Keywords: habitat, revegetation, wetland Location: southern Swan Coastal Plain Author: Penny Hussey, calm, Como



Yüklə 1.28 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
tarix06.09.2017
ölçüsü1.28 Mb.

 

 

Creekline Revegetation for Wildlife 



Keywords:  

habitat, revegetation, wetland 

Location: 

southern Swan Coastal Plain 

Author: 

Penny Hussey, CALM, Como. 

Are you considering revegetating a creek or wetland on the 

Coastal Plain from Perth to Busselton? For the highest 

survival rate and the greatest wildlife value, it is important to 

choose the right species. 

P L A N T S   F O R   R E V E G E T A T I O N  

Replanting the banks of a creekline has many 

advantages for the health of the stream and the river or estuary 

it runs into. If done thoughtfully, the revegetation can not only 

protect water quality, but can provide useful products such as cut 

flowers or firewood as well as shade and shelter for stock, and 

also help create a wildlife corridor. 

To return the stream and the streamside vegetation to a 

healthy state, it is best to try to recreate something similar to 

the original ecosystem. Distinct assemblages of plants are adapted 

to grow at different distances from the 

stream edge and height above flood level. Each plays an 

interlinked role in protecting the bank and providing fauna 

habitat. 

To create the most useful wildlife corridor, the vegetation 

should be as diverse as possible. Dense shrubs and hollow trees 

provide nesting sites; a shrubby or tussocky ground layer gives 

shelter and nesting sites; and something in flower all year round 

will provide food for nectar and insect eaters. Vegetation 

remaining along creeklines can provide a basis from 

which to start. Alternatively, look at the existing 

topography and waterlogging situation, and select appropriate 

plants to fit the sites available. 

All the plants listed here may be obtained from specialist 

nurseries. Alternatively, seed may be collected and direct seeded 

on site - remember that a license will be needed for seed 

collection from Crown land. Site preparation (especially 

good weed control) is vital (see references). 

 

 

 



 

  

 



 

 

 



L a n d   f o r   W i l d l i f e   Page I 

 

In the area of Coastal Plain between Mandurah and 

Busselton, creeks and rivers have three ecological zones: 

Zone 1 - stream bank and flood plain 

Soil: 

wet, may be waterlogged or seasonally 



inundated. 

Needed:   fringe of reedy plants to hold stream edge and 

provide shelter for fauna such as frogs, bandicoots, 

native water rats, long-necked tortoise and water 

birds. Taller shrubs to hold soil and provide nesting / 

foraging sites for birds. 

Problem:   fertile, high nutrient areas, very suitable for 

dense weed growth. Erosion prone. 

Zone 2 - sides of bank 

Soil: 


usually fertile loam, subject to seasonal floods 

Needed:   strong root mat of trees, shrubs and ground covers 

to hold soil. Provides habitat for many different types 

of fauna, especially those that like nesting in banks. 

Problem:   erosion prone 

Zone 3 - top of bank 

Soil: 

may be gravelly, sandy or loamy, depending on site 



Needed:   as wide a buffer before pasture/crop land as can be 

managed, 5 m minimum, 10 - 20 m better. Trees, 

shrubs and ground layer appropriate to soil type 

to provide foraging and nesting sites for a wide 

range of fauna including bandicoots, bush rats, 

possums, goannas and small birds. 

Problem:   weed invasion, fire management, feral animal 

control. 

 

 

 



When revegetating, try to replace all 

Zones 


If this is not done, the creekline ceases to be a corridor for the 

animals which use the zone that has been lost. In addition, there 

could be insufficient vegetation to buffer the creekline and 

protect it, especially after flood events. 

Other wetlands 

The plants listed can also be used for revegetation around 

lakes and swamps on the Coastal Plain, since the same Zones 

apply to wetlands. 

References 

"A Guide to Wetland Management on the Swan Coastal Plain" 

1992. N. Godfrey, P. Jennings & 0. Nicholls. Wetlands 

Conservation Society, Perth. 

"Growing Locals: Gardening with local plants in Perth" 1996. 

R. Powell & J. Emberson. Western Australian Naturalists' 

Club, Perth. 

"Small Block Manual: Land management on small rural blocks 

in the Shire of Serpentine-Jarrahdale" 1994. W. Mortlock. Shire 

of Serpentine-Jarrahdale. 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 


Trees 

Name 

Zone 

 

 

Description

Establishment*

Ecological habitat 

Comments 

Agonis flexuosa 

(WA Peppermint) 

2,3 

tree to 10m, weeping branches, 



white flowers In spring 

seed or seedlings 

coastal sand over limestone 

fauna habitat, especially possums, 

attracts Insects 

Banksia grandis 

(Bull BanksIa) 

Open tree to 8m, fast growing, 



yellow flowers in spring and early 

summer 


seed or seedlings 

grows in woodland 

nectar producer 

Banksia littoralis 

(Swamp BanksIa) 

1,2 

Stout, spreading tree to 10m, 



yellow flowers in winter 

seed or seedlings 

common In swampy wetlands 

very important nectar producer as It 

flowers in winter 

Casuarina obesa 

(Salt Sheoak) 

 

upright tree to 10m 



seed or seedling - will 

regenerate naturally 

onto bare ground 

common around saline rivers, swamps 

and estuaries 

tolerates saline soil 



Eucalyptus calophylla 

(Marri) 


large tree to 30m, cream flowers 

in summer/autumn 

seed or transplant 

sandy woodland, loamy soils on lower 

valley slopes 

flowers vital for nectar eating fauna In 

summer, mature trees have hollows for 

nesting 

Eucalyptus gomphocephala 

(Tuart) 


large, stately tree to 30m, cream 

flowers In spring 

seed or transplant, 

germinates on ashbeds 

after fire 

on coastal limestone or sand 

mature trees have hollows vital for 

fauna, nectar producer 

Eucalyptus rudis 

(Flooded Gum) 

1,2 

Tall, fast growing tree to 25m 



seed or seedling - will 

regenerate naturally 

onto bare ground 

common along rivers and creeks, and 

around wetlands 

Important nectar producer, old trees 

have hollows for fauna habitat 

Melaleuca cuticularis 

(Saltwater Paperbark) 

Slow-growing upright tree to 10m 



seed or seedling - will 

regenerate naturally 

onto bare ground 

common around saline creeks and 

estuaries 

tolerates saline water and soils, forms 

important waterbird nesting habitat 

Melaleuca preissiana 

(Modong) 

Slow-growing stately tree to 15m, 



white flowers in early summer 

seed or seedlings 

found in seasonal wetlands 

Important nectar producer and 

nesting habitat 

Melaleuca raphiophylla 

(Freshwater Paperbark) 

Slow-growing dense tree to 10m, 

white flowers in spring 

seed or seedlings 

common along rivers and wetlands 

most Important tree for waterbIrd 

nesting sites 

Xylomelum occidentale 

(Forest Woody Pear) 



slow-growing gnarled small tree, 

masses of cream flowers in 

summer 


seed or seedlings 

In sandy woodlands 

Important nectar producer, fruits 

harvested as cut flowers 



 

Ground layer 

Name 

 

 

 

 

 

Zone 

Description

Establishment*

Ecological habitat

Comments

Arthropodium capillipes 

(Chocolate Lily) 



tuberous perennial, pale mauve 

hanging flowers on 1 m tall stalk In 

summer 


seed 

grows in sandy woodlands 

can cope with grass weed 

competition. Flowers important for 

native Insects 

Kennedia prostrata 

(Red Runner) 

2,3 


prostrate creeper, scarlet flowers 

in spring 

seed or seedlings 

common in sandy woodland 

nitrogen fixer. Good ground cover, 

can cope with disturbance 



 

Climbers 

Name 

 

 

 

Zone 

Description 

Establishment*

Ecological habitat

Comments 

Billardiera candida 

(Wedding Creeper) 

twiner, white flowers in early 



summer 

seed 


grows on loamy riverbanks 

very attractive 



Billardiera coeruleo- 

punctata 

twiner, blue flowers In early 



summer 

seed 


in woodland 

Important for native insects 



Hardenbergia comptoniana 

(Native Wisteria) 

2,3 

climber with twining stems, purple- 



blue flowers in late winter 

seed or seedlings 

common In woodland, especially after 

fire 


nitrogen fixer. Nectar and seeds 

Important foods 



List of plants suitable for creekline revegetation in the southern part of the Swan Coastal Plain 

 

 

 





Shrubs 

Name 

 

 



Zone 

Description

Establishment"

Ecological habitat 

Comments 

Acacia  pulchella 

(Prickly Moses) 

2,3 

branched shrub to 1.5m, yellow 



flowers in winter and spring 

seed or seedlings 

common In woodland, especially after 

fire 


short-lived, nitrogen fixer, seeds 

Important foods 



Acacia dentifera 

dense shrub to 3m, yellow flowers 



in spring 

seed or seedlings 

grows on loam/clay riverbanks and 

woodland 

nitrogen fixer, attracts insects, nest site, 

seeds nutritious 



Acacia saligna 

(Orange Wreath Wattle) 

2,3 

Large dense shrub, relatively short- 



lived 

seed or seedlings 

common In around wetlands, 

especially after tire 

nitrogen fixer. Seeds Important foods 

Agonis linearifolia (Swamp 

Peppermint) 

1,2 

upright spreading shrub to 3m, 



white flowers in spring 

seed or seedling 

common in swamps, seasonal 

wetlands and creek banks 

excellent erosion control, withstands 

flooding, attracts Insects 



Astartea fascicularis 

1,2 


upright, open, weeping shrub to 

2m, white flowers In summer 

seed or seedling 

common under paperbark 

bank stabiliser, valuable as little else in 

flower then 



BoronIa heterophylla (Pink 

BoronIa) 

1,2 

Tall upright shrub to 2m, pink 



flowers in spring 

seed or seedling 

In sandy swampy flats 

nectar producer, harvested 

commercially as cut flower 

Callystachys lanceolatum 

(Greenbush) 

1,2 


tall erect shrub to 4m, 

orange/yellow pea flowers in early 

summer 

seed or seedlings 



grows on creek banks and around 

seasonal swamps. Not common. 

nitrogen producer, highly nutritious 

foliage, nectar producer 



Calothamnus laterals 

(Swamp One-sided 

Bottlebrush) 

erect shrub to 1.5m, red flowers In 



spring 

seed or seedling 

seasonally waterlogged swampy areas 

nectar producer 



Calothamnus quadrifidus 

(One-sided Bottlebrush) 

2,3 


dense shrub to 2m, red flowers in 

early summer 

seed or seedlings 

on all soils, good drainage 

nectar producer 

Dryandra sessilis 

(Parrot Bush) 

tall, upright, prickly shrub, yellow 



flowers in spring 

seed or seedlings 

in sandy or lateritic woodland 

nectar producer, seeds relished by 

parrots 

Grevillea diversifolia 

(Valley Grevillea) 

1,2 

open shrub or small tree to 10m, 



greenish-black flowers In winter, 

spring and summer 

seed or seedlings 

on loamy banks and floodplain soils, 

usually under Flooded Gum. Can 

withstand occasional Inundation, but 

not prolonged waterlogging. Appears 

in thickets after tire. 

fast growing but relatively short-lived. 

Flowers attractive to insects. Dense 

thickets good small bird habitat. 

Grevillea vestita 

dense prickly, greyish shrub to 2m, 



white flowers in late winter/spring 

seed or seedlings 

forms thickets on

 

sandy soil after tire 



superb small bird habitat, nectar, 

seeds and nesting sites 



Hakea prostrata 

(Harsh Hakea) 

2,3 

open shrub or small gnarled tree 



to 3m, cream flowers in spring 

seed or seedlings, will 

regenerate naturally Into 

bare soil 

found in sandy woodland 

nectar producer 



Kunzea ericifolia 

(Spearwood) 

Dense upright shrub, yellow 



flowers In spring 

seed or seedlings 

common on sandy soil 

nectar producer, bird nesting sites 



Kunzea recurva 

erect, open shrub to 1.5m, pink 



flowers In spring 

seed or seedlings 

found in sandy woodland 

nectar producer 



Labichea lanceolata 

(Tall Labichea) 

dense, prickly shrub to 3m, yellow 



flowers in spring 

seed or seedlings, 

regenerates after fire 

in moist gullies and loamy river banks. 

Appears In dense thickets after fire. 

nitrogen fixer, nectar producer, seeds 

important for seed-eating fauna 

Melaleuca incana 

(Grey Honeymyrtle) 

1,2 

large shrub or small tree to 4m, 



cream bottlebrush flowers in late 

winter 


seed or seedlings, 

regenerates after fire 

on winter-wet depressions or swamps, 

not salt-tolerant. 

nectar producer. Good windbreak 

Melaleuca lateriflora 

(Gorada) 

large shrub to 3m, globular clusters 



of white flowers in summer. 

seed or seedlings 

on clay flats subject to seasonal 

waterlogging, but drying out in 

summer. Not salt tolerant. 

nectar producer 



Melaleuca laterita 

(Robin Redbreast Bush) 

upright shrub to 1.5m, spectacular 



red flowers In early summer 

seed or seedlings 

seasonally waterlogged swampy areas 

excellent nectar producer 



 

 

 



 

Shrubs ctd. 

Name 

 

 

 

 

 

Zone 

Description

Establishment*

Ecological habitat

Comments

Melaleuca teretifolia 

(Banbar) 

1,2 


spreading shrub to 3m, cream 

flowers in spring 

seed or seedlings 

forms dense thickets in lakes and 

swamps 

tolerates long periods of waterlogging



nectar producer 

Melaleuca uncinata 

(Broombush) 

 

upright shrub to 4m, yellow flowers 

in globular heads In spring and 

early summer. 

seed or seedlings 

forms thickets In winter-wet swamps. 

Wheatbelt plants salt-tolerant. 

nectar producer. Cut commercially for 

brush fencing. 

Melaleuca viminea 

(Mohan) 


1,2 

rounded shrub to 3m, white 

flowers In terminal clusters in spring 

seed or seedlings 

forms thickets around clay-based 

wetlands (rare around swamps on 

sandy soils) and alongside estuaries. 

abundant nectar producer. Important 

as shelter and nest sites for aquatic 

birds. 


Myoporum caprarioides 

(Slender Myoporum) 

1,2 

Open shrub to 2m, white flowers in 



spring 

seed or seedlings 

grows along saline creek banks 

will tolerate salinity, nectar producer 



Oxylobium lineare 

(River Pea) 

1,2 

tall, erect shrub to 3m, red/ yellow 



pea flowers in summer 

seed or seedlings 

grows along creeks In the Hills 

nitrogen producer, highly nutritious 

foliage, nectar producer 

Regelia inops 

(Mouse Bush) 

2,3 


Dense tangled shrub to 1.5m, 

mauve flowers in spring 

seed or seedlings, will 

regenerate naturally into 

bare soil 

found on sandy soil, around swampy 

depressions 

nectar producer, good bandicoot 

habitat 

Viminaria juncea (Swishbush) 

1,2 


fast-growing but short-lived erect 

shrub with weeping branches and 

sprays of gold flowers In summer 

seed or seedlings 

common around swamps and 

wetlands, especially after fire 

nitrogen fixer, nectar producer, 

attractive 



 

Reed-like tussocks 

Name 

 

 

 

 

 

Zone 

Description

Establishment*

Ecological habitat

Comments

Agrostocrinum scabrum 

(Blue-eyed Reed) 



tufted clump, bright blue flowers in 

spring 

seed or transplant 



clumps 

in woodland on loam 

flowers Important for native insects 

Baumea articulata 

(Jointed Rush) 

tall tufted clumps 



transplant clumps 

common rush of shallow freshwater 

wetlands 

good dense habitat 



Dianella revoluta 

(Dianella) 

2,3 

tufted clump, pale blue flowers In 



early summer 

transplant clumps 

in woodland on loam 

flowers Important for native insects 



Juncus krausii 

(Sea Rush) 

tufted clumps 



transplant clumps 

common rush of freshwater and saline 

wetlands 

excellent for stream edging 



Lepidosperma gladiatum 

(coast) + L. effusum (Inland) 

(Sword sedge) 

2,3 


tufted rush 

transplant clumps 

common In woodland 

Important bird nesting sites, good 

bandicoot habitat 

Leptocarpus coangustatus 

(Twine Rush) 



tufted rush 

transplant clumps 

seasonal freshwater swamps 

good groundcover habitat 

Orthrosanthos laxus (Morning 

Iris) 


tufted plant, pale blue flowers in 

spring 

seed or transplant 



clumps 

In loamy or gravelly woodland 

flowers important for native insects 

Patersonia occidentalis 

(Western Iris) 



tufted clumps, large mauve 

flowers In spring 

seed and transplant 

clumps 

common in sandy woodland 



attractive groundcover, flowers 

important for native insects 

 

 

 



 

Note: 


If done with care, many perennial tussock plants can be transplanted by being lifted, broken Into segments and replanted. Care Is needed however. Consult a 

specialist Plant Nursery for advice. 

 

*Note: Most plants can be established either by direct seeding or by planting seedlings. 



 

 

 



  

Wildlife 

Notes

 1

 

Creekline Revegetation for Wildlife 

 

  

 



Banksia littoralis 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Melaleuca lateriflora 

Drawings by Margaret Pieroni from 



'Leaf and Branch: 

Trees 

and Tall 

Shrubs of Perth' by Robert Powell. CALM. 

Published by the Department of Conservation and Land Management, Perth. 

All correspondence should be addressed to : The Editor Wildlife Notes', CALM Wildlife Branch, Locked Bag 104, Bentley 

Delivery Centre, WA 6983. Phone: (08) 9334 0530, Fax (08) 9334 0278 



 

Page 6 Land  for Wildlife 

 



Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə