International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research



Yüklə 0.58 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü0.58 Mb.

Int. J. Pharm. Sci. Rev. Res., 38(2), May – June 2016; Article No. 16, Pages: 83-88                                                               ISSN 0976 – 044X  

 

 



International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research 

Available online at 

www.globalresearchonline.net  

© Copyright protected. Unauthorised republication, reproduction, distribution, dissemination and copying of this document in whole or in part is strictly prohibited. 

 

83

 



 

 

                                                                                                                          

 

 

Saumya Singh, Himani Badoni, Vinay Kumar, Ayush Madan, Promila Sharma, Syed Mohsin Waheed* 

Department of Biotechnology, Graphic Era University, 566/6 Bell Road, Clement Town, Dehradun, Uttarakhand, India. 

*Corresponding author’s E-mail:

 

syedmohsinwaheed@yahoo.com 

 

Accepted on: 15-04-2016; Finalized on: 31-05-2016. 

ABSTRACT 

Current  work  was  undertaken  with  the  aim  of  exploring  the  antioxidant  properties  of  various  plant  extracts  and  their  potential 

therapeutic use. Methanolic extract of 4 plants namely Trapa bispinosa, Trigonella foenum-graecum, Syzygium cumini and Betula 

utilis  were  investigated  for  their  phytochemical  composition  and  antioxidant  properties.  Trigonella  foenum-graecum  extract  was 

found to have the highest antioxidant activity demonstrated by DPPH inhibition assay and the extracts of all the four plants have 

antioxidant properties. Besides, the extracts of these plants were tested for various classes of phytoconstituents present in these 

plants  to  determine  the  phytochemical  composition.  All  the  four  plant  extracts  have  antioxidant  property  and  at  least  one 

compound from the class of phytocompounds like alkaloids, flavonoids reducing sugars and tannins as a constituent. The present 

study is a part of larger project that would explore for the therapeutic potential of these extracts in various diseases resulting from 

oxidative  stress  and  especially  of  neuronal  origin  that  would  modulate  a  potential  target  in  neurons  and/or  brain.  The  extracts 

showing best antioxidant properties will potentially have good therapeutic properties for the diverse kinds of diseases resulting from 

oxidative stress. 

Keywords:  Trapa  bispinosa,  Trigonella  foenum-graecum,  Syzygium  cumini,  Betula  utilis,  antioxidant,  phytoconstituents,  oxidative 

stress.


 

 

INTRODUCTION 

raditional medicine has a long history since ancient 

times. It is a bundle of knowledge, proficiencies and 

practices  based  on  theories,  view  points  and 

experiences native to different cultures, and inexplicable 

and  vague  at  times,  nevertheless  useful  in  protection  of 

health. Traditional medicine is the synthesis of beneficial 

experience  of  generations  of  physicians  practicing 

indigenous 

systems 

of 


medicine. 

The 


names 

alternative/complementary/non-conventional/indigenous 

medicine  are  used  interchangeably  as  opposed  to 

conventional medicine in some countries. India is one of 

the  12  mega  biodiversity  centers  having  45,  000  species 

of plant and its biodiversity is unmatched because it has 

16  different  agroclimatic  regions  including  10  vegetative 

zones  and  15  biotic  regions

1

.  The  rich  floral  diversity 



makes India a major practitioner of traditional medicines 

like  Ayurveda,  Unani,  Siddha  and  Homeopathy.  The 

traditional  medicine  preparations  include  therapeutic 

plants,  minerals  and  organic  matters  etc.  Even 

therapeutic  drugs  used  in  conventional  medicine  are 

derived  from  plants  thus  making  them  directly  or 

indirectly dependent upon the traditional medicine. 

Trapa  bispinosa,  Trigonella  foenum-graecum,  Syzygium 

cumini,  and  Betula  utilis  plants  were  chosen  because  of 

their  immense  medicinal  value  in  traditional  medicine. 



Trapa  bispinosa  is  an  aquatic  floating  herb  belonging  to 

the family trapaceae. It grows throughout Africa and Asia 

in  lakes  and  ponds  and  is  often  cultivated  for  its  edible 

fruit.  The  therapeutic  value  of  the  whole  herb  and  fruit 

has long been documented in conventional medicine as a 

cure  for  various  ailments.  The  entire  herb  has  been 

reported 

for 


hepatoprotective, 

antimicrobial, 

antibacterial,  antitumor,  antioxidant  and  free  radical 

scavenging activities

13



Trigonella  foenum-graecum  Linn.  (Fenugreek)  is  an 



annual  herb  belonging  to  Leguminosae  family,  grown  in 

India,  Egypt,  and  Middle  Eastern  region.  It  is  one  of  the 

oldest  medicinal  plants,  which  is  commonly  used  in 

traditional  medicine.  The  plant  is  reported  to  have  anti-

hyperglycemic  effect  and  used  as  antidiabetic  agent.  It 

has  diuretic,  uterine  &  cardio  tonic  effects,  hypotensive, 

hypolipidemic, 

hypoglycemic, 

hyperinsulinemic, 

antidiabetic  activities,  and  also  antinociceptive  and  anti-

inflammatory action

14



Syzygium  cumini  (Myrtaceae)  also  known  as  Syzygium 

jambolanum  and  Eugenia  cumini,  commonly  known  as 

Jamun.  S.  cumini  is  an  important  medicinal  plant  in 

various  traditional  systems  of  medicine.  It  is  effective  in 

the  treatment  of  diabetes  mellitus,  inflammation,  ulcers 

and  diarrhea  and  preclinical  studies  show  that  it 

possesses 

chemopreventive, 

radioprotective 

and 

antineoplastic  properties  (ref).  The  plant  is  rich  in 



phytocompounds  containing  namely  malic  acid,  oxalic 

acid,  gallic  acid,  betulinic  acid,  quercetin,  myricetin, 

myricitin,  myricetin.  Myricetin  works  as  a  strong 

antioxidant and quercetin shows protective effect against 

neurological disorders

25



Betula  utilis  D.  Don  (Betulaceae)  known  as  Himalayan 

birch  is  a  moderate-sized  tree  that  grows  up  to  20  m  in 

height.  The  bark  is  shining,  reddish-white  or  white,  with 

A Comparitive Study of Antioxidant Properties and Phytochemical Composition of Trapa bispinosa, 

Trigonella foenum-graecum, Syzygium cumini and Betula utilis 

T

Research Article 



Int. J. Pharm. Sci. Rev. Res., 38(2), May – June 2016; Article No. 16, Pages: 83-88                                                               ISSN 0976 – 044X  

 

 



International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research 

Available online at 

www.globalresearchonline.net  

© Copyright protected. Unauthorised republication, reproduction, distribution, dissemination and copying of this document in whole or in part is strictly prohibited. 

 

84

 



white  horizontal  smooth,  lenticels.  Betula  utilis  shows 

various pharmacological activities like antimicrobial, anti-

inflammatory,  anticancer,  antioxidant  and  anti-HIV 

activities.  The  plant  possesses  various  alkaloids  having 

diverse therapeutic effects

24



Various  drugs  have  been  used  and  cited  in  various 

treatises  of  traditional  medicines.  The  plants  Syzygium 



cumini  (SC),  Trigonella  foenum-graecum  (TF  )  Trapa 

bispinosa( TB) Betula utilis (BU) were selected to explore 

their  antioxidant  properties  and  there  by  their 

therapeutic  activity  against  various  kinds  of  diseases 

involving  oxidative  stress.  Biological  system  during  the 

course 

of 


respiration, 

physiologically 

or 

pathophysiologically,  produces  harmful  intermediates 



called  reactive  oxygen  species  (ROS).  Excess  ROS  in  the 

body  can  lead  to  damage  of  proteins,  lipids,  and  DNA, 

resulting  in  so-called  oxidative  stress.  The  excess 

production of reactive oxygen species results in oxidative 

stress,  causing  cellular  damage,  because  ROS  can  react 

with  and  damage  cellular  macromolecules,  like  DNA, 

proteins  and  lipids

6-8


.  Oxidative  stress  is  the  cause  for 

many  age-related  neurodegenerative  diseases.  Thus,  the 

phytoconstituents having antioxidant activity can mitigate 

the effects of oxidative stress and therefore can be used 

for  therapeutic  purpose  in  case  of  diseases  occurring 

through oxidative stress. 



MATERIALS AND METHODS 

Material 

Plant  parts,  methanol,  DPPH,  Fehling’s  solution  A  and 

Fehling’s  solution  B,  ethanol,  distilled  water,  HCl, 

chloroform,  conc.  H

2

SO

4



,  ammonia  solution,  picric  acid, 

hexane,  alpha  naphthol,  NaOH  ,  CuSO

4

,  ninhydrin 



solution, acetic acid anhydride, ferric chloride. 

Methodology 

Plant collection 

The  plant  Syzygium  cumini  (leaves),  Trigonella  foenum-



graecum  (seed)  collected  from  Dehradun,  Uttarakhand, 

India, and Trapa bispinosa (fruit) collected from Roorkee, 



Betula  utilis  (bark)  collected  from  Bhojbasa,  Uttarkashi 

district of Uttarakhand India. 



Plant authentication 

The  plants  Trapa  bispinosa,  Trigonella  foenum-graecum, 



Syzygium  cumini  and  Betula  utilis  were  authenticated 

from  Botanical  Survey  of  India  with  accession  numbers 

(Trigonella  foenum  graecum  Acc  No.  114996,  Trapa 



bispinosa  Acc  No.  114995,  Syzygium  cumini  Acc.  No. 

114993, Betula utilis Acc. No. 114994). 



Preparation of methanolic extracts 

TB, TF, SC and BU plant parts were dried under shade and 

powdered  in  laboratory.  The  prepared  powder  forms 

were  soaked  overnight  in  methanol  prior  to  extract 

preparation in Soxhlet apparatus. 

The powders (200 grams) of TF, SC, BU and TB put in 7:3 

methanol  water  mixtures  for  boiling  using  Soxhlet 

apparatus  for  8  cycles  at  68°C  for  ~8  hours  with 

intermittent  shaking.  The  prepared  extract  was  filtered 

and  evaporated  by  rotary  evaporator  at  60°C.  The  dried 

extract  powder  was  kept  in  a  glass  container  in  a 

refrigerator  and  used  subsequently  for  the  preliminary 

screening of phytochemicals and experimental studies. 

Preparation of aqueous extracts 

TF,  SC,  BU  and  TB  powders  (200  grams)  were  boiled  in 

distilled  water  (1000  ml)  for  15-20  minutes,  then  left 

overnight  at  room  temperature  and  filtered  next 

morning.  The  filtrate  was  evaporated  to  concentrate  in 

hot  air  oven  at  80°C  and  concentrate  was  stored  in 

refrigerator.  The  concentrated  extracts  were  used  for 

preliminary 

screening 

of 


phytochemicals 

and 


experimental studies. 

Determination  of  antioxidant  activity  by  DPPH  radical 

scavenging method 

The DPPH radical scavenging capacity of each extract was 

determined  using  method  of  Miliauskas

9,10


.  DPPH  shows 

maximum  absorption  at  515  nm  wavelength,  the  color 

disappears  by  reduction  of  antioxidant  compound.  The 

DPPH  solution  was  prepared  in  methanol  (6  ×  10

-5

  M), 

and  2  ml  of  this  solution  was  mixed  with  100  µl  of 

Methanolic  extracts  using  different  concentrations  (20, 

40, 80µg/ml). The samples were incubated for 30 min at 

37  °C,  and  then  absorbance  was  measured  at  515  nm 

(AE).  A  blank  sample  was  prepared  with  100  µl  of 

methanol and 2 ml of DPPH solution and absorbance was 

measured (AB). Standard was prepared using 1% ascorbic 

acid  and  serially  diluted  to  3.125%  of  original.  Ascorbic 

acid  matched  concentration  used  as  control.  The 

experiment  was  carried  out  in  triplicate  and  each 

experiment  was  repeated  three  times.  %  inhibition  was 

calculated using the following formula: 

(% inhibition) = [(AB-AE)/AB] *100 

Where  AB  absorbance  of  the  blank  sample  and  AE  is 

absorbance of the plant extract. 

 

 

 

 

 


Int. J. Pharm. Sci. Rev. Res., 38(2), May – June 2016; Article No. 16, Pages: 83-88                                                               ISSN 0976 – 044X  

 

 



International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research 

Available online at 

www.globalresearchonline.net  

© Copyright protected. Unauthorised republication, reproduction, distribution, dissemination and copying of this document in whole or in part is strictly prohibited. 

 

85

 



RESULTS 

Phytochemical qualitative characterization 

Table 1: Preliminary photochemical Investigation

11

 



S. No 

Test 

Observation 

Inference 

1. 


Test for carbohydrates 

Molisch's test (general test): to 2-3 ml extract, add few drops of 

alpha  naphthol  solution  in  alcohol.  Shake  &  add  concentrated 

H

2



SO

4

 from the side of a test tube. 



Violet ring is formed at  the junction 

of two liquids. 

Carbohydrates are present. 

2. 


Test for proteins 

Biuret  test  (general  test):  To  3  ml  extract  add  4%  NaOH  &  few 

drops of 1% CuSO

4

 solution. 



No violet or pink colour appears. 

Proteins/peptides are absent. 

3. 

Test for amino acids 

Ninhydrin  test  (general  test):  heat  3  ml  extract  and  3  drops  of 

5% ninhydrin solution in boiling water bath for 10 min. 

Purple or bluish colour appears. 

Amino acids are present. 

4. 


Test for fats and oils: 

Place  a  small  amount  of  extract  on  glass  slide.  Make  a  smear. 

Add a drop of Sudan Red III reagent. After 2 min. wash with 50% 

alcohol mount in glycerin observe under microscope. 

No oil globules are observed. 

Fats and oils are absent. 

5. 

Test for steroid: 

Liebaermann-Burchard  reaction:  mix  2  ml  extract  with 

chloroform.  Add  1-2  ml  acetic  anhydride  and  2  drops  of  conc. 

H

2



SO

4

 from the side of the test tube. 



Chloroform  layer  appears  red  and 

acid  layer  shows  greenish  yellow 

fluorescence. 

Steroids are present. 

6. 

Test for cardiac glycosides: (Keller- Killiani test): to 2 ml extract, 

add glacial acetic acid, 1 drop 5% FeCl

3

 and conc. H



2

SO

4



Reddish  brown  colour  appears  at 

the junction of two liquid layers and 

upper layer appears bluish green. 

Cardiac glycosides are present. 

7. 


Test for saponin glycosides 

Foam test: shake the drug extract or dry powder vigorously with 

water. 

Persistent foam observed. 



Saponinglycosides/saponins  

are present. 

8. 

Test for alkaloids 

Wagner’s  test:  2-3  ml  filtrate  with  few  drops  of  Wagner’s 

reagent. 

Reddish brown ppt. 

Alkaloids are present. 

9. 


Test for tannins 

Add few drops of 5% FeCl

3

 solution in extracts. 



Deep blue-black colour. 

Tannins are present 

10. 

Test for flavonoids 

Ferric  chloride  test  –  test  solution  treated  with  few  drops  of 

ferric chloride solution 

Blackish 

red 

colour 


formation 

occurs. 


Flavonoids are present 

Preparation of extracts 

Table 2: Percentage yield of plant extracts 

Extract 

TB (A) 

TB (M) 

TF (A) 

TF (M) 

SC (A) 

SC (M) 

BU (A) 

BU (M) 

Percentage yield 

(gms) 

26gm 


(13 %) 

27 gm 


(13.5 %) 

30 gm 


(15 %) 

29.8 gm 


(14.9 %) 

23.92gm 


(11.96 %) 

27.2gm 


(13.6%) 

24 gm 


(12 %) 

25.8 gm 


(12.9 %) 

Table 

Extract constituents 

TB (A) 

TB (M) 

TF (A) 

TF (M) 

SC (A) 

SC (M) 

BU (A) 

BU (M) 

Carbohydrates 

















Proteins 

















Amino acids 

















Fats and oils 

















Steroids 

















Cardiac glycosides 

















Alkaloides 

















Tannin 

















Flavonoids 

















Int. J. Pharm. Sci. Rev. Res., 38(2), May – June 2016; Article No. 16, Pages: 83-88                                                               ISSN 0976 – 044X  

 

 



International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research 

Available online at 

www.globalresearchonline.net  

© Copyright protected. Unauthorised republication, reproduction, distribution, dissemination and copying of this document in whole or in part is strictly prohibited. 

 

86

 



 

 

(1) 



 

(2) 

 

(3) 

 

(4) 

Figure: DPPH assay (1) DPPH radical scavenging activities 

of  Trigonella  foenum-graecum  extract  extract,  (2)  DPPH 

radical  scavenging  activities  of  Trapa  Bispinosa  extract, 

(3) DPPH radical scavenging activities of Syzygium cumini, 

(4)  DPPH  radical  scavenging  activities  of  Betula  utilis 

extract. 



A- Aqueous 

M-Methanolic 

The results of our laboratory prepared extracts from the 

four  medicinal  plants  are  presented  in  table  2.  The 

percentage  yield  of  the  extracts  were  26  gm  (13  %)  and 

27  gm  (13.5  %)  for  Trapa  bispinosa,  30  gm  (15  %)  and 

29.8  gm  (14.9  %)  for  Trigonella  foenum-graecum,  23.92 

gm  (11.6  %)  and  27.2  gm  (13.6  %)  for  Syzygium  cumini 

and  24  gm  (12  %)  and  25.8  gm  (12.9)  for  Betula  utilis 

aqueous and methanolic extracts respectively. 

Plant authentication 

The  plants  Trapa  bispinosa,  Trigonella  foenum-graecum, 



Syzygium cumini and Betula utilis was authenticated from 

Botanical  Servay  of  India  with  accession  number 

(Trigonella  foenum  graecum  Acc  No.  114996,  Trapa 

bispinosa  Acc  No.  114995,  Syzygium  cumini  Acc.  No. 

114993, Betula utilis Acc. No. 114994). 



Preliminary photochemical Investigation 

Important  medicinal  phytochemicals  such  as  reducing 

sugars,  flavonoids,  alkaloids,  tannins,  proteins,  amino 

acids,  steroids  and  cardiac  glycosides  were  tested.  The 

result  of  the  phytochemical  analysis  shows  that  the  all 

four plants are rich in at least one of proteins, amino acid, 

steroid,  cardiaglycoside,  tannin,  alkaloids,  flavonoids 

reducing sugars and tannins. 



DPPH assay 

DPPH radical scavenging activities of plant extracts varied 

from  56%  to  92%.  Trigonella  foenum-graecum  extract 

showed the highest antioxidant activity of 92%, 90% and 

86%  inhibition  in  methanolic  extract  and  in  aqueous 

extract  inhibition  of  90%,  88%  and  88%  of  DPPH  was 

recorded.  In  Trapa  bispinosa  plant  methanolic  extract 

DPPH  inhibition  of  88%,  87%  and  81%,  and  in  aqueous 

extract  87%,  75%  and  53%  was  observed.  Syzygium 

cumini methanolic  extract  showed  DPPH inhibition  of  87 

%,  71%  and  65%  and  in  aqueous  extract  inhibition 

observed  was  89%,  75%  and  60%.  Inhibition  in  Betula 

utilis  methanolic  extract  was  88%,  87%  and  81%;  and  in 

aqueous extract DPPH inhibition was 56%, 66% and 75% 

inhibition  at  80,  40  and  20µg/ml  concentrations 

respectively. 



DISCUSSION 

The  extracts  of  four  plants  that  were  part  of  this  study 

gave  yields  in  the  range  of approximately  12-15% (Table 

1) and are rich in various classes of phytocompounds like 

alkaloids, tannins, flavonoids, cardiac glycosides, steroids, 

amino acids and carbohydrates (Table 2). All these classes 

of  phytoconstituents  exert  diverse  effects  on  physiology 

depending upon their composition. 



Int. J. Pharm. Sci. Rev. Res., 38(2), May – June 2016; Article No. 16, Pages: 83-88                                                               ISSN 0976 – 044X  

 

 



International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research 

Available online at 

www.globalresearchonline.net  

© Copyright protected. Unauthorised republication, reproduction, distribution, dissemination and copying of this document in whole or in part is strictly prohibited. 

 

87

 



The  plants  BU,  SC,  TF  and  TB  have  been  used  to 

ameliorate 

various 

diseases 

like 

constipation, 



inflammation  in  gastritis,  arthritis,  alcohol  induced  liver 

toxicity, heart diseases, cancer, obesity, and are known to 

be hypoglycemic, neuroprotective and beneficial for liver 

function,  blood  lipids,  proapoptosis,  cardiovascular 

health.  In  addition  their  phytoconstituents  act  as 

cytotoxic agents against malignant brain-tumors but their 

role  in  curing  diseases  of  neuronal  origin  is  explored  to 

lesser  extent.  Most  studies  provide  only  the  superficial 

information,  lacking  depth  and  targets  to  cure  the 

diseases.  Traditional  awareness  of  plants  for  medicine  is 

based  on  personal  experiences  and  the  knowledge 

handed  down  from  one  generation  to  next  generations 

mostly  by  word  of  mouth  or  also  in  the  form  written 

treatise  or  manuscripts  in  various  Indian  vernacular 

languages. By 19th century active principles of medicinal 

plants  were  isolated  based  on  such  knowledge  base  and 

discovery  of  quinine  from  Cinchona  bark  was  the  first 

active principle isolated and characterized

4

. Extract of TF 



contains  caparine,  fenugrikine,  gentianineyamogenin, 

gitogenin,  neotigogens  4-hydroxyisoleucine.  whereas 

methanolic extract TF is composed of caparine, trignollin, 

fenugrikine,  gentianine,  tigogenin,  neotigogens,  4-

hydroxyisoleucine and the aqueous extract of TB contains 

pyridoxine,  thiamine,  nicotinic  acid,  D  amylase, 

pantothenic acid, phosphorylase, 2β,3α,23-trihydroxyurs-

12-en-28-oic 

acid 

whereas 


methanolic 

extract 


composition  is  pyridoxine,  thiamine,  nicotinic  acid,  D 

amylase,  pantothenic  acid,  phosphorylase,  2β,3α,23-

trihydroxyurs-12-en-28-oic acid (Pubchem). 

Both  BU  and  SC  plants  are  known  for  their  medicinal 

value  for  curing  various  pathophysiological  conditions. 

The phytoconstituents of BU are betulin, lupeol, oleanolic 

acid,  acetyloheanolic  acid,  betulitc  acid,  lupenone, 

sitosterol,  methyle  betulonate,  methyl  betulate  and 

karachic  acid. BU  is  known for its  antiseptic,  proapatotic 

properties. Oleanic acid have anti-inflammatory and anti-

tumor  properties  and  it  prevents  from  cerebral 

ischemia


20,21

.  Betulinic  acid  is  well-known  as  a 

development 

inhibitor 

of 

human 


melanoma, 

neuroectodermal  and  malignant  tumor  cells  and  it  was 

also  reported  to  stimulate  apoptosis  in  these  cells. 

Betulinic  acid  acts  as  an  anticancer  agent  operating 

through  different mechanisms  and  has  been  reported  to 

activate apoptotic pathways in cancer cells

22

. The plant SC 



has been previously reported for the gastroprotective and 

anti-ulcerogenic, 

anti-inflammatory, 

hypoglycemic, 

hypolipidemic,  antianaemic,  antioxidant  properties.  SC 

works as strong antioxidant and thus it has oxygen radical 

scavenging  capacity.  The  SC  contains  phytochemicals 

namely  malic  acid,  oxalic  acid,  gallic  acid,  betulic  acid, 

quercetin, myricetin, myricitin. Myricetin works as strong 

antioxidant  and  quercetin  shows  protective  effect  in 

neurological  disorders

23

.  Owing  to  their  antioxidant  rich 



phytochemical  nature  these  plants  have  immense 

therapeutic  potential  to  fight  against  various  types  of 

diseases  of  diverse  origin  and  nature  viz.,  infectious 

diseases  of  bacterial,  fungal  and  viral  nature,  life  style 

diseases  like  diabetes  and  hypertension,  diseases  of 

neuronal 

origin 

like, 


epilepsy 

and 


dementia, 

neurodegenerative  diseases  like  AD  and  PD,  besides 

various forms and types of cancers. 

This investigation supports that four plants are promising 

source  of  natural  antioxidants.  Antioxidant  properties 

differ significantly among the four selected plant extracts 

depending  upon  the  content  and  composition  of  the 

phytoconstituents. Among these plant extracts, Trigonella 



foenum-graecum and Trapa bispinosa showed very strong 

antioxidant  properties.  The  plant  BU  shows  less 

antioxidant activity in inverse dose dependant manner in 

contrast  with  other  three  plants  taken  in  this  study,  but 

that does not undermine its therapeutic value since it has 

strong  proapoptotic  nature  due  to  the  presence  of 

betulinic  acid.  Our  results  are  in  conformation  with  a 

previous study on B. utilis

24



REFERENCES 



1.

 

Chopra  R.N.,  Nayar  S.L.  and  Chopra  I.C.  In  Glossary  of 



Indian medicinal plants, Council of Scientific and Industrial 

ResearchNew Delhi, 1, 1956, 197. 

2.

 



WHO  traditional  medicine  strategy  2002–2005,  Geneva: 

WHO; 2002. 

3.

 

Willcox  ML,  Bodeker  G.  Traditional  herbal  medicines  for 



malaria, British Medical Journal, 329, 2004, 1156-9. 

4.

 



Phillipson  J  D.  Phytochemistry  and  medicinal  plants, 

Phytochemistry, 56, 2001, 237-243. 

5.

 

Swerdlow  Joel  L.  Nature’s  Medicine:  Plants  That  Heal, 



National Geographic Society Publication, 2000. 

6.

 



Cerutti PA, Trump BF Inflammation and oxidative stress in 

carcinogenesis, Cancer Cells, 3(1), 1991, 1-7. 

7.

 

Ames BN, Shigenaga MK. Oxidants are a major contributor 



to aging. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 663, 

1992, 85–96. 

8.

 

Ames BN, Shigenaga MK, Hagen TM. Oxidants, antioxidants 



and  degenerative  diseases  of  aging.  Proceedings  of  the 

National Academy of Sciences, 90, 1993, 7915–22. 

9.

 

Miliauskas, G, Venskutonis, PR, Van Beek, TA. Screening of 



radical scavenging activity of some medicinal and aromatic 

plant extracts, Food Chemistry852004, 231–237. 

10.

 

Brand-Williams,  W  Cuvelier  ME,  Berset  C.  Use  of  a  free 



radical  method  to  evaluate  antioxidant  activity.  LWT-Food 

Science and Technology, 28, 1995, 25–30. 

11.

 

Harborne JB. Phytochemical Methods. New Delhi: Springer 



(India) Pvt. Ltd, 2005, 17. 

12.


 

Kim  JH,  Park  SH,  Kim  YW,  Ha  JM,  Bae  SS,  Lee  GS.  The 

Traditional  Herbal  Medicine,  Dangkwisoo-San,  Prevents 

Cerebral  Ischemic  Injury  through  Nitric  Oxide-Dependent 

Mechanisms,  Evidence  Based  Complementary  Alternative 

Medicine  2011.  Journal  of  Ethnopharmacol,  140(1),  2012, 

107–116. 

13.


 

Khosla P, Gupta DD, Nagpal RK. Effect of Trigonella foenum 

graecum  (Fenugreek)  on  blood  Glucose  in  normal  and 


Int. J. Pharm. Sci. Rev. Res., 38(2), May – June 2016; Article No. 16, Pages: 83-88                                                               ISSN 0976 – 044X  

 

 



International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research 

Available online at 

www.globalresearchonline.net  

© Copyright protected. Unauthorised republication, reproduction, distribution, dissemination and copying of this document in whole or in part is strictly prohibited. 

 

88

 



diabetic  rats.  Indian  Journal  of  Physiol  Pharmacol,  39(2), 

1995, 173-4. 

14.

 

Das  PK,  Bhattacharya  S,  Pandey  JN,  and  Biswas  M. 



Antidiabetic  activity  of  Trapa  natans  fruit  peel  extract 

against streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Global Journal 

of Pharmacol, 5(3), 2010, 186-190. 

15.


 

Dakshinamurtia  K,  Sharma  SK,  Jonathan  A,  Geiger  D. 

Neuroprotective  actions  of  pyridoxine.  Biochim  Biophys 

Acta, 1647, 2003, 225-229. 

16.

 

Vyawahare  NS,  and  Ambikar  DB.  Evaluation  of 



neuropharmacological  activity  of  hydroalcoholic  extract of 

fruits  of  Trapa  bispinosa  in  laboratory  animals. 

International Journal Pharma Science, 22, 2010, 32-35. 

17.


 

Fulda S, Friesen C, Los M, Scaffidi C, Mier W, Benedict M, 

Nunez  G,  Krammer  PH,  Peter  ME,  Debatin  KM.  Betulinic 

acid  triggers  CD95  (APO  1/Fas)-and  p53-independent 

apoptosis  via  activation  of  caspases  in  neuroectodermal 

tumors. Cancer Research, 57, 1997, 4956–4964. 

18.

 

Fulda  S,  Jeremias  I,  Steiner  HH,  Pietsch  T,  Debetulinic 



acidtin  KM.  Betulinic  acid:  a  new  cytotoxic  agent  against 

malignant  brain-tumor  cells.  International  journal  of 

cancer, 82, 1999, 435–41. 

19.


 

Kumar  A,  Ilavarasan  R,  Jayachandran  T.  Antiinflammatory 

activity  of  Syzygium  cumini  seed.  African  Journal  of 

Biotechnology, 7, 2008, 1932-40. 

20.

 

Laura  Caltana,  María  Luisa  Nieto,  and  Alicia  Brusco 



Oleanolic  acid:  a  promising  neuroprotective  agent  for 

cerebral  ischemia  Neural  Regenration  Research,  10(4), 

2015, 540–541. 

21.


 

Caltana L, Rutolo D, Nieto ML, Brusco A. Further evidence 

for the neuroprotective role of oleanolic acid in a model of 

focal brain hypoxia in  rats. Neurochemestry  International, 

79, 2014, 79-87. 

22.


 

Fisher  DE.  Apoptosis  in  cancer  therapy:  crossing  the 

threshold, Cell, 78(4), 1994, 539–542. 

23.


 

Choi DH, Li C, Choi JS. Effects of myricetin, an antioxidant, 

on  the  pharmacokinetics  of  losartan  and  its  active 

metabolite, EXP-3174, in rats: possible role of cytochrome 

P450  3A4,  cytochrome  P450  2C9  and  P-glycoprotein 

inhibition  by  myricetin.  Journal  of  Pharmacy  and 

Pharmacology, 62(7), 2010, 908-14. 

24.


 

Kumaraswamy  M. V.  and  Satish  S.  Free  radical  scavenging 

activity  and  lipoxygenase  inhibition  of  Woodfordia 

fructicosa  Kurz  and  Betula  utilis  Wall,  African  Journal  of 

Biotechnology, 7(12), 2008, 2013-2016. 

25.


 

Aqil  F,  Gupta  A,  Munagala R,  Jeyabalan J,  Kausar  H,  Singh 

IP, Gupta RC. Antioxidant and antiproliferative activities of 

anthocyanin/ 

ellagitannin-enriched 

extracts 

from 

Syzygiumcumini  L.  (‘jamun’,  the  Indian  Blackberry)  Nutr 



Cancer, 64(3), 2012, 428–438. 

 

Source of Support: Nil, Conflict of Interest: None. 





Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə