Incidence of Extra-Floral Nectaries and their Effect on the Growth and Survival of Lowland Tropical Rain



Yüklə 485,21 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/6
tarix07.08.2017
ölçüsü485,21 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6

Incidence of Extra-Floral Nectaries and their Effect on the Growth and Survival of Lowland Tropical Rain

Forest Trees

Honors Research Thesis

Presented in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for graduation “with Honors Research Distinction in

Evolution and Ecology” in the undergraduate colleges of The Ohio State University

by

Andrew Muehleisen



The Ohio State University

May 2013


Project Advisor: Dr. Simon Queenborough, Department of Evolution, Ecology and Organismal Biology

Incidence of Extra-Floral Nectaries and their Effect on

the Growth and Survival of Lowland Tropical Rain Forest

Trees

Andrew Muehleisen

Evolution, Ecology & Organismal Biology, The Ohio State University, OH 43210, USA



Summary

Mutualistic relationships between organisms have long captivated biologists, and extra-floral nectaries

(EFNs), or nectar-producing glands, found on many plants are a good example. The nectar produced from

these glands serves as food for ants which attack intruders that may threaten their free meal, preventing

herbivory. However, relatively little is known about their impact on the long-term growth and survival of

plants. To better understand the ecological significance of EFNs, I examined their incidence on lowland

tropical rain forest trees in Yasuni National Park in Amazonian Ecuador.

Of those 896 species that were observed in the field, EFNs were found on 96 species (11.2%), widely

distributed between different angiosperm families. This rate of incidence is high but consistent with other

locations in tropical regions. Furthermore, this study adds 13 new genera and 2 new families (Urticaceae and

Caricaceae) to the list of taxa exhibiting EFNs.

Using demographic data from a long-term forest dynamics plot at the same site, I compared the growth and

survival rates of species that have EFNs with those that do not. This same analysis was also done with data

from two other sites with EFN surveys, Barro Colorado Island, Panama and Pasoh Forest Reserve, Malaysia.

Results showed that while species with EFNs have generally higher diameter growth rates, they also have

higher mortality rates than species without, suggesting a cost to this ecological strategy.



Keywords: extra-floral nectaries, tropical forest, growth rate, mortality rate

Introduction

Tropical forests represent a fascinating yet incredibly

complex web of interactions, the ecology of which, in

many cases, is still largely enigmatic, and the mech-

anisms that generate and maintain the remarkable

diversity of plants and animals found within them

remain a fundamental question in biology (Palmer

1994, Hubbell 2001, Wright 2002). While one suite

of mechanisms are purely stochastic in nature (e.g.

Hubbell 2001) many other mechanisms depend on

niche differences between species to permit coexist-

ence (Chesson 2000, Silvertown 2004). Niche differ-

ences are driven primarily in response to selection

pressures, which in tropical forests include compet-

ition with neighbors for (often low levels of) light,

nutrients and water (Chapin et al. 1986, Denslow

et al. 1987, Chazdon & Pearcy 1988), as well as in-

tense predation pressure from pests, pathogens and

herbivores (Barone 2000, Novotny et al. 2010).

Herbivory represents a particularly selective force,

as up to 20% of plant net primary production may

be consumed each year (Agrawal 2011). In response,

tropical rain forest trees have developed a myriad

of defense mechanisms, from physical (e.g. spines,

hairs; Hanley et al. 2007) to chemical (e.g. low nu-

trition, toxic compounds; Feeny 1976, Levin & York

1978, Coley & Barone 1996). Further, many plants

have evolved mutualistic relationships with animals

in an effort to deter herbivores. A common mutual-

ism is with ants and such ant-plant relationships offer

a considerable measure of defense from herbivory,

and can have a positive impact on plant performance

(Beattie 1985).

One such example of ant-plant mutualisms are

extra-floral nectaries (EFNs), which are nectar-

producing glands found outside of a plant’s flower,

typically at the base of the leaf or on the petiole, al-

though their location can vary considerably on the

plant (Figure 1). EFNs vary in morphology, ranging

from raised bowls or bulbs to very small hairs and

tissues (Elias 1983). The nectar produced by these


A. Muehleisen

Incidence and Ecological Significances of Extra-Floral Nectaries



2

glands serves as a food source, primarily for ants,

which are believed to provide protection to the plant

in return, by way of aggression toward intruding or-

ganisms including herbivores (Bentley 1977a, Keeler

1977, 1989, Koptur 1992). This form of ant protection-

ism can result in reduced damage to both vegetative

and reproductive parts, improving plant perform-

ance and fitness (Koptur 1992, Oliveira 1997). How-

ever, relatively little is known about their overall

ecological impact at the population and community

levels as well as on the long-term performance of

individual plants.

Fig. 1

Example structure and locations of

extra-floral nectaries on plants.

Source:


Aus-

tralia


Biological

Resources

Study

(environ-



ment.gov.au/biodiversity/abrs)

Previous intensive surveys have determined the

incidence of EFNs on Barro Colorado Island, Panama

(Schupp & Feener 1991) and in the Pasoh Forest Re-

serve, Malaysia (Fiala & Linsenmair 1995). These

studies provided an excellent picture of the distribu-

tion of EFNs at these sites, and until last year were the

best data available on the phylogenetic distribution

of EFNs. However, new work has drawn together

all available data on EFN incidence currently known,

to examine the phylogenetic distribution of EFNs

throughout the plant phylogeny (Weber & Keeler

2012). This study found 1.0-1.8% of plant species had

EFNs, distributed in 108 families, although the au-

thors suggest that the unknown incidence of EFNs

may be as great as the their currently known incid-

ence (Weber & Keeler 2012), requiring further in-

depth studies of EFN incidence within and between

plant communities.

In this study, I expand upon our prior understand-

ing by undertaking an intensive survey of EFN in-

cidence of tree species in an old growth Neotropical

aseasonal lowland rain forest, an environment that

has not yet been studied for EFNs. I analyze the long-

term demographic rates of trees with and without

EFNs to elucidate the ecological significance of this

defensive strategy. In a large permanent forest plot in

Yasuni National Park, Ecuador, I examined 896 spe-

cies of tree for the presence or absence of EFNs. I used

published census data to compare abundance, and

growth and mortality rates of trees with and without

EFNs. Finally, I also used the results of surveys in BCI

and Pasoh to examine how plant performance is re-

lated to EFN incidence there, such that a comparison

of the phylogenetic distribution and demographic

rates related to EFN can be made between three study

sites. If mutualism with ants, and EFNs in particular,

provide a benefit, I predict higher abundance and

greater performance in species with EFNs.

Q U E S T I O N S

1. What is the incidence and phylogenetic distribu-

tion of extra-floral nectaries on trees in a lowland

Neotropical rain forest?

2. Do trees with extra-floral nectaries have differ-

ent abundances, and growth and mortality rates

than trees without extra-floral nectaries?

3. How do findings from our study site compare

with other locations in which the incidence of

extra-floral nectaries have been studied?

Methods

S T U DY S I T E S

I carried out fieldwork in Yasuni National Park,

Ecuador, and used published data from Barro Col-

orado Island, Panama (Feener & Schupp 1991) and

2


A. Muehleisen

Incidence and Ecological Significances of Extra-Floral Nectaries



3

Pasoh Forest Reserve, Malaysia (Fiala & Linsenmair

1995) on the incidence of EFN (Figure 2).

Yasuni National Park and adjacent Huaorani ter-

ritory comprise 1,600,000 ha of largely pristine trop-

ical lowland aseasonal rain forest in eastern Ecuador

(Finer et al. 2009, Bass et al. 2010). Yasuni Scientific

Research Station, established and maintained by the

Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Ecuador, is loc-

ated in the north-western corner of the park, in terra-

firme, mature forest bordering the Tiputini River. The

research station maintains a 25 ha Forest Dynamics

Plot (FDP, 0

41’S, 76



24’W), which lies along two

smaller ridges dominated by red clays and separated

by a valley characterized by brown or grey alluvium

(Valencia et al. 2004). The plot is extremely biologic-

ally diverse, with a described tree species count of

1,104 (Valencia et al. 2004). The climate at Yasuni is

aseasonal, with an average annual rainfall of 2,826

mm, with no month receiving less than 100 mm of

rainfall (Valencia et al. 2004).

Barro Colorado Island (BCI), Panama is a 1,560

ha island located in Gatun Lake, formed when the

Panama Canal was developed. The 50 ha Forest

Dynamics Plot was established in 1980 and is main-

tained by the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

(STRI). The FDP is located near the center of BCI

(9



9’S, 79



50’W) and consists primarily of lowland

moist tropical forest, about half of which is mature

growth. There is a relatively high diversity of trees

at the FDP, with 321 different species of tree recor-

ded. The climate at BCI is seasonal, with a dry season

lasting roughly from December to April or May and

an average annual rainfall of 2,551 mm (Leigh et al.

2004).

Pasoh Forest Reserve, Malaysia is a 11,000 ha re-



serve situated in peninsular Malaysia. The 50 ha

Forest Dynamics Plot situated within the reserve

(2



58’N, 102



18’E) was established in 1986 and is and

maintained by the Forest Research Institute Malaysia.

The forest consists primarily of lowland mixed dip-

terocarp forest, and is surrounded by roughly 1,000

ha of previously logged forest. The FDP at Pasoh

has a tree diversity of around 824 species. The cli-

mate at Pasoh is seasonal, with dips in precipitation

in January-February and June-July, and an average

annual rainfall of 1,571mm (Manokaran et al. 2004).



Fig. 2

Locations of Yasuni National Park, Barro

Colorado Island and Pasoh Forest Reserve

F I E L D S U RV E Y S

I undertook a survey for incidence of extra-floral nec-

taries on woody species at Yasuni in June-August

2012. Species were censused in three ways. In the

field, I searched along trails within and around the

FDP and found 787 species. A further 109 rare spe-

cies were found by searching for specific individuals

within the FDP. In this way, I examined a total of

896 species in the field (81% of the total 1,104 species

in the FDP). The remaining 208 species that I could

not find in the field were checked from dried spe-

cimens in the field station herbarium. This method

was effective for those plants with obvious nectary

structures (e.g. Fabaceae), although dried structures

are much more difficult to identify than living struc-

tures. Therefore, species with EFNs determined in

the herbarium were included only in demographic

analysis.

Data on the incidence of extra-floral nectaries for

species from the other two sites were obtained from

Schupp & Feener (1991, BCI) and Fiala & Linsenmair

(1995, Pasoh). I added to these data with new data

from Croat (1978) and Garwood (2009), for species

located in the BCI FDP.

3


A. Muehleisen

Incidence and Ecological Significances of Extra-Floral Nectaries



4

D E M O G R A P H I C DATA

At all three sites, identical methodology was followed

to establish large forest plots. All plots were pro-

fessionally surveyed, and within them every shrub

and tree stem >1 cm diameter at breast height (DBH,

1.3m) are mapped, marked, measured and identi-

fied every 5 years (Condit 1998). To date, three

censuses have been carried out at Yasuni, four at

BCI and three at Pasoh. All demographic data can

be found at the Center for Tropical Forest Science

website (www.ctfs.si.edu, for a summary, see Table

1).

From these census data, demographic rates have



been calculated (Condit et al. 2006). Annual mortal-

ity (survival from one census to the next) and growth

rates (diameter increment) were determined using

Bayesian hierarchical models. Abundance and demo-

graphic rates were calculated for each species for

individuals in two size classes: 1-10 cm DBH and

>

10 cm DBH. For consistency, census years leading



up to or closest to the year 2000 were used. For each

species, I also assigned growth form (shrub, treelet,

understory tree, canopy tree or emergent tree). Fi-

nally, the higher-level taxonomy for each site was

updated to reflect the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group

III (APG III) system (The Angiosperm Phylogeny

Group 2009).

DATA A N A LY S I S

To examine the taxonomic distribution of extra-floral

nectaries, I compared the proportions of individuals,

species, genera, families, and orders with EFNs at

each site using a proportion test. To test whether

species with EFNs were more abundant than spe-

cies without, and also whether species with EFN had

higher growth rates and higher mortality rates, I used

linear regression. All data analysis was completed in

the statistics package R version 2.15.1.

Results

I surveyed shrub and tree species at three tropical

forest sites for extra-floral nectaries. At Yasuni, I

censused 896 species out of 1,104 species on the FDP.

At BCI, Schupp & Feener (1991) surveyed 173 spe-

cies, though only 150 of these are present on the FDP

(of 321 total). Using additional references, I added

another 24 species with EFNs. At Pasoh, Fiala & Lin-

senmair (1995) surveyed 741 out of 824 species. Thus,

I have a good sample of the species at each site, and

most of the unsurveyed species are rare and thus non-

representative of the community as a whole. Details

of species from each site with EFN can be found in

Appendix 2.

TA X O N O M I C D I S T R I B U T I O N

At Yasuni, I found 96 species with extra-floral nectar-

ies (11.2% of the total 896 species, Figure 3a). These

were distributed among 41 genera and 17 families.

Over half (58) of the species with EFNs were in the

family Fabaceae, largely thanks to the diversity of

Inga (44 species) at Yasuni, all of which have EFNs.

Seventy-nine percent of all species with EFNs were

found within either the Fabales or Malpighiales or-

ders. In addition, I documented 13 new genera and 2

new families (Caricaeae and Urticaceae) to the global

list of taxon exhibiting EFNs (Keeler 2013).

At BCI, 49 (32.7%) of 150 species of tree were found

to have EFNs (Schupp & Feener 1991, Figure 3b).

They were distributed among 31 genera and 19 fam-

ilies (Figure 2b). Eighteen species with EFNs were in

the family Fabaceae, also due largely to the diversity

of Inga (15 species). Similar to Yasuni, 61% percent of

all species with EFNs were found within either the

Fabales or Malpighiales orders.

At Pasoh, 80 (9.7%) of 824 species were found to

have EFNs (Fiala & Linsenmair 1995, Figure 3c). They

were distributed among 47 genera and 16 families.

Unlike Yasuni and BCI, Pasoh exhibited a more even

distribution of EFN bearing trees across different taxa.

Euphorbiaceae, rather than Fabaceae, exhibited the

most species with EFNs (21 species). Forty percent of

all species with EFNs were in the order Malpighiales,

while the next most important order was Malvales

containing 17.5% of species with EFNs.

Across all study sites, Yasuni and Pasoh were

4


A. Muehleisen

Incidence and Ecological Significances of Extra-Floral Nectaries



5

Table 1

Demographic rates and abundances for all tree species per hectare across all three sites. Growth

is measured in mm per year, mortality in % per year and abundance in individuals per ha.

1-10 cm DBH

>

10 cm DBH



Yasuni

Pasoh


BCI

Yasuni


Pasoh

BCI


Growth

Min


0.79

1.02


0.90

0.22


0.27

0.27


Max

6.25


3.13

8.69


3.01

1.66


4.22

Mean


1.76

1.57


2.53

0.74


0.60

1.04


SD

0.62


0.26

1.30


0.39

0.20


0.60

Mortality

Min

0.27


0.43

0.23


0.36

0.51


0.33

Max


20.41

19.21


30.90

16.68


7.58

17.70


Mean

2.04


1.99

4.31


1.49

1.87


2.72

SD

2.27



1.67

4.66


1.02

0.75


2.20

Abundance

Min

0.00


0.00

0.00


0.00

0.00


0.00

Max


184.60

159.88


638.56

71.96


11.16

36.56


Mean

5.64


6.51

21.10


0.72

0.69


1.99

SD

13.10



14.71

70.45


2.91

1.33


4.31

most similar in their proportion of species with EFNs

(11.2% in Yasuni, 32.7% in BCI, and 9.7% in Pasoh).

BCI exhibited an incidence of species with EFNs up

to three times greater than Yasuni and Pasoh, and at

all taxon levels, BCI showed greater proportions of

plants with EFNs than both Yasuni and Pasoh. How-

ever, BCI exhibited a much lower incidence of EFNs

at the individual level compared with other study

sites. The distribution of species with EFNs in each

family for each site can be seen in Figure 4.

A B U N DA N C E , A N D G ROW T H A N D M O RTA L I T Y

R AT E S

Species varied widely in their abundances, growth

and mortality rates (Table 1). Species at BCI were on

average three times more abundant than species from

Yasuni and Pasoh, which reflects the lower species

richness found at BCI. Both growth and mortality

rates were also much higher at BCI than those found

at Yasuni or Pasoh.

In accordance with my prediction, species with

EFN had higher mean abundance than species

without EFNs at Yasuni and Pasoh, but this was not

the case at BCI (Figure 5 a, b, c). At Yasuni, species

abundances for trees with EFNs were 25-30% greater

than those without. At Pasoh, these differences were

even greater, where those species with EFNs were

114-117% more abundant than those without. In con-

trast, at BCI trees in the small size class without EFNs

were almost 170% more abundant, and abundances

were lower for those individuals >10 cm DBH.

Significantly greater growth rates were found in

trees with EFNs in each plot, although this differed

with size class between sites. At Yasuni, trees with

EFNs in both size classes had higher growth rates,

growing about 0.28 mm extra per year than species

without EFNs. At BCI only trees in the small size

class had significantly higher growth rates, and at

Pasoh only trees in the large size class (Figure 5e, f).

Significantly higher mortality rates were found for

species with EFN in the large size class (trees >10 cm

DBH) at all three sites (Figure 5g, h, i), and in Pasoh

trees 1-10 cm DBH also had significantly higher mor-

tality rates. In all cases growth and mortality rates

were found to be either greater or the same in trees

with EFNs.

5


A. Muehleisen

Incidence and Ecological Significances of Extra-Floral Nectaries



6

Fig. 3

Proportion of trees that exhibit EFNs at the individual and varying taxonomic levels, by location.

6


A. Muehleisen

Incidence and Ecological Significances of Extra-Floral Nectaries



7

Fig. 4

Number of species examined in each family at each site, with dark bars representing species with

extra-floral nectaries.

7


A. Muehleisen

Incidence and Ecological Significances of Extra-Floral Nectaries



8

Fig. 5

Abundance (a,b,c), and growth (d,e,f) and mortality (g,h,i) rates as a function of EFN presence in

shrub and tree species in three tropical forest sites. Points are mean values per EFN group, split into two size

classes: trees ≤10 cm DBH (red circles),trees >10 cm DBH (black squares). Points connected by dashed lines

that are filled indicate statistical difference at P < 0.05. Error bars show 95% confidence intervals.

8


A. Muehleisen

Incidence and Ecological Significances of Extra-Floral Nectaries



9

Discussion

From an intensive field survey of 896 tree and shrub

species in an Amazonian lowland tropical rain forest,

I documented 96 species with extra-floral nectaries,

64 of which had not previously been recorded as pos-

sessing EFNs. Comparing Yasuni with two other

intensive survey sites, I found that the distribution of

EFNs across taxa was consistent between Yasuni and

Pasoh, and broader at BCI. The reverse was found

to be true in terms of total EFN presence on indi-

viduals at each plot. Species with EFNs appeared to

be more successful ecologically at Yasuni and Pasoh,

having higher abundance than species without EFNs,

while at BCI the opposite was true. Further, I found

a significant effect of EFN incidence on long-term

plant performance. Tree species with EFNs showed

higher growth and mortality rates compared to those

without EFNs at all three sites in at least one size

class.

TA X O N O M I C D I S T R I B U T I O N AT YA S U N I



This study adds 13 new genera and 2 new families

(Caricaeae and Urticaceae, Appendix 1) to the list

of taxon exhibiting EFNs. This increases the global

number of familes with EFNs to 110, 17 of which

are found at Yasuni. The family with the most num-

ber of EFNs at Yasuni was Fabaceae, which is also

true globally. However, the family Euphorbiaceae

had the second highest incidence of EFNs at Yasuni,

which stands in contrast to global patterns which

show Passifloraceae and Malvaceae as second and

third, respectively. Only one species from Malvaceae

had nectaries at Yasuni, while there were none from

Passifloraceae, although I did not survey any vines

and lianas, the predominant growth form of Passi-

floraceae. The presence of EFNs at Yasuni was much

greater than the currently known worldwide incid-

ence (11.2% at Yasuni, to 1.5% worldwide, Weber &

Keeler 2012).

TA X O N O M I C D I S T R I B U T I O N B E T W E E N S I T E S

All three locations exhibited fairly equivalent dis-

tribution of EFNs across taxon, with BCI represent-

ing the greatest breadth of distribution. Oddly, BCI

also exhibited the lowest total number of individuals

with EFNs, despite the wide taxonomic distribution

and greater number of species relative to Pasoh and

Yasuni. Pasoh, which overall had the smallest phylo-

genetic distribution and species count of those trees

with EFNs, had the greatest number of individuals

with nectaries. It is not certain what might cause this

trend, though care should be taken labeling this a

trend from only three plots. This relationship could

be examined in other plots to determine whether a

trend truly exists.

In Yasuni, BCI and Pasoh the orders Fabales and

Malpighiales are well represented by species with

EFNs, with at least 10 species being found in each

order with EFNs. Unlike in BCI and Yasuni, the or-

ders Ericales and Malvales were also found to have

at least 10 species with EFNs in Malaysia, according

to Fiala & Linsenmair (1995). EFNs were found in

both of these families in BCI and Yasuni, but not to

the extent that they were found in Pasoh. As such,

despite an overall smaller distribution of EFNs across

orders in Pasoh (27% in Pasoh, as opposed to 33%

and 36% in Yasuni and BCI, respectively), more famil-

ies were well represented by species with EFNs. BCI

and Yasuni, then, have a thinner distribution of EFNs

across orders. This is generally the case for famil-

ies as well, as those orders with many EFN bearing

species in Pasoh are this way due to particularly well-

represented families (Dipterocarpaceae, Ebenaceae,

Euphorbiaceae and Fabaceae). This, in large part, re-

flects the different floristic composition of Paleo vs

Neotropical forests (Gentry 1993).

G E O G R A P H I C D I S T R I B U T I O N

An increase in EFN presence as latitude decreases

has been noted previously (Pemberton 1998), but it

is also informative to examine how EFN distribution

changes across different habitat types at similar lat-

itudes. Yasuni and Pasoh, which are two lowland

9


A. Muehleisen

Incidence and Ecological Significances of Extra-Floral Nectaries




Yüklə 485,21 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə