Infestation (Photo: Land Protection, qdnrw) habit prior to flowering



Yüklə 145,18 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix22.05.2017
ölçüsü145,18 Kb.

infestation (Photo: Land Protection, QDNRW)

habit prior to flowering (Photo: Land Protection, QDNRW)

lower leaves (Photo: Land Protection, QDNRW)

upper leaves and flower clusters (Photo: Chris Gardiner)

four-angled stems with clusters of immature and mature

fruit (Photo: Chris Gardiner)

Weeds of Australia - Biosecurity Queensland Edition Fact Sheet

Weeds of Australia - Biosecurity Queensland Edition Fact Sheet



Hyptis capitata

Scientific Name

Scientific Name

Hyptis capitata Jacq.

Family

Family


Labiatae (South Australia)

Lamiaceae (Queensland, New South Wales, the ACT, Victoria, Tasmania, Western

Australia and the Northern Territory)

Common Names

Common Names

buttonweed, false ironwort, knobweed, wild-hops

Origin

Origin


This species is native to southern Mexico, Central America (i.e. Belize, Costa Rica, El

Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panama), the Caribbean and tropical

South America (i.e. Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru).

Naturalised Distribution

Naturalised Distribution

Knobweed (

Hyptis capitata) is not yet widely naturalised in Australia, and is mostly

confined to the coastal areas of northern Queensland. It has also been recorded in

central Queensland, the Northern Territory and on Christmas Island.

It is also widely naturalised in tropical Asia (e.g. Vietnam, Thailand, Singapore, Malaysia,

Indonesia and the Philippines) and on several Pacific islands (e.g. Hawaii, Western

Samoa, Solomon Islands, Palau, Guam and French Polynesia).

Habitat

Habitat


This species is mainly found in wetter tropical and sub-tropical environments. It is a

weed of disturbed sites, crops, pastures, roadsides, waterways and open woodlands.

Habit

Habit


A large upright (i.e. erect) herbaceous plant with several branching stems (50-250 cm

tall) arising from a long-lived (i.e. perennial) rootstock.

Distinguishing Features

Distinguishing Features

a large upright herbaceous plant with several branching stems growing 60-

250 cm tall.

its stems are four-angled and its widely spaced leaves are oppositely

arranged.

its leaves have irregularly toothed margins and small oil glands on their

undersides.

its small white flowers are borne in stalked globular clusters (about 15 mm

across) and are surrounded by green tubular structures.

these flower clusters turn brown when mature and contain small

'seeds' which rattle when the stems are shaken.

Stems and Leaves

Stems and Leaves

The hairy (i.e. pubescent) stems are four-angled (i.e. quadrangular) and usually develop

pairs of branches in the upper leaf forks (i.e. axils).

The bright green leaves (5-15 cm long and 2-6 cm wide) are oppositely arranged and

widely spaced along the stems. They are borne on stalks (i.e. petioles) 2-3 cm long and

are egg-shaped in outline (i.e. ovate) or oblong in shape. The leaf blades have

irregularly toothed (i.e. serrate) margins and pointed tips (i.e acute apices). Small oil

glands are usually present on the undersides of the leaves.


clusters of old fruit (Photo: Chris Gardiner)

Flowers and Fruit

Flowers and Fruit

The small white flowers are arranged in dense rounded clusters (15-25 mm across) that

resemble flower-heads. These flower clusters are borne on stalks (i.e. peduncles) 2-9

cm long and are produced in the upper leaf forks (i.e. axils). The individual flowers are

stalkless (i.e. sessile) and the white petals of these flowers (5-6 mm long) are partially

fused into a tube (i.e. corolla tube). They separate into two lobes near the top (i.e. they

are two-lipped). The lower of these lobes is inflated (i.e. saccate) and bent sharply

downwards (i.e. deflexed), while the upper lobe usually has some faint purplish spots.

Each of these small flowers is surrounded by a green tubular structure (i.e. calyx tube)

with five lobes, which is made up of the fused sepals (3-4 mm long). Flowering usually

occurs during late autumn and early winter.

The fused sepal tubes (i.e. the calyces) become enlarged (up to 10 mm long) after the

flowers die, and they eventually turn brown in colour. Inside each of these calyx tubes a

small four-lobed fruit (i.e schizocarp) is produced, which divides into four small 'seeds' (i.e. nutlets or mericarps). These 'seeds' are dark brown to

black in colour (1-2 mm across) with two distinct white markings at one end. They are relatively smooth in texture and almost rounded (i.e. sub-

globular) in shape.

Reproduction and Dispersal

Reproduction and Dispersal

This species reproduces mainly by seed. The seeds are often spread in the fruit which readily adhere to animals, clothing and vehicles. They may

also be dispersed by water, machinery, or in contaminated agricultural produce. The long-lived rootstocks can occasionally also be spread by

cultivation practices.

Environmental Impact

Environmental Impact

Knobweed (

Hyptis capitata) is regarded as an environmental weed in northern Queensland and as a potential environmental weed in the Northern

Territory. This species prefers to grow in disturbed sunny areas on heavy soils with above average moisture levels. It can form dense thickets and is

a common weed of roadsides, creekbanks, headlands and overgrazed pastures in northern Queensland. Its main effect is to dominate or replace

the natural shrub/herb layer of more open plant communities, though it is regarded to be invading relatively slowly.

 

Knobweed (



Hyptis capitata) mainly occurs in tropical wet lowlands and foothills of the Ingham-Cairns region. It has also been recorded along road

and powerline corridors in the Wet Tropics World Heritage area. It was also discovered in Kakadu National Park in the Northern Territory in 1997,

and this population is subject to an eradication program.

Other Impacts

Other Impacts

This species is also a weed of crops and pastures in northern Australia.

Legislation

Legislation

This species is declared under legislation in the following states and territories:

Northern Territory: B

B  - growth and spread of this species to be controlled (throughout all of the Territory) and, C

C  - not to be introduced

into the Territory.

Western Australia: Prohibited - on the prohibited species list and not permitted entry into the state.

Management

Management

For information on the management of this species see the following resources:

the 


Northern Territory Department of Natural Resources, Environment and The Arts Agnote on this species, which is available online at

http://www.nt.gov.au/weeds.

Similar Species

Similar Species

Knobweed (

Hyptis capitata) is relatively similar to hyptis (Hyptis suaveolens) and lion's tail (Leonotis nepetifolia). These species can be distinguished

by the following differences:

knobweed (

Hyptis capitata) has white flowers that are borne in small dense globular clusters (15-25 mm across) at the top of stalks (i.e

peduncles) 2-9 cm long.

hyptis (

Hyptis suaveolens) has pinkish, bluish-purple or lavender coloured flowers that are borne in loose few-flowered clusters in the

leaf forks (i.e. axils).

lion's tail (

Leonotis nepetifolia) has orange flowers that are borne in large stalkless (i.e. sessile) globular clusters (50-60 mm across) in

the upper leaf forks (i.e. axils).



Fact sheets are available from Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation (DEEDI) service centres and our Customer Service Centre (telephone 13

25 23). Check our website at 

www.biosecurity.qld.gov.au

 to ensure you have the latest version of this fact sheet. The control methods referred to in this fact sheet

should be used in accordance with the restrictions (federal and state legislation, and local government laws) directly or indirectly related to each control method. These

restrictions may prevent the use of one or more of the methods referred to, depending on individual circumstances. While every care is taken to ensure the accuracy of

this information, DEEDI does not invite reliance upon it, nor accept responsibility for any loss or damage caused by actions based on it.

Copyright © 2016. All rights reserved. Identic Pty Ltd. Special edition of Environmental Weeds of Australia for Biosecurity Queensland.

The mobile application of Environmental Weeds of Australia is available from the Google Play Store and Apple iTunes.

Android Edition



Apple iOS Edition


Yüklə 145,18 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə