Ethnopharmacol. 

114(2):254-259. 

doi: 

10.1016/j.jep.2007.08.007. 



Eze  E. A.,  Danga  S. P.  &  Okoye F. B.  (2014).  Larvicidal  activity  of the 

leaf extracts of Spondias mombin Linn. (Anacardiaceae) from various 

solvents  against  malarial,  dengue  and  filarial  vector  mosquitoes 

(Diptera: Culicidae). J. Vector Borne Dis. 51(4):300-306.  

Gbolade  A.  A.  &  Adeyemi  A.  A.  (2008).  Anthelmintic  activities  of  three 

medicinal  plants  from  Nigeria.  Fitoterapia  79(3):223-225.  doi: 

10.1016/j.fitote.2007.11.023. 

Gonçalves J. L. S., Lopes R. C., Oliveira D. B., Costa S. S., Miranda M. 

M. F. S., Romanos M. T. V., Santos N. S. O. & Wigg M. D. (2005). In 

vitro  anti-rotavirus  activity  of  some  medicinal  plants  used  in  Brazil 

against 


diarrhea. 

J. 


Ethnopharmacol. 

99(3):403-407. 

doi: 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2005.01.032. 



Gryseels  B.,  Polman  K.,  Clerinx  J.  &  Kestens  L.  (2006).  Human 

schistosomiasis.  Lancet.  368(9541):1106-1118.  doi:  10.1016/s0140-

6736(06)69440-3. 

Keiser J.,  Thiemann  K.,  Endriss Y. &  Utzinger J.  (2008).  Strongyloides 



ratti:  in  vitro  and  in  vivo  activity  of  tribendimidine.  PLoS  Negl.  Trop. 

Dis. 2(1):e136. doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0000136. 

Kotze  A.  C.,  Clifford  S.,  O'Grady  J.,  Behnke  J.  M.  &  McCarthy  J.  S. 

(2004).  An  in  vitro  larval  motility  assay  to  determine  anthelmintic 

sensitivity  for  human  hookworm  and  Strongyloides  species.  Am.  J. 

Trop. Med. Hyg. 71(5):608-616.  

Legarda-Ceballos  A.  L.,  Lopez-Aban  J.,  Del  Olmo  E.,  Escarcena  R., 

Bustos L. A., Rojas-Caraballo J., Vicente B., Fernández-Soto P., San 

Feliciano  A.  &  Muro  A.  (2016).  In  vitro  and  in  vivo  evaluation  of  2-

aminoalkanol 

and 

1,2-alkanediamine 



derivatives 

against 


Strongyloides  venezuelensis.  Parasit.  Vectors  9(1):364.  doi: 

10.1186/s13071-016-1648-5. 

Machado M., Dinis A. M., Salgueiro L., Custodio J.  B.,  Cavaleiro  C.  & 

 


 

 

Bastos et al.          7 



 

 

 



Sousa  M.  C.  (2011).  Anti-Giardia  activity  of  Syzygium  aromaticum 

essential oil and eugenol: Effects on growth, viability, adherence and 

ultrastructure. 

Exp. 


Parasitol. 

127(4):732-739. 

doi: 

10.1016/j.exppara.2011.01.011. 



Muthee J. K., Gakuya D. W., Mbaria J. M., Kareru P. G., Mulei C. M. &

 

Njonge  F.  K.  (2011).  Ethnobotanical  study  of  anthelmintic  and  other 



medicinal  plants  traditionally  used  in  Loitoktok  district  of  Kenya.  J. 

Ethnopharmacol. 135(1):15-21. doi: 10.1016/j.jep.2011.02.005. 

Nolan  T.  J.,  Megyeri  Z.,  Bhopale  V.  M.  &  Schad  G.  A.  (1993). 

Strongyloides  stercoralis:  The  first  rodent  model  for  uncomplicated 

and  hyperinfective  strongyloidiasis,  the  Mongolian  Gerbil  (Meriones 



unguiculatus). 

J. 


Infect. 

Dis. 


168(6):1479-1484. 

doi: 


10.1093/infdis/168.6.1479. 

Okwuosa  O.  M.,  Chukwura  E.  I.,  Chukwuma  G.  O.,  Okwuosa  C.  N., 

Enweani  I.  B.,  Agbakoba  N.  R.,  Chukwuma  C.  M.,  Manafa  P.  O.  & 

Umedum  C.  U.  (2012).  Phytochemical  and  antifungal  activities  of 

Uvaria. chamae leaves and roots, Spondias mombin leaves and bark 

and  Combretum  racemosum  leaves.  Afr.  J.  Med.  Med.  Sci.  41:99-

103.  

Olounlade  P.  A.,  Azando  E.  V.,  Hounzangbe-Adote  M.  S.,  Ha  T.  B., 



Leroy E., Moulis, C., Fabre N., Magnaval J. F., Hoste H. & Valentin A. 

(2012).  In  vitro  anthelmintic  activity  of  the  essential  oils  of 



Zanthoxylum  zanthoxyloides  and  Newbouldia  laevis  against 

Strongyloides 

ratti

Parasitol. 

Res. 

110(4):1427-1433. 



doi: 

10.1007/s00436-011-2645-4. 

Olsen  A.,  van  Lieshout  L.,  Marti  H.,  Polderman  T.,  Polman  K., 

Steinmann P., Stothard R., Thybo S., Verweij J. J. & Magnussen, P. 

(2009). Strongyloidiasis--the most neglected of the neglected tropical 

diseases?  Trans.  R.  Soc.  Trop.  Med.  Hyg.  103(10):967-972.  doi: 

10.1016/j.trstmh.2009.02.013. 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Olson C. E. & Schiller E. L. (1978). Strongyloides ratti infections in rats. 



II. Effects  of cortisone  treatment.  Am. J.  Trop.  Med.  Hyg.  27(3):527-

531. 


Panic G., Duthaler U., Speich B. & Keiser J. (2014). Repurposing drugs 

for  the  treatment  and  control  of  helminth  infections.  Int.  J.  Parasitol. 

Drugs Drug Resist. 4(3):185-200. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpddr.2014.07.002 

Sato  Y.  &  Toma  H.  (1990).  Strongyloides  venezuelensis  infections  in 

mice. Int. J. Parasitol. 20(1):57-62.  

WHO  (2012).  Research  priorities  for  helminth  infections.  World  Health 

Organ Tech. Rep. Ser. 972:1-174.  

Wianowska  D.,  Garbaczewska  S.,  Cieniecka-Roslonkiewicz  A., 

Dawidowicz  A.  L.  &  Jankowska  A.  (2016).  Comparison  of  antifungal 

activity  of  extracts  from  different  Juglans  regia cultivars  and juglone. 



Microb. Pathog. 100:263-267. doi: 10.1016/j.micpath.2016.10.009. 

Yüklə 295,36 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə