International clinical guidelines



Yüklə 0,69 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə8/8
tarix13.12.2016
ölçüsü0,69 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8


(A:III) 

o

 



Use topical corticosteroids in the postoperative period, unless contraindicated. (A:II) 

o

 



Add more frequent visits, if needed, for patients with postoperative complications. (A:III) 

o

 



Additional treatments as necessary to maximize chances for long-term success. (A:III) 

Patient Education for Patients with Medical Therapy 

• 

Discuss diagnosis, severity of the disease, prognosis and management plan, and likelihood that 



therapy will be lifelong. (A:III) 

• 

Educate about eyelid closure or nasolacrimal occlusion when applying topical medications to 



reduce systemic absorption. (B:II) 

• 

Encourage patients to alert their ophthalmologist to physical or emotional changes that occur when 



taking glaucoma medications. (A:III)  

• 

Educate about the disease process, rationale and goals of intervention, status of their condition, and 



relative benefits and risks of alternative interventions so that patients can participate meaningfully 

in developing an appropriate plan of action. (A:III) 

 

Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma  



(Follow-up Evaluation) 

 

(Ratings: A: Most important, B: Moderately important, C: Relevant but not critical 



Strength of Evidence: I: Strong, II: Substantial but lacks some of I, III: consensus of expert opinion in 

absence of evidence for I & II) 

 

Exam History 



• 

Interval ocular history (A:III) 

• 

Interval systemic medical history (B:III) 



• 

Side effects of ocular medication (A:III) 

• 

Frequency and time of last IOP-lowering medications, and review of use of medications (B:III) 



 

Physical Exam 

• 

Visual acuity (A:III) 



• 

Slit-lamp biomicroscopy (A:III) 

• 

Measurement of IOP and time of day of measurement (A:III) 



• 

Evaluation of optic nerve and visual fields (see table below) (A:III) 

• 

Pachymetry should be repeated after any event that may alter central corneal thickness (A:II) 



 

Management Plan for Patients on Medical Therapy: 

• 

Reconsider current IOP and its relationship to the target IOP at each visit. (A:III) 



• 

At each exam, record dosage and frequency of use, discuss adherence to the therapeutic regimen 

and patient's response to recommendations for therapeutic alternatives or diagnostic procedures. 

(A:III) 


• 

Perform gonioscopy if there is a suspicion of angle closure, anterior-chamber shallowing or 

anterior-chamber angle abnormalities or if there is an unexplained change in IOP. (A:III) Perform 

gonioscopy periodically (e.g., 1-5 years). (A:III) 

• 

Assess treatment regimen if target IOP is not achieved and maintained in light of potential risks 



and benefits of additional or alternative treatment. (A:III) 

• 

If a drug fails to reduce IOP, replace with an alternate agent until effective medical treatment is 



established. (A:III) 

• 

Adjust target pressure downward if disc or visual field change is progressive. (A:III)  



• 

Within each of the recommended intervals, factors that determine frequency of evaluation include 

the severity of damage, the stage of disease, the rate of progression, the extent to which the IOP 

exceeds the target pressure and the number and significance of other risk factors for damage to the 

optic nerve. (A:III)  

• 

Deleting or adding medication justifies a follow-up visit at an interval appropriate for washout or 



maximal effect of medication withdrawn or added. (A:III) 

Follow-Up: 

Recommended Guidelines for Follow-up: 

Target IOP 

Achieved 

Progression of 

Damage 

Duration of 



Control 

(months) 

Follow-up 

Interval 

[B:III] 

Optic Nerve 

Head Evaluation 

[A:III] 


Visual Field 

Evaluation 

[A:III] 

Yes 


No 

< 6 

Within 6 

3-12 months 

3-12 months 



months 

Yes 


No 

> 6 


Within 12 

months 


3-12 months 

3-12 months 

Yes 

Yes 


(n/a) 

Within 4 

months 

1-12 months 



12 months 

No 


Yes or No 

(n/a) 


Within 4 

months 


1-12 months 

12 months 

 

Patient Education for Patients with Medical Therapy: 



• 

Encourage patients to alert their ophthalmologist to physical or emotional changes that occur when 

taking glaucoma medications. (A:III) 

• 

Refer for or encourage patients with significant visual impairment or blindness to use appropriate 



vision rehabilitation and social services. (A:III) 

 

Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma Suspect  



(Initial and Follow-up Evaluation) 

 

(Ratings: A: Most important, B: Moderately important, C: Relevant but not critical 



Strength of Evidence: I: Strong, II: Substantial but lacks some of I, III: consensus of expert opinion in 

absence of evidence for I & II) 

 

Initial Exam History (Key elements) 



• 

Ocular history (A:III) 

• 

Systemic history (A:III) 



• 

Family history (A:III) 

• 

Review of pertinent records (A:III) 



• 

Assessment of impact of visual function on daily living and activities (A:III) 

 

Initial Physical Exam (Key elements) 



• 

Visual acuity (A:III) 

• 

Pupils (B:II) 



• 

Slit-lamp biomicroscopy of anterior segment (A:III) 

• 

Measurement of IOP (A:I)  



• 

Central corneal thickness (A:II) 

• 

Gonioscopy (A:III) 



• 

Evaluation of optic nerve head and retinal nerve fiber layer, with magnified stereoscopic 

visualization (A:III) 

• 

Documentation of the optic disc morphology, best performed by color stereophotography or 



computer-based image analysis(A:II)  

• 

Evaluation of the fundus (through a dilated pupil whenever feasible) (A:III) 



• 

Visual field evaluation, preferably by automated static threshold perimetry (A:III) 



 

Management Plan for Patients in Whom Therapy is Indicated: 

• 

An appropriate initial goal is to set target pressure 20% less than mean of several IOP 



measurements and <24 mm Hg. (A:I) 

• 

Choose regimen of maximal effectiveness and tolerance to achieve desired therapeutic response. 



(A:III) 

Follow-Up Exam History 

• 

Interval ocular history (A:III) 



• 

Interval systemic medical history and any change of systemic medications (B:III) 

• 

Side effects of ocular medications if patient is being treated (A:III) 



• 

Frequency and time of last glaucoma medications, and review of use, if patient is being treated 

(B:III) 

 

Follow-Up Physical Exam 



• 

Visual acuity (A:III) 

• 

Slit-lamp biomicroscopy (A:III) 



• 

IOP and time of day measurement (A:III) 

• 

Gonioscopy is indicated when there is a suspicion of an angle-closure component, anterior 



chamber shallowing or unexplained change in IOP (A:III) 

 

Recommended Guidelines for Follow-up [A:III] 



Treatment  Target IOP 

Achieved 

High Risk of 

Damage 


Follow-up 

Interval 

Frequency of Optic Nerve Head 

and Visual Field Evaluation 

No 

N/A 


No 

6-24 months 

6-24 months 

No 


N/A 

Yes 


3-12 months 

6-18 months 

Yes 

Yes 


Yes 

3-12 months 

6-18 months 

Yes 


No 

Yes 


< 4 months 

3-12 months 

 

Patient Education for Patients with Medical Therapy: 



• 

Discuss number and severity of risk factors, prognosis, management plan and likelihood that 

therapy, once started, will be long term. (A:III) 

• 

Educate about disease process, rationale and goals of intervention, status of their condition, and 



relative benefits and risks of alternative interventions. (A:III) 

• 

Educate about eyelid closure and nasolacrimal occlusion when applying topical medications to 



reduce systemic absorption. (B:II) 

• 

Encourage patients to alert their ophthalmologist to physical or emotional changes that occur when 



taking glaucoma medications. (A:III) 

 

 



Primary Angle Closure  

(Initial Evaluation and Therapy) 

 

(Ratings: A: Most important, B: Moderately important, C: Relevant but not critical 



Strength of Evidence: I: Strong, II: Substantial but lacks some of I, III: consensus of expert opinion in 

absence of evidence for I & II) 

 

Initial Exam History (Key elements) 



• 

Systemic history (e.g., use of topical or systemic medications) (A:III) 

• 

Ocular history (symptoms suggestive of intermittent angle-closure attacks) (A:III) 



• 

Family history of acute angle-closure glaucoma (B:II) 

 

Initial Physical Exam (Key elements) 



• 

Visual acuity (A:III) 

• 

Refractive status (A:III) 



• 

Pupils (A:III) 

• 

Slit-lamp biomicroscopy (A:III) 



o

  Anterior chamber inflammation suggestive of a recent or current attack 

o

  Corneal edema  



o

  Central and peripheral anterior-chamber depth 

o

  Iris atrophy, particularly sector types, posterior synechiae or mid-dilated pupil  



o

  Signs of previous angle closure attacks 

• 

Measurement of IOP (A:III) 



• 

Gonioscopy of both eyes (A:III) 

• 

Evaluation of fundus and optic nerve head using direct ophthalmoscope or biomicroscope (A:III) 



 

Diagnosis 

• 

Establish a diagnosis of primary angle closure, excluding secondary forms (A:III) 



 

Management Plan for Patients in Whom Iridotomy is Indicated 

• 

Treat acute PAC by laser iridotomy or incisional iridectomy if a laser iridotomy cannot be 



successfully performed. (A:III) 

• 

In acute angle-closure attacks, usually use medical therapy first to lower the IOP, to reduce pain 



and clear corneal edema in preparation for iridotomy. (A:III) 

• 

Perform prophylactic iridotomy in fellow eye if chamber angle is anatomically narrow. (A:II) 



• 

Perform surgery on one eye at a time for patients requiring bilateral incisional iridectomy (several 

days apart) whenever feasible to avoid simultaneous bilateral complications. (A:III) 

  

Surgery and Postoperative Care for Iridotomy Patients 



•  Ensure the patient receives adequate postoperative care. (A:III) Plan prior to and after surgery 

includes: 



o

  Informed consent (A:III) 

o

  At least one preoperative evaluation by the surgeon (A:III) 



o

  At least one IOP check within 30 to 120 minutes following laser surgery (A:II) 

o

  Use of topical anti-inflammatory agents in the postoperative period, unless contraindicated 



(A:III) 

•  Follow-up evaluations include: 

o

  Evaluation of patency of iridotomy (A:III) 



o

  Measurement of IOP (A:III) 

o

  Gonioscopy, if not performed immediately after iridotomy (A:III) 



o

  Pupil dilation to reduce risk of posterior synechiae formation (A:III) 

o

  Fundus examination as clinically indicated (A:III) 



•  Use medications perioperatively to avert sudden IOP elevation, particularly in patients with severe 

disease. (A:III) 

•  Refer for and encourage patients with significant visual impairment or blindness to use vision 

rehabilitation and social services. (A:III) 

 

Evaluation and Follow-up of Patients with Iridotomy: 



• 

After iridotomy, follow patients with glaucomatous optic neuropathy as specified in the Primary 

Open-Angle Glaucoma PPP. (A:III) 

• 

Follow all other patients as specified in the Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma Suspect PPP. (A:III) 



 

Education for Patients if Iridotomy is not Performed: 

• 

Inform patients at risk for acute angle closure about symptoms of acute angle-closure attacks and 



instruct them to notify immediately if symptoms occur. (A:III) 

• 

Warn patients of danger of taking medicines that could cause pupil dilation and induce an angle-



closure attack. (A:III) 

 

Trachoma 



 

(Ratings: A: Most important, B: Moderately important, C: Relevant but not critical 

Strength of Evidence: I: Strong, II: Substantial but lacks some of I, III: consensus of expert opinion in 

absence of evidence for I & II) 

 

Initial Exam History 



• 

Living in a trachoma-endemic region (A:I) 

• 

Duration of red eye (an acute follicular conjunctivitis may be due to other organisms) (C:III) 



• 

Any previous similar episodes (active trachoma is often recurrent) (C:III) 

• 

Household contacts with history of trachoma or chronic conjunctivitis (B:I) 



• 

Purulent discharge (although active trachoma is often sub-clinical or asymptomatic) (C:III) 

• 

Duration of trichiasis (C:III) 



• 

History of previous lid surgery (A:III) 

 


Initial Physical Exam 

• 

Using 2.5x magnification loupes and adequate lighting (daylight or torchlight) or using a slit lamp, 



assess signs of trachoma using the WHO simplified grading scale: (A:III) 

• 

Briefly, note any trichiasis or corneal opacity. Evert the upper palpebral conjunctivae and note 



follicles over the tarsal plate (5 follicles greater than 0.5 mm in the central tarsus constitutes the 

WHO grade of TF), intense inflammatory thickening obscuring 50% of the normal, underlying 

conjunctival vasculature (TI), and easily visible scarring (TS). 

 

Diagnostic (Laboratory) Tests 



• 

PCR testing for chlamydial DNA—this is the gold standard for identifying infection but not for 

diagnosing trachoma (B:I) 

• 

Direct Chlamydial Immunofluorescence test +/- chlamydial culture of conjunctival epithelial cells 



(C:II) 

• 

Chlamydial culture (difficult to perform) (C:II) 



• 

Giemsa stain of conjunctival scrape to look for: 

o

  Basophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies in epithelial cells (C:III) 



o

  Polymorphonuclear leucocytes (C:III) 

 

Management 



• 

Management of trachoma should be community based. The WHO recommends the 

integrated SAFE Strategy, surgery for trichiasis, community wide antibiotic treatment, facial 

cleanliness education and environmental improvements (B:III) 

• 

Surgical: Trichiasis surgery (bilamellar tarsal rotation or the related Trabut procedure) should be 



considered if any of the following are present: 

  one or more in-turned eyelashes are abrading the cornea when the patient is looking 

straight ahead (A:II) 

  pre-existing evidence of corneal damage from trichiasis (B:II) 

  severe discomfort from trichiasis (C:III) 

o

  Contra-indications to trichiasis surgery include defective lid closure, children with 



trichiasis (may need general anesthetic), and poor general health. (C:III) 

o

  Epilation is considered an alternative for refusal to have surgery (B:III) 



• 

Community-wide antibiotic treatment is recommended if there is >10% active trachoma in 

children aged 1-9 years of age in the community. Targeted treatment of clinically active cases is 

recommended for a lower prevalence.  Household contacts, and in particular, siblings, may also be 

treated, even if they have no active signs of infection (B:II) 

• 

The following antibiotic treatment is recommended by the WHO: 



o

  Single dose azithromycin: in children aged <16 years dosage is 20mg/kg (maximum dose 

1g); in adults dosage is 1g (A:I) 

o

  Or, use topical 1% tetracycline eye ointment in pregnant women, children aged below 6 



months and those allergic to macrolides, used twice daily in both eyes for 6 weeks (A:I) 

o

  It is acceptable to treat follicular conjunctivitis in a trachoma-endemic area with antibiotics 



even without laboratory documentation of active chlamydial infection (A:I) 

• 

Facial Cleanliness: promote regular face-washing with clean water. Clean faces have been 



associated with clinically active trachoma, but it should be noted that face-washing interventions 

have not been shown to reduce ocular chlamydial infection (B:II) 



• 

Environmental Improvements: (improving water supply, latrine provision and fly control).  The 

face fly Musca sorbens has been implicated as a possible vector for trachoma and breeds 

preferentially on human feces.  These flies cannot breed in latrines, so latrine construction is 

thought to reduce fly populations and trachoma transmission (B:II) 

 

Follow-up Evaluation 



• 

WHO recommends annual, community based treatment with reassessment at three years. 

(B:II) 

• 

Note that follicles can take months to clear even after infection has been eliminated, and that re-



treatment may not be warranted if follicles are slowly improving depending on the time that has 

elapsed since the last treatment was given. (B:II) 

• 

For treatment of individual more frequent examinations can be undertaken.  Follow-up 1 



month after treatment, with retreatment as necessary is reasonable. 

• 

Re-infection frequently occurs in endemic areas, so patient education regarding methods that may 



reduce transmission is useful. (C:III) 

• 

After trichiasis surgery, patients should be seen within 2 weeks for suture removal, and annually to 



ensure that trichiasis has not returned. (A:III)  

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 




Yüklə 0,69 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə