International clinical guidelines



Yüklə 0,69 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə7/8
tarix13.12.2016
ölçüsü0,69 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8

 

Management Recommendations for Patients with Diabetes 



 

Severity of Retinopathy  Presence 

of 

CSME* 


Follow-up 

(Months) 

Scatter 

(Panretinal) 

Laser 

Fluorescein 



Angiography 

Focal 


Laser† 

1. Normal or minimal 

NPDR 

No 


12 

No 


No 

No 


2. Mild to moderate 

NPDR  


No 

6-12 


No 

No 


No 

3. Severe or very severe 

NPDR 

Yes         



2-4 

No 


Usually  

Usually*^ 

4. Severe or very severe 

NPDR 


No 

2-4 


Sometimes‡ 

Rarely 


No 

5. Non-high-risk PDR 

Yes 

2-4 


Sometimes‡ 

Usually 


Usually** 

6. Non-high-risk PDR 

No 

2-4 


Sometimes‡ 

Rarely 


No 

7. High-risk PDR 

Yes 

2-4 


Sometimes‡ 

Usually 


Usually^ 

8. High-risk PDR 

No 

3-4 


Usually‡ 

Rarely 


No 

9. High-risk PDR not 

amenable to 

photocoagulation (e.g., 

media opacities) 

Yes 

3-4 


Usually‡ 

Usually 


Usually** 

10. High-risk PDR not 

amenable to 

photocoagulation (e.g., 

media opacities) 

1-6 



Not Possible††  Occasionally 

Not 


Possible†† 

 

* Exceptions include: hypertension or fluid retention associated with heart failure, renal failure, 



pregnancy, or any other causes that may aggravate macular edema. Deferral of photocoagulation for a 

brief period of medical treatment may be considered in these cases. Also, deferral of CSME treatment is 

an option when the center of the macula is not involved, visual acuity is excellent, and the patient 

understands the risks. 

† Focal photocoagulation refers to direct focal laser to microaneurysms or a grid photocoagulation pattern 

to areas of diffuse leakage or nonperfusion seen on fluorescein angiography.  

^ Deferring focal photocoagulation for CSME is an option when the center of the macula is not involved, 

visual acuity is excellent, close follow-up is possible, and the patient understands the risks. However, 

initiation of treatment with focal photocoagulation should also be considered because although treatment 

with focal photocoagulation is less likely to improve the vision, it is more likely to stabilize the current 

visual acuity.  

‡ Scatter (panretinal) photocoagulation surgery may be considered as patients approach high-risk PDR. 

The benefit of early scatter photocoagulation at the severe nonproliferative or worse stage of retinopathy 

is greater in patients with type 2 diabetes than in those with type 1. Treatment should be considered for 

patients with severe NPDR and type 2 diabetes. Other factors, such as poor compliance with follow-up, 

impending cataract extraction or pregnancy, and status of fellow eye will help in determining the timing of 

the scatter photocoagulation. 

** Some experts feel that it is preferable to perform the focal photocoagulation first, prior to scatter 

photocoagulation, to minimize scatter laser-induced exacerbation of the macular edema. 

†† Vitrectomy indicated in selected cases. 

CSME = clinically significant macular edema; NPDR = nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy; PDR = 

proliferative diabetic retinopathy 

Dry Eye Syndrome (Initial Evaluation) 

 

(Ratings: A: Most important, B: Moderately important, C: Relevant but not critical 



Strength of Evidence: I: Strong, II: Substantial but lacks some of I, III: consensus of expert opinion in 

absence of evidence for I & II) 

 


Initial Exam History 

• 

Ocular symptoms and signs (A:III) 



• 

Exacerbating conditions (B:III) 

• 

Duration of symptoms (A:III) 



• 

Topical medications used and their effect on symptoms (A:III) 

• 

Ocular history, including 



o

  Contact lens wear, schedule and care (A:III) 

o

  Allergic conjunctivitis (B:III) 



o

  Corneal history (prior keratoplasty, LASIK, PRK) (A:III) 

o

  Punctal surgery (A:III)  



o

  Eyelid surgery (e.g., prior ptosis repair, blepharoplasty, entropion/ectropion repair) (A:III) 

o

  Bell's palsy (A:III) 



o

  Chronic ocular surface inflammation (e.g., ocular cicatricial pemphigoid, Stevens-Johnson 

syndrome) (A:III) 

• 

Systemic history, including  



o

  Smoking (A:III) 

o

  Dermatological diseases (e.g., rosacea) (A:III) 



o

  Atopy (A:III) 

o

  Menopause (A:III) 



o

  Systemic inflammatory diseases (e.g., Sjogren’s syndrome, graft vs host disease, 

rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma) (A:III) 

o

  Systemic medications (e.g., antihistamines, diuretics, hormones and hormonal antagonists, 



antidepressants, cardiac antiarrhythmic drugs, isotretinoin, diphenoxylate/atropine, beta 

blockers, chemotherapy agents, any other drug  with anticholinergic effects) (A:III) 

o

  Trauma (e.g., chemical) (A:III) 



o

  Chronic viral infections (e.g., chronic hepatitis C, human immunodeficiency virus) (B:III) 

o

  Surgery (e.g., bone marrow transplant, head and neck surgery) (B:III) 



o

  Radiation of orbit (B:III) 

o

  Neurological conditions (e.g., Parkinson’s disease, Bell’s palsy, Riley-Day syndrome) 



(B:III) 

o

  Dry mouth, dental cavities, oral ulcers (B:III) 



 

Initial Physical Exam 

• 

Visual acuity (A:III) 



• 

External examination  

o

  Skin (A:III) 



o

  Eyelids (A:I) 

o

  Adnexae (A:III) 



o

  Proptosis (B:III) 

o

  Cranial nerve function (A:III) 



o

  Hands (B:III) 

• 

Slit-lamp biomicroscopy 



o

  Tear film (A:III)  

o

  Eyelashes (A:III) 



o

  Anterior and posterior eyelid margins (A:III) 



o

  Puncta (A:III) 

o

  Inferior fornix and tarsal conjunctiva (A:III) 



o

  Bulbar conjunctiva (A:III) 

o

  Cornea (A:III) 



 

Care Management 

• 

For patients with aqueous tear deficiency, the following measures are appropriate:  



o

  Elimination of exacerbating medications where feasible (A:III) 

o

  Ocular environmental interventions (A:III) 



o

  Humidification of ambient air (A:III) 

o

  Computer work site intervention (A:III)  



o

  Aqueous tear enhancement (A:III) 

• 

For patients with aqueous tear deficiency, the following surgical therapies are used when medical 



treatment has not been adequate or appropriate:  

o

  Correction of lid abnormality resulting from blepharitis, trichiasis or lid malposition (e.g., 



lagophthalmos, entropion/ectropion) (A:III) 

o

  Punctal occlusion (A:III)  



o

  Tarsorrhaphy for severe cases (A:III) 

 

Patient Education 



• 

Counsel patients about the chronic nature of dry eye and its natural history. (A:III) 

• 

Provide specific instructions for therapeutic regimens. (A:III) 



• 

Reassess periodically the patient's compliance and understanding of the disease, risks for 

associated structural changes and realistic expectations for effective management, and reinforce 

education. (A:III) 

• 

Refer patients with manifestation of a systemic disease to an appropriate medical specialist. 



(A:III) 

• 

Caution patients with pre-existing dry eye that LASIK or PRK may worsen their dry eye condition. 



(A:III) 

 

Esotropia (Initial and Follow-up Evaluation) 



 

(Ratings: A: Most important, B: Moderately important, C: Relevant but not critical 

Strength of Evidence: I: Strong, II: Substantial but lacks some of I, III: consensus of expert opinion in 

absence of evidence for I & II) 

 

Initial Exam History (Key elements) 



• 

Ocular symptoms and signs (A:III) 

• 

Ocular history (date of onset and frequency of the deviation, presence or absence of diplopia) 



(A:III) 

• 

Systemic history (review of prenatal, perinatal and postnatal medical factors) (A:III)  



• 

Family history, including presence of strabismus, amblyopia, extraocular muscle surgery (A:III) 

 


Initial Physical Exam (Key elements) 

• 

Visual acuity (A:III) 



• 

Ocular alignment (at distance and near) (A:III) 

• 

Extraocular muscle function (A:III) 



• 

Sensory parameters (A:III) 

• 

Evaluation of the fundus, with attention to macular position (A:III) 



• 

Cycloplegic refraction (A:III) 

 

Care Management



 

•  First prescribe corrective lenses for any clinically significant refractive error. (A:III)  

•  Consider all forms of esotropia for treatment and re-establish ocular alignment promptly. (A:III)  

•  If optical correction does not align the eyes, then surgical correction is recommended. (A:III) 

•  Treat significant amblyopia prior to esotropia surgery to increase likelihood of binocularity. 

(A:III)   

 

Follow-up Evaluation 



• 

Follow-up visits should include:

 

o

  Tolerance and side effects of therapy (A:III) 



o

  Visual acuity and/or fixation pattern with correction of refractive error (A:III)    

o

  Deviation at distance and near fixation with correction of refractive error (A:III)  



o

  Observation of A or V patterns and/or oblique dysfunctions (A:III)  

o

  Status of binocular vision (A:III) 



•  Assess hyperopia using cycloplegia at least yearly, and 4 to 6 month intervals may be 

necessary 

(A:III)

 

 



Esotropia Follow-up Evaluation Intervals (A:III) 

Age (years) 

Routine Interval Follow-up (months)* 

0-1 


1-3 

1-5 


3-6 

5-10 


6-12 

 *More frequent visits may be necessary if amblyopia is present or if there is a recent deterioration of 

alignment.  

 

 Patient Education 



•  Discuss findings with the patient when appropriate and/or parents/caregivers to enhance 

understanding of disorder and to recruit them in a team effort for therapy. (A:III) 

•  For adult patients, discuss advantages and disadvantages of various modes of treatment in 

developing a treatment plan. (A:III)  

•  Formulate treatment plans in consultation with the patient and/or family/caregivers, and the plans 

should be responsive to their expectations and preferences. (A:III) 



•  Discuss the potential psychological side effects with the patient and parent/caregiver as 

appropriate. (A:III) 

 

Eye Disease in Leprosy  



(Initial Evaluation and Management) 

 

(Ratings: A: Most important, B: Moderately important, C: Relevant but not critical 



Strength of Evidence: I: Strong, II: Substantial but lacks some of I, III: consensus of expert opinion in 

absence of evidence for I & II) 

 

Initial Exam History 



• 

Ocular symptoms (decreased vision, epiphora, symptoms of irritation) (A:III) 

• 

Duration of lagophthalmos (6 months) (A:III) 



• 

Duration of leprosy (usually from date of diagnosis) (B:III) 

• 

Type of leprosy (A:III) 



• 

MDT treatment; what drugs and for how long (A:III) 

• 

History of leprosy reactions (CB:III) 



 

Initial Physical Exam 

• 

Visual acuity (A:III) 



• 

Eyelids and lid closure (A:III) 

• 

Corneal sensation (A:III) 



• 

Conjunctiva (A:III) 

• 

Sclera (A:III) 



• 

Pupil (A:III) 

• 

Nasolacrimal apparatus (A:III) 



• 

Slit lamp biomicroscopy 

o

  Corneal epithelial integrity (A:III) 



o

  Corneal nerve beading, stromal opacity (B:III) 

o

  Anterior chamber (A:III) 



o

  Iris atrophy (A:III) 

o

  Iris "pearls" (B:III) 



o

  Posterior synechiae (A:III) 

o

  Cataract (A:III) 



Care Management 

The main important conditions (cataract, lagophthalmos, anterior uveitis) are managed as for any patient, 

and people with leprosy should be integrated into the normal eye care service, specifically: 

• 

Cataract should be removed when it adversely affects patient's visual function (A:III) 



• 

IOL is not contraindicated as long as quality of surgery is good and eye is quiet (A:III) 

• 

Chronic lagophthalmos should be treated surgically if cornea is compromised or cosmesis is a 



problem, regardless of severity of lagophthalmos, by whatever procedure the surgeon does best 

(A:III) 


• 

Special considerations in a person afflicted with leprosy include:  

o

  New onset lagophthalmos (duration <6 months) should be treated with oral prednisolone 



25-30 mg per day tapered over 6 months. (A:III) 

o

  Acute uveitis should be treated with intensive topical steroid; associated systemic leprosy 



reaction must be ruled out or treated if present with systemic steroid give dose) (A:III) 

 

Patient Education 



• 

At the end of MDT all patients should be warned that lagophthalmos could develop and 

understand the risks associated with this. (A:III) 

• 

Patients with residual lagophthalmos must be told about the risk form exposure and specifically 



warned about development of red eye and decreased vision. (A:III) 

• 

Patients should understand risks to eye during reaction and given explicit instructions on where to 



report if reaction develops. (A:III) 

• 

All patients should be informed of significance of decreased vision and told to report this to case 



worker for referral to higher level. (A:III) 

 

Posterior Vitreous Detachment (PVD), Retinal Breaks and 



Lattice Degeneration  

(Initial and Follow-up Evaluation) 

 

(Ratings: A: Most important, B: Moderately important, C: Relevant but not critical 



Strength of Evidence: I: Strong, II: Substantial but lacks some of I, III: consensus of expert opinion in 

absence of evidence for I & II) 

 

Initial Exam History (Key elements) 



• 

Symptoms of PVD (A:I) 

• 

Family history (e.g., Stickler syndrome) (A:II) 



• 

Prior eye trauma, including surgery (A:II) 

• 

Myopia (A:II) 



• 

History of cataract surgery (A:II) 

 

Initial Physical Exam (Key elements) 



• 

Examination of the vitreous for detachment, pigmented cells, hemorrhage, and condensation 

(A:III) 

• 

Examination of the peripheral fundus with scleral depression (A:III) The preferred method of 



evaluating peripheral vitreoretinal pathology is with indirect ophthalmoscopy combined with 

scleral depression (A:III) 

 

Ancillary Tests 



•  Perform B-scan ultrasonography if peripheral retina cannot be evaluated. (A:II) If no 

abnormalities are found, frequent follow-up examinations are recommended. (A:III) 

 


Surgical and Postoperative Care if Patient Receives Treatment: 

•  Inform patient about the relative risks, benefits and alternatives to surgery (A:III) 

•  Formulate a postoperative care plan and inform patient of these arrangements (A:III) 

•  Advise patient to contact ophthalmologist promptly if they have a significant change in symptoms 

such as new floaters or visual field loss (A:II) 

 

Care Management 



Management Options 

Type of Lesion 

Treatment 

Acute symptomatic horseshoe tears 

Treat promptly (A:II) 

Acute symptomatic operculated tears 

Treatment may not be necessary (A:III) 

Traumatic retinal breaks 

Usually treated (A:III) 

Asymptomatic horseshoe tears 

Usually can be followed without treatment (A:III) 

Asymptomatic operculated tears 

Treatment is rarely recommended (A:III) 

Asymptomatic atrophic round holes 

Treatment is rarely recommended (A:III) 

Asymptomatic lattice degeneration without 

holes 

Not treated unless PVD causes a horseshoe tear 



(A:III) 

Asymptomatic lattice degeneration with holes 

Usually does not require treatment (A:III) 

Asymptomatic dialyses 

No consensus on treatment and insufficient evidence 

to guide management  

Fellow eyes atrophic holes, lattice 

degeneration, or asymptomatic horseshoe tears 

No consensus on treatment and insufficient evidence 

to guide management 

 

Follow-up History 



• 

Visual symptoms (A:I) 

• 

Interval history of eye trauma, including intraocular surgery (A:I) 



 

Follow-up Physical Exam 

• 

Visual acuity (A:III) 



• 

Evaluation of the status of the vitreous, with attention to the presence of pigment or syneresis 

(A:II) 

• 

Examination of the peripheral fundus with scleral depression (A:II) 



• 

B-scan ultrasonography if the media is opaque (A:II) 



• 

Patients who present with vitreous hemorrhage sufficient to obscure retinal details and a negative 

B-scan should be followed periodically. For eyes in which a retinal tear is suspected, a repeat B-

scan should be performed about 4 weeks later (A:III) 

 

Patient Education 



•  Educate patients at high risk of developing retinal detachment about the symptoms of PVD and 

retinal detachment and the value of periodic follow-up exams. (A:II) 

•  Instruct all patients at increased risk of retinal detachment to notify their ophthalmologist promptly 

if they have a significant increase in floaters, loss of visual field, or decrease in visual acuity. 

(A:III) 

 

Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma (Initial Evaluation) 



 

(Ratings: A: Most important, B: Moderately important, C: Relevant but not critical 

Strength of Evidence: I: Strong, II: Substantial but lacks some of I, III: consensus of expert opinion in 

absence of evidence for I & II) 

 

Initial Exam History (Key elements) 



• 

Ocular history (A:III) 

• 

Systemic history (A:III) 



• 

Family history (A:II) 

• 

Assessment of impact of visual function on daily living and activities (A:III) 



• 

Review of pertinent records (A:III) 

 

Initial Physical Exam (Key elements) 



• 

Visual acuity (A:III) 

• 

Pupils (B:II) 



• 

Slit-lamp biomicroscopy of anterior segment (A:III) 

• 

Measurement of IOP (A:I)  



o

  Time of day recorded because of diurnal variation (B:III) 

• 

Central corneal thickness (A:II) 



• 

Gonioscopy (A:III) 

• 

Evaluation of optic nerve head and retinal nerve fiber layer with magnified stereoscopic 



visualization (A:III) 

• 

Documentation of the optic disc morphology, best performed by color stereophotography or 



computer-based image analysis (A:II)  

• 

Evaluation of the fundus (through a dilated pupil whenever feasible) (A:III) 



• 

Visual field evaluation, preferably by automated static threshold perimetry (A:III) 

 

Management Plan for Patients in Whom Therapy is Indicated 



• 

Set an initial target pressure of at least 20% lower than pretreatment IOP, assuming that the 

measured pretreatment pressure range contributed to optic nerve damage.  (A:I) The more 

advanced the damage, the lower the initial target pressure should be. (A:III) 



• 

In many instances, topical medications constitute effective initial therapy. (A:III) 

• 

Laser trabeculoplasty is an appropriate initial therapeutic alternative. (A:I) 



• 

Filtering surgery may sometimes be an appropriate initial therapeutic alternative. (A:I)  

• 

Choose a regimen of maximal effectiveness and tolerance to achieve desired therapeutic response. 



(A:III) 

 

Surgery and Postoperative Care for Laser Trabeculoplasty Patients 



• 

Ensure the patient receives adequate postoperative care. (A:III) Plan prior to and after surgery 

includes: 

o

  Informed consent. (A:III) 



o

  At least one preoperative evaluation and IOP measurement by the surgeon. (A:III) 

o

  At least one IOP check within 30 to 120 minutes following surgery. (A:I) 



o

  Examine within 6 weeks of surgery or sooner if concerned about IOP-related optic nerve 

damage. (A:III) 

 

Surgery and Postoperative Care for Filtering Surgery Patients 



• 

Ensure the patient receives adequate postoperative care. (A:III) Plan prior to and after surgery 

includes: 

o

 



Informed consent. (A:III) 

o

 



At least one preoperative evaluation by the surgeon. (A:III) 

o

 



Follow-up on first day (12 to 36 hours after surgery) and at least once from the second to 

tenth postoperative day. (A:II) 

o

 

In absence of complications, additional routine postoperative visits during a 6-week period. 



Yüklə 0,69 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə