Julissa Roncal, Ph. D. ProJect Plant ecologist



Yüklə 114,92 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix18.08.2017
ölçüsü114,92 Kb.

conserving

Julissa Roncal, Ph.D. 

PRoJect Plant ecologist

a

s a participating institution in the  



  Center for Plant Conservation  

     (CPC), Fairchild shares the 

responsibility for the conservation and 

restoration of imperiled plants in South 

Florida and the U.S. Caribbean territories. 

Puerto Rico has a list of 53 endangered and 

threatened plant species—including trees, 

shrubs, cacti, ferns, vines, one palm and 

one orchid—growing on diverse habitats 

such as subtropical moist and rain forests, 

limestone hills and serpentine soils.

 

Working in the Caribbean is nothing  



new for Fairchild. Former director John 

Popenoe made early collections of 

endangered species. In 1989, 1991, 1994  

and 1995, Fairchild staff returned to collect 

seeds and cuttings from endangered and 

threatened species. Seeds were propagated 

and curated in Fairchild’s greenhouse 

facilities. Adult-size plants are located in  

the living collection for exhibition, making 

this the best ex-situ (off-site) collection of 

Puerto Rican endangered and threatened 

plants in the continental U.S.

In February, Fairchild conservation 

ecologist/South Florida team leader Dr. 

Joyce Maschinski and I visited Puerto Rico 

to review the status of wild populations of 

these 53 species. How many populations  

for each species are there? What is the total 

number of plants per species? Have 

flowers, fruits or seedlings been reported? 

Have any of these species been successfully 

propagated? Are there any reintroduced 

populations? With 16 Puerto Rican 

colleagues working with the U.S. Fish  

and Wildlife Service, the Puerto Rican 

Department of Natural and Environmental 

Resources, the University of Puerto Rico 

and the Luis Munoz Marin in San Juan, we 

discussed conservation needs and options. 

Several interesting findings emerged. 

Researchers Marian Sepúlveda-Orengo  

Long-term Conservation Collaboration with Puerto Rico

Fairchild researchers head to the Caribbean to review the status of 53 endangered and threatened plant species.

and Duane Kolterman at the University  

of Puerto Rico determined that the fern 

species Adiantum vivesii is a sterile hybrid 

and thus will be proposed to be delisted. 

Colleagues reported success propagating 

several species (for example, Calyptronoma 

rivalisDaphnopsis helleranaEugenia 

woodburyanaJuglans jamaicensisStahlia 

monosperma) offsite and onsite, and have 

introduced them in the wild. They are 

updating records of restoration success  

of several taxa. We identified six species 

with high recovery potential, including 

Calyptronoma rivalisGoetzea elegans, 

Harrisia portoricensisPeperomia wheeleri

Solanum dymophylum and Stahlia 

monosperma. In the case of Ilex cookii

separation of sexes in different individuals 

—a condition termed dioecy—limits 

recovery of the species, since populations 

are either male or female, making sexual 

reproduction difficult or impossible. Other 

species, such as Aurodendron pauciflorum

Buxus vahliiDaphnopsis helleranaEugenia 

woodburyana and Trichilia triacantha, 

among others, are mostly confined to 

private land; therefore, introduction to 

natural protected areas is urgent if we  

want to secure the species. Suitable habitat 

for reintroduction is especially limited for 



Lyonia truncate, Mitracarpus maxweliae  

and Mitracarpus polycladus.

We outlined recovery plans for each of 

the 53 species, and hope to collaborate with 

the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the 

Department of Natural and Environmental 

Resources to implement those plans. With 

future funding, we want to send our 

greenhouse propagules back to Puerto 

Rico, introduce them in natural areas and 

assess perpetuity of the population  

through continued long-term monitoring. 

By increasing the total population number  

of a species, we will reduce its risk of 

extinction and achieve species delisting. 

But little is known of the biology and 

propagation requirements of several 

species on the list. By collaborating with 

Puerto Rican colleagues, we aim to conduct 

urgent research for their recovery. We  

also want to obtain new species of Puerto 

Rican plants to improve our unique ex-situ 

exhibition, and increase public awareness 

of Caribbean biodiversity. 

P

H



O

TO

S



: S

Te

v



e S

H

ir



a

H

left: Solanum drymophilum is a species considered to have high recovery potential 



because of successful propagation techniques. Goetzea elegans (center) also has  

a high recovery potential—one introduced and eight wild populations exist. See  

this plant in Fairchild’s living collection. 

Right: Only 11 individuals of Banara 

vanderbiltii—highly vulnerable to fires, hurricanes and vandalism—are left in the wild.

18| The Tropical Garden



18| The Tropical Garden

Kataloq: 2012
2012 -> Soalan: Kawasan Perdagangan Bebas asean (afta) yang dipersetujui oleh pertubuhan asean menjanjikan pelbagai kebaikan untuk kawasan asean. Namun, pelaksanaan perjanjian ekonomi juga mendatangkan pelbagai implikasi. Bincangan
2012 -> Asean free trade area pendahuluan
2012 -> Greetings on behalf of the Brothers of Pi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc., (Chapter)
2012 -> Umwitwarariko ku bijanye n’ukwandura imigera y’indwara ku bana bakiri bato Integuro y’icigwa
2012 -> Kateqoriya b təşkilatın adı Layihənin adı Keçiriləcəyi yer İstənilən büdcə
2012 -> Davamlılıq İndeksi üzrə hesabat vətəndaş cəmiyyətinin inkişafı məsələlərini əhatə edir
2012 -> E-netsiS. Net portal ürün Grubu
2012 -> 1. kokteyl yiyecekleri Kokteyl Partileri
2012 -> Bəxtiyar Tuncay AĞa məHƏMMƏD Şah qacar və ya taleyin qara ulduzu

Yüklə 114,92 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə