International clinical guidelines



Yüklə 0,69 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə6/8
tarix13.12.2016
ölçüsü0,69 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8


o

 

Conjunctiva (A:III) 



o

 

Sclera (A:III) 



o

 

Cornea (A:III) 



o

 

Anterior chamber (A:III) 



o

 

Anterior vitreous (A:III) 



Diagnostic Tests 

• 

Manage majority of community-acquired cases with empiric therapy and without smears or 



cultures. (A:III) 

• 

Indications for smears and cultures: 

o

  Sight-threatening or severe keratitis of suspected microbial origin prior to initiating therapy 



(A:III) 

o

  A large corneal infiltrate that extends to the middle to deep stroma (A:III)  



o

  Chronic in nature (A:III) 

o

  Unresponsive to broad spectrum antibiotic therapy (A:III) 



o

  Clinical features suggestive of fungal, amoebic, or mycobacterial keratitis (A:III) 

• 

The hypopyon that occurs in eyes with bacterial keratitis is usually sterile, and aqueous or vitreous 



taps should not be performed unless there is a high suspicion of microbial endophthalmitis. (A:III) 

• 

Corneal scrapings for culture and smears should be inoculated directly onto appropriate culture 



media and slides in order to maximize culture yield. (A:III). If this is not feasible, place specimens 

in transport media. (A:III). In either case, immediately incubate cultures or take promptly to the 

laboratory. (A:III) 

 

Care Management 



• 

Topical antibiotic eye drops are preferred method in most cases. (A:III) 

• 

Use topical broad-spectrum antibiotics initially in the empiric treatment of presumed bacterial 



keratitis. (A:III) 

• 

For severe keratitis (deep stromal involvement or a defect larger than 2 mm with extensive 



suppuration), use a loading dose every 5 to 15 minutes for the first hour, followed by applications 

every 15 minutes to 1 hour around the clock. (A:III) For less severe keratitis, a regimen with less 

frequent dosing is appropriate. (A:III) 

• 

Use systemic therapy for gonococcal keratitis. (A:III) 



• 

In general, modify initial therapy when there is a lack of improvement or stabilization within 48 

hours. (A:III) 

• 

For patients treated with ocular topical corticosteroids at time of suspected bacterial keratitis, 



reduce or eliminate corticosteroids until infection has been controlled. (A:III) 

• 

When the corneal infiltrate compromises the visual axis, may add topical corticosteroid therapy 



following at least 2 to 3 days of progressive improvement with topical antibiotics. (A:III) 

Continue topical antibiotics at high levels with gradual tapering. (A:III) 

• 

Examine patients within 1 to 2 days after initiation of topical corticosteroid therapy. (A:III) 



 

Bacterial Keratitis  

(Management Recommendations) 

 

(Ratings: A: Most important, B: Moderately important, C: Relevant but not critical 



Strength of Evidence: I: Strong, II: Substantial but lacks some of I, III: consensus of expert opinion in 

absence of evidence for I & II) 

 

Follow-up Evaluation 



• 

Frequency depends on extent of disease, but follow severe cases initially at least daily until clinical 

improvement or stabilization is documented. (A:III) 

 


Patient Education 

• 

Educate about the destructive nature of bacterial keratitis and need for strict compliance with 



therapy. (A:III) 

• 

Discuss possibility of permanent visual loss and need for future visual rehabilitation. (A:III) 



• 

Educate patients with contact lenses about increased risk of infection associated with contact lens, 

overnight wear, and importance of adherence to techniques to promote contact lens hygiene. 

(A:III) 


• 

Refer patients with significant visual impairment or blindness for vision rehabilitation if they are 

not surgical candidates. (A:III)  

Antibiotic Therapy of Bacterial Keratitis [A:III] 

Organism 

Antibiotic  

Topical 

Concentration 

Subconjunctival Dose 

No organism 

identified or 

multiple types 

of organisms 

Cefazolin with 

Tobramycin / 

Gentamicin or 

Fluoroquinolones 

50 mg/ml 

9-14 mg/ml 

 

3 or 5 mg/ml 



100 mg in 0.5 ml 

 

20 mg in 0.5 ml 



Gram-positive 

Cocci 


Cefazolin 

Vancomycin* 

Bacitracin* 

Moxifloxacin or 

Gatifloxacin 

50 mg/ml 

15-50 mg/ml 

10,000 IU 

 

3 or 5 mg/ml 



100 mg in 0.5 ml 

25 mg in 0.5 ml 

Gram-negative 

Rods 


Tobramycin 

/Gentamicin 

Ceftazidime 

Fluoroquinolones 

9-14 mg/ml 

50 mg/ml 

3 or 5 mg/ml 

20 mg in 0.5 ml 

100 mg in 0.5 ml 

Gram-negative 

Cocci** 

Ceftriaxone 

Ceftazidime 

Fluoroquinolones 

50 mg/ml 

50 mg/ml 

3 or 5 mg/ml 

100 mg in 0.5 ml 

100 mg in 0.5 ml 

Non-


tuberculous 

Mycobacteria  

Amikacin 

Clarithromycin*** 

Fluoroquinolones 

20-40 mg/ml 

 

3 or 5 mg/ml 



20 mg in 0.5 ml 

Nocardia 

Amikacin 

Trimethoprim/Sulfa 

methoxazole: 

Trimethoprim 

Sulfamethoxazole 

20-40 mg/ml 

 

 

16 mg/ml 



80mg/ml 

20 mg in 0.5 ml  

* For resistant Enterococcus and Staphylococcus species and penicillin allergy. Vancomycin and 

Bacitracin have no gram-negative activity and should not be used as a single agent empirically in treating 

bacterial keratitis. 


** Systemic therapy is necessary for suspected gonococcal infection. 

*** Dosage for oral systemic therapy in adults is 500 mg every 12 hours. Topical therapy has had some 

success but the medication is irritating and clinical experience is limited. 

Blepharitis (Initial and Follow-up Evaluation) 

 

(Ratings: A: Most important, B: Moderately important, C: Relevant but not critical 



Strength of Evidence: I: Strong, II: Substantial but lacks some of I, III: consensus of expert opinion in 

absence of evidence for I & II) 

 

Initial Exam History 



• 

Ocular symptoms and signs (A:III) 

• 

Duration of symptoms (A:III) 



• 

Unilateral or bilateral presentation (A:III) 

• 

Exacerbating conditions (e.g., smoke, allergens, wind, contact lens, low humidity, retinoids, diet, 



alcohol) (A:III) 

• 

Symptoms related to systemic diseases (e.g., rosacea, allergy) (A:III) 



• 

Current and previous systemic and topical medications (A:III) 

• 

Recent exposure to an infected individual (e.g., pediculosis) (C:III) 



• 

Ocular history (e.g., previous ophthalmic surgery and trauma, including radiation and chemical 

trauma) (A:III) 

• 

Systemic history (e.g., dermatological diseases, such as acne, rosacea and eczema and medications 



such as isotretinoin) (A:III) 

 

Initial Physical Exam 



• 

Visual acuity (A:III) 

• 

External examination 



o

  Skin (A:III) 

o

  Eyelids (A:I) 



• 

Slit-lamp biomicroscopy  

o

  Tear film (A:III) 



o

  Anterior eyelid margin (A:III) 

o

  Eyelashes (A:III) 



o

  Posterior eyelid margin (A:III) 

o

  Tarsal conjunctiva (A:III) 



o

  Bulbar conjunctiva (A:III) 

o

  Cornea (A:III) 



 

Diagnostic Tests 

• 

Cultures may be indicated for patients with recurrent anterior blepharitis with severe inflammation 



as well as for patients who are not responding to therapy. (A:III) 

• 

Biopsy of the eyelid to exclude the possibility of carcinoma may be indicated in cases of marked 



asymmetry, resistance to therapy or unifocal recurrent chalazion that do not respond well to 

therapy. (A:II) 



• 

Consult with the pathologist prior to obtaining the biopsy if sebaceous cell carcinoma is 

suspected.(A:II) 

 

Care Management 



• 

Treat patients with blepharitis initially with a regimen of eyelid hygiene. (A:III) 

• 

For patients with staphylococcal blepharitis, a topical antibiotic such as erythromycin can be 



prescribed to be applied one or more times daily on the eyelids for one or more weeks. (A:III) 

• 

For patients with meibomian gland dysfunction, whose chronic symptoms and signs are not 



adequately controlled with eyelid hygiene, oral tetracyclines can be prescribed. (A:III) 

• 

A brief course of topical corticosteroids may be helpful for eyelid or ocular surface inflammation. 



The minimal effective dose of corticosteroids should be utilized and long-term corticosteroid 

therapy should be avoided if possible. (A:III) 

 

Follow-up Evaluation 



• 

Follow-up visits should include: 

o

  Interval history (A:III) 



o

  Visual acuity (A:III) 

o

  External exam (A:III) 



o

  Slit-lamp biomicroscopy (A:III) 

 

Patient Education 



• 

Counsel patients about the chronicity and recurrence of the disease process. (A:III) 

• 

Inform patients that symptoms can frequently be improved but are rarely eliminated. (A:III)  



 

Cataract (Initial and Follow-up Evaluation) 

 

(Ratings: A: Most important, B: Moderately important, C: Relevant but not critical 



Strength of Evidence: I: Strong, II: Substantial but lacks some of I, III: consensus of expert opinion in 

absence of evidence for I & II) 

 

Initial Exam History 



• 

Symptoms (A:II) 

• 

Ocular history (A:III) 



• 

Systemic history (A:III) 

• 

Assessment of visual functional status (A:II) 



 

Initial Physical Exam 

• 

Visual acuity, with current correction (A:III) 



• 

Measurement of BCVA (with refraction when indicated) (A:III) 

• 

Ocular alignment and motility(A:III) 



• 

Pupil reactivity and function (A:III) 

• 

Measurement of IOP (A:III) 



• 

External examination (A:III) 



• 

Slit-lamp biomicroscopy (A:III) 

• 

Evaluation of the fundus (through a dilated pupil) (A:III) 



• 

Assessment of relevant aspects of general and mental health (B:III) 

 

Care Management 



• 

Treatment is indicated when visual function no longer meets the patient's needs and cataract 

surgery provides a reasonable likelihood of improvement. (A:II) 

• 

Cataract removal is also indicated when there is evidence of lens-induced diseases or when it is 



necessary to visualize the fundus in an eye that has the potential for sight. (A:III) 

• 

Surgery should not be performed under the following circumstances: (A:III) glasses or visual aids 



provide vision that meets the patient's needs’, surgery will not improve visual function; the patient 

cannot safely undergo surgery because of coexisting medical or ocular conditions; appropriate 

postoperative care cannot be obtained. 

• 

Indications for second eye surgery are the same as for the first eye. (A:II) (with consideration 



given to the needs for binocular function) 

 

Preoperative Care 



Ophthalmologist who is to perform the surgery has the following responsibilities:  

• 

Examine the patient preoperatively (A:III) 



• 

Ensure that the evaluation accurately documents symptoms, findings and indications for treatment 

(A:III) 

• 

Inform the patient about the risks, benefits and expected outcomes of surgery  (A:III) 



• 

Formulate surgical plan, including selection of an IOL (A:III) 

• 

Review results of presurgical and diagnostic evaluations with the patient (A:III) 



• 

Formulate postoperative plans and inform patient of arrangements (A:III) 

 

Follow-up Evaluation 



• 

High-risk patients should be seen within 24 hours of surgery. (A:III) 

• 

Routine patients should be seen within 48 hours of surgery. (A:III) 



• 

Components of each postoperative exam should include: 

o

   Interval history, including new symptoms and use of postoperative medications (A:III) 



o

  Patient's assessment of visual functional status (A:III) 

o

  Assessment of visual function (visual acuity, pinhole testing) (A:III) 



o

  Measurement of IOP (A:III) 

o

  Slit-lamp biomicroscopy (A:III) 



 

Nd:YAG Laser Capsulotomy 

• 

Treatment is indicated when vision impaired by posterior capsular opacification does not meet the 



patient's functional needs or when it critically interferes with visualization of the fundus. (A:III) 

• 

Educate about the symptoms of posterior vitreous detachment, retinal tears and detachment and 



need for immediate examination if these symptoms are noticed. (A:III) 

 


Patient Education 

• 

For patients who are functionally monocular, discuss special benefits and risks of surgery, 



including the risk of blindness. (A:III) 

 

Conjunctivitis (Initial Evaluation) 



 

(Ratings: A: Most important, B: Moderately important, C: Relevant but not critical 

Strength of Evidence: I: Strong, II: Substantial but lacks some of I, III: consensus of expert opinion in 

absence of evidence for I & II) 

 

Initial Exam History 



• 

Ocular symptoms and signs (e.g., itching, discharge, irritation, pain, photophobia, blurred vision) 

(A:III) 

• 

Duration of symptoms (A:III) 



• 

Unilateral or bilateral presentation (A:III) 

• 

Character of discharge (A:III) 



• 

Recent exposure to an infected individual (A:III) 

• 

Trauma (mechanical, chemical, ultraviolet) (A:III) 



• 

Contact lens wear (e.g., lens type, hygiene and use regimen) (A:III) 

• 

Symptoms and signs potentially related to systemic diseases (e.g., genitourinary discharge, 



dysuria, upper respiratory infection, skin and mucosal lesions) (A:III) 

• 

Allergy, asthma, eczema (A:III) 



• 

Use of topical and systemic medications (A:III) 

• 

Use of personal care products (A:III) 



• 

Ocular history (e.g., previous episodes of conjunctivitis (A:III) and previous ophthalmic surgery) 

(B:III) 

• 

Systemic history (e.g., compromised immune status, prior systemic diseases) (B:III) 



• 

Social history (e.g., smoking, occupation and hobbies, travel and sexual activity) (C:III) 

 

Initial Physical Exam 



• 

Visual acuity (A:III) 

• 

External examination 



o

  Regional lymphadenopathy (particularly preauricular) (A:III) 

o

  Skin (A:III) 



o

  Abnormalities of the eyelids and adnexae (A:III) 

o

  Conjunctiva (A:III) 



• 

Slit-lamp biomicroscopy  

o

  Eyelid margins (A:III) 



o

  Eyelashes (A:III) 

o

  Lacrimal puncta and canaliculi (B:III) 



o

  Tarsal and forniceal conjunctiva (A:II) 

o

  Bulbar conjunctiva/limbus (A:II) 



o

  Cornea (A:I) 

o

  Anterior chamber/iris (A:III) 



o

  Dye-staining pattern (conjunctiva and cornea) (A:III) 

 

Diagnostic Tests 



• 

Cultures, smears for cytology and special stains are indicated in cases of suspected infectious 

neonatal conjunctivitis. (A: I) 

• 

Smears for cytology and special stains are recommended in cases of suspected gonococcal 



conjunctivitis. (A:III) 

• 

Confirm diagnosis of adult and neonate chlamydial conjunctivitis with immunodiagnostic test 



and/or culture. (A:I) 

• 

Biopsy the bulbar conjunctiva and take a sample from an uninvolved area adjacent to the limbus in 



an eye with active inflammation when ocular cicatricial pemphigoid is suspected. (A:III) 

• 

A full-thickness lid biopsy is indicated in cases of suspected sebaceous carcinoma. (A:II) 



 

Care Management 

• 

Use systemic antibiotic treatment for conjunctivitis due to Neisseria gonorrhoeae (A:I) or 



Chlamydia trachomatis. (A:II) 

• 

Treat sexual partners to minimize recurrence and spread of disease when conjunctivitis is 



associated with sexually transmitted diseases and refer patients and their sexual partners to an 

appropriate medical specialist. (A:III) 

• 

Refer patients with manifestation of a systemic disease to an appropriate medical specialist. 



(A:III) 

 

Follow-up Evaluation 



• 

Follow-up visits should include: 

o

  Interval history (A:III) 



o

  Visual acuity (A:III) 

o

  Slit-lamp biomicroscopy (A:III)  



 

Patient Education 

• 

Counsel patients with contagious varieties to minimize or prevent spread of diseases in the 



community. (A:III) 

 

Diabetic Retinopathy  



(Initial and Follow-up Evaluation) 

 

(Ratings: A: Most important, B: Moderately important, C: Relevant but not critical 



Strength of Evidence: I: Strong, II: Substantial but lacks some of I, III: consensus of expert opinion in 

absence of evidence for I & II) 

 

Initial Exam History (Key elements) 



• 

Duration of diabetes (A:I) 

• 

Past glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c) (A:I) 



• 

Medications (A:III) 

• 

Systemic history (e.g., onset of puberty(A:III), obesity(A:III), renal disease(A:II), systemic 



hypertension(A:I), serum lipid levels(A:II), pregnancy(A:I))  

 

Initial Physical Exam (Key elements) 



• 

Best-corrected visual acuity (A:I) 

• 

Measurement of IOP (A:III)  



• 

Gonioscopy when indicated (for neovascularization of the iris or increased IOP) (A:III) 

• 

Slit-lamp biomicroscopy (A:III) 



• 

Dilated funduscopy including stereoscopic examination of the posterior pole (A:I) 

• 

Examination of the peripheral retina and vitreous, best performed with indirect ophthalmoscopy or 



with slit-lamp biomicroscopy, combined with a contact lens (A:III) 

 

Diagnosis 



• 

Classify both eyes as to category and severity of diabetic retinopathy, with presence/absence of 

CSME.(A:III) Each category has an inherent risk for progression.  

 

Follow-up History 



• 

Visual symptoms (A:III) 

• 

Systemic status (e.g., pregnancy, blood pressure, renal status) (A:III) 



• 

Glycemic status (hemoglobin A1c) (A:I) 

 

Follow-up Physical Exam 



• 

Visual acuity (A:I) 

• 

Measurement of IOP (A:III)  



• 

Slit-lamp biomicroscopy with iris examination (A:II) 

• 

Gonioscopy (if neovascularization is suspected or present or if intraocular pressure is increased) 



(A:II) 

• 

Stereo examination of the posterior pole with dilation of the pupils (A:I) 



• 

Examination of the peripheral retina and vitreous when indicated (A:II) 

 

Ancillary Tests 



• 

Fundus photography is seldom of value in cases of minimal diabetic retinopathy or when diabetic 

retinopathy is unchanged from the previous photographic appearance. (A:III)  

• 

Fundus photography may be useful for documenting significant progression of disease and 



response to treatment. (B:III) 

• 

Fluorescein angiography is used as a guide for treating CSME (A:I) and as a means of evaluating 



the cause(s) of unexplained decreased visual acuity. (A:III) Angiography can identify macular 

capillary nonperfusion (A:II) or macular edema (or both) as possible explanations for visual loss.  

• 

Fluorescein angiography is not routinely indicated as part of the examination of patients with 



diabetes. (A:III) 

• 

Fluorescein angiography is not needed to diagnose CSME or PDR, both of which are diagnosed by 



means of the clinical exam.  

 

Patient Education 

• 

Discuss results or exam and implications. (A:II) 



• 

Encourage patients with diabetes but without diabetic retinopathy to have annual dilated eye 

exams. (A:II) 

• 

Inform patients that effective treatment for diabetic retinopathy depends on timely intervention, 



despite good vision and no ocular symptoms. (A:II) 

• 

Educate patients about the importance of maintaining near-normal glucose levels and near-normal 



blood pressure and lowering serum lipid levels. (A:III) 

• 

Communicate with the attending physician, e.g., family physician, internist, or endocrinologist, 



regarding eye findings. (A:III) 

• 

Provide patients whose conditions fail to respond to surgery and for whom treatment is unavailable 



with proper professional support and offer referral for counseling, rehabilitative, or social services 

as appropriate. (A:III) 

• 

Refer patients with significant visual impairment to a provider experienced in vision rehabilitation 



who can equip the patient with appropriate aids. (A:III) 

 

Diabetic Retinopathy  



(Management Recommendations) 



Yüklə 0,69 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə