International clinical guidelines



Yüklə 0,69 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə5/8
tarix13.12.2016
ölçüsü0,69 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8

(B:II)  

•  ÜST t r find n a a ıdakı antibiotik müalic si tövsiyy  olunur: 

o

  T k doza azitromisin: 16 ya dan a a ı u aqlarda 20 mq/kq (maksimal doza 1 gr.); 



böyükl rd  1 gr-dır. (A:I) 

o

  V  yaxud hamil  qadınlarda, 6 aydan kiçik u aqlarda, h mçinin makrolidl r  



allergiyası olan  xsl rd  6 h ft  müdd tind  günd  2 d f  olmaqla 1%-li tetrasiklin 

göz m lh mini h r iki göz  istifad  etm li (A:I) 

o

  Traxoma üçün endemik regionlarda laborator t sdiql nm  olmadan bel  follikulyar 



konyunktivitl rin müalic si h yata keçiril  bil r (A:I) 

•  Üzün gigiyenası: üzü t miz su il  yumaq üçün  rait yaratmalı. Üzün t miz olması traxomanın 

olmamasına z man t vermir v  üzün gigiyenasına riay t etdikd  bel  traxomanın aktiv formalarına 

rast g lm k olar. (B:II) 

• 

traf mühitin abadla dırılması: (su t minatını t kmill dirm li, ayaqyoluların t mizliyi v  milç kl r  



n zar t). Musca sorbens cinsind n olan milç kl r traxomanın yayılmasında xüsusi rol oynayırlar. 

(B:II)  


 

Sonrakı müayin l r 

 

•  ÜST üç ild n bir t krar qiym tl ndirm  il  illik icma müalic sini tövsiyy  edir. (B:II)  



•  Unutmayin ki, infeksiyanın qar ısı alındıqdan sonra bel  follikulların tam t mizl nm si üçün aylar 

t l b oluna bil r v  follikulların sorulması l ng ged rs , sonuncu müalic nin müdd ti n z r  

alınmaqla t krar müalic  bar d  dü ünm li. (B:II)  

•  Müalic d n 1 ay sonra x st ni mü ahid  etm li v  lazım olarsa, t krar müalic  etm li 

•  Yenid n yoluxma ad t n endemik zonalarda ba  verdiyind n, x st l ri yoluxmanın qar ısını ala 

bıl c k t dbirl r bard  m lumatlandırmalı (C:III) 

•  Trixiaz c rrahiyy sind n sonrakı 2 h ft  müdd tind  tiki l r sökülm li v  trixiazın qayıtmamasına 

min olmaq üçün ild  bir d f  x st l ri müayin  etm li (A:III) 

 

 

 



 

 


ICO International Clinical Guidelines 

 

 



This document contains 19 International Clinical Guidelines defined by the International Council 

of Ophthalmology (ICO). 

 

The Guidelines are designed to be translated and adapted by ophthalmologic societies to help 



ophthalmologists assess how they are treating patients. They are intended to serve a supportive and 

educational role and ultimately to improve the quality of eye care for patients. 

 

  

List of Guidelines Available  



•  Age-related Macular Degeneration (Initial and Follow-up Evaluation)  

•  Age-related Macular Degeneration (Management Recommendations) 

•  Amblyopia (Initial and Follow-up Evaluation) 

•  Bacterial Keratitis (Initial Evaluation) 

•  Bacterial Keratitis (Management Recommendations) 

•  Blepharitis (Initial and Follow-up Evaluation) 

•  Cataract (Initial Evaluation) 

•  Conjunctivitis (Initial Evaluation) 

•  Diabetic Retinopathy (Initial and Follow-up Evaluation) 

•  Diabetic Retinopathy (Management Recommendations) 

•  Dry Eye (Initial Evaluation) 

•  Esotropia (Initial and Follow-up Evaluation) 

•  Eye Disease in Leprosy (Initial Evaluation and Management) 

•  Posterior Vitreous Detachment, Retinal Breaks and Lattice Degeneration (Initial and Follow-up 

Evaluation) 

•  Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma (Initial Evaluation) 

•  Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma (Follow-up Evaluation) 

•  Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma Suspect (Initial and Follow-up Evaluation) 

•  Primary Angle Closure (Initial Evaluation and Therapy) 

•  Trachoma 

 

Preface to the Guidelines 



 

International Clinical Guidelines are prepared and distributed by the International Council of 

Ophthalmology on behalf of the International Federation of Ophthalmological Societies. 

 

These Guidelines are to serve a supportive and educational role for ophthalmologists worldwide. 



These guidelines are intended to improve the quality of eye care for patients. They have been adapted in 

many cases from similar documents (Benchmarks of Care) created by the American Academy of 

Ophthalmology based on their Preferred Practice Patterns. 

 

While it is tempting to equate these to Standards, it is impossible and inappropriate to do so. The 



multiple circumstances of geography, equipment availability, patient variation and practice settings 

preclude a single standard. 

 

Guidelines on the other hand are a clear statement of expectations. These include comments of the 



preferred level of performance assuming conditions that allow the use of optimum equipment, 

pharmaceuticals and/or surgical circumstances. 

 


 

Thus, a basic expectation is created and if the situation is optimum, the optimum facets of 

diagnosis, treatment and follow up may be employed. Excellent, appropriate and successful care can also 

be provided where optimum conditions do not exist. 

 

Simply following the Guidelines does not guarantee a successful outcome. It is understood that, 



given the uniqueness of a patient and his or her particular circumstance, physician judgment must be 

employed. This can result in a modification in application of a guideline in individual situations. 

 

Medical experience has been relied upon in the preparation of these guidelines, and they are 



whenever possible, evidence-based. This means these Guidelines are based on the latest available 

scientific information. The ICO is committed to provide updates of these guidelines on a regular basis 

(approximately every two to three years). 

 

Age-Related Macular Degeneration  



(Initial and Follow-up Evaluation) 

 

(Ratings: A: Most important, B: Moderately important, C: Relevant but not critical 



Strength of Evidence: I: Strong, II: Substantial but lacks some of I, III: consensus of expert opinion in 

absence of evidence for I & II) 

 

Initial Exam History (Key elements) 



•  Symptoms (metamorphopsia, decreased vision) (A:II) 

•  Medications and nutritional supplements (B:III) 

•  Ocular history (B:II) 

•  Systemic history (any hypersensitivity reactions) (B:II) 

•  Family history, especially family history of AMD (B:II) 

•  Social history, especially smoking (B:II) 

 

Initial Physical Exam (Key elements) 



•  Visual acuity (A:III) 

•  Stereo biomicroscopic examination of the macula (A:I) 

Ancillary Tests 

Intravenous fundus fluorescein angiography in the clinical setting of AMD is indicated: (A:I) 

o

  when patient complains of new metamorphopsia 



o

  when patient has unexplained blurred vision 

o

  when clinical exam reveals elevation of the RPE or retina, subretinal blood, hard exudates 



or subretinal fibrosis  

o

  to detect the presence of and determine the extent, type, size, and location of CVN and to 



calculate the percentage of the lesion composed of or consisting of classic CNV 

o

  to guide treatment (laser photocoagulation surgery or verteporfin PDT) 



o

  to detect persistent or recurrent CNV following treatment 

o

  to assist in determining the cause of visual loss that is not explained by clinical exam 



Each angiographic facility must have a care plan or an emergency plan and a protocol to minimize the 

risk and manage any complications. (A:III)   



Follow-up Exam History 

• 

Visual symptoms, including decreased vision and metamorphopsia (A:II) 



• 

Changes in medications and nutritional supplements (B:III) 

• 

Interval ocular history (B:III) 



• 

Interval systemic history (B:III) 

• 

Changes in social history, especially smoking (B:II) 



 

Follow-up Physical Exam 

• 

Visual acuity (A:III) 



• 

Stereo biomicroscopic examination of the fundus (A:III) 

 

Surgical and Postoperative Care for Patients Receiving Thermal Laser Surgery, 



Photodynamic Therapy (PDT), or Intravitreal Injections 

• 

Discuss risks, benefits and complications with the patient and obtain informed consent (A:III) 



• 

For thermal laser surgery and PDT, treat within 1 week after fluorescein angiography (A:I) 

• 

Examine at 2 to 4 weeks after initial thermal laser surgery to confirm that CVN has been 



obliterated and perform fluorescein angiography (A:I)  

• 

Examine at 4 to 6 weeks after thermal laser surgery and perform fluorescein angiography, and 



thereafter, depending on clinical findings and judgment (A:I)  

• 

Examine and perform fluorescein angiography at least every 3 months for up to 2 years after 



verteporfin PDT (A:I) 

• 

Examine with retreatments as indicated every 4 to 8 weeks after intravitreal injections (see table) 



(A:III) 

 

Patient Education 



• 

Educate patients about the prognosis and potential value of treatment as appropriate for their 

ocular and functional status. (A:III) 

• 

Encourage patients with early AMD to have regular dilated eye exams for early detection of 



intermediate AMD. (A:III) 

• 

Educate patients with intermediate AMD about methods of detecting new symptoms of CVN and 



about the need for prompt notification to an ophthalmologist. (A:III) 

• 

Instruct patients with unilateral disease to monitor their vision in their fellow eye and to return 



periodically even in absence of symptoms, but promptly after onset of new or significant visual 

symptoms. (A:III) 

• 

For patients with CVN for whom treatment may be indicated, counsel as follows: (A:III) 



treatment will reduce, but not eliminate the risk of severe visual loss; thermal laser surgery will 

produce permanent scotomas and explain anticipated effect of scotoma on central visual function; 

verteporfin PDT and pegaptanib sodium treatment will reduce risk of moderate and severe visual 

loss, but most patients will still lose some vision over 2 years, and improvement in visual acuity is 

unusual; there is a high risk of CNV persistence or recurrence after thermal laser surgery that could 

require additional laser surgery, and this risk is greatest in the first year; and multiple fluorescein 

angiograms are necessary for appropriate follow-up.  

• 

 Refer patients with reduced visual function for vision rehabilitation (see www.aao.org/smartsight) 



and social services. (A:III) 

 

Age-related Macular Degeneration  

(Management Recommendations) 

 

(Ratings: A: Most important, B: Moderately important, C: Relevant but not critical 



Strength of Evidence: I: Strong, II: Substantial but lacks some of I, III: consensus of expert opinion in 

absence of evidence for I & II) 

 

Treatment Recommendations and Follow-up Plans for  



Age-related Macular Degeneration 

Recommended 

Treatment 

Diagnoses Eligible for 

Treatment 

Follow-up Recommendations 

Observation with no 

medical or surgical 

therapies (A:I)  

No clinical signs of AMD 

(AREDS category 1) 

 

Early AMD (AREDS category 



2) 

 

Advanced AMD with bilateral 



subfoveal geographic atrophy or 

disciform scars 

As recommended in the Comprehensive 

Adult Medical Eye Evaluation PPP 

(A:III) 

 

Return exam at 6 to 24 months if 



asymptomatic or prompt exam for new 

symptoms suggestive of CVN (A:III) 

 

No fundus photos or fluorescein 



angiography unless symptomatic (A:I) 

Antioxidant vitamin and 

mineral supplements as 

recommended in the 

AREDS reports (A:I) 

Intermediate AMD (AREDS 

category 3) 

Advanced AMD in one eye 

(AREDS category 4) 

Monitoring of monocular near vision 

(reading/Amsler grid) (A:III) 

 

Return exam at 6 to 24 months if 



asymptomatic or prompt exam for new 

symptoms suggestive of CVN (A:III) 

 

Fundus photography as appropriate 



 

Fluorescein angiography if there is 

evidence of edema or other signs and 

symptoms of CVN 

Thermal laser 

photocoagulation 

surgery as recommended 

in the MPS reports (A:I)    

Extrafoveal classic CNV, new 

or recurrent 

 

Juxtafoveal classic CNV 



 

May be considered for new or 

recurrent subfoveal CNV if the 

lesion is less than 2 MPS disc 

areas and the vision is 20/125 or 

Return exam with fluorescein 

angiography approximately 2 to 4 weeks 

after treatment, and then at 4 to 6 weeks 

and thereafter depending on the clinical 

and angiographic findings (A:III) 

 

Retreatments as indicated 



 

Monitoring of monocular near vision 



worse, especially if PDT is 

contraindicated or not available 

 

May be considered for 



juxtapapillary CVN 

(reading/Amsler grid) (A:III)  

PDT with verteporfin as 

recommended in the 

TAP and VIP reports 

(A:I) 


Subfoveal CNV, new or 

recurrent, where the classic 

component is  >50% of the 

lesion and the entire lesion is 



<5400 microns in greatest linear 

diameter 

 

Occult CNV may be considered 



for PDT with vision <20/50 or 

if the CVN is <4 MPS disc 

areas in size when the vision is 

>20/50 


Return exam approximately every 3 

months until stable, with retreatments as 

indicated (A:III) 

 

Fluorescein angiography or other 



imaging as indicated 

 

Monitoring of monocular near vision 



(reading/Amsler grid) (A:III) 

Pegaptanib sodium 

intravitreal injection as 

recommended in 

pegaptanib sodium 

literature (A:I) 

Subfoveal CNV, new or 

recurrent, for predominantly 

classic lesions <12 MPS disc 

area in size 

 

Minimally classic, or occult 



with no classic lesions where 

the entire lesion is <12 disc 

areas in size, subretinal 

hemorrhage associated with 

CVN comprises <50% of 

lesion, and/or there is lipid 

present, and/or the patient has 

lost 15 or more letters of visual 

acuity during the previous 12 

weeks 


Patients should be instructed to report 

any symptoms suggestive of 

endophthalmitis without delay, 

including eye pain or increased 

discomfort, worsening eye redness, 

blurred or decreased vision, increased 

sensitivity to light, or increased number 

of floaters (A:III) 

 

Return exam with retreatments every 6 



weeks as indicated (A:III) 

 

Monitoring of monocular near vision 



(reading/Amsler grid) (A:III) 

Ranibizumab intravitreal 

injection 0.5 mg as 

recommended in 

ranibizumab literature 

(A:I) 


Subfoveal CNV 

Patients should be instructed to report 

any symptoms suggestive of 

endophthalmitis without delay, 

including eye pain or increased 

discomfort, worsening eye redness, 

blurred or decreased vision, increased 

sensitivity to light, or increased number 

of floaters (A:III) 

 

Return exam with retreatments every 4 



weeks as indicated (A:III) 

 


Monitoring of monocular near vision 

(reading/Amsler grid) (A:III) 

 

 

Bevacizumab intravitreal 



injection as described in 

published reports (A:III)  

                    

The ophthalmologist 

should provide 

appropriate informed 

consent with respect to 

the off-label status 

(A:III) 

Subfoveal CNV 

Patients should be instructed to report 

any symptoms suggestive of 

endophthalmitis without delay, 

including eye pain or increased 

discomfort, worsening eye redness, 

blurred or decreased vision, increased 

sensitivity to light, or increased number 

of floaters (A:III) 

 

Return exam with retreatments every 4 



to 8 weeks as indicated (A:III) 

 

Monitoring of monocular near vision 



(reading/Amsler grid) (A:III) 

 

NOTE: If patients treated with thermal laser photocoagulation surgery, verteporfin PDT, or intravitreal 



injections notice visual loss or change prior to the next scheduled visit, return evaluation that may 

include angiography is recommended. (A:III) 

AMD = Age-related Macular Degeneration; AREDS = Age-related Eye Disease Study; CNV = 

choroidal neovascularization; MPS = Macular Photocoagulation Study; PDT = photodynamic therapy; 

TAP = Treatment of Age-related Macular Degeneration with Photodynamic Therapy; VIP = Verteporfin 

in Photodynamic Therapy 

Amblyopia (Initial and Follow-up Evaluation) 

 

(Ratings: A: Most important, B: Moderately important, C: Relevant but not critical 



Strength of Evidence: I: Strong, II: Substantial but lacks some of I, III: consensus of expert opinion in 

absence of evidence for I & II) 

 

Initial Exam History (Key elements) 



• 

Ocular symptoms and signs (A:III) 

• 

Ocular history (A:III) 



• 

Systemic history, including review of prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal medical factors (A:III) 

• 

Family history, including eye conditions and relevant systemic diseases (A:III) 



 

Initial Physical Exam (Key elements) 

• 

Visual acuity (A:III) 



• 

Assessment of fixation pattern (A:III) 

• 

Pupil reactivity and function (A:III) 



• 

Ocular alignment and motility (A:III) 

• 

External examination: lids, lashes, lacrimal apparatus, orbit, face (A:III) 



• 

Evaluation of the fundus (including posterior pole of retina) (A:III) 

• 

Cycloplegic refraction (A:III) 



 

Care Management 

• 

Provide ongoing management until approximately age 10 years. (A:III) 



• 

Choose treatment to meet the patient's visual, physical, social and psychological needs and based 

on potential risks and benefits for the patient. (A:III) 

• 

Treatment goal is to achieve equalization/normalization of fixation patterns or visual acuity. 



(A:III) 

• 

Once maximal visual acuity has been obtained, treatment should be tapered or stopped. (A:III) 



 

Follow-up Evaluation 

• 

Follow-up visits should include: 



o

  Amount of occlusion and /or spectacle wear achieved by report (A:III) 

o

  Side effects (e.g., skin irritation, ocular redness, flushing and psychosocial issues) (A:III) 



o

  Visual acuity or fixation of each eye (A:III) 

o

  Ocular alignment (A:III) 



o

  Repeat cycloplegic refraction, as indicated (at least yearly, and 4-6 month intervals may be 

necessary) (A:III) 

 

Amblyopia Follow-up Evaluation Intervals During Active Treatment Period (A:III) 



Age 

(years) 


High Percentage 

Occlusion 

(>70% of waking 

time) 


Low Percentage 

Occlusion 

(>70% of waking time) 

or Penalization 

Maintenance Treatment or 

Observation 

0-1 

Days to 4 weeks 



2-8 weeks 

1-4 months 

1-2 

2-8 weeks 



2-4 months 

2-4 months 

2-3 

3-12 weeks 



2-4 months 

2-4 months 

3-4 

4-16 weeks 



2-6 months 

2-6 months 

4-5 

4-16 weeks 



2-6 months 

2-6 months 

5-7 

6-16 weeks 



2-6 months 

2-6 months 

7-9 

8-16 weeks 



3-6 months 

3-12 months 

Over 9 

8-16 weeks 



3-6 months 

6-12 months 



 

Patient Education 

• 

Discuss diagnosis, severity of disease, prognosis and treatment plan with patient, parents and /or 



caregivers. (A:III) 

• 

Develop a team approach with the patient, family/caregiver and others such as teachers or day-care 



providers, giving attention to visual, psychological, social and economic factors, and assuring that 

they understand the disease process, rationale and goals of treatments, and the benefits and 

complications. (A:III) 

• 

Discuss potential psychological side effects with the parent/caregiver. (A:III) 



• 

Explain the importance of monitoring and long-term follow-up of the problem with the 

parent/caregiver and patient. (A:III) 

 

Bacterial Keratitis (Initial Evaluation) 



 

(Ratings: A: Most important, B: Moderately important, C: Relevant but not critical 

Strength of Evidence: I: Strong, II: Substantial but lacks some of I, III: consensus of expert opinion in 

absence of evidence for I & II) 

 

Initial Exam History  



• 

Ocular symptoms (A:III) 

• 

Circumstances surrounding onset of symptoms (A:III) 



• 

Prior ocular history (A:III) 

• 

Systemic history (A:III) 



• 

Current ocular medications and medications recently used (A:III) 

• 

Medication allergies (A:III) 



 

Initial Physical Exam 

• 

General appearance of patient (B:III) 



• 

Facial examination (B:III) 

• 

Visual acuity (A:III) 



• 

Eyelids and eyelid closure (A:III) 

• 

Conjunctiva (A:III) 



• 

Nasolacrimal apparatus (B:III) 

• 

Corneal sensation (A:III) 



• 

Slit-Lamp biomicroscopy 

o

 

Eyelid margins (A:III) 



Yüklə 0,69 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə