Infusion of pastoral care into the teaching of language arts Author(s) jessica



Yüklə 69,05 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix25.05.2017
ölçüsü69,05 Kb.

 

 

Title 



Infusion of pastoral care into the teaching of language arts 

Author(s) JESSICA 

BALL 

Source 


Teaching and Learning, 14(1),78-86 

Published by 

Institute of Education (Singapore) 

 

 



 

 

 



This document may be used for private study or research purpose only. This document or 

any part of it may not be duplicated and/or distributed without permission of the copyright 

owner. 

The Singapore Copyright Act applies to the use of this document. 



Infusion of  pastoral care 

into the teaching of 

language arts 

BALL 


By  the  end  of  1993,  Pastoral  Care  and  Career  Guidance 

(PCCG)  will  have  been  implemented  in  all  secondary  schools  in 

Singapore, and gradual extension of  PCCG to all primary schools will 

have  begun.  Implementation is  occurring  in  varying  degrees  and 

forms  in  different  schools. However,  the  Ministry  of  Education  has 

encouraged  the  adoption  of  a  developmental,  whole  school 

approach to PCCG. This is a preventive, holistic approach which is 

intended to involve all school staff  in planning and delivery, and to 

affect all students so that their development across domains, and not 

just in the intellectual sphere, is  facilitated (Best, 1989; 

Chia, 1988). 



One of the most important avenues 

the goals of the 

whole  school, PCCG  approach is through the 

infusion of  content 

and  activities guided 

by 

PCCG  into  the  academic  curriculum. 

Integration of  PCCG  into academic subject areas is challenging for 

several  reasons. First,  it  will nearly  always require modifications of 

curriculum  content  and  traditional,  teacher  directed  didacticism. 

Second, each school must fill in the details of how integration can be 

achieved,  given the opportunities and  constraints inherent in each 

school's particular circumstances (e.g., aspects of  how  the  school 

day is structured, make-up of the staff, resources, parent involvement 

and  receptivity,  etc.). But  perhaps most  importantly, teachers and 

principals approach the issue of integrating PCCG into the academic 

curriculum  with  trepidation  because  of  a  certain  mystical  aura 

surrounding the PCCG initiative. Precisely what kinds of  programme 

modifications need to be explored, or  what activities would actually 

contribute to realizing the objectives of  PCCG, often seem elusive. 



Infusion of  pastoral care into the teaching of  language arts 

79 

Indeed,  many  Singaporean  teachers  charged  with 

responsibility  for  implementing  PCCG  in  their  respective  schools 

have  expressed  uncertainty  about  how  to  integrate  PCCG  into 

academic classes. Similarly, educators in Britain have struggled with 

problems  of  translating  traditional  pedagogical  practices  and 

academic curricula into educational experiences that  foster  pupils' 

all-round development in  the manner hoped for in  the pastoral care 

paradigm (Best, 1989; Chia, 1987; 

1989). This report offers 

some suggestions for heightening the visibility of classroom activities 

and  course content  that  are  in line  with PCCG  objectives as  I  see 

them, and in so doing help to de-mystify the implications of PCCG for 

subject teaching. 



Re-Envisioning Curriculum 

Curriculum  organization,  course  content,  and  teaching 

strategies are  likely to need revision in order  to  meet  the  apparent 

new, holistic  and  developmental thrust in Singaporean educational 

goals. We know that, in most cases, it is best to undertake curriculum 

reconstruction incrementally,  with  evidence  of  small  but  important 

successes providing reassurance and support for  subsequent, and 

more far-reaching change 

1982). With this process in mind, it 

would seem most favourable to begin the process of  infusing PCCG 

into academic curricula within the context of  language arts. 

Both  PCCG  and  the  language  arts  aim  to  develop  pupils' 

creative  and  critical  thinking  capacities,  self-expression, 

communication,  and  social  understanding. Within  both  the  PCCG 

and integrated language arts frameworks, literacy is viewed as both 

an individual and social phenomena, and as a process rather than as 

a product. Considering these basic  aims and premises, there is an 

essential correspondence between PCCG and language arts, when 

both of these are well-conceived and delivered. Thus, it would seem 

that much could be gained by planning their  delivery  synthetically, 

rather than as unrelated aspects of  the school programme. 


80 

Teaching and Learning 

Teaching Strategies 

Providing opportunities for personal expression and facilitating 

development of  social understanding are two of  the most important 

means to achieving the developmental goals of  PCCG. Many of  the 

activities  appropriate  to  language  arts  classes  can  contribute  to 

these  aims.  For  example,  pupils  develop  their  capacities  for  self- 

reflection, creative and critical thinking, and self-expression through 

writing, speaking, teamwork, and other kinds of  productive activities. 

Their  self-understanding,  social  understanding,  and  access  to 

knowledge  beyond  their  direct  experience  is  developed  through 

reading, listening, observing, and team work. 

The following are just  a few  examples of  activities common to 

many language classes aimed at the development of  reading skills, 

showing  how  they  can  be  conceived  and  used  to  further  the 

communicative aims of  PCCG. 

Listening  to  stories:  Learning  to  listen  actively  and  make 

meaning  out  of  what  others have  to  say,  and relating  this  to 

one's own experiences. 

(2) 

Telling stories: Learning to organize one's thinking so that ideas 

can  be  shared  orally  or  in  writing  in  a  clear  and  interesting 

manner. 

(3) 

Sharing personal experiences: Developing confidence and skill 

in telling about or  illustrating something on  a purely 

basis. 

(4) 


Discussion: Learning  social skills  in  general,  and  specifically 

developing the ability to interact with what other people say and 

write. 



range  of  flexible  teaching  strategies  should  be  used  that 



involve pupils actively in their learning process, and that will enable 

them to develop the kinds of  life skills and confidence they will need 

to take with them from school into the rest of their lives. Following are 

some suggested characteristics of  this kind of  pedagogy, informed 

by PCCG. 


Infusion 

of 

pastoral care into the teaching of  language arts 

81 

preponderance of 



discovery  or  enquiry-based activities, 

rather than a primarily teacher-dominated didacticism. 

Incorporation of 

social skills objectives, 

as well as academic 

objectives, in planning and delivering every lesson 

active 


listening,  giving  positive  feedback  to  classmates,  turn-taking 

during group work, etc.). 

Many kinds of 

peer interactions, 

such as collaborative writing 

projects,  small  group  discussions,  peer  review,  and  so  on, 

involving heterogeneous pupil groupings. 

Instructional 

accommodation of  differences among pupils 

in 


interests,  preparedness,  pacing,  self-esteem,  and 

accomplishment. 



Teacher feedback that is constructively informative, 

rather 


than  primarily  evaluative; that  is,  teachers'  responses  are  not 

used  primarily  to  correct  mistakes  or  to  evaluate  pupil 

contributions in terms of  "right" or "wrong", but rather to reward 

active  participation,  build  confidence,  encourage  reflective 

thinking, and ask follow-up questions that lead pupils on to the 

next 


Pupil  profiling, 

involving  individualized  assessment  on  a 

continuous, internal (i.e., in-house) basis by the teacher and the 

student, based not  only  on  acquisition of  language skills  but 

also  on  the  development  of  other  personal  and  social 

capacities. 



Pupil assessment 

of  their own progress, and pupil evaluation 

of 

what 

they  are learning (e.g., through frequent conferences 

with the teacher with reference to their  individual pupil profile, 

keeping  a  journal,  compiling  chronological  samples  of  their 

written work in portfolios). 

Peer review, 

in which students work in pairs and small groups 

and learn to respond holistically and constructively to the written 

and oral expressions of their peers. (This kind of peer evaluation 

is much more developmentally supportive and motivating than 


82 

Teaching and Learning 

the  increasingly  common  use  of  "peer  editing",  in  which 

classmates  are  asked  to  find 

correct  each  other's 

spelling and grammatical errors.) 

The texts by 

(1 989) and Tiedt 

(1 


983; 1989) are excellent 

repositories of  practical approaches to language arts education that 

incorporate  these kinds  of  interactive,  holistic, and  developmental 

emphases. 



Content 

synthesis of  teaching  in  the  language  arts with  the  PCCG 



approach requires thougthful selection of  literature, comprehension 

passages,  vocabulary lists,  worksheet  sentences,  and  writing  and 

discussion topics. This content must be: 

(1)  developmentally appropriate 

(2) 

calibrated to  the ability level of  the pupil with  respect to  task 



demands 

(3) 


culturally relevant and unbiased 

(4) 

non-sexist 

(5) 

responsive  to  the  expressed  needs  and  interests  of  the 



particular pupils for  whom the selections are made. 

(6) 

presented within a meaningful substantive context 

(7)  presented with a rationale that makes sense to pupils in terms of 

their own aims. 



The Thematic Approach 

The thematic approach is one structure for making the most of 

the essential complementarity between language arts and PCCG. In 

this approach, skill-building activities such as reading, composition, 



Infusion of  pastoral care into the teaching of  language arts 

83 

listening,  and  speaking  all  revolve  around  one  topic  or  theme.  A 

major  advantage of  using  this  approach  is  that  pupils experience 

language arts, not as a "subject" for its own sake, or  as an array of 

unconnected  classroom  activities  (e.g.,  spelling,  composition, 

literature), but as a process of  using communication to extend their 

grasp  of  issues  that  are  personally  meaningful and  important. For 

example, issues that are relevant within the framework of  PCCG that 

could be developed into thematic units include: Friendship, Gender, 

Conflict, Work, Community. Themes can be as simple as "My Family," 

or as complex as  "Responsibility" or "Pride". Work on themes could 

extend  over  as  little  as  one  week  (e.g.,  Expressing  Sadness; 

Sportspersonship), or  over an entire school year (e.g., Other People 

and Me; Environment). 

Theme  selection  must  be  based  on  a  consideration  of 

developmental tasks and issues that nearly all pupils at a given level 

will  be  confronting.  In  addition,  themes  must  be  grounded  in,  or 

directly  related  to,  the  particular  cultural,  socio-economic, familial, 

and educational context of  the  pupils  who  are  expected to  benefit 

from exploration of  the theme. 

The selection of  themes can be done by individual classroom 

teachers, on the basis of  his or her assessment of  expressed needs, 

concerns,  and  goals  of  the  pupils  in  his  or  her  class  each  year. 

Alternatively,  relevant  themes  could  be  identified  on  the  basis  of 

information  gathered  by  the  school's  PCCG  planning  committee, 

whose task is to conduct regular needs assessments of  the student 

population in  order  to  prioritize  areas  that  should  be the  target  of 

PCCG activities in the school. 

Thematic  units  can  also  be  created  to  provide  in-depth 

coverage  of  topics  that  are  presented  in  existing  language  arts 

syllabi. Thus, for  example, the unit  in the  current Primary 

English 



syllabus on "Good and Bad Behaviours" could be slightly recast and 

elaborated. Students  could  be  actively  involved in reflection upon 

their own and others' behaviours with reference to these dimensions, 

through  poems, stories, pictures,  group discussions, presentations 

on "good and bad behaviours", and written and oral debates about 

the implications of the theme for understanding pupils' interactions in 

and out of  class. 


84 

Teaching and Learning 

Yet  another  approach to  theme  development is for  a  team  of 

teachers  to  work  together  to  plan  a  series  of  thematic  units,  or  a 

single umbrella theme  for  the  whole year  (e.g., Pring, 1984). Some 

agreement should be reached by all the language arts teachers in a 

school  about  what  themes  will  be  used  at  each  level.  This 

coordination  will  help  to  ensure  continuity  and  avoid  repetition  of 

materials as pupils move from level to level. 

Once  relevant  themes  have  been  identified,  planning  the 

activities and materials for the unit can be simplified and made more 

enjoyable  if  several  teachers  working  at  the  same  level  pool  their 

ideas, information, and resources. Teachers can also adapt some of 

the many "packaged" thematic curriculum guides that are available, 

or  extract ideas and sample units from resource books for  creating 

thematic  units  (e.g.,  Coody,  1983;  Gamberg,  Kwak,  Hutchings, & 

Altheim, 1988). 

At  the  present  time,  there  is  insufficient  research-based 

understanding  about  the  particular  psychosocial  needs  and 

strengths of  Singaporean pupils at various developmental stages to 

warrant  proposal of  a structured programme of  thematic  units  that 

could  be  offered  for  teachers  of  all  language  classes.  However, 

teachers  can begin to  work  out  some  of  the  priorities for  thematic 

development  based  on  their  knowledge  of  normative  child 

development, the aims of  PCCG, and a needs assessment of pupils 

carried out in their respective schools. 

Conclusion 

Through the  use of  teaching  strategies and  thematic  content 

based  on  a  serious  effort  to  put  into  practice  the  holistic, 

developmental  intent  of  PCCG,  we  can  provide  a  meaningful, 

motivating framework  within  which  pupils  can  acquire  and  extend 

their language skills. Language arts can then become an important 

vehicle  for  exploring  social  issues,  personal  experiences, 

interpersonal  interactions,  and  the  nature  of  the  learning  process 

itself.  The  infusion  of  PCCG  into  academic  subject  areas  is 

potentially fruitful conception that could help to advance new, holistic 



objectives,  pupil-centred  teaching  practices,  and  criteria  for 

selection  of  content  that  support  and  extend  the  all-round 

development of  pupils. 


Infusion of  pastoral 

care 

into the teaching of  language arts 

85 

References 

Best, 


R. (1989). Pastoral care: Some reflections and a restatement. Pastoral 

Care In Education, 

(4): 


7-13. 

Bird, L. (1989). 



Becoming a Whole Language School: The 

Oaks Story. 

New  York: Richard Owen. 

Chia, J.E.  (1987). The relationship between the administrative, pastoral and 

academic  structures  in  schools  and  systems  of  profiling. Unpublished 

Doctoral thesis, University of  Bath, 

Coody, B. (1983). 



Using Literature With Young Children. Dubuque, IA: Wm. 

C. Brown. 

J. (1989). Pastoral curriculum: Examples from a London Borough. 

Pastoral Care in Education, 7 (3): 39-43. 

V.,  Chia, L. (1988). Pastoral Care in British Schools: Application 

for  Singapore. Paper  presented at  the  Third  Annual  Conference  of  the 

Educational Research Association, Singapore. 

Garnberg, R.,  Kwak, W., Hutchings, R., 

Altheim, 

J. 

(1988). 


Learning and 

Loving It. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. 

Hart-Hewins,  L. 

Wells,  J.  (1990). 

Real  Books  For  Reading:  Learning  to 

Read With Children's Literature. Markharn, ONT.  Canada: Pembroke. 

A.V. (1 982). 



The Curriculum: Theory and Practice. 2nd Edition. London: 

Harper 


Row. 

B.  (1989). 



Organizing  the  Whole  Language  Classroom: 

Practical Ideas  for  Teaching  Language Arts. 

ONT.,  Canada: 

Pembroke. 

C.,  Kiefer,  B., 

Levistik,  L,  (1990). 

An  Integrated  Language 

Perspective in the Elementary School. New York: 

Pring, R. (1 984). 



Personal and Social Education in the Curriculum: Concepts 

and Content. London: Hodder 

Stoughton. 

Smith, L.E.W. (1972). 

Towards a New English Curriculum. London: J.M. Dent 

Sons. 


86 

Teaching and Learning 

Templeton, 

S. 

(1991). 


Teaching  the  Integrated  Language  Arts.  Boston: 

Hougton Mifflin. 

Tiedt, I.M. (1983). 

The Language Arts Handbook. New York: Prentice-Hall. 

Tiedt, I. 



M. (1 989). 

A holistic language and literacy 

program for  the 

classroom. Boston: Allyn and Bacon. 

Document Outline

  • copyright_TeachingAndLearning1.doc
  • TL-14-1-78.pdf


Yüklə 69,05 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə