Interim Recovery Plan 2014–2019 Department of Parks and Wildlife, Western Australia



Yüklə 441,05 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix03.09.2017
ölçüsü441,05 Kb.

 

 

 



Interim Recovery Plan No. 

347

 

 



(Kunzea acicularis

 

Interim Recovery Plan 



2014–2019 

 

 



 

Department of Parks and Wildlife, Western Australia 

June 2014 



 

Interim Recovery Plan for Kunzea acicularis 

 



List of Acronyms 



 

The following acronyms are used in this plan: 

 

ADTFRT 


Albany District Threatened Flora Recovery Team 

BGPA 


Botanic Gardens and Parks Authority 

CALM 


Department of Conservation and Land Management 

CITES 


Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species 

CR 


Critically Endangered 

DEC 


Department of Environment and Conservation 

DAA 


Department of Aboriginal Affairs 

DMP 


Department of Mines and Petroleum 

DPaW 


Department of Parks and Wildlife (also shown as Parks and Wildlife) 

DRF 


Declared Rare Flora 

EPBC 


Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation 

IBRA 


Interim Biogeographic Regionalization for Australia

 

IRP 



Interim Recovery Plan 

IUCN 


International Union for Conservation of Nature 

LGA 


Local Government Authority 

NRM 


Natural Resource Management 

PEC 


Priority Ecological Community 

PICA 


Public Information and Corporate Affairs 

RP 


Recovery Plan 

SCB 


Species and Communities Branch (Parks and Wildlife) 

SCD 


Science and Conservation Division 

SWALSC 


South West Aboriginal Land and Sea Council 

TEC 


Threatened Ecological Community 

TFSC 


Threatened Flora Seed Centre 

TSSC 


Threatened Species Scientific Committee 

UCL 


Unallocated Crown Land

 

UNEP-WCMC  United Nations Environment Program World Conservation Monitoring Centre 



VU 

Vulnerable 

WA 

Western Australia 



WAPC 

Western Australia Planning Commission 

 

 

 



 

Interim Recovery Plan for Kunzea acicularis 

 



Foreword 



 

Interim  Recovery  Plans  (IRPs)  are  developed  within  the  framework  laid  down  in  Department  of  Parks  and 

Wildlife Policy Statements Nos. 44 and 50 (CALM 1992; CALM 1994). Note: The Department of Conservation 

and Land Management (CALM) formally became the Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC) in 

July 2006 and the Department of Parks and Wildlife in July 2013. Plans outline the recovery actions that are 

required to urgently address those threatening processes most affecting the ongoing survival of threatened 

taxa or ecological communities, and begin the recovery process. 

 

Parks and Wildlife is committed to ensuring that Threatened taxa are conserved through the preparation and 



implementation  of  Recovery  Plans  (RPs)  or  IRPs,  and  by  ensuring  that  conservation  action  commences  as 

soon as possible and, in the case of Critically Endangered (CR) taxa, always within one year of endorsement 

of that rank by the Minister. 

 

This plan will operate from June 2014 to May 2019 but will remain in force until withdrawn or replaced. It is 



intended that, if the taxon is still ranked as Vulnerable (VU), this plan will be reviewed after five years and the 

need for further recovery actions assessed. 

 

This  plan  was  given  regional  approval  on  6  June  2014  and  was  approved  by  the  Director  of  Science  and 



Conservation on 13 June 2014 The provision of funds identified in this plan is dependent on budgetary and 

other constraints affecting Parks and Wildlife, as well as the need to address other priorities. 

 

Information in this plan was accurate at June 2014. 



 

Plan preparation: This plan was prepared by: 

 

Robyn Luu 



Project Officer, Parks and Wildlife Species and Communities Branch, Locked Bag 104, 

Bentley Delivery Centre, Western Australia, 6983. 

Andrew Brown 

Threatened  Flora  Coordinator,  Parks  and  Wildlife  Species  and  Communities  Branch, 

Locked Bag 104, Bentley Delivery Centre, Western Australia, 6983. 

 

Acknowledgments: The following people provided assistance and advice in the preparation of this plan: 

 

Sarah Barrett 



Flora Conservation Officer, Parks and Wildlife Albany District 

Andrew Crawford 

Principal  Technical  Officer,  Threatened  Flora  Seed  Centre,  Science  and  Conservation 

Division 

Mia Podesta 

Ecologist  -  Threatened  Ecological  Communities  (TECs)  database,  Parks  and  Wildlife 

Species and Communities Branch 

Amanda Shade 

Assistant Curator (Nursery) Botanic Gardens and Parks Authority 

 

Thanks also to the staff of the Western Australia Herbarium for providing access to Herbarium databases and 



specimen information. 

 

Cover photograph by Mike Fitzgerald. 



 

Citation: This plan should be cited as: Department of Parks and Wildlife (2014) Kunzea acicularis

 

Toelken & 



G.F.Craig Interim Recovery Plan 2014–2019. Interim Recovery Plan No. 347. Department of Parks and Wildlife, 

Western Australia. 



 

Interim Recovery Plan for Kunzea acicularis 

 



Summary 



 

Scientific name: 

Kunzea acicularis

 

 

Common name: 

none 

Family: 

Myrtaceae 



Flowering period:  October−November 

DPaW region: 

South Coast 



DPaW district: 

Albany 


Shire: 

Ravensthorpe 



IBRA region: 

Esperance Plains 



NRM region:  

South Coast Regional Initiative 

 

Planning Team 



IBRA subregion: 

Fitzgerald ESP01 

 

Recovery team: 

ADTFRT 


Distribution and habitat: Kunzea acicularis is known from one location north-east of Ravensthorpe where it 

grows  in  pale  orange  clay-loam  soil  in  open  mallee  woodland  and  heath  with  Eucalyptus  pleurocarpa,  E



tetraptera,  Banksia  cirsioides,  Hakea  laurina,  Andersonia  parvifolia,  Beaufortia  schaueri,  Melaleuca  societatis 

and Mhamata (Toelken and Craig 2007). 

 

Habitat critical to  the survival of the species, and  important  populations: Given that  there is just one 

known population of Kunzea acicularis, all known habitat is habitat critical to the survival of the species and 

the  wild  population  is  an  important  population.  Habitat  critical  to  the  survival  of  K.  acicularis  includes  the 

area of occupancy of the population, areas of similar habitat surrounding and linking subpopulations (these 

providing  potential  habitat  for  population  expansion  and  for  pollinators),  additional  occurrences  of  similar 

habitat that may contain undiscovered populations of the species or be suitable for future translocations, and 

the local catchment for the surface and/or groundwater that maintains the habitat of the species. 

 

Conservation  status:  Kunzea  acicularis  is  specially  protected  under  the  Western  Australian  Wildlife 



Conservation Act 1950 and is ranked as Vulnerable (VU) in Western Australia under International Union for 

Nature  Conservation  (IUCN  2001)  criteria  D2  due  to  its  very  restricted  area  of  occupancy.  The  species  is 

known from a single location. The current extent of occurrence is estimated to be 940.7m

2

 and the area of 



occupancy  is  estimated  to  be  0.147km

2

.  The  species  is  not  listed  under  the  Commonwealth  Environment 



Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999

 

Threats:  The  main  threats  to  the  species  are  narrow  distribution,  road  maintenance,  altered  fire  regimes, 



Phytophthora dieback and potential future mining operations. 

 

Existing  recovery  actions:  The  following  recovery  actions  have  been  or  are  currently  being  implemented 

and have been considered in the preparation of this plan: 

1.

 



Relevant land managers have been made aware of this species and its locations. 

2.

 



Declared Rare Flora (DRF) markers have been installed at Population 1a. 

3.

 



Surveys have been undertaken in the Ravensthorpe area. 

4.

 



14,870  seeds  collected  from  Population  1  in  November  2004  and  2,958  seeds  also  collected  from 

Population 1, in December 2009 are currently stored in Parks and Wildlife’s TFSC at –18

C. 


 

Plan  objective:  The  objective  of  this  plan  is  to  abate  identified  threats  and  maintain  or  enhance  in  situ 

populations to ensure the long-term conservation of the species in the wild. 

 

 

 



 

Interim Recovery Plan for Kunzea acicularis 

 



Recovery criteria 



 

Criteria for recovery success: 

 



The number of extant populations has increased from one to two or more over the term of the plan and/or 

 



The number of mature individuals has increased by 10% or more over the term of the plan from 17,500 to 19,250 or 

more. 


 

Criteria for recovery failure: 

 



The number of mature individuals has decreased by 10% or more over the term of the plan from 17,500 to 15,750 or 

less. 


 

Recovery actions 

 

1.



 

Coordinate recovery actions 

2.

 

Monitor population 



3.

 

Ensure long-term protection of habitat 



4.

 

Determine the susceptibility of Kunzea acicularis to 



Phytophthora cinnamomi 

5.

 



Undertake regeneration trials 

6.

 



Develop and implement a fire management strategy 

7.

 



Collect and store seed 

8.

 



Undertake surveys 

9.

 



Obtain biological and ecological information 

10.


 

Undertake and monitor translocations 

11.

 

Liaise with land managers and Aboriginal 



communities 

12.


 

Map habitat critical to the survival of Kunzea 



acicularis 

13.


 

Promote awareness 

14.

 

Review this plan and assess the need for further 



recovery actions

 

 



 

Interim Recovery Plan for Kunzea acicularis 

 



1. Background 



 

History 


 

Kunzea  acicularis  was  first  collected  north-east  of  Ravensthorpe  by  G.  Cockerton  in  2003  and  was 

formally described by Toelken and Craig in 2007. One population comprising 17,500 mature plants is 

currently known. 

 

Description 



 

Kunzea  acicularis  is  a  medium  shrub  to  two  metres  tall  with  few  erect  stems,  each  of  which  is 

irregularly branched. Young branches are densely covered with fine spreading hairs. The leaf petiole is 

0.3  to  0.7  millimetres  long  and  more  or  less  appressed.  The  lamina  is  oblanceolate  to  elliptic-

oblanceolate.  The  inflorescence  is  a  botryum  with  three  to  five  flowers,  and  the  corolla  is  pink  to 

mauve. The name acicularis is Latin for ‘needle-like’ and refers to the long needle-like acumen of the 

perules and bracts (Toelken and Craig 2007). 

 

Kunzea acicularis is similar to the southern form of Kpreissiana with both having bracts longer than 

half  the  hypanthium.  However,  K.  acicularis  differs  from  K.  preissiana  by  the  combination  of  being 

usually taller, having broader leaves and lanceolate-triangular long-pointed perules and bracts on the 

inflorescence, as well as longer, acute, triangular calyx lobes (Toelken and Craig 2007). 

 

Illustrations and/or further information 



 

Toelken,  H.R.  and Craig,  G.F.  (2007)  Kunzea  acicularis,  K.  strigosa  and  K.  similis  subsp.  mediterranea 

(Myrtaceae)  -  new  taxa  from  near  Ravensthorpe,  Western  Australia.  Nuytsia  17:  385−396;  Western 

Australian  Herbarium  (1998−)  FloraBase  −  the  Western  Australian  Flora.  Department  of  Parks  and 

Wildlife. http://florabase.dpaw.wa.gov.au/. 

 

Distribution and habitat 



 

Kunzea  acicularis  is  known  from  one  location  north-east  of  Ravensthorpe  where  it  grows  on  pale 

orange  clay-loam  with  Eucalyptus  pleurocarpa,  E.  tetraptera,  Banksia  cirsioides,  Hakea  laurina



Andersonia  parvifolia,  Beaufortia  schaueri,  Melaleuca  societatis  and  M.  hamata  (Toelken  and  Craig 

2007). 


 

Table 1. Summary of population land vesting, purpose and manager 

 

Population number & 



location 

Parks and 

Wildlife 

district 

Shire 

Vesting 

Purpose 

Manager 

1a. NE of Ravensthorpe  Albany 

Ravensthorpe 

LGA 


Road reserve 

Shire of Ravensthorpe 

1b. NE of Ravensthorpe  Albany 

Ravensthorpe 

Non vested 

UCL 


WAPC 

1c.NE of Ravensthorpe 

Albany 

Ravensthorpe 



Non vested 

UCL 


WAPC 

 

Interim Recovery Plan for Kunzea acicularis 

 



 



Biology and ecology 

 

Kunzea  acicularis  appears  to  be  an  obligate  seeder,  regenerating  prolifically  following  disturbance. 

When  observed  in  2008  part  of  Population  1b  comprised  of  immature  plants  that  had  recruited 

following the Three Star Lakes fire in 2003. 

 

The susceptibility of Kunzea acicularis to Phytophthora dieback is not known. Other members of the 



genus that have been tested have low to moderate susceptibility. 

 

Conservation status 



 

Kunzea acicularis is specially protected under the Western Australian Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 

and  is  ranked  as  Vulnerable  (VU)  under  International  Union  for  Nature  Conservation  (IUCN  2001) 

criteria D2 due to its very restricted area of occupancy. The species is known from a single location 

with  an  extent  of  occurrence  estimated  to  be  940.7m

2

  and  area  of  occupancy  estimated  to  be 



0.147km

2

. The species is not listed under the Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity 



Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act). 

 

Threats 



 

 



Narrow distribution. As the species is known from one population, its genetic diversity is limited 

and  the  likelihood  of  it  falling  victim  to  chance  demographic  or  environmental  events  such  as 

wildfire is much increased. 

 



Road  maintenance  including  grading, chemical  spraying,  construction of  drainage  channels  and 

the mowing of roadside vegetation is a threat to Population 1a. 

 

Altered  fire  regimes.  Fire  should  if  possible  be  prevented  from  occurring  in  the  area  of  the 



population,  except  where  used  as  a  recovery  action.  Species  confined  to  single  populations  are 

vulnerable to stochastic events such as poor seasons in early years after fire. Fire may also facilitate 

weed invasion and when it occurs should be followed up with appropriate weed control. 

 



Phytophthora dieback. •  Phytophthora  cinnamomi  is  a  potential  threat  to  Kunzea  acicularis

Although other Kunzea species tested have low to moderate susceptibility, the susceptibility of K. 



acicularis  is  unknown.  Other  susceptible  plant  species  with  which  it  grows  may  also    be  greatly 

impacted resulting in habitat change. 

 

Future  mining  operations.  If  mining  occurs  in  tenement  (E74/419),  held  by  BHP  Billiton  Nickel 



West Pty Ltd., it will have the potential to severely impact or destroy the habitat of the species. 

 

Table 2. Summary of population information and threats 

 

Population number & 

location 

Land status  Year / no. of plants 

Current 

condition 

Threats 

1a. NE of 

Ravensthorpe 

Road 


reserve 

2004 


2007 

2000* 


2000 

Healthy 


Narrow distribution, road maintenance, 

altered fire regimes, disease, mining 



1b. NE of 

Ravensthorpe 

UCL 


2004 

2008 


2000* 

13,500 (1,550) 

Healthy 

Narrow distribution, altered fire 

regimes, disease, mining 

1c.NE of 

Ravensthorpe 

UCL 


2004 

2007 


2000* 

2000 


Healthy 

Narrow distribution, altered fire 

regimes, disease, mining 


 

Interim Recovery Plan for Kunzea acicularis 

 



Note: Populations in  bold  text  are considered to  be important populations;  *  = total for both subpopulations;  and (  ) = 



number of seedlings. 

 

The intent of this plan is to provide actions that will mitigate immediate threats to Kunzea acicularis



Although  climate  change  and  drought  may  have  a  long-term  effect  on  the  species,  actions  taken 

directly to prevent their impact are beyond the scope of this plan. 

 

Guide for decision-makers 



 

Section 1 provides details of current and possible future threats. Development and/or land clearing in 

the immediate vicinity of Kunzea acicularis will require assessment. On-ground works should not be 

approved unless the proponents can demonstrate that their actions will have no significant negative 

impact  on  the  species,  its  habitat  or  potential  habitat  or  on  the  local  surface  hydrology,  such  that 

drainage in the habitat of the species would be altered. 

 

Habitat  critical  to  the  survival  of  the  species,  and 



important populations 

 

Given that Kunzea acicularis is ranked as VU and there is only one population, it is considered that all 



known  habitat  for  the  wild  population  is  critical  to  the  survival  of  the  species  and  that  the  wild 

population is an important population. Habitat critical to the survival of Kacicularis includes the area 

of  occupancy  of  the  population,  areas  of  similar  habitat  surrounding  and  linking  subpopulations 

(these  providing  potential  habitat  for  population  expansion  and  for  pollinators),  additional 

occurrences of similar habitat that may contain undiscovered populations of the species or be suitable 

for future translocations, and the local catchment for the surface and/or groundwater that maintains 

the habitat of the species. 

 

Benefits to other species or ecological communities 



 

Recovery actions implemented to improve the quality or security of the habitat of Kunzea acicularis 

will also  improve the  status  of  associated  native vegetation.  One  Declared  Rare  Flora (DRF)  species 

and one Priority flora taxon occur within 1.5km of K. acicularis. These taxa are listed in the table below: 

 

Table 3. Conservation-listed flora species occurring within 1.5km of Kunzea acicularis 

 

Species name 



Conservation status (WA) 

Conservation status 

(EPBC Act) 

Marianthus mollis 

Priority 4 

EN 

Allocasuarina hystricosa 

Priority 4 

 

For a description of conservation codes for Western Australian flora see 



http://www.dpaw.wa.gov.au/images/documents/plants-animals/threatened-

species/Listings/Conservation_code_definitions_18092013.pdf

 

 

Kunzea acicularis does not occur within or adjacent to any Threatened Ecological Communities (TECs) 



or Priority Ecological Communities (PECs).

 

 



 

 


 

Interim Recovery Plan for Kunzea acicularis 

 



International obligations 



 

This  plan  is  fully  consistent  with  the  aims  and  recommendations  of  the  Convention  on  Biological 

Diversity, ratified by Australia in June 1993, and will assist in implementing Australia’s responsibilities 

under that Convention. The species is not listed under Appendix II in the United Nations Environment 

Program World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC) Convention on International Trade in 

Endangered  Species  (CITES),  and  this  plan  does  not  affect  Australia’s  obligations  under  any  other 

international agreements. 

 

Aboriginal consultation 



 

A search of the Department of Aboriginal Affairs (DAA) Aboriginal Heritage Sites Register revealed no 

sites of  Aboriginal significance  adjacent  to  the  population  of  Kunzea  acicularis.  However,  input  and 

involvement has been sought through the South West Aboriginal Land and Sea Council (SWALSC) and 

DAA to determine if there are any issues or interests with respect to management for this species in 

the vicinity of these sites. Indigenous opportunity for future involvement in the implementation of the 

plan is included as an action in the plan. Aboriginal involvement in management of land covered by 

an agreement under the Conservation and Land Management Act 1984 is also provided for under the 

joint management arrangements in that Act, and will apply if an agreement is established over any 

reserved lands on which this species occurs. 

 

Social and economic impacts 



 

For  land  under  the  management  of  the  Shire  of  Ravensthorpe  (Subpopulation  1a)  and  unallocated 

Crown land (UCL) (Subpopulations 1b and 1c) some impacts may occur through restrictions imposed 

on the management of the land, such as maintenance of the road infrastructure. A mineral exploration 

lease also covers the area where K. acicularis is known to occur and there is potential for economic 

impact should mining operations begin. 

 

Affected interests 



 

Affected  interests  include  the  Western  Australian  Planning  Commission  (WAPC)  and  the  Shire  of 

Ravensthorpe. Mining tenement holder, First Quantum, may also be affected by actions referred to in 

this plan. Recovery actions refer to continued liaison with affected stakeholders. 

 

Evaluation of the plan’s performance 



 

Parks and Wildlife, with assistance from the Albany District Threatened Flora Recovery Team (ADTFRT), 

will evaluate the performance of this plan. In addition to annual reporting on progress and evaluation 

against  the  criteria  for  success  and  failure,  the  plan  will  be  reviewed  following  four  years  of 

implementation. 

 

 



 

 

Interim Recovery Plan for Kunzea acicularis 

 

10 


2. Recovery objective and criteria 

 

Plan objective 

 

The objective of this plan is to abate identified threats and maintain or enhance in situ populations to 



ensure the long-term conservation of the species in the wild. 

 

Recovery criteria 

 

Criteria for recovery success: 

 



The number of extant populations has increased from one to two or more over the term of the plan and/or 

 



The number of mature individuals has increased by 10% or more over the term of the plan from 17,500 to 

19,250 or more. 

 

Criteria for recovery failure: 

 



The number of mature individuals has decreased by 10% or more over the term of the plan from 17,500 to 

15,750 or less. 

 

 

 



3. Recovery actions 

 

Existing recovery actions 



 

Relevant  land  managers  have  been  made  aware  of  the  current DRF  status  of  the  species  and  their 

legal obligations in regards to its protection. 

 

DRF markers have been installed at Subpopulation 1a to alert people of the presence of the DRF and 



the  need  to  avoid  activities  that  may  damage  the  species  or  its  habitat.  Dashboard  stickers  and 

posters describing the significance of DRF markers have been produced and distributed. 

 

Surveys have been undertaken, both directly through targeted surveys and indirectly as part of other 



survey programs in the Ravensthorpe area. These include: 

 



 

Surveys of East Mount Barren and the Ravensthorpe Range by Andy Chapman in 1998; 

 

Survey of Whoogarup Range and Mount Drummond areas in December 1998; 



 

Survey of the Shoemaker-Levy tenements north of Bandalup Hill by G. Craig in 1999; 



 

Helicopter survey of the northern part of the Ravensthorpe Range by G. Cockerton in 1999; 



 

Helicopter survey of Bandalup Hill by G. Cockerton and R. Pepper in October 2000; 



 

A series of surveys at East Mount Barren, and between there and Quoin Head, by G. Craig and M. 



Jones in October 2000; 

 



Extensive roadside survey of the eastern section of Fitzgerald River National Park in 2000; 

 



Survey of Bandalup gravel pits in October 2000; 

 

Interim Recovery Plan for Kunzea acicularis 

 

11 


 

Traversing  of  large  areas  of  Ravensthorpe  Range  during  regional  vegetation  mapping  projects 



between 2007 to 2008; 

 



Survey of habitat in the vicinity of known populations and other areas identified as having similar 

soil landscapes by the Ravensthorpe Regional Flora Survey Team in 2007 to 2009; 

 

Establishment of 264 permanent quadrats across the Ravensthorpe Range as part of the Banded 



Ironstone Formation Survey in 2008;  

 



Survey  of  remote  hills  between  Kundip  and  Bandalup  Hill  and  Kundip  Nature  Reserve  by  the 

Ravensthorpe Regional Flora Survey Team in 2008 and 2009. 

 

Approximately 14,870 seeds collected from Population 1 in November 2004 and 2,958 seeds collected 



in December 2009 are stored in Parks and Wildlife’s Threatened Flora Seed Centre (TFSC) at –18

C. 



 

Future recovery actions 

 

Parks  and  Wildlife  is  overseeing  the  implementation  of  this  plan  and,  with  the  assistance  of  the 



ADTFRT,  will  include  information  on  progress  in  annual  reports  to  Parks  and  Wildlife’s  Corporate 

Executive  and  funding  bodies.  Where  recovery  actions  are  implemented  on  lands  other  than  those 

managed  by  Parks  and  Wildlife,  permission  has  been  or  will  be  sought  from  the  appropriate  land 

managers prior to actions being undertaken. The following recovery actions are roughly in order of 

descending  priority,  influenced  by  their  timing  over  the  term  of  the  plan.  However  this  should  not 

constrain addressing any recovery action if funding is available and other opportunities arise. 

 

1.  Coordinate recovery actions 



 

Parks  and  Wildlife  with  assistance  from  the  ADTFRT  will  coordinate  recovery  actions  for  Kunzea 



acicularis  and  include  information  on  progress  in  annual  reports  to  Parks  and  Wildlife’s  Corporate 

Executive and funding bodies. 

 

Action: 

Coordinate recovery actions 



Responsibility: 

Parks and Wildlife (Albany District), with assistance from the ADTFRT 



Cost:  

$8,000 per year 

 

2.  Monitor population 



 

Monitoring of grazing, weed invasion, habitat degradation, population stability (expansion or decline), 

disease, pollinator activity, seed production, recruitment, and longevity will be undertaken. 

 

Action: 

Monitor population 

Responsibility: 

Parks and Wildlife (Albany District), with assistance from the ADTFRT 



Cost:  

$10,000 per year 

 

 

 


 

Interim Recovery Plan for Kunzea acicularis 

 

12 


3.  Ensure long-term protection of habitat 

 

Parks and Wildlife will investigate the possibility of having land containing Kunzea acicularis, reserved 



for the conservation of flora. 

 

Action: 

Ensure long-term protection of habitat 

Responsibility: 

Parks and Wildlife (Albany District, Land Unit), WAPC, Department of Mines and 

Petroleum (DMP) 

Cost:  

$3,000 per year 

 

4.  Determine the susceptibility of Kunzea acicularis to  Phytophthora 



cinnamomi 

 

The level of susceptibility of Kunzea acicularis to Phytophthora cinnamoni is unknown. Plants grown 



from seed will be forwarded to Parks and Wildlife Science and Conservation Division for testing. 

 

Action: 

Determine the susceptibility of Kunzea acicularis to Phytophthora cinnamomi 

Responsibility: 

Parks and Wildlife (Albany District, Science and Conservation Division (SCD)) 



Cost:  

$3,000 in year 1 

 

5.  Undertake regeneration trials 



 

Different techniques should be investigated (i.e. soil disturbance, fire and smoke water), to determine 

the most appropriate method of germinating Kunzea acicularis seed in the wild. Any disturbance trials 

will need to be undertaken in conjunction with weed control. 

 

Action: 

Undertake regeneration trials 



Responsibility: 

Parks and Wildlife (SCD, Albany District) 



Cost:  

$10,000 in years 1 and 3, $4,000 in years 2, 4 and 5 

 

6.  Develop and implement a fire management strategy 



 

A fire management strategy will be developed that recommends fire frequency, intensity, season, and 

control measures. 

 

Action: 

Develop and implement a fire management strategy 

Responsibility: 

Parks and Wildlife (Albany District) 



Cost:  

$10,000 in year 1, and $6,000 in years 2−5 

 

 

 


 

Interim Recovery Plan for Kunzea acicularis 

 

13 


7.  Collect and store seed 

 

Preservation  of  genetic  material  is  essential  to  guard  against  extinction  of  the  species  if  the  wild 



population is lost. It is recommended that seed be collected and stored in the TFSC and BGPA. 

 

Action: 

Collect and store seed 

Responsibility: 

Parks and Wildlife (Albany District, TFSC), BGPA 



Cost:  

$10,000 per year 

 

8.  Undertake surveys 



 

It is recommended that any potential habitat for Kunzea acicularis be surveyed during its flowering 

period. All surveyed areas will be recorded and the presence or absence of the species documented to 

increase survey efficiency and reduce unnecessary duplicate surveys. Where possible, volunteers will 

be involved. 

 

Action: 

Undertake surveys 

Responsibility: 

Parks and Wildlife (Albany District), with assistance from the ADTFRT and 

volunteers 

Cost:  

$10,000 per year 

 

9.  Obtain biological and ecological information 



 

Improved knowledge of the biology and ecology of the species will provide a scientific basis for the 

management of Kunzea acicularis in the wild and and will include: 

 

1.



 

Reproductive strategies, phenology and seasonal growth; 

2.

 

Reproductive success and pollination biology; 



3.

 

Soil  seed  bank  dynamics  and  the  role  of  disturbance,  competition,  drought,  inundation  and 



grazing in recruitment and seedling survival; 

4.

 



Minimum viable population size; and 

5.

 



The impact of changes in hydrology. 

 

Action: 

Obtain biological and ecological information 

Responsibility: 

Parks and Wildlife (SCD, Albany District) 



Cost:  

$50,000 in years 1−3 

 

10.  Undertake and monitor translocations 



 

If  required,  a  translocation  proposal  will  be  developed  and  suitable  translocation  sites  selected. 

Information on the translocation of threatened plants and animals in the wild is provided in Parks and 

Wildlife’s Policy Statement No. 29 Translocation of Threatened Flora and Fauna (CALM 1995) and the 

Australian  Network  for  Plant  Conservation  translocation  guidelines  (Vallee  et  al.  2004).  All 

translocation  proposals  require  endorsement  by  Parks  and  Wildlife’s  Director  of  Science  and 

Conservation. Monitoring of translocations is essential and will be included in the timetable developed 

for the Translocation Proposal. 

 


 

Interim Recovery Plan for Kunzea acicularis 

 

14 


 

Action: 

Undertake and monitor translocations 



Responsibility: 

Parks and Wildlife (SCD, Albany District), BGPA 



Cost:  

$42,000 in years 1 and 2; and $26,500 in years 3−5 as required 

 

11.  Liaise with land managers and Aboriginal communities 



 

Staff  from  Parks  and  Wildlife's  Albany  District  will  liaise  with  land  managers  to  ensure  that  Kunzea 



acicularis  is  not  accidentaly  damaged  or  destroyed  and  the  habitat  is  maintained  in  a  suitable 

condition for the conservation of the species. Aboriginal consultation will take place to determine if 

there are any issues or interests in areas that are habitat for the species. 

 

Action: 

Liaise with land managers and Aboriginal communities 

Responsibility: 

Parks and Wildlife (Albany District) 



Cost:  

$4,000 per year 

 

12.  Map habitat critical to the survival of Kunzea acicularis 



 

Although habitat critical to the survival of the species is alluded to in Section 1, it has not yet been 

mapped. If additional populations are located, habitat critical to their survival will also be determined 

and mapped. 

 

Action: 

Map habitat critical to the survival of Kunzea acicularis 



Responsibility: 

Parks and Wildlife (Species and Communities Branch (SCB), Albany District) 



Cost: 

$6,000 in year 2 

 

13.  Promote awareness 



 

The importance of biodiversity conservation and the protection of Kunzea acicularis will be promoted 

by  setting  up  poster  displays,  developing  and  distributing  an  information  sheet  and  by  developing 

formal links with local naturalist groups and interested individuals. 

 

Action: 

Promote awareness 



Responsibility: 

Parks and Wildlife (Albany District, SCB, Public Information and Corporate Affairs 

(PICA)), with assistance from the ADTFRT 

Cost: 

$7,000 in years 1 and 2; $5,000 in years 3−5 

 

14.  Review this plan and assess the need for further recovery actions 



 

If  Kunzea  acicularis  is  still  ranked  as  VU  at  the  end  of  the  five-year  term  of  this  plan  the  need  for 

further  recovery  actions,  or  a  review  of  this  plan  will  be  assessed  and  a  revised  plan  prepared  if 

necessary. 

 

Action: 

Review this plan and assess the need for further recovery actions 



Responsibility: 

Parks and Wildlife (SCB, Albany District) 



Cost:  

$6,000 in year 5 

 


 

Interim Recovery Plan for Kunzea acicularis 

 

15 


Table 4. Summary of recovery actions 

 

Recovery action 



Priority 

Responsibility 

Completion date 

Coordinate recovery actions 

High 

Parks and Wildlife (Albany District), with 



assistance from the ADTFRT 

Ongoing 


Monitor population 

High 


Parks and Wildlife (Albany District), with 

assistance from the ADTFRT 

Ongoing 

Ensure long-term protection of habitat  High 

Parks and Wildlife (Albany District, Land Unit), 

DOP, DMP 

Ongoing 

Determine the susceptibility of Kunzea 



acicularis to Phytophthora cinnamomi 

High 


Parks and Wildlife (Albany District, SCD) 

2015 


Undertake regeneration trials 

High 


Parks and Wildlife (SCD, Albany District) 

2019 


Develop and implement a fire 

management strategy 

High 

Parks and Wildlife (Albany District) 



Developed by 2015 

with implementation 

ongoing 

Collect and store seed 

High 

Parks and Wildlife (Albany District, TFSC), 



BGPA 

2019 


Undertake surveys 

High 


Parks and Wildlife (Albany District),with 

assistance from the ADTFRT and volunteers 

Ongoing 

Obtain biological and ecological 

information 

High 


Parks and Wildlife (SCD, Albany District) 

2017 


Undertake and monitor translocations 

Medium 


Parks and Wildlife (SCD, Albany District), BGPA  2019 

Liaise with land managers and 

Aboriginal communities 

Medium 


Parks and Wildlife (Albany District) 

Ongoing 


Map habitat critical to the survival of 

Kunzea acicularis 

Medium 


Parks and Wildlife (SCB, Albany District) 

2016 


Promote awareness 

Medium 


Parks and Wildlife (Albany District, SCB, PICA), 

with assistance from the ADTFRT 

2019 

Review this plan and assess the need 



for further recovery actions 

Medium 


Parks and Wildlife (SCB, Albany District) 

2019 


 

4. Term of plan 

 

This  plan  will  operate  from  June  2014  to  May  2019  but  will  remain  in  force  until  withdrawn  or 



replaced. If the species is still ranked VU after five years, the need for further recovery actions will be 

determined. 

 

5. References 



 

Department  of  Conservation  and  Land  Management  (1992)  Policy  Statement  No.  44  Wildlife 



Management Programs. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia. 

Department of Conservation and Land Management (1994) Policy Statement No. 50 Setting Priorities 



for  the  Conservation  of  Western  Australia’s  Threatened  Flora  and  Fauna.  Department  of 

Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia. 

Department of Conservation and Land Management (1995) Policy Statement No. 29 Translocation of 

Threatened  Flora  and  Fauna.  Department  of  Conservation  and  Land  Management,  Western 

Australia. 

Government  of  Australia  (1999)  Endangered  Species  Protection  Act  1999.  Government  Printer, 

Canberra. 



 

Interim Recovery Plan for Kunzea acicularis 

 

16 


International Union for Conservation of Nature (2001) IUCN Red List Categories: Version 3.1. Prepared 

by the IUCN Species Survival Commission. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK. 

Toelken,  H.R.  and Craig,  G.F.  (2007)  Kunzea  acicularis,  K.  strigosa  and  K.  similis  subsp.  mediterranea 

(Myrtaceae) - new taxa from near Ravensthorpe, Western Australia. Nuytsia 17: 385−396. 

Vallee, L., Hogbin, T., Monks, L., Makinson, B., Matthes, M. and Rossetto, M. (2004) Guidelines for the 

Translocation of Threatened Australian Plants. Second Edition. The Australian Network for Plant 



Conservation. Canberra, Australia. 

Western Australian Herbarium (1998−) FloraBase − the Western Australian Flora. Department of Parks 

and Wildlife. http://florabase.dpaw.wa.gov.au/. 

 

6. Taxonomic description 



 

Kunzea acicularis 

 

Toelken,  H.R.  and  Craig,  G.F.  (2007)  Kunzea  acicularis,  K.  strigosa  and  K.  similis  subsp.  mediterranea 



(Myrtaceae) - new taxa from near Ravensthorpe, Western Australia. Nuytsia 17: 385−396. 

 

Shrub to 2m tall, with few erect stems each little- and irregularly- branched often with short branches; 

young branches with flanges indistinct and usually only along part of the internodes, densely covered 

with  fine  (long  and  short)  spreading  hairs;  early  bark  longitudinally  irregularly  fissured,  fibrous-

peeling, grey. Leavespetiole 0.3–0.7mm long, more or less appressed; lamina oblanceolate to elliptic-

oblanceolate, (2.4–)3.5–6(–8.2) x (1.2–)1.5–2.2(–2.6)mm, obtuse to rounded, rarely acute when young, 

gradually  constricted  into  petiole,  concave  with  lateral  margins  more  or  less  incurved  or  rarely  flat 

above, slightly convex to ridged below, somewhat appressed on long shoots, spreading on short ones, 

densely covered with long fine hairs on both surfaces and spreading about right angles (60–90°) when 

mature. Inflorescence a botryum with (1–)3–5(–6) flowers, terminal on short or rarely on long shoots, 

with  mainly  terminal  growth  after  flowering  but  sometimes  especially  on  short  shoots  immediately 

branching above botryum; perules usually few and sometimes caducous, triangular often narrowly so, 

1.8–2.5mm, pointed, with one central vein, densely covered outside with more or less spreading hairs; 

bracts  narrowly  triangular,  2.8–3.3(–3.5)  x 0.9–1.3mm,  pointed,  usually  with  one  vein  from  the  base, 

more or less densely covered outside with spreading hairs but often wearing off towards the apex; 



bracteoles in pairs, linear-triangular to linear, 3.1–3.6 x 0.25–0.50mm, pointed, with one central vein, 

densely covered outside with long spreading hairs. Hypanthium 3.3–3.8mm long when flowering (free 

tube  1.4–2.2mm  long),  densely  covered  with  spreading  antrorse  hairs.  Calyx  lobes  triangular  to 

triangular-lanceolate, 1.5–1.8 mm long, acute to pointed, margins slightly incurved, densely covered 

outside with long antrorse hairs, rarely becoming glabrous towards the apex. Corolla lobes orbicular, 

3.3–4mm long, with claw almost absent, pink to mauve. Stamens c.26 in more than on whorl, usually 

longer than corolla lobes; filaments 4.9–6.8mm long; anthers 0.4–0.5mm long, with large subterminal 

gland. Ovary with 5 locules, surmounted by a style base partly sunk in to the upper surface; placenta a 

narrowly  elliptic  disc,  little  fleshy,  with  ascending  attachment  connected  to  middle,  with  lobes  only 

connate on the outside margins each lobe with one row of ovules; ovules 9–12 per locule, spreading 

or lower ones pendulous and often slightly longer; style 5.8–6.6mm long, scarcely broadened towards 

the  base;  stigma  capitate  and  little  depressed  at  apex,  often  at  a  slight  angle.  Fruit  an  urceolate 

capsule, usually with 5 vertical ridges partly hidden in the tomentum, with calyx lobes spreading. Seed 

unknown.


 


Yüklə 441,05 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə