Issn 2320-3862 jmps 2015; 3(3): 01-08 2014 jmps received: 10-03-2015 Accepted: 08-04-2015 Adalgisa da Silva Alvarez



Yüklə 0,96 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/3
tarix11.08.2017
ölçüsü0,96 Mb.
  1   2   3

 

~ 1 ~ 


Journal of Medicinal Plants Studies 2015; 3(3): 01-08

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



ISSN 2320-3862 

 

JMPS 2015; 3(3): 01-08 



 

© 2014 JMPS 

 

Received: 10-03-2015 



  

Accepted: 08-04-2015 

 

Adalgisa da Silva Alvarez  

Programa de Pós-graduação de 

Doutorado em Ciências Agrárias, 

Universidade Federal Rural da 

Amazônia, Av. Presidente 

Tancredo Neves 

 

Maria das Graças Bichara Zoghbi 

Coordenação de Botânica, Museu 

Paraense Emílio Goeldi, Av. 

Presidente Tancredo Neves, 1901, 

66040-170, Belém, PA, Brasil 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Correspondence

Adalgisa da Silva Alvarez  

Programa de Pós-graduação de 

Doutorado em Ciências Agrárias, 

Universidade Federal Rural da 

Amazônia, Av. Presidente 

Tancredo Neves 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Chemical variation in essential oil constituents of 



Platonia insignis Mart. From North of Brazil

 

 



Adalgisa da Silva Alvarez, Maria das Graças Bichara Zoghbi 

 

Abstract

 

Platonia  insignis  (Clusiaceae),  a  native  tree  of  Amazon  produces  fruit  largely  used  in  some  food. 

Although extensively research on free fatty acids and volatiles of the pulp, shell and seeds, no paper was 

encountered  concerning  volatiles  from  the  leaves  of  this  species.  Essential-oil  samples  were  extracted 

from  fifteen  individual  plants  of  Platonia  insignis  from  representative  wild  populations  from  three 

municipalities  in  the  Northeastern  Pará,  Brazil,  and  investigated  by  gas  chromatography/mass 

spectrometry (GC/MS)  and gas chromatography/flame  ionization  detector (GC/FID).  The results  of the 

oil compositions were processed by Hierarchical Component Analysis (HCA) allowing establishment of 

two groups of essential oils differentiated by the content of β-caryophyllene (Cluster I), and α-selinene/β-

selinene (Cluster II). HCA also distinguished the oils taken from the Mosqueiro Island from the oils from 

Bragança and Santo Antonio do Tauá during the dry and rainy Amazonian seasons. 

 

 



Keywords:

 

Chemical variation, essential oil constituents, Platonia insignis, Brazil 



 

1. Introduction 

Bacuri (Platonia insignis Mart.) belonging to the Clusiaceae family, is one of the most popular 

fruit  of  the  State  of  Pará.  In  all  Amazon,  this  species  showed  large  concentration  in  the 

Salgado and in the Marajó Island (Cavalcante, 2010). In the State of Pará, was dispersed in the 

direction  to  the  northeast  of  Brazil,  reaching  of  the  States  to  Maranhão  and  Piauí;  in  south 

direction, the dispersion reached the States of Tocantins and Mato Grosso, getting to break the 

borders  of  Brazil;  in  the  north  direction  it  reached  the  State  of  Amapá,  also  happening, 

although in a rare  area way, in the State  of Amazonas (Cavalcante, 2010; Nascimento et  al., 

2007). Bacuri is found  in abundance in the  markets  of Belém  in the  months of February  and 

March. 


Oleic (39.0%), palmitic (28.0%) and stearic (28.0%) acids were identified in the fat of the seed 

of P. insignis for the first time by Pechnick and Chaves (1945). The predominance of palmitic 

and oleic acids  in seed, pulp  and shells  of bacuri  fruit also was reported  by  other  researchers 

(Hilditch and Pathak, 1949; Bentes et al., 1986/1987; Guedes et al., 1990; Rogez et al., 2004). 

Concerning  the  volatile  compounds  Alves  and  Jennings  (1979)  identified  heptane,  linalool, 

cis-linalool  oxide  and  trans-linalool  oxide  as  a  major  constituents  encountered  in  the 

pasteurized pulp of bacuri fruit. Extraction of bacuri shells by different methods (LCO

2, 

SCO


2, 

SD,  EtOH  at  room  temperature  and  in  Soxhlet)  showed  the  presence  of  free  fatty  acids, 

linalool,  3,7-dimethyl-1-octen-3,7-diol,  eugenol,  β-bisabolene,  α-terpineol,  methyl  benzene, 

trans-linalool  oxide,  cis-linalool  oxide  and  trimethyl  citrate  (Monteiro  et  al.,  1997).  Linalool 

and its cis-furanoid oxide, 2,6-dimethyl-octa-3,7-dien-2,6-diol (isomer 2) were encountered in 

a  major  amount  of  the  pulp  fruit  (Boulanger  et  al.,  1999).  In  the  same  way,  considering  the 

volatile  compounds  present  in  the  bound  fraction,  released  by  enzymatic  hydrolysis  of  the 

crude  heterosidic  extract,  2-phenylethanol  had  the  highest  concentration  (Boulanger  et  al., 

1999;  Franco  and  Janzantti,  2005).  Linalool  and  α-terpineol  were  the  most  prominent 

compounds encountered in the SDE-extract of the pulp of bacuri fruits taken in the open Ver-

o-Peso  market  in  the  city  of  Belém  (Borges  and  Rezende,  2000).  The  formation  of  volatile 

constituents  during  heat  treatment  of  bacuri  pulp  at  the  natural  pH  of  the  fruit  was  reported 

(Boulanger and Crouzet, 2001). Linalool, hotrienol, cis-linalool furanoxide and trans-linalool 

furanoxide were major in pH = 3 then compared to pH = 7, in SDE extraction (Boulanger and 

Crouzet,  2001).  Linalool  is  the  compound  responsible  for  the  most  intense  aroma  and  floral 

characteristic of the pulp of bacuri fruit, while the contribution of a fruity note was assigned to 

the ester methyl hexanoate (Borges and Rezende, 2000). A survey of literature reveals no  



 

~ 2 ~ 


Journal of Medicinal Plants Studies 

 

existence of the studies on leaf volatiles of P. insignis. The aim 



of the present paper was to characterize the volatiles present in 

the  leaves  of  P.  insignis  from  three  populations  that  grown 

wild in three municipalities in the Northeastern of the State of 

Pará, and investigate the chemical variability in the function of 

the place of collection and the influence of the seasonal period. 

 

2. Experimental Part 

For  this  research  fifteen  natural  specimens  of  three 

municipalities  in  the  State  of  Pará  were  selected:  Area  I  is 

located in the Community of Benjamin Constant belonging to 

the municipality of Bragança located between the geographical 

coordinates: 1 ° 00 '00 "and 1 ° 10' 00 'south latitude and 46 ° 

40' 00  'and 46 ° 50' 00  "west longitude of  Greenwich (Figure 

1); area  II is the São Caetano of Maynooth, northeastern Pará, 

Microrregião  Salgado  and  displays  geographic  coordinates: 

00º  44  '33  "South  latitude  and  48  01'  03"  longitude  west  of 

Greenwich. Limited to: the North - Atlantic Ocean in the east - 

Municipalities Curuçá, São  João da Ponta and  Terra Alta, the 

South - City Watch and the West - City Watch (Figure 1) and 

area  III  is  located  between  geographical  coordinates:  1  4  '11 

"to  1  13'  42"  South  latitude  and  48  19  '20  "to  48  °  29'  14" 

longitude west of Greenwich, covering an approximate area of 

220 km2,  with an average  altitude of 15  m  above sea  (Figure 

1). Integral part of the city of Bethlehem, the Mosqueiro Island 

is  located  on  the  right  portion  of  the  Estuary  Guajarino,  with 

approximately 220 km2, contained in the northeastern state of 

Para (SALES, 2005) region. Samples were collected from five 

trees of each area, during the summer and winter amzônico for 

two  consecutive  years.  Botanical  identification  was  made  in 

the herbarium  of the Goeldi  Museum, in  comparison with the 

voucher # 62195. After extraction, the samples were dried for 

7 days in a room with air conditioning (low humidity) and then 

ground. 


 

 

 

Fig 1: Locality of collection of fifteen samples of P. insignis.

 

 



Extraction  of  volatiles.  The  dry  plant  material  was 

hydrodistilled  for  3h,  using  a  Clevenger-type  apparatus.  The 

oils  obtained  were  centrifuged  for  3min  in  3000  rpm,  dried 

over  anhydrous  sodium  sulphate  and  centrifuged  again  at  the 

same  conditions.  Yield  was  calculated  in  mL/100g  of  dried 

material.  Residual  water  present  in  the  dried  samples  was 

obtained  by  infrared  in  a  MATER-50  equipment.  The 

solutions  containing  2μL  of  the  oil  in  1mL  of  hexane  were 

immediately  prepared  to  gas  chromatography  analysis.  The 

samples  taken  in  Bragança  in  the  rainy  season  also  were 

submitted  to  the  extraction  by  SDE  (simultaneous-distillation 

extraction).  Samples  of  dried  leaves  (100  g  each)  was  mixed 

with  water  (20  mL)  and  submitted  to  SDE  for  3  h,  using  a 

Chrompack Micro-steam Distillation Extractor and pentane (2 

mL)  as  organic  mobile  phase,  and  immediately  submitted  to 

GC and CG/MS analysis. 



Analysis of the volatiles. GC/MS: The oils were analyzed using 

a  Shimadzu  GC/MS  Model  QP  2010  Plus,  equipped  with  a 

Rtx-5MS  (30  m  x  0.25  mm;  0.25  μm  film  thickness)  fused 

silica  capillary  column.  Helium  was  used  as  carrier  gas 

adjusted to 1.2mL/min at 57KPa; splitless injection of 1 μL, of 

a  hexane  solution;  injector  was  250°C  and  detector 

temperature  was  250°C;  oven  temperature  programmed  was 

60–240°C  at  3°C/min,  interface  of  the  detector  was  250°C. 

EIMS:  electron  energy,  70  eV;  ion  source  temperature  and 

connection  parts:  250°C.  The  Individual  components  were 

identified by comparison of  both mass spectrum  and their GC 

retention  indices  with  those  in  the  data  system  libraries  and 

cited  in  the  literature  (Adams,  2007).  Retention  indices  were 

calculated  according  Van  den  Dool  and  Kraft  (1963).  GC: 

This  was  performed  on  a  Shimadzu  QP-2010  instrument, 

equipped  with  FID,  in  the  same  conditions,  except  hydrogen 

was used as the carrier gas. The percentage composition of the 

oil  samples  were  computed  from  the  GC  peak  areas  without 

using correction for response factors. 

 

3. Results and discussion 

For  the  15  specimens  were  obtained  30  essential  oils,  and  5 

pentane  concentrate.  In  total,  106  different  compounds  were 

identified. Tables 1 - 3  gives the  volatiles identified in the 30 

oils  obtained  from  15  samples  collected  in  the  three  selected 

municipalities. Table 4 shows the chemical composition of the 

five  samples  taken  in  Bragança  in  the  rainy  season,  obtained 

by  SDE.  All  oils  from  the  three  localities  studied  showed 

0.05% yield in dry and rainy seasons. All oils from the leaves 

of  P.  insignis  were  terpenoid  in  nature,  but  aldehydes,  fatty 

acids,  alcohols  and  other  compounds  were  encountered  as 

minor  constituents.  No  significant  differences  between 

individual  chemical  components  encountered  in  the  samples 

taken  in  the  same  locality  have  been  observed.  In  the  same, 

samples taken in the two different Amazonian seasons showed 

high similarity within the same season. The oils extracted from 

the  plants  growing  in  the  municipality  of  Bragança  and  São 

Caetano  de  Odivelas  showed  a  similar  chemical  composition, 

characterized  by  the  presence  of  β-caryophyllene  as  a  major 

constituent, while the oils from Mosqueiro were  characterized 

by  the  occurrence  of  α-selinene  and  β-selinene  as  a  major 

constituents. However, considerable quantitative variation was 

noted  when  compared  the  volatiles  on  dry  and  rainy  seasons. 

In  the  oils  from  Bragança  β-caryophyllene  changed  from 

9.29%  to  13.13%  in  the  dry  season,  and  from  16.49%  to 

22.99%  during  rainy  season;  in the  oils  from  São  Caetano  de 

Odivelas, β-caryophyllene changed from 22.99% to 33.25% in 

the  dry  season,  and  from  13.13%  to  15.08%  during  rainy 

season; in the oils from Mosqueiro Island, β-selinene  changed 

from  8.54%  to  11.82%  in  dry  season  and  from  18.82%  to 

23.75%  in  rainy  season.  Among  the  108  constituents  only 

linalool, 

β-cyclocitral, 

α-copaene, 

β-bourbonene, 

β-

caryophyllene,  trans-α-bergamotene,  γ-cadinene,  and  (3Z)-



hexenyl benzoate were encountered in all samples analyzed. 

From those 92 components identified in the thirty essential oil 

samples  submitted  to  multivariate  analysis  using  HCA,  two 

well-defined  clusters  of  essential  oils  were  differentiated 

(Figure 2). Cluster I, composed by the samples from Bragança 

and São Caetano de Odivelas, and Cluster II, composed by the 

samples  from  Mosqueiro.  Cluster  I  was  divided  in  four 

subclusters  represented  by the samples taken in two localities 

and in the two Amazonian seasons. Subcluster Ia and Ib were 

composed  by  the  samples  from  Bragança  in  dry  season  and 



 

~ 3 ~ 


Journal of Medicinal Plants Studies 

 

rainy  season,  respectively.  Subcluster  Ic  and  Id  were  formed 



by  the  samples  taken  in  São  Caetano  de  Odivelas,  in  dry 

season  and  rainy  season,  respectively.  In  the  same  way, 

Subclusters IIa and IIb were composed by the samples taken in 

the  Mosqueiro  Island  in  dry  season  and  rainy  season, 

respectively.  Extraction  by  DES  allowed  the  identification  of 

69  compounds,  among  them  (2E)-hexenal  (9.99%  -  27.51%) 

and  β-caryophyllene  (12.79%  -  17.53%)  were  major.  (2E)-

Hexenal  was  best  extracted  by  SDE  (9.99  –  27.51%),  then 

compared  to  those  obtained  by  HD  (zero  –  2.47%)  for  the 

samples  from  Bragança,  in  the  rainy  season.  (3E)-Hexenal, 

hexanoic  acid,  acetophenone,  benzyl  alcohol,  heptanoic  acid, 

trans-linalool  furanoxide,  4-vinyl-4-methoxyphenol,  eugenol, 

γ-nonalactone, 



allo-aromadendrene, 

hexadecanal, 

(3Z)-

hexenyl  cinnamate,  heptadecanal  and  octadecanal  also 

identified  in  pentane  concentration  obtained  by  SDE. 

Comparison  of  our  results  obtained  from  the  leaves  of  P. 



insignis  by  SDE  with  the  data  presented  by  Borges  and 

Rezende (2000) for the  pulp volatiles reveals both similarities 

and  differences:  they  found  linalool  (24.1%),  α-terpineol 

(12.0%),  trans-linalool  furanoxide  (11.1%)  and  cis-linalool 

furanoxide (6.1%)  as a  major compounds.  In the leaf  pentane 

concentrate  from Bragança (rainy season), (2E)-hexenal (9.99 

–  27.51%)  and  β-caryophyllene  (12.79  –  17.53%)  were 

identified as a major compounds, following by linalool (1.11 – 

5.93%) and δ-cadinene (5.42 – 6.84%). In the same way, (2E)-

hexenal,  limonene,  (E)-β-ocimene,  cis-linalool  furanoxide, 



trans-linalool  furanoxide,  α-terpineol,  geraniol,  trans-α-

bergamotene  and  β-ionone  also  were  detected  in  the  pulp 

submitted  SDE  by  Boulanger  et  al.  (1999).  The  main 

components of leaf essential oil of  P. insignis were confirmed 

to  be  β-caryophyllene,  β-selinene,  and  α-selinene.  HCA 

showed  the  existence  of  a  highly  intra-specific  variability 

within  the  essential  oil  of  P.  insignis,  and  separates  the  oils 

obtained from individuals taken in Bragança and São Caetano 

de Odivelas of the individuals taken in Mosqueiro Island.  

 

 

 

Fig 2: Hierarchical Component Analysis (HCA) of  Platonia insignis 

plants  collected from  three  populations  from North  of  Brazil,  in  the 

dry and yet Amazon seasons.  B1d-B5d = Bragança-dry season, B1r-

B5r  = Bragança-rainy  season;  S1d-S5d  =  São Caetano  de Odivelas-

dry  season;  S1r-S5r  =  São Caetano  de  Odivelas-rainy  season,  M1d-

M5d = Mosqueiro-dry season; M1r-M5r = Mosqueiro-rainy season. 



 

Table 1: Constituents (%) identified in the leaf essential oils of Platonia insignis growing wild in the municipality of Bragança in the dry and 

rainy Amazonian seasons 

 

Constituents 

Dry season 

Rainy season 

 

1ds 

2ds 

3ds 

4ds 

5ds 

1rs 

2rs 

3rs 

4rs 

5rs 

(2E)-hexenal 

1.01 

1.43 


 

0.77 


0.89 

 

 



0.98 

 

2.47 



limonene 

0.42 


0.64 

0.27 


0.52 

0.39 


 

 

0.31 



 

0.37 


(Z)-β-ocimene 

0.20 


0.32 

0.12 


0.26 

0.2 


 

 

0.22 



 

0.26 


(E)-β-ocimene 

0.54 


1.12 

0.36 


0.65 

0.55 


0.30 

 

0.90 



 

1.04 


cis-linalool furanoxide 

0.07 


0.13 

 

0.15 



0.21 

 

 



 

 

 



terpinolene 

0.35 


0.51 

0.22 


0.45 

0.41 


 

 

0.30 



 

0.33 


linalool 

3.02 


4.03 

1.12 


3.84 

3.86 


4.29 

1.04 


6.94 

1.29 


7.63 

allo-ocimene 

0.10 


0.17 

0.06 


0.13 

0.11 


 

 

 



 

 

(2E,6Z)-nonadienal 



0.14 

0.27 


0.04 

0.17 


0.17 

 

 



0.39 

0.24 


0.32 

(2E)-nonenal 

0.18 

0.26 


0.07 

0.20 


0.18 

 

 



0.21 

0.18 


0.13 

octanoic acid 

0.25 

0.37 


0.05 

0.26 


0.35 

 

 



0.56 

 

 



α-terpineol 

0.62 


0.95 

0.16 


0.87 

0.99 


0.48 

0.15 


0.93 

0.15 


0.88 

safranal 

0.07 

0.11 


0.02 

0.08 


0.06 

 

 



0.23 

 

0.23 



β-cyclocitral 

0.16 


0.23 

0.05 


0.15 

0.17 


 

0.27 


0.32 

0.28 


0.31 

nerol 


0.39 

0.59 


0.11 

0.54 


0.60 

 

 



0.39 

 

0.35 



(3Z)-butanoate 3-methylhexenyl 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

0.13 



 

0.12 


geraniol 

0.92 


1.27 

0.27 


1.21 

1.29 


0.49 

 

0.76 



 

0.62 


(2E)-decenal 

0.15 


0.16 

0.08 


0.16 

0.15 


 

 

 



 

 

geranial 



0.03 

0.05 


 

0.03 


0.04 

 

 



 

 

 



safrole 

 

 



 

 

 



 

0.47 


 

0.33 


 

(3Z)-hexenyl tiglate 

 

 

 



 

 

0.36 



 

0.31 


 

0.28 


δ-elemene 

0.14 


0.16 

0.11 


0.13 

0.14 


 

 

 



 

 

α-cubebene 



1.99 

1.81 


2.20 

1.79 


1.71 

3.57 


3.00 

2.73 


2.99 

2.77 


α-ylangene 

0.42 


0.39 

0.30 


0.36 

0.28 


 

0.48 


0.41 

 

 



α-copaene 

3.81 


3.55 

3.96 


3.21 

2.97 


8.93 

8.31 


6.37 

9.00 


7.18 

β-bourbonene 

1.90 

2.76 


1.27 

1.49 


1.03 

5.90 


6.14 

4.72 


5.67 

4.72 


α-gurjunene 

0.88 


0.99 

0.75 


0.77 

0.70 


0.99 

0.91 


0.90 

1.06 


0.77 

β-caryophyllene 

11.36 

9.53 


13.13 

10.92 


9.29 

22.99 


20.62 

16.94 


22.55 

18.44 


β-gurjunene 

1.28 


1.29 

1.21 


1.03 

1.13 


1.77 

2.17 


2.10 

1.77 


1.55 

trans-α-bergamotene 

1.65 


1.95 

1.67 


1.51 

1.29 


2.22 

4.11 


1.42 

4.09 


1.98 

α-guaiene 

0.90 

1.02 


0.88 

0.75 


1.08 

0.86 


0.96 

0.75 


0.99 

0.80 


α-humulene 

3.46 


3.02 

3.93 


3.43 

2.84 


5.60 

5.80 


4.96 

6.31 


5.17 

cis-cadina-1(6),4-diene 

0.53 


0.61 

0.49 


0.44 

0.47 


 

 

 



 

 


 

~ 4 ~ 


Journal of Medicinal Plants Studies 

 

trans-cadina-1(6),4-diene 

1.27 

1.22 


1.34 

1.06 


1.01 

 

 



 

 

 



γ-muurolene 

1.86 


1.65 

1.94 


1.49 

1.46 


3.95 

3.89 


3.37 

4.12 


3.51 

germacrene D 

1.33 

1.34 


1.53 

1.11 


1.28 

1.78 


1.38 

1.43 


1.49 

1.40 


(E)-β-ionone 

 

 



 

 

 



0.94 

0.99 


0.85 

1.08 


0.86 

viridiflorene 

2.15 

2.10 


2.31 

1.84 


1.76 

2.50 


2.90 

2.16 


2.65 

2.20 


α-muurolene 

1.54 


1.46 

1.63 


1.28 

1.31 


1.82 

1.80 


1.65 

1.92 


1.64 

(E,E)-α-farnesene 

2.08 

2.78 


2.64 

1.88 


2.97 

 

 



 

 

 



γ-cadinene 

1.74 


1.86 

1.68 


1.39 

1.56 


1.72 

1.72 


1.51 

1.76 


1.59 

δ-cadinene 

5.00 

4.41 


5.48 

4.09 


3.82 

8.30 


8.34 

6.73 


8.51 

7.15 


trans-cadina-1,4-diene 

0.89 


0.91 

0.87 


0.73 

0.74 


1.13 

1.09 


1.03 

1.11 


1.04 

α-cadinene 

0.63 

0.61 


0.63 

0.53 


0.54 

0.58 


0.53 

0.47 


0.62 

 

α-calacorene 



0.91 

0.95 


0.90 

0.82 


0.72 

0.76 


0.98 

0.75 


1.01 

1.21 


(E)-nerolidol 

1.96 


1.75 

2.09 


1.93 

2.40 


1.03 

1.21 


1.19 

1.24 


1.1 

(3Z)-hexenyl benzoate 

0.99 

1.27 


0.80 

0.81 


1.10 

1.73 


1.92 

1.58 


1.13 

1.47 


dendrolasin 

1.78 


1.12 

1.85 


1.59 

1.40 


 

 

 



 

 

gleenol 



1.16 

1.63 


1.54 

1.18 


1.25 

1.26 


1.19 

1.42 


 

 

viridiflorol 



1.12 

1.05 


1.13 

1.12 


0.92 

 

1.00 



 

 

0.57 



humulene epoxide II 

0.39 


0.43 

0.36 


0.38 

0.38 


 

 

 



 

 

1,10-di-epi-cubenol 



0.38 

0.34 


0.38 

0.43 


0.31 

 

 



 

 

 



1-epi-cubenol 

1.67 


1.41 

1.55 


1.61 

1.28 


1.15 

1.32 


1.51 

1.01 


1.10 

cis-cadin-4-en-7-ol 

0.53 


0.45 

0.45 


0.49 

0.45 


 

 

 



 

 

caryophylla-4(12),8(13)-dien-5-ol 



0.28 

0.29 


 

0.27 


0.28 

 

 



 

 

 



epi-α-muurolol 

2.47 


1.78 

2.82 


2.57 

1.81 


 

 

 



 

 

cubenol 



 

 

 



 

 

1.32 



1.28 

1.69 


1.08 

1.28 


α-muurolol 

0.90 


0.82 

0.79 


0.88 

0.74 


 

 

 



 

 

α-cadinol 



2.47 

1.84 


2.44 

2.73 


1.98 

1.12 


0.72 

1.24 


0.85 

1.07 


cadalene 

0.24 


0.27 

0.29 


0.24 

0.22 


 

0.27 


 

 

 



nonadecane 

0.02 


0.04 

0.04 


0.03 

 

 



 

 

 



 

hexadecanoic acid 

1.79 

2.04 


3.24 

 

5.75 



 

 

 



 

 

(5E,9E)-farnesyl acetone 



 

 

 



 

 

 



0.25 

 

0.18 



 

ethyl linoleate 

0.25 

0.16 


0.26 

0.29 


0.34 

 

 



 

 

 



                   ds = dry season, rs = rainy season 

 


Yüklə 0,96 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə