Lilian suzette gibbs an early ascent of mt bellenden ker



Yüklə 4,7 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü4,7 Mb.

In this issue...

EXCURSION REPORT – APRIL 

2015...................................2

H

ERBERTON



 P

OWER


 L

INE


 

S

PECIES



 L

IST


.................4

VALE ANN RADKE...............4

LILIAN SUZETTE GIBBS – AN 

EARLY ASCENT OF MT 

BELLENDEN KER..................5

WHAT'S HAPPENING...........8

C

AIRNS


 B

RANCH


 ...........8

T

ABLELANDS



 B

RANCH


......8

T

OWNSVILLE



 B

RANCH


......8

Society for Growing Australian Plants

Cairns Branch

Newsletter 149-150

May-June 2015

E

XCURSION

 R

EPORT

 – A

PRIL

 2015

Stuart Worboys

Far north Queensland is blessed with a vast diversity of habitats, with a rich 

and diverse flora to match.  From high mountains to coastal mangroves, 

desert-like sand dunes to rich basaltic soils, rivers to lakes and swamps, we 

can boast the richest and most diverse flora in the nation.  We tend to be 

more enamoured of our coastal and tablelands rainforests than of the 

habitats further inland.  Only naturally – what is closest to home is also 

closest to our hearts.  But for us coastal people, explorations just a little 

further inland can be extremely rewarding.

The landscape to the west of Herberton has been a popular excursion site 

for SGAP Tablelands for many years.  But sad to say, SGAP Cairns has not 

made the trip often enough in recent years.  The rugged rolling hills 

between Herberton and Petford here are home to a tough but beautiful flora,

including several rare and restricted species (Australia's only purple wattle, 



Acacia atropurpurea is one famous example).  April's excursion took us to 

one of the highest accessible points in the hills to see what was in flower.  

We were well rewarded.

Immediately to the west of Herberton, the hills rise to well over a thousand 

metres.  A combination of cool upland climate, low but reliable rainfall and 

really crappy soils provide conditions ideal for an almost temperate zone 

heathland flora – with peas, lilies, ground orchids, tea-trees and guinea 

flowers more reminiscent of the flora of southern Australia than the tropics. 



It's this flora that Coralie and I 

set out to explore on a fine 

sunny Sunday.  

Coralie parked her car where 

the Powerlink high voltage 

powerlines cross the 

Herberton-Petford Road, and 

we toddled off down the rough 

gravel track that provides 

maintenance access to the 

lines.  A broad swathe of the 

powerline corridor is kept free 

of trees – a benefit for those of 

us looking for weird and 

wonderful things amongst the 

grasses and subshrubs of the 

ground layer.  

We were greeted at the start of 

the walk by some handsome 

Gympie Messmates 

(Eucalyptus cloeziana).  

Hiding amongst the grasses, 

Coralie spotted a fluorescent 

orange coral fungus.  Further 

on, our eyes were caught by 

bright patches of red around 

flat rocky outcrops.  These 

turned out to be the massed 

tiny flowers of Gonocarpus 

acanthocarpus, an attractive 

perennial herb.  In poorer soils 

along the road grew tufts of an 

insignificant grass-like plant – 

common but far from eye 

catching.  One of these tufts 

surprised me by having a 

small, almost colourless, three-

petalled flower.  This one 

flower enabled me to track 

down a name for this mystery 

plant – Laxmannia gracilis.

Seepages along the track 

provided moist homes for 

some tiny but delicately 

coloured bladerworts 

(Utricularia caerulea).  Thick 

grass, mostly kangaroo grass 

(Themeda triandra) provided 

shelter for the lovely ground 

orchid, Diuris oporina, which 

is known only from the 

woodlands on the western edge

of the Wet Tropics.  

Grass trees (Xanthorrhoea 

johnsonii) were everywhere, 

many in full flower, with bees, 

flies and wasps buzzing 

excitedly around the sweet 

nectar rewards.

Further along, the track took a 

sharp right turn and headed 

steeply downhill.  Attractively 

gnarled Eucalyptus shirleyi, no

more than four metres high, 

dominated the vegetation, and 

at their bases grew the native 

pea Mirbelia speciosa subsp. 

ringrosei showing off their 

stunning purple flowers.  At 

the bottom of the gully, a tiny 

trickle of water was still 

running over rocks and little 

waterfalls.  A few handsome 

cypress-pines (Callitris 

intratropica) grew in the gully.

In moist patches on the rocks, 

we caught rock violets (Boea 

hygroscopica ) at the very end 

of their season.  Our final find 

for the day was a prickly little 

shrub of the heath family, as 

yet unnamed: Astroloma sp. 

Baal Gammon.  

Our explorations over, it was 

time to turn around and head 

back up the hill.  We returned 

to the car sweaty and well 

exercised, and very pleased 

with the sights of the day.

3

Astroloma sp. Baal Gammon

Diuris oporina - a donkey orchid

Utricularia caerulea - a delicate 

carnivore

Eye catching coral fungus


Herberton Power 

Line Species List

* indicates an introduced species.



Gymnosperms

CUPRESSACEAE

Callitris intratropica

Monocots

BORYACEAE

Borya septentrionalis

LAXMANNIACEAE

Laxmannia gracilis

ORCHIDACEAE

Diuris oporina

POACEAE

Mnesithea rottboelioides

Themeda triandra

*Urochloa mosambicensis

XANTHORRHOEACEAE

Xanthorrhoea johnsonii

Eudicots

ASTERACEAE

Coronidium newcastlianum

Xerochrysum bracteatum

CASUARINACEAE

Allocasuarina inophloia

Allocasuarina torulosa

DILLENIACEAE

Hibbertia longifolia

DROSERACEAE

Drosera peltata

FABACEAE

*Chamaecrista rotundifolia

Crotalaria calycina

GESNERIACEAE

Boea hygroscopica

HALORAGACEAE

Gonocarpus acanthocarpus

LENTIBULARIACEAE

Utricularia caeurlea

MYRTACEAE

Corymbia citriodora

Eucalyptus cloeziana

Eucalyptus mediocris

Eucalyptus shirleyi

Lophostemon suaveolens

Melaleuca borealis

Melaleuca viminalis

PICRODENDRACEAE

Petalostigma pubescens

RHAMNACEAE

Cryptandra debilis

STYLIDIACEAE

Stylidium graminifolium

V

ALE

 A

NN

 

R

ADKE

Mary Gandini

Ann Radke from Yuruga Native 

Plant Nursery lost her battle with 

cancer on April 29th.

Her funeral was held on Tuesday 

May 6th at Atherton. It was a very 

moving service attended by family, 

friends and many people whose 

lives had been touched by Ann.

The many eulogies revealed not 

only a loving wife, mother, 

grandmother and friend, but also a

very talented person, a first class 

honours student and an excellent 

business woman- someone who 

readily shared her knowledge.

Ann, together with husband Peter, 

was instrumental in forming both 

Tablelands and Cairns branches of 

Society for Growing Australian 

Plants. They were very active in 

growing and promoting the use of 

native Australian plants and, with 

the establishment of Yuruga 

Nursery, provided a source for 

gardeners to obtain desirable 

species for home planting and 

revegetation. 

4

Ann Radke with husband Peter.

Cryptandra debilis, a tiny subshrub

Boea hygroscopica – Rock Violet

The tiny flower of Laxmannia 

gracilis


The introduction of clonal 

production of Eucalyptus for 

plantations made them well 

respected around the world.

At a time when few knew the 

names and characteristics of the 

many plants In our region Ann 

produced a couple of little booklets

with hand drawn illustrations, e.g. 

Cape Flattery, McIvor River, 

Irvinebank, and contributed to 

other publications such as an 

illustrated reference to many of 

our Proteaceae. Many plants were 

discovered, propagated and put 

into horticulture by Ann and Peter.

We send our condolences to Peter 

and his family.

Vale Ann, may you rest in peace.

Last year, whilst researching the 

work of Eric Mjöberg, I came 

across this fascinating paper by 

L.S. Gibbs.  Further investigation 

revealed that L.S. Gibbs was a 

Miss Lilian Suzette Gibbs, a 

talented self funded botanical 

explorer, who, amongst other feats, 

was the first botanist to climb Mt 

Kinabalu.  This paper, edited from 

volume 55 of the “Journal of 

Botany British and Foreign” tells 

the story of Miss Gibbs' ascent of 

Mt Bellenden Ker in March 1914 in

her own words.

In March 1914, proceeding from 

Dutch New New Guinea to Sydney 

via Macassar, I stopped at Cairns in

North Queensland, for the purpose 

not only of ascending Bellenden 

Ker, 5400', the highest mountain in 

the country, but also of spending 

some weeks at Kuranda, at 1000', 

on the Barron River, to enable me 

to form some idea of the vegetation

in this outlying portion of the 

Malayan-Papuan floral region.

Both these localities had been 

visited by Dr. K. Domin, of Prague,

during his long stay for botano-

geographical work in North .  

Queensland.  I was indebted to him 

for a most interesting account of 

the fine mixed forest, of which in 

present times the heavy rainfall 

permits the development in this 

comparatively small north eastern 

corner of the Australian continent, 

but which, as Domin rightly states, 

"is only a small remainder of a 

flora spread formerly over large 

areas, now mostly sunk under the 

sea".

As March is the height of the 



summer or rainy season in these 

parts, it was not considered a very 

propitious time for work on 

Bellenden Ker, all previous ascents 

having been made in the winter or 

dry season. The relatively high 

number of new species obtained is 

possibly attributable to this fact.

A spell of fine weather prevailing at

the time decided me to proceed at 

once to Harvey's Creek in the 

Mulgrave valley, the base from 

which the highest or central peak of

the Bellenden -Ker range is most 

accessible. Here, the enterprising 

landlord of the local hotel very 

kindly making all arrangements for 

me, I was enabled to start the 

Thursday morning after my arrival, 

accompanied by Claude, the small 

son of the house, a very 

enthusiastic companion, and four 

natives or "blacks" as they are 

generally but not very correctly 

called, to act as guides and carry 

tent, provisions and possible 

botanical booty.  This last, owing to

the sterile nature of the granitic 

shallow soil, and consequently 

limited character of the vegetation, 

proved very much less than my 

Papuan experiences had led me to 

anticipate.  The altitude of the 

mountain being low, and a break in 

the fine weather to be expected to 

any moment, arrangements were 

made to spend only one night on 

the summit.

...[The] lower slopes of this range 

[were] quite easy to penetrate. Here

the undergrowth consists 

principally of the very general 

endemic tree-fern Alsophila 

rebeccae [Cyathea rebeccae] with 

entire pinnules, a Macrozamia, and 

the peculiar Bowenia spectabilis in 

very young examples, only 

showing simple branches like 

deltoid fronds in appearance. 

5


A graceful little palm, Bacularia 

minor [Linospadix minor], about 3 

metres high—with stems as thick 

as a walking-stick, the red fruit 

crowded at the apex of flexible 

peduncles which radiate beyond the

leaves,—was a very common 

representative of an Indo-Malavan 

and Papuan genus. Mackinlaya 



macrosciadea, a slight undershrub, 

2-8 m. high, with light green 

foliage and flowers and white fruit, 

was also common—a Papuan 

species which here reaches the 

limit of its distribution, recalling 

the closely allied Anomopanax 

arfakensis, equally

abundant in the Arfak Mts.

of N.W. New Guinea, in

habit and colouring, the

latter, however, with green

fruit.


Always rising, we crossed

two fine torrents with the

widespread Angiopteris

evecta on their banks, also

at the limit of its

distribution… On a rock

overhanging the second

stream, at about 1000', the

very pretty Boea



hygroscopica 

representing the last outlier

of a family widely spread

in India, Malaya, China,

New Guinea and the

Solomon Islands—formed

an unexpected patch of

bright purple colour.

Behind this stream the

ground, always exposed

and sterile in character,

rose much more steeply,

with the Macrozamia,

Bacularia and Mackinlaya

still conspicuous amongst the 

scanty undergrowth. Swinging 

sharply to the left we passed up 

some slopes of loose dry soil and 

leaves, open enough a afford a view

over the Mulgrave River valley and

the hills bordering to the south ; 

then turning sharply to the right we 

stepped on to a long ridge plateau 

about 2000', running apparently 

east to west and quite different in 

the character of its vegetation.

A most delicious scent made me 

hunt round till I found a group of 

Randia disperma [Crispiloba 

disperma], a bushy shrub about 3-4

m. high, with dark green leaves, 

bearing very few of the delicate 

long, tubular, white flowers, of 

which the extreme edges of the 

corolla lobes are very densely 

crisped.  Slender trees of 

Brackenridgea australiana, with 

ascending branches covered with 

the striking fruit, consisting of 

largish blueblack seeds borne on 

red enlarged calyx-leaves ; 

Garcinia Gibbsiae, with green 

flowers turning brown later, and the

white-flowered Symplocos 

Thwaitesii were the dominant 

substaging species in flower under 

the slender forest trees.

On this long ridge Alsophila 



Rebeccae persisted, but the smaller 

Bacularia Palmeriana [Linospadix 

palmerianus] from this point 

replaces B. minor, which it 

resembles in appearance, the leaves

being less pinnate and more 

approaching the youth form. The 

comparatively level surface of the 

plateau ridge was covered with 

broken granite over which small 

mosses and epiphytic ferns spread 

luxuriantly, the handsome 



Hymenophyllum Baileyanum being 

general.  Interspersed amongst the 

stones Marattia fraxinea [Ptisana 

oreades] with Blechnum Whelani 

were the commonest terrestrial 

ferns, the latter of rosette habit, the 

fertile fronds, with much narrower 

pinnae, rising above the larger 

sterile ones.  The 

predominance of the few 

species present, combined 

with the absence of much 

epiphytic growth on the trunks

of the trees, gives a non-

tropical character to this 

undergrowth, of which the 

general facies is more 

suggestive of that of Devon or 

Cornwall woodlands.

Proceeding along the ridge, as 

the altitude increases the 

stones become larger and 

more piled one on top of the 

other, though still sheltering 

terrestrial ferns, with clumps 

of the sedge Exocarya 

scleroides; the spreading 

Hymenophyllum Baileyanum 

with the Vittaria pusilla var. 



wooroonooran [Scleroglossum

wooroonooran ], the widely 

distributed Polypodium 



Billardieri [Microsorum 

pustulatum subsp. 

pustulatum], and the endemic 

P. simplicissimum [Crypsinus 



simplicissimus], only known 

from N. Queensland, were 

abundant on the rocks, occasionally

associated with Liparis reflexa, a 

small orchid with cream flowers.  

At about 3000' the undergrowth 

became denser and the trees 

smaller; Alyxia ilicifolia, with white

flowers, was general, with A. 

ruscifolia—of denser habit and 

much smaller leaves and orange 

berries—which persisted to the top,

6


as did Symplocos Thwaitesii and 

the ubiquitous Machinlaya, 



Bacularia and Alsophila Rebeccae.

After some climbing we emerged 

on to another shoulder of the 

mountain at 4000', on the ultimate 

spur of which the camping ground 

was reached, where the natives, 

after putting up the tent, 

expeditiously erected for 

themselves one of their neat 

"gunyas" or shelters, which look 

like inverted bowls. In this case the 

ribs were made of "lawyer canes," 



Calamus australis (Mart.) Becc.—

which are about 3-4 cm. thick—

arranged lattice- wise, tied with 

creepers, and then interwoven with 

palm leaves. Condemned to 

perpetual roving by the prevailing 

sterility of a country which in its 

whole length and breadth does not 

produce a single plant-food capable

of cultivation, these natives, owing 

to the necessities of the nomadic 

habit, have never evolved a more 

stable form of dwelling... Even in 

these hills the native Australian 

tribes were not helped by the heavy

rainfall, as the slopes are too barren

to admit of any cultivation, even 

had the ubiquitous sweet potato of 

other tropical countries been 

available.

Near the camp a group of a very 

fine Palm, Arania appendiculata 



[Oraniopsis appeniculata ]up to 5

metres in height—the leaves 3-4 m.

long, with silver undersides to the 

pinnae, showed some specimens 

just coming into flower, but I could

only find male plants, though Dr. 

Beccari informs me the female 

alone had been previously 

collected. 

The next morning we started early 

for the summit, leaving one of the 

boys behind to keep camp, as 

cassowaries, wallaby, and even 

megapodes, or "brush turkeys”... 

The final cone consists of a mass of

rock, overgrown with vegetation 

quite different in type from that of 

the lower levels, though many of 

the prevailing species are 

identical...  It forms a wind-swept 

scrub very like the plant-covering 

of Lord Howe's Island, some of the 

species indeed, like Alyxia 

ilicifolia, being common to both 

formations, while the generic 

relationship is very close.

The small trees grow too closely 

together to allow of much 

undergrowth... The dwarfed and 

scrubby trees were still largely 

composed of the two Alyxias 

already mentioned ; Eugenia 

erythrodoxa [Syzyigium 

erythrodoxum], from 4500' to the 

top, had largish flowers of a 

charming rose-pink colour; 

Mackinlaya macrosciadea and 

many examples of the small 



Bacularia about 1 m. high, still 

fruiting, but only showing the 

youth form of leaf. The palms, 

Orania appendiculata and 

Calyptrocalyx australasica 

[Laccospadix australasicus] ran up 

almost to the top ; Alsophila 

rebeccae was still abundant, while 

the handsome Alsophila 



robertsiana [Cyathea robertsiana], 

2 m. high, was seen in one 

example.

At 5000' the famous Dracophyllum



sayeri, peculiar to this mountain, 

the only representative in 

Queensland of a genus widely 

distributed throughout New 

Zealand, with many stout much 

branched stems, formed a large part

of the dense shrubbery marking the 

last 500' ; the fine cream flower-

heads, with pink bracts and the red 

fruit recalled D. latifolium A. Cunn.

of the mixed forest regions of New 

Zealand. This genus will probably 

yet be found in New Guinea [it has 

not  been recorded from the island].



Drimys oblonga [Hypsophila 

halleyana] with red flowers was 

characteristic of the extreme 

summit with Alyxia ruscifolia and a

Psychotria sp. not properly in 

flower.  The stems of the small 

trees composing this dense scrub 

growth were clothed in small 

mosses and hepatics, associated 

with the abundant little white 



Dendrobium Taylori [Cadetia 

taylori] and the minute 

Bulbophyllum Lilianae with white 

petals and yellow labellum, 

growing tightly round the smallest 

branches.  On the summit a small 

space had been cleared exposing 

the granite, where a large clump of 



Gahnia psittacorum [Gahnia 

sieberiana], so common in the 

Arfak Mts. of N.W. New Guinea, 

grew by the rock.

It was about 9 a.m. when we 

arrived, but there was only a 

restricted view, which soon clouded

over, down the Mulgrave valley to 

the sea, and up it in the Mt. Bartle 

Frere direction. In the inevitable 

bottle our names, with those of the 

three boys who accompanied us, 

were written on the back of 

Mjöberg's record of his ascent, this 

indefatigable investigator having 

been the last to visit the mountain.  

The mentality of the Australian 

natives is supposed to be one of the

lowest in the human scale, yet these

men asked me to put down the 

name of the boy left at the camp, as

it was not his fault he was not there

as well.  Among the records of 

previous ascents I was interested to 

see Domin's card, but, being 

heavily glazed, it was already 

turning black, and had half 

perished. Dr. Mjoberg had made 

interesting notes on the temperature

and atmospheric conditions 

prevailing at the time of his ascent.

Threatening clouds closing round 

did not allow much time to hunt for



Rhododendron lochae, the only 

representative of this typical 

Malayan and Papuan genus in 

Australia ; however, I heard later 

… that it is limited to the summit of

one of the two other peaks of this 

range. We hurried down to the tent 

and had only just struck camp when

rain fell in torrents, and persisted 

for the rest of the day, incidentally 

mobilising battalions of leeches.  

We returned to Harvey's Creek at 

about 1 p.m., when the plants 

obtained were arranged and packed,

and I left the next morning for 

Kuranda.


7

W

HAT

'

S

 

H

APPENING

Cairns Branch

Meetings and excursions on the 3

rd

 

Sunday of the month.



SUNDAY 21 JUNE 2015

This month we're looking at the 

weed control and rehabilitation 

done by the rangers of Jaragun on 

the lower Russell River.  Jaragun is 

lead by Dennis Ah Kee and Liz 

Owen, and we'll be visiting both 

the nursery and the rehab site  We 



have TWO possible meeting 

points:

10 am – Meet at 45 Jamieson Close

Gordonvale to inspect the Jaragun 

Nursery.  To get there, head to 

Gordonvale along the Bruce 

Highway, then turn on to the Gillies

Highway and head to Atherton.  At 

the roundabout, turn right, then 

left onto Dempsey St, then first 

right onto Jamieson Close.

12 noon – For those that like the 

more usual meeting time, meet at 

Rotary Park at Babinda Creek at 

12pm.


  Heading south from Cairns, 

when you reach Babinda, turn right

and cross the railway tracks just 

past the station.  Turn right at the T

intersection, then head down 

Howard Kennedy Drive to the 

Babinda Creek bridge.  Rotary Park 

is just before the bridge, on the 

left.  Meet at the shelter next to 

the playground.



Tablelands Branch

Meetings on the 4

th

 Wednesday of 



the month.  

Excursion the following Sunday. 

Any queries, please contact Chris 

Jaminon on 4091 4565 or email 

hjaminon@bigpond.com 

   Townsville Branch

Meets on the 2nd Wednesday of 

the month, February to November, 

in Annandale Community Centre at

8pm, and holds excursions the 

following Sunday. 

See www.sgaptownsville.org.au/ 

for more information. 

8

SGAP CAIRNS 2015 COMMITTEE 



Chairperson  Boyd Lenne 

Vice-chairperson  Pauline Lawie 

Treasurer   Stuart Worboys 

Secretary   Coralie Stewart 

Newsletter   Stuart Worboys 

Webmaster   Tony Roberts



Document Outline

  • Society for Growing Australian Plants Cairns Branch
  • Excursion Report – April 2015
    • Herberton Power Line Species List
  • Vale Ann Radke
  • What's Happening
    • Cairns Branch
    • Tablelands Branch
    • Townsville Branch


Yüklə 4,7 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə