Issn no. (Print): 2454-7913 issn no. (Online): 2454-7921



Yüklə 0,75 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/4
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü0,75 Mb.
  1   2   3   4

  

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                                   ISSN NO. (Print):    2454-7913 

                                                                                                                   ISSN NO. (Online): 2454-7921  

 

Diversity Assessment of Woody Plants of Megamalai Wildlife 

Sanctuary, Theni District, Tamilnadu 

S. Karuppusamy and V. Ravichandran 

Centre for Botanical Research, Department of Botany,  

The Madura College (Autonomous), Madurai – 625 011, Tamilnadu, India. 

 (Corresponding author: S. Karuppusamy) 

(Published by Research Trend, Website: www.biobulletin.com) 

(Received 02 April 2016; Accepted 16 April 2016) 



 

ABSTRACT:  The present study was carried out for documentation of woody plants of Megamalai 

Wildlife  Sanctuary  in  the  southern  Western  Ghats  of  Theni  district,  Tamil  Nadu.  A  total  of  486 

woody plant species, of which 283 trees, 191 shrubs and 12 lianas, belongs to 237 genera and 76 

families  respectively  were  recorded  duirng  the  September  2012  to  December  2015.  The  most 

dominant families are Rubiaceae (48 species), Fabaceae (33 species), Lauraceae (27 species) and 

they  have  contributed  higher  number  of  species  followed  by  Euphorbiaceae,  Moraceae  and 

Malvaceae  (21  species  each).  At  the  generic  level  Ficus  (16  species)  and Litsea  (14  species)  are 

dominated  and  followed  by  Syzygium,  Diospyros,  Grewia  (10  each).  Out  of  486  woody  taxa,  8 

species  are  confined  only  to  this  Wildlife  Sanctuary;  Nothopegia  vajravelui,  Sonerila 

parameswaranii,  Ardisia  blatteri,  schefflera  maduraiensis,  Ixora  monticola,  Anisochilus  henryi, 

Elaeocarpus gaussenii, and Drypetes porteri. Among 486 woody plant species, about 41 species 

are in the IUCN threat status. Elaeocarpus gaussenii, Ixora johnsonii and Syzygium travancoricum 

are in Critically Endangered category (CR), 15 species of this list are under Endangered category 

(EN)  and  12  spcies  in  Vulnarable  category  (VU).  The  study  impressed  that  this  area  is  more 

relevent to the conservation of local flora. 

Key  words: Woody  taxa,  Megamalai Wildlife  Sanctuary,  Diversity,  Threat  status,  Endangered  species, 

Conservation. 



INTRODUCTION 

The Western Ghats is a chain of mountain ranges 

from  the  hills  south  of  Tapati  river  in  the  north  to 

Kanyakumari  along  the  west  coast  of  India 

covering  the  states  of  Goa,  Maharashtra, 

Karnataka, 

Tamil 

Nadu 


and 

Kerala 


with 

approximately  1500  km  of  narrow  running  stretch 

(Nayar 1996). The climatic and altitudinal gradient 

has resulted in a variety of vegetation types, from 

evergreen  to  semi-evergreen  and  from  moist 

deciduous  to  dry  deciduous  compositions.  In  the 

higher  elevations  stunted  montane  communities 

have also developed.  

Four  major  forest  types  and  23  different  forest 

subtypes have been recognized in Western Ghats 

based 

on 


ecological 

factors 


and 

floristic 

composition  (Pascasl  1982,  1988;  Ramesh  et  al. 

1997). It is one of the hottest hot spot in the world 

(Myers  et  al.  2000).  The  area  is  known  for  their 

unique high range of endemic floral diversity. Tree 

species  are  dominating  the  endemism  about  63% 

moreover  southern  Western  Ghats  represented 

1051  endemic  species  (Ramesh  &  Pascal  1991; 

Viswanathan 1999; Richard & Muthukumar 2012). 

Southern  Western  Ghat  ranges  consist  of 

Agasthiyamalai, 

Travancore, 

Mahendragiri, 

Kalakadu  Mundanthurai,    Courtallum,     Sivagiri, 

Bio Bulletin (2016), Vol. 2(1): 74-89,       Karuppusamy and Ravichandran                                        74

 

 



 

Bio Bulletin

  

  

  



  

2(1): 74-89(2016)

 

    (Published by Research Trend, Website: 

www.biobulletin.com

) 

Rajapalyam  hills,  Anamalai,  Palni  hills,  Nilgiri, 

Wynaad and Caradamom hill ranges. These forest 

areas  have  covered  different  type  of  forest 

vegetation  such  as  dry  deciduous  forest,  moist 

deciduous  forest,  wet  evergreen  forest,  sholas, 

savannas, scrub, and montane forests. The forest 

types  of Western  Ghats  have  been  classified  and 

described  its  uniquness  by  various  authors 

(Champion  &  Seth  1968;  Pascasl  1988;  Ramesh 

et al. 1997). 

The  Western  Ghats  is  one  of  the  major  tropical 

evergreen-forested  regions  in  India  and  it  has 

possessed  unique  plant  diversity.  The  richness  of 

floristic  diversity  of  the  region  has  already  been 

brought  out  by  many  pioneered  workers  (Gamble 

1915-1936; Fyson 1932; Nair & Daniel 1986; Rao 

1994;  Nayar  1996).  Floristic  diversity  of  southern 

Western  Ghats  also  accounted  by  several 

botanists  (Manilal  1988;  Matthew  1981-1984  and 

1999;  Mohanan  &  Henry  1994;  Nayar  1996; 

Ramachandran  &  Nair  1988)  and  also  highlighted 

the diversity and richness of the flora of the region. 

About  2100  endemic  flowering  plants  have  been 

reported  from  out  of  5800  flowering  plant  species 

in  this  mega  endemic  area  (Rao  1994;  Nair  & 

Henry  1983;  Nayar  1996)  from  which  1215  taxa 

are  arborescent.  This  constitutes  approximately 

27%  of  the  total  Indian  flora.  Agasthyamalai 

regions alone constituted about 2000  species; the 

Nilgiris support ca 2611 species while Silent valley 

have  approximately  1300  plant  species.  Most  of 

the  District  floras  form  Western  Ghat  areas 

published  in  recent  years  reveals  that  more  than 

1200  tree  species  estimated  for  Western  Ghat 

regions  (Rao  &  Razi  1981;  Manilal 1988; 

Ramachandran  &  Nair  1988;  Chandrabose  et  al

1988;  Mohanan  &  Henry  1994;  Mohanan  & 

Sivadasan  2002;  Ramaswamy  et  al.  2001). 

Presence  of  about  60  endemic  genera  including 

49 monotypic genera makes this region floristically 

unique  and  significant  (Sheeba  &  Narasimhan 

2011).  The  woody  plant  diversity  and  ecology  of 

Western  Gahts  have  been  accounted  many 

workers  (Pascal  &  Pelissier  1996;  Parthasarthy 

1999; Ramesh et al. 2007; Richard & Muthukumar 

2012).  

The  Meghamalai  Wildlife  Sanctuary  (MWLS)  is 

situated  in  the  southern  Western  Ghats  of  Theni 

district,  Tamil  Nadu.  It  is  adjoining  hill  range  of 

Periyar Tiger Reserve, Idukki district of Kerala and 

Grizzled  Squirrel Sanctuary  of  Srivilliputhur, Tamil 

Nadu.  The  hill  ranges  have  been  botanized  by 

several pioneered botanists since 1900s.  

Many  botanists  have  described  several  new  taxa 

of  orchids  and  Angiosperms  from  the  mountain 

region  (Blatter  &  Hallberg  1917;  Rajasekaran 

1986).  About  5  new  woody  taxa    namely 



Chinonanthus 

ramiflora 

ssp. 


peninsularis

Syzygium  sriganesanii,  S. 

zeylanicum  var. 

megamalayanum

Nothopegia 

vajravelui

Schefflera maduraiensis described from the range 

(Ravikumar  &  Lakshmanan  1999).  The  present 

study was aimed to carry out the documentation of 

woody  plant  diversity  in  Meghamalai  WLS, 

Southern Western Ghats of Tamil Nadu.  

MATERIALS AND METHODS 

A. Study area 

Megamalai  hills  or  High  Wavy  mountains  is 

adjoined  by  Palni  hills  in  the  north,  Sethur  and 

Sivagiri  hills  in  the  south,  Thekkadi  hiils  (Periyar 

Tiger  Reserve)  in  the  southeast,  Cardamom  hills 

and  Kerala  state  in  the  west  and  a  spur  of 

Varushanadu  ranges  towards  northeast.  It  is  lies 

between  9

° 

35’  to  9



°

  45’  N  latitude  and  77

°

  15’  to 



77

°

 27’ E longitude cover an area of 653 sq.km. It 



is a part of the Western Ghat biodiversity hot spot. 

This  hill  range  forms  main  catchment  of  some 

important  perennial  rivers  of  South  India  such  as 

Vaigai,  Vaipar  and  Suruliar.  The  hill  range  is 

mostly  surrounded  by  several  tea,  coffee,  and 

cardamom  estates  with  the  patch  of  dense  forest 

cover.  The  altitude  ranged  from  foot  hill  to  the 

highest  Brooke  peaks  about  600  to  2000  M, 

inhabiting forest types ranging from scrub jungle to 

evergreen, 

montane 

forests 


and 

sholas 


surrounded by grasslands.  

B. Data collection 

The  study  area  has  been  thoroughly  explored  for 

collection  of  woody  taxa  with  frequent  field  visits 

from September 2012 to December 2015 covering 

all the  seasons.  The  plant  specimens  which  have 

been  dentatively  identified  in  the  field,  have  been 

critically  studied  and  identified  by  using  local  and 

regional  floras  (Beddome  1868-1874;  Gamble  & 

Fischer  1915-1936;  Gopalan  &  Henry  2000; 

Ramesh  et  al.  2007),  besides  many  other  recent 

monographs  and  revisions.  The  identities  of  the 

plants  were  confirmed  by  comparision  with 

authentic 

specimens 

deposited 

in 


Madras 

Herbarium  (MH),  Botanical  Survey  of  India, 

Southern  Circle,  Coimbatore.  The  voucher 

specimens  were  deposited  in  the  Madura  college 

herbarium, Madurai.  

 

Bio Bulletin (2016), Vol. 2(1): 74-89,       Karuppusamy and Ravichandran                                        75

 


An  updated  and  correct  nomenclature  checked 

with  authentic  websites  (www.plantlist.org)  and 

also  checked  the  threat  status  of  woody  species 

from  IUCN  (iucn.org).  The  comprehensive  list  of 

woody  plant  taxa  are  tabulated  with  updated 

botanical  names  in  alphabetical  order,  family 

name, habit type, IUCN threat status and voucher 

number.  



RESULT AND DISCUSSION 

Intensive  and  extensive  botanical  explorations 

conducted  in  all  seasons  covering  various  forest 

types  of  Megamalai  WLS  have  resulted  a  total  of 

486  woody  Angiosperms  taxa  belongs  to  237 

genera  and  76  families  respectively  (Table  1). 

Among  the  woody  taxa,  trees  are  representing 

highest in number 283 species followed by shrubs 

(191 species) and lianas (12 species) respectively. 

The  dominant  plant families  in  the  study  area  are 

Rubiaceae  (48  species)  followed  by  fabaceae  (27 

species) 

and 

Euphorbiaceae, 



Moraceae, 

Malvaceae  represented  21  species  each.  The 

most dominant genera includes Ficus (16 species) 

and  Litsea  (14  species)  followed  by  Syzygium



DiospyrosGrewia having 10 species each.  

Table  1:  Woody  plants  of  Megamalai  Wildlife  Sanctuary  (T:  Tree,  S:  Shrub,  L:  Liana,  NA:  Not 

Assessed,  EN:  Endangered,  CR:  Critically  Endangered,  VU:  Vulnerable,  DD:  Data  Defecient,  LC: 

Least  Concern,  LR:  Low  Risk,  NE:  Not  Evaluated,  NT:  Near  Threatened,  CD:  Conservation 

Dependent.). 

S.    

No 

Binomial  

Family  

Habit  

IUCN 

category  

Voucher No. 

1. 


Acacia catechu (L.f.) Willd. 

Fabaceae 

T  

NE 


SK1121 

2. 


Acacia chundra (Roxb. ex Rottler) Willd. 

Fabaceae  

T  

NE 


SK1106 

3. 


Acacia horrida (L.) Willd. 

Fabaceae  

T  

NE 


SK1171 

4. 


Acacia leucophloea (Roxb.) Willd. 

Fabaceae  

T  

NE 


SK1177 

5. 


Acacia pennata (L.) Willd. 

Fabaceae  

T  

NE 


SK &VR1169 

6. 


Acacia torta (Roxb.) Crib. 

Fabaceae  

T  

NE 


SK1118 

7. 


Acrocarpus fraxinifolius Wight 

Fabaceae  

T  

NE 


SK1101 

8. 


Acronychia pedunculata L. (Miq.) 

Rutaceae  

T  

NE 


SK&VR1132 

9. 


Actinodaphne bourdillonii Gamble 

Lauraceae  

T  

NE 


SK1158 

10. 


Actinodaphne lawsonii Gamble 

Lauraceae  

T  

NE 


SK1165 

11. 


Actinodaphne madraspatana Bedd. ex Hook.f. 

Lauraceae 

T  

NE 


SK&VR1113 

12. 


Actinodaphne wightiana (Kuntze) Noltie 

Lauraceae 

T  

NE 


SK & VR1111 

13. 


Aegle marmelos Corr. 

Rutaceae  

T  

NE 


SK1147 

14. 


Aglaia elaeagnoidea (A.Juss) Benth. 

Meliaceae  

T  

NE 


SK&VR1124 

15. 


Agrostistachys indica Dalz. 

Euphorbiaceae  

T  

NE 


SK&VR1186 

16. 


Aidia gardneri (Thw.) Tiruveng. 

Rubiaceae  

S  

NE 


SK1135 

17. 


Alangium salviifolium (L.f.) Wangerin  

Alangiaceae  

T  

NE 


SK1151 

18. 


Albizia lathamii Hole. 

Fabaceae  

T  

NE 


SK&VR1141 

19. 


Allophylus cobbe (L.) Raeusch. 

Sapindaceae  

S  

NE 


SK&VR 1102 

20. 


Allophylus serratus (Hiern) Kurz 

Sapindaceae  

S  

NE 


SK&VR 1156 

21. 


Allophylus  subfalcatus  var.  distachys  (D.C.) 

S.Mukh. 


Sapindaceae  

S  


NE 

SK&VR 1127 

22. 

Alphonsea sclerocarpa Thw. 

Annonaceae  

S  

NE 


SK&VR 1162 

23. 


Alseodaphne semecarpifolia Nees  

Lauraceae 

T  

NE 


SK&VR 1108 

24. 


Alstonia scholaris (L.) R.Br. 

Apocynaceae  

T  

LR/LC 


(1998) 

SK 1115 


25. 

Alstonia venenata R.Br. 

Apocynaceae 

S  

NE 


SK&VR 1138 

26. 


Anamirta cocculus Wight and Arn.  

Menispermaceae  

L  

NE 


SK&VR 1148 

27. 


Ancistrocladus heyneanus Wall. ex Graham 

Ancistrocladaceae   T  

NE 

SK&VR 1198 



28. 

Anisochillus robustus Hook.f. 

Lamiaceae  

S  

NE 


SK&VR 1179 

 

Bio Bulletin (2016), Vol. 2(1): 74-89,       Karuppusamy and Ravichandran                                         76 

 

S.    

No 

Binomial  

Family  

Habit  

IUCN 

category  

Voucher No. 

29. 


Anogeissus latifolia  

(Roxb. ex DC.) Wall. ex Bedd.  

 

Combretaceae  



T  

NE 


SK 1117 

30. 


Antiaris toxicaria Lesch. 

Moraceae  

T  

NE 


SK&VR 1192 

31. 


Antidesma acidum Retz. 

Phyllanthaceae  

T  

NE 


SK&VR 1144 

32. 


Antidesma alexitaria L. 

Phyllanthaceae  

T  

NE 


SK0904 

33. 


Antidesma ghasembilla Gaertn. 

Phyllanthaceae  

S  

NE 


SK 0956 

34. 


Antidesma montanum Blume 

Phyllanthaceae  

T  

NE 


SK 0667 

35. 


Aphanamixis polystachya (Wall.) R.Parker 

Meliaceae  

T  

LR./LC 


(1998) 

SK 1103 


36. 

Apodytes dimidiata E.Mayer ex. Arn. 

Icacinaceae  

  T  

NE 


SK 0727 

37. 


Ardisia blatteri Gamble 

Primulaceae  

S  

EN 


(1998) 

SK 0801 


38. 

Ardisia pauciflora Heyne ex Roxb. 

Primulaceae  

S  

NE 


SK 0826 

39. 


Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam. 

Moraceae  

T  

NE 


SK 0701 

40. 


Artocarpus hirsutus Lam. 

Moraceae 

T  

NE 


SK 0630 

41. 


Atalantia monophylla Corr. 

Rutaceae  

S  

NE 


SK 0929 

42. 


Atalantia racemosa Wight and Arn. 

Rutaceae  

S  

NE 


SK&VR 1114 

43. 


Atalantia wightii Tan. 

Rutaceae  

S  

NE 


SK 0781 

44. 


Azima tetracantha Lam. 

Salvadoraceae  

S  

NE 


SK 0746 

45. 


Bauhinia racemosa Lam. 

Fabaceae  

T  

NE 


SK 0803 

46. 


Benkara malabarica Lam.  

Rubiaceae 

S  

NE 


SK 0900 

47. 


Bhesa indica (Bedd.) Ding Hou 

Celastraceae  

T  

NE 


SK 0673 

48. 


Bischofia javanica Blume 

Euphorbiaceae 

T  

NE 


SK 0640 

49. 


Blachia  andamanica  ssp.  denudata  (Benth.) 

N.P.Balakr. & Chakrab.  

Euphorbiaceae 

S  


NE 

SK 0905 


50. 

Blachia calycina Benth. 

Euphorbiaceae 

S  

NE 


SK0919 

51. 


Blachia umbellata Baill. 

Euphorbiaceae 

S  

NE 


SK0939 

52. 


Boehmaria glomerulifera Miq. 

Urticaceae  

S  

NE 


SK&VR 1200 

53. 


Boehmaria macrophylla Hornem. 

Urticaceae  

   S  

NE 


SK&VR 1176 

54. 


Breynia saksenana (Manilal et al.,) Chakrab. & 

N.P. Balakr., 

Phyllanthaceae 

   S  


NE 

SK 0601 


55. 

Brugmansia  suaveolans  (Humb.  &  Bonpl.  ex 

Willd.) Bercht. & C. Presl 

Solanaceae  

S  


NE 

SK 0854 


56. 

Buchnania axillaris (Desr.) Ramam. 

Anacardiaceae  

T  

NE 


SK 0763 

57. 


Buchnania lanzan Spreng. 

Anacardiaceae  

T  

NE 


SK 0901 

58. 


Buddleja asiatica Lour. 

Scrophularaceae  

S  

NE 


SK 0975 

59. 


Butea monosperma (Lam.) Taub.  

Fabaceae  

T  

NE 


1161 

60. 


Cadaba fruticosa (L.) Druce 

Capparidaceae  

S  

NE 


SK 0723 

61. 


Cadaba trifoliata Wight and Arn. 

Capparidaceae  

S  

NE 


SK 0602 

62. 


Callicarpa tomentosa (L.) Murr.  

Verbenaceae  

S  

NE 


SK 0638 

63. 


Calophyllum inophyllum L. 

Calophyllaceae  

T  

LR/LC 


(1998) 

SK 0973 


64. 

Canarium strictum Roxb. 

Burseraceae 

T  

NE 


SK 0788 

65. 


Cansjera rheedii Gmel. 

Opiliaceae  

S  

NE 


SK 0627 

66. 


Canthium coromandelicum (Burm.f.) Alston  

Rubiaceae 

S  

NE 


SK 0687 

67. 


Canthium ficiforme Hook.f. 

Rubiaceae 

T  

EN 


(1998) 

SK 0983 


68. 

Canthium neilgherrense Wight 

Rubiaceae 

T  

NE 


SK 0739 

69. 


Canthium rheedii DC. 

Rubiaceae 

S  

NE 


1104 

Bio Bulletin (2016), Vol. 2(1): 74-89,       Karuppusamy and Ravichandran                                         77 

 

S.    

No 

Binomial  

Family  

Habit  



Yüklə 0,75 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə