In this issue



Yüklə 1,03 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü1,03 Mb.

IN THIS ISSUE

Seed Notes 10

 

page 


1

D

D



D

D

Description



All three genera consist of 

woody perennials. They 

range from dwarf shrubs 

suitable as groundcovers, 

to medium shrubs reaching 

several metres in height. 

Their leaves, which are more 

often than not opposite, 

small and narrowly linear, 

all exhibit the distinctive 

aromatic smell of the family 

Myrtaceae. Many species 

within the Chamelaucium 

alliance have attractive, 

long lasting ornamental 

flowers, in particular the 

bells of the Darwinia and 

the small waxy flowers of 

the Chamelaucium. Many 

species have great potential 

for ornamental horticulture, 

presenting an important 

future for floriculture (e.g. 

Chamelaucium uncinatum). 

Flowers of the genus 



Darwinia come in green, 

yellow, pink and red while 

those of the Chamelaucium 

occur in a range of colours 

from white to pink and to 

red. Verticordia flowers 

are feathery and often 

prominently displayed, 

borne singly but appearing 

as heads or spikes. They are 

generally brightly coloured, 

ranging from yellow to red 

and to purple. Inter-generic 

hybridisation may occur 

between different species 

within the genera.

Darwinia, 

Chamelaucium, 

and Verticordia

The three genera, 



Chamelaucium, Darwinia and 

Verticordia form part of the 

tribe Chamelaucieae belonging 

to the Chamelaucium alliance 

of the family Myrtaceae

They share many distinctive 

characteristics and will be 

treated in this publication as a 

group. The genus Darwinia was 

named after Dr Erasmus Darwin, 

the grandfather of the naturalist 

Charles Darwin. The meaning of 

the name Chamelaucium is not 

very clear, although in Greek, 

chamai means dwarf or on the 

ground and leucos means white. 



Verticordia was named after the 

Roman goddess Venus due to 

the beauty of the flowers.

Above: Verticordia aurea. Below: Verticordia fragrans. Photos – Anne Cochrane

This issue of 

Seed Notes 

will cover the genus 



Darwinia, Chamelaucium 

and Verticordia.

D

 



Description

D

 



Geographic 

distribution and 

habitat

D

 



Reproductive biology

D

 



Seed collection

D

 



Seed quality 

assessment

D

 

Seed germination



D

 

Recommended reading



Above right: Verticordia albida.

Left: Verticordia penicillaris.

Photos – Anne Cochrane

No. 10 Darwinia, Chamelaucium and Verticordia



Seed Notes 10

 

page 





D

D



D

D

D



Geographic distribution and habitat

These three genera are 

endemic to Australia, with a 

large proportion of species 

of Darwinia and Verticordia 

found in south-western 

Australia. Chamelaucium is 

entirely endemic to Western 

Australia. There are more 

than 150 species in the genus 



Verticordia; more than 20 in 

Chamelaucium and more than  

60 in Darwinia. All these plant 

genera occupy a prominent place 

in many shrub and heathland 

communities together with other myrtaceous genera such 

as Callistemon, Agonis, Leptospermum, Melaleuca and 



Calothamnus. Most species appear to have a need for well-

drained soils, although many grow in a wide range of soils and 

climatic conditions. Darwinia are found in sandy coastal heaths 

and in the species rich mountains of the Stirling Range National 

Park. Verticordia and Chamelaucium can be found on laterite, 

granites and in deep siliceous sand. Many populations of these 

genera are at risk of local extinction in the near future due to 

a range of threatening processes. These include disease, weed 

invasion, salinity, small population sizes, habitat fragmentation 

and/or continued land clearing. Over-picking of flowers from 

the wild also has impacted wild populations of several species, 

common and rare. In addition, Darwinia are considered 

susceptible to the dieback disease, Phytophthora cinnamomi.

Seed collection

Species in the Chamelaucium alliance have indehiscent fruits, 

or nuts, that usually contain only one seed and are shed 

annually. They are never discharged but the entire flower 

dries and breaks off below the receptacle. Seed must be 

collected when mature and timing of collections is important. 

It is possible to collect seed of each of the three genera 

from below plants but insect predation may be higher in 

such collections. Old flowers of Verticordia form the fruit 

and hence old faded flowers are collected when they easily 

come off the plant. Both Darwinia and Chamelaucium form 

fruits that appear different from the flowers and turn brown 

and leathery to hard when ripe. For most species in the 

three genera several months from the beginning of flower 

initiation to seed collection are needed. Most Darwinia and 



Chamelaucium are spring flowering with summer fruiting, 

whereas Verticordia may be either spring or summer flowering 

and seed is ripe for collecting mid summer. 

Above: Darwinia citriodora. 

Photo – Andrew Crawford

Approximate distribution of 

Darwinia, Chamelaucium and



      Verticordia in Australia.

Reproductive biology

Most species in the Chamelaucium alliance are likely to be 

pollinated by either specialised or unspecialised insects, and  

may include native bees and wasps. Darwinia species that have  

a conflorescence surrounded by bracts may possibly be bird-

pollinated whereas most other members of the genus are 

thought to be insect-pollinated.  

It has been postulated that 

Verticordia grandis may be bird 

pollinated due to the flower 

structure. Apparent pollinator 

mutualisms also have been reported 

for some other species of Verticordia

Profuse flowering in some species 

indicates intense competition for 

pollinators. Honey eating birds are 

frequent visitors to the flowers of  

all three genera.



Above: Collecting seed of the rare Verticordia staminosa ssp. cylindracea var. erecta.

Photo – Anne Cochrane

Single flower of  Verticordia 

carinata. 



Photo – Anne Cochrane

Seed Notes 10

 

page 





D

D



D

Seed quality assessment

It is very difficult to determine from a cursory visual assessment 

whether or not a seed has formed within the fruits of Darwinia



Chamelaucium or Verticordia. Seed set is often low, particularly 

in Verticordia. To determine whether seed has set, it is necessary 

to perform a cut test on a representative sample of fruit. Simply 

dissect the fruit with a scalpel blade. If you wish to keep the 

seed for germinating then care is needed not to damage any 

seed found. It is preferable to 

use a microscope for this job. 

Seed needs to be white, firm 

and translucent for it to  

be considered healthy  

and potentially viable.  

In Darwinia and Chamelaucium

it is far easier to determine 

whether seed has formed 

within the fruit. The fruit 

will be slightly swollen at the 

base and in the case of the 

latter, it may be glossy  

and not shrivelled.

Darwinia collina seed dissected from fruit 



(above) and whole fruit (below)

Photo – Anne Cochrane

Species in all three genera are 

considered difficult to grow from 

seed. Plants have traditionally 

been propagated by cuttings.  

It is likely that seed dormancy  

in Verticordia, Darwinia and 

Chamelaucium is influenced by  

a complex interaction of factors. 

The breakdown of seed dormancy 

and the transition of dormant 

seed to germinable seed appears 

to require not only the removal  

of the seed coat, which acts as 

a barrier to water uptake, but 

also the addition of growth 

hormones to overcome an 

after-ripening requirement. 

It is possible that the 

hypanthium (floral tube) 

and perianth (sepals and 

petals of a flower) might 

help protect the seed 

from weathering, thus 

maintaining dormancy. 

Dormancy breaks down 

naturally over time because  

of weathering and soil 

disturbance. Many species in 

these three genera appear 

to have a strong reliance on 

fire to stimulate germination, 

indicating heat and/or smoke 

may help alleviate dormancy 

in seeds. Recent research 

has demonstrated smoke 

responsiveness for some 

species. Naked seed from the 

cut test mentioned under Seed 

Quality Assessment can be grown 

in the jelly-like substance agar, or 

put into small dishes with filter 

paper and kept moist. Some seed 

will germinate after several weeks. 

If access to the growth hormone 

gibberellic acid is available then 

additions of this to the agar or 

filter paper at 25 mg per litre will  

greatly assist germination.



Whole fruits of Chamelaucium 

aorocladus; central right fruit coloured 



and plump indicating good seed.

Darwinia chapmaniana seed 



and fruit. 

Photos – Anne Cochrane

Darwinia leiostyla seed 



and fruit

Chamelaucium aorocladus  



seed and fruit.

Darwinia acerosa. Fruit on right 



swollen and holding seed; fruit on 

left shrivelled with aborted seed.

Darwinia oxylepis seed and fruit

Verticordia albida 

partially dissected 

flower revealing seed.

Chamelaucium griffinii.

Chamelaucium uncinatum.

Verticordia staminosa 



ssp. cylindracea.

Verticordia spicata 



ssp. squamosa.

Germinating seeds of 

Chamelaucium, Darwinia and 

Verticordia.

Photos – Anne Cochrane

Seed germination

Verticordia fimbrilepis.

D


for Western Australia

Seed Notes

2007501-0308-1

Seed Notes 10

 

page 




These 


Seed Notes aim  

to provide information 

on seed identification, 

collection, biology and 

germination for a wide 

range of seed types 

for Western Australian 

native species.

They have been written and 

compiled by Anne Cochrane, 

Manager of DEC's Threatened 

Flora Seed Centre.

Concept by Grazyna 

Paczkowska.

Designed by DEC’s  

Graphic Design Section.

The 

Seed Notes are 



available from  

www.naturebase.net

Seed Notes

  

are published by  



the Perth Branch of the 

Wildflower Society of 

Western Australia (Inc.) 

with assistance from 

the Western Australian 

Lotteries Commission 

and the Department 

of Environment and 

Conservation (DEC).

D

D



Recommended reading 

Blake, T. L. 1981. A Guide to Darwinia and 



Homoranthus. Society for Growing Australian 

Plants, Melbourne.

Cochrane, A., Brown, K., Cunneen, S. and 

Kelly, A. 2001. Intra- and inter-specific 

variation in seed production and germination 

in 22 rare and threatened Western Australian 

taxa in the genus Verticordia (Myrtaceae). 

Journal of the Royal Society of Western 

Australia 84, 3.

Elliot, W. R. and Jones, D. L. 1984. 



Encyclopaedia of Australian Plants Suitable 

for Cultivation. Volume 3. Lothian Publishing, 

Melbourne.

Sharr, F. A. 1978. Western Australian Plant 

Names and their Meanings. A Glossary. 

University of Western Australia Press, Perth.



Top left: Chamelaucium sp. Gingin. Top right: Verticordia aurea. Above: Verticordia endlicheriana var. angustifolia.

Photos – Anne Cochrane


Yüklə 1,03 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə