Introduction Leiomyosarcoma is a rare tumor of the penile



Yüklə 42,95 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix14.04.2017
ölçüsü42,95 Kb.
#14008

Introduction

Leiomyosarcoma  is  a  rare  tumor  of  the  penile

mesechymal tissue. Because of the small number of

cases  reported  so  far, the  conclusions  about  treat-

ment  and  prognosis  are  equivocal.

We  report  an



additional case, and attempt a review in the literature.

Case report

A 78-year-old  farm  worker presented with  a  3-year

history of gradual painless swelling of the penis. His

medical  history  was  remarkable  for  generalized

vascular  disease  and  diabetes  mellitus. During  the

physical  examination  a  non-mobile  hard  mass  was

palpated  involving the base and the midshaft of the

penis. The glans  penis was  normal and  no regional

lymphadenopathy  was  found. Serum  biochemistry

and full blood count were normal. A CT showed a

soft  mass  lesion involving the  corpora cavernosa  of

the penis, but no evidence of metastatic disease.With

the  presumptive  diagnosis  of  penile  sarcoma  the

patient underwent a radical penectomy with perineal

urethrostomy. Macroscopically, a  tumor  measuring 

8 ´ 8 ´ 14 cm was found to arise from the  corpora,

making the distinction between them almost impos-

sible. The  urethra  and  glans  were  free  of  invasion

(Fig. 1). Microscopically, the tumor had the features

of high-grade sarcoma, being composed of neoplastic

spindle-shaped  cells, with  eosinophilic  cytoplasm

arranged  in  fascicles. The  cells  showed  moderate

nuclear atypia, with  hyperchromatic nuclei and  the

mitotic  rate  was  ve  per  high-power  eld. On

immunohistochemical staining, the tumor cells were

positive  for  vimentin  and  SMA  (smooth  muscle

antigen) (Fig. 2) and negative for desmin and S-100

protein. In  conclusion, the  tumor  proved  to  be  a

leiomyosarcoma. The  patient  made  an  uneventful

recovery  and  is  well, with  no  evidence  of  disease,

2 years after the operation.

Discussion

The most common primary  malignant neoplasm of

the  penis  is  squamous  cell  carcinoma, followed  by

metastatic  neoplasms  such  as  prostate, bladder,

rectum, kidney  and  testis, and  those  spreading  by

direct  extension  from  the  adjacent  structures.

Mesenchymal neoplasms are rare and represent less

than 5% of all types of penile malignant disease.

2

According  to  Dehner  and  Smith, who  in  their



classic review

analyzed 46 primary soft tissue tumors



of  the  penis, leiomyosarcoma  represents  approxi-

mately  13.5  and  6.5%  of  penile sarcomas  and  soft

tissue  tumors  in  general, respectively. This  is  in

concordance with  the  earlier  results  of  Ashley  and

Edwards

4

where they found an incidence of 5.5%.



To the best of our knowledge, the last well-docu-

mented case was that  of Pow-Sang and Orihuela in

1994

5

and, according to their review, the present case



is the  20th  of  the  deep-seated lesions and  the  28th

that has been reported in general.

The age range at diagnosis is from 6 years

6

to the



late 80s.

7

1



1

1

Sarcoma (2002) 6, 75–77



CASE REPORT

Leiomyosarcoma of the penis

VASILIOS S. KATSIKAS

1

, KONSTANTINOS D. KALYVAS



1

, SPIROS S. IOANNIDIS

1

,

MICHALIS V. PAPATHANASIOU



1

, KONSTANTINA P. PANAGIOTOPOULOU

2

,

PANAGIOTIS M. HITIROGLOU



2

& KONSTANTINOS YANNAKOYORGOS

1

Departments of 

1

Urology and 

2

Pathology, Medical School, Aristoteles University of Thessaloniki, Greece

Abstract 

We report a case of a 78-year-old patient with penile leiomyosarcoma, treated by  radical penectomy. Two years  after the

operation the patient is without evidence of local recurrence or metastatic disease. We also  discuss the treatment options

and attempt a review of the literature.



Key words: leiomyosarcoma, penis, deep, surgery

Correspondence to: Dr. Konstantinos Kalyvas, 27 Koritsas St., GR 55535 Thessaloniki, Greece. E-mail: kalivas@spark.net.gr

ISSN 1357–714X print/ISSN 1369–1643 online/02/0200075–03 © Taylor & Francis Ltd

DOI: 10.1080/1357714021000022177



76

Katsikas et al.

Fig. 1. Macroscopic view of the excised tumor, arrowheads indicating the glans penis at the bottom. Note that the urethra is free of

invasion.The tumor size is estimated to be approximately 18 cm.

Fig. 2. On immunohistochemical stains, strong positivity for smooth muscle antigen (SMA, 100) can be seen.

Pratt and Ross

7

were the  rst authors who classi-



ed penile leiomyosarcomas into two distinct patho-

logical  and  clinical  entities,

super cial  and

deep-seated tumors.

Super cial lesions usually present as a tumorlet in

the distal shaft or the penile prepuce, often in middle-

aged  men, and  commonly  it  is  a  slowly  growing

tumor, with low metastatic potential.

Deep lesions, one of which we present here, arise

from the glans penis and from the proximal portions

of the corpora cavernosa or corpus spongiosum, and

occur at a relatively more advanced age.

In  contrast  to  the  super cial  tumors, the  deep

lesions  show  greater  propensity  to  metastasize  and

have  therefore poorer prognosis. Clinically  they  are

poorly  circumscribed, rm  non-tender  masses  that

in ltrate surrounding tissues and can be the cause of

urinary obstruction or urethrocutaneous  stula.

8

The  origin  of  the  super cial  type  neoplasm  is



presumed to  be  the  erector  pilorum  muscle  of  the

dermis  or  the  smooth  muscular  elements  of  the

subcutaneous  tissue. The  deep-seated  lesions

possibly  arise  from  the  smooth  muscle  cells  of  the

corpora cavernosa or the corpus spongiosum, or they

may be due to progression of an initially super cial

lesion.

5

For the tumors arising in the glans penis the



origin could be from blood vessel walls.

6

On  gross  section  they  are  usually  rubbery  in



consistency, well  circumscribed  and  with  white,

yellow, or gray appearance.

Microscopically, they  are  composed  of  spindle-

shaped  smooth  muscle  bers  arranged  into  inter-

lacing  fasicles. The  importance  of  mitotic  rate  and

other nuclear differentiation variables, have not been

analyzed in the literature, but the data show that the

degree of differentiation is reliable in order to predict

the tumor propensity to in ltrate the adjacent struc-

tures or to metastasize. Histologically the two types

are identical.

On  electron  microscopy  examination  myo brils,

dense  bodies, and  abundant  pinocytic  vesicles  are

noted, and  a  continuous  basal  lamina  is  present

around most of the tumor cells.

9

It  seems  that, of  mesenchymal  penile  tumors,



leiomyosarcomas are more prone to  recur and they

become more undifferentiated with each recurrence,

1

The  recurrence  rate  is  relatively  similar  in  both



groups, but the metastatic potential is higher in deep-

seated lesion.

3

The  treatments  of  choice  are  (1)  surgery, in  the



form of local excision, amputation whether partial or

total, or  radical  penectomy, (2)  radiation, or  (3)

chemotherapy. Surgery should aim at the excision of

the  tumor  mass. Amputation, is  the  most  effective

treatment  to  prevent  recurrences for  both  types  of

penile leiomyosarcoma,

5

but the approach should be



individualized, and because super cial tumors tend

to  appear  in  younger  men, these  cases  can  be

managed  by  local  excision  with  negative  surgical

margins whenever this  is possible. Deep lesions are

most  appropriately  treated  with  a  more  aggressive

approach, namely amputation for the  distal lesions,

or radical penectomy for the middle or proximal shaft

lesions.


In  contrast  to  squamous  cell  carcinoma  of  the

penis where the excision of the regional lymph nodes

can be considered curative in early stages, this is not

the case in penile leiomyosarcoma,

10

and the  radia-



tion or excision of  regional lymph nodes cannot be

considered to have an in uence on patient survival.

5

Pre- or postoperative external beam radiation has



not proved its value in treating penile leiomyosarco-

mas or in increasing survival rates.

11

Brachytherapy



has  not  yet  been  reported  as  a  treatment.

Chemotherapy with anthracyclines or etoposide has

provided  poor  results  and, unfortunately, ongoing

trials show that the newer taxanes, have not been suc-

cessful in treating uterine leiomyosarcomas.

12

Nevertheless, both  treatment  modalities  can  be



used  for  palliation  in  recurrences not  amenable  to

surgical treatment.

In  conclusion, leiomyosarcoma  of  the  penis  is  a

very rare disease cured mainly by surgical interven-

tion. The  effectiveness  of  radiation  therapy  and

chemotherapy  is  debatable, and  the  lack  of  large

series  makes  the  conclusions  insecure. Because  of 

the small number of cases so far, the best approach

for  these  malignant  tumors  is  the  collaboration

between the urological surgeon, the pathologist, the

radiotherapist and the medical oncologist in order to

optimize  the  results  for  the  best  interest  of  the

patient.

References

1. Valadez  RA, Waters  WB. Leiomyosarcoma  of  penis.



Urology 1986; 27(3): 265–7.

2. Lucia MS, Miller GJ. Histopathology of the malignant

lesions of the penis.

Urol Clin N Am 1992; 19: 227.

3. Dehner LP,Smith BH. Soft tissue tumors of the penis.

A clinicopathologic study of 46 cases.

Cancer 1970; 25:

1431–47.


4. Ashley  DJ, Edwards  EC. Sarcoma  of  the  penis.

Leiomyosarcoma of the penis.



Br J Surg 1957; 45: 170.

5. Pow-Sang  MR, Orihuela  E  . Leiomyosarcoma  of  the

penis.

J Urol 1994; 151(6): 1643–5.

6. Glucker E, Hirshowitz B, Gellei B. Leiomyosarcoma of

the glans penis. Case report.

Plast Reconstr Surg 1972;

50(4): 406–8.

7. Pratt  RM, Ross  RT. Leiomyosarcoma  of  the  penis.

A report of a case.



Br J Surg 1969; 56(11): 870–2.

8. Nkposong EO, Osunkoya BO. Leiomyosarcoma of the

penis.

West Africa Med J 1972; 21: 32.

9. Kathuria S, Jablokow VR, Molnar Z. Leiomyosarcoma

of the penile prepuce with ultrastructural study.

Urology

1986; 27(6): 556–7.

10. SrivinasV, Morse MJ, Herr HW, Sogani PC, Whitmore

WF Jr. Penile cancer: relation of extent of nodal metas-

tasis to survival.

J Urol 1987; 137: 880.

11. Greenwood N, Fox H, Edwards EC. Leiomyosarcoma

of the penis.

Cancer 1972; 29(2): 481–3.

12. Sutton G, Blessing JA, Ball H. Phase II trial of pacli-

taxel in leiomyosarcoma of the uterus: a gynecological

oncology  group  study.



Gynecol  Oncol  1999; 74(3):

346–9.


1

1

1



Penile leiomyosarcoma

77


Yüklə 42,95 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə