Luiz Ricardo L. Simone Carlo M. Cunha 1


Measurements (respectively length, height, width



Yüklə 4,77 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə3/4
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü4,77 Mb.
1   2   3   4

Measurements (respectively length, height, width,

in mm):

HGLC: 11.5 by 12.2 by 12.0; MNHN (Sta.

DW11): 15.7 by 17.7 by 9.2 (valve); MNHN (Sta.

CP889): 19.7 by 17.0 by 9.1 (valve).



Geographic Distribution:

South and Central Indo-

Pacific in 146–805 m depth.

Material Examined:

Paratypes of S. ericia: AUSTRA-

LIA; South Cape Wiles, 174–183 m, 35°39

Ј S, 136°40Ј E,

AMS 032068, 1 left, 1 right valves (Zoological Results of

the F.I.S. E

NDEAVOUR

, 28 Aug. 1909).



Other Material Examined:

Holotype of S. japonica:

JAPAN. ANSP 49639, 1 shell. MNHN. SW PACIFIC.

Loyaute Islands16 lots [122 v]. TONGA IS. 12 lots [59

v]. GUAM. Marianas Islands, 3 lots [15 v]. AUSTRALIA.

South Cape Wiles, 1 lot [6 v]. NEW CALEDONIA.

South, 3 lots [7 specimens]; Banc Esponge, 2 lots [3

specimens]; Chesterfield Plateau, 1 specimen. PHILIP-

PINES. Aliguri Is. 2 lots [1 specimen and 3 v]; Bohol

Sea, Off Balicasag Island, 1 lot [1 v]. FIJI. 1 specimen.

MYANMAR (BURMA). 1 lot [5 v] Preparis North Chan-

nel, 1 lot [4 v]; N.W. of Tavoy I., 1 lot [11 v]. ANDA-

MANS SEA. 1 lot [1 v]. THAILAND. Phuket I., 1 lot [11

v]; Andaman Sea, 1 lot [1 v] (Details in Simone and

Cunha, in press.)

Spinosipella costeminens (Poutiers, 1981)

(Figures 60–65, 68–71, 83–92, 103–108)



Verticordia (Spinosipella) costeminens Poutiers, 1981: 351 (pl.

4, figs 1–4, text fig 5).



Spinosipella costeminens.—Poutiers and Bernard, 1995: 110,

143, 158 (figs. 1–2).



Diagnosis:

Shell with 16–17 tall radial ribs, those

more posterior to middle surface very taller, normally

possessing blade-like projections along tip; 3–4 more

posterior abruptly lower, preceded by a very tall, carina-

like rib.



Description:

S

HELL



: Up to 30 mm. Color white. De-

gree of convexity (width/length) in each valve approxi-

mately 0.50. Outer surface prickly, with somewhat cha-

otic organization (Figures 60, 61, 68–70). Sculptured by

strong, uniform, arched, radial ribs, from 16 to 17 in each

valve (Figures 60, 61); ribs increasing from region ante-

rior to umbo to region between middle and posterior

thirds, last ribs in this region taller and more separated

from each other, last one on a weak carina (Figure 70);

larger ribs normally possessing blade-like, projection

Page 70

THE NAUTILUS, Vol. 122, No. 2



along tip; posterior third as a slope, having 3–4 ribs simi-

lar to those of anterior region; blade like projection ab-

sent in some specimens (Figures 68–71). Posterior edge

about twice broader than anterior edge. Between umbos

and anterior edge a concavity bearing transversal ribs

similar to ribs of remaining region (Figures 64, 65); pre-

umbonal region narrow, smooth about 10% of shell

length (Figures 64, 65, 69). Anterior, ventral, and poste-

rior edges forming zigzag (Figures 62, 63, 71, 103), with

tips longer and narrower projected in those middle and

larger ribs. Hinge with a large cardinal tooth in right

valve, stubby, tall (about 10% of valve width), broadly



Figures 83–86.

Spinosipella costeminens. Anatomy. 83. Whole specimen with right valve extracted, right view. 84. Specimen

extracted from shell, posterior view, showing siphonal area. 85. Whole right view, some portions of right mantle lobe extracted,

particularly regions ventral to septum, and ventral and dorsal to renal fold (rf) to expose inner surface; cerebral ganglion (ce) seen

by transparency. 86. Same, ventral-slightly right view. Scale bar = 5 mm.

L. R. L. Simone and C. M. Cunha, 2008

Page 71


pointed, somewhat flat (Figures 63, 71, 103); correspon-

dent socket in left valve shallow, restrict to dorsal sur-

face; this socket flanked by small posterior tooth, with

insertion of anterior valve edge approximately in middle

region of this tooth (Figure 62), anterior tooth absent

(Figure 62).

Additional details for this species see Poutiers (1981),

Poutiers and Bernard (1995).

L

ITHODESMA



(F

IGURES


103–105): Characters similar

to those in preceding species, differing in being propor-

tionally shorter and wider (Figures 104–105). Length

about


1

5



to

1



6

of hinge length, and about 1.5 times wider

and long.

M

AIN



M

USCLE


S

YSTEM


(F

IGURES


83–87): Characters

similar to those in preceding species. Anterior adductor

muscle about 20% dorso-ventrally longer (Figures 83, 85).

F

OOT AND



B

YSSUS


(F

IGURES


85, 84, 90, 107): Shape

and disposition similar to those in S. deshayesiana. Byssal

gland relatively deep, running immersed in ventral re-

gion of pedal musculature at about half of byssal furrow



Figures 87–90.

Spinosipella costeminens. Anatomy. 87. Whole right view, mainly showing digestive tubes and main ganglia,

topology of some structures also shown. Scale bar = 5 mm. 88. Scheme of layers of tissue in indicated region of stomach. Scale bar

= 0.5 mm. 89. Fore- and midgut opened longitudinally for exposing inner surface (same scale of Figure 87). 90. Foot, ventral-slightly

posterior view, sectioned transversally in two levels to show inner layer of tissues. Scale bar = 1 mm.



Figures 91–108.

Spinosipella species. Anatomy. 91. S. costeminens, middle horizontal, longitudinal section through visceral mass

at same level as pericardium (MNHN sta. CP767, Mallory, 5

␮m). Scale bar = 2 mm. 92. Same, detail of posterior region of mantle

border. Scale bar = 1 mm. 93–102. S. deshayesiana93. Detail of hinge region of left valve with lithodesma (lt) still attached, right

view. Scale bar = 2 mm. 94. Detail of posterior region of supraseptal chamber, right view, right mantle lobe removed (MNHN sta.

DW1499). Scale bar = 1mm. 95. Infraseptal chamber roof, ventral view, right mantle lobe removed (MNHN sta. CP767). Scale bar

= 2 mm. 96–99. Lithodesma (MNHN sta. DW739). Scale bar = 1 mm. 96. Ventral view. 97. Dorsal view. 98. Posterior-slightly dorsal

view. 99. Posterior view. 100. Same specimen, empty shell, ventral view, valves slightly open, lithodesma still in situ. Scale bar = 2

mm. 101. Same, detail of hinge and lithodesma. 102. Same, ventral-slightly anterior view. 103–108. S. costeminens103. Shell,

ventral view, valves open, lithodesma still attached to left valve (MNHN sta. CP1460). Scale bar = 2 mm. 104–105. Lithodesma, same

lot (other specimen), dorsal and ventral views respectively. Scale bar = 1 mm. 106. Detail of anterior region, right view, integument

removed, mainly showing right cerebral ganglion (ce) (same lot). Scale bar = 1 mm. 107. Infraseptal chamber roof, ventral view, right

mantle lobe removed (MNHN CP767). Scale bar = 1 mm. 108. Detail of posterior (siphonal) region, posterior view (MNHN

CP1460). Scale bar = 2 mm.

Page 72

THE NAUTILUS, Vol. 122, No. 2



length towards dorsal (Figure 90, by). Thick muscular

layer surrounding a nucleus of conective tissue (Figure

90, cj).

M

ANTLE



(F

IGURES


84–86, 92, 108): Characters similar

to those in preceding species, with following distinctive

characters. Pair of secondary tentacles positioned be-

tween incurrent and excurrent siphons (Figures 84, 108);

remaining tentacles similar in size and position. Ventral

pair of tentacles of incurrent siphon generally symmetri-

cal. Zigzag formed by mantle edge having secondary

folds positioned in more distal tips, possibly elated to

taller radial shell ribs (Figure 108). Radial mantle gland

(Figure 92) similar to S. deshayesiana.

P

ALLIAL


C

AVITY


(F

IGURES


85–86, 107): Characters

similar to those in preceding species, except for wider

platform between posterior region of gills as part of sep-

tum (Figure 107).

V

ISCERAL


M

ASS


(F

IGURES


85–87): Characters similar

to those in preceding species, differing mainly by wider

region separating pair of renal folds in supraseptal cham-

ber (Figure 85).

C

IRCULATORY AND



E

XCRETORY


S

YSTEMS


(F

IGURES


85,

91): Pericardium and heart with characters similar to

those in S. deshayesiana (Figure 91). Kidneys of similar

features, differing mainly by enlargement of pair of renal

folds (Figures 85–86, rf), taller and wider, almost divid-

ing supraseptal chamber in two—internal and external—

halves. Height of renal fold about 80% of that of su-

praseptal chamber height. In addition to an enlargement,

both renal folds still have posterior end in more anterior

position and wider separation between folds and visceral

mass (Figure 85).

D

IGESTIVE



S

YSTEM


(F

IGURES


87–89): Characters simi-

lar to those in preceding species. Esophagus with about

1



3



of visceral mass length, running horizontally, perpen-

dicular to posterior surface of anterior adductor muscle

(Figure 87, es). Stomach main chamber with longer re-

gion as a blind-sac projected posteriorly. Gastric wall

constituted by external layer of weak connective tissue

(Figure 88, cj), two thick muscular layers of similar size,

with outer layer of longitudinal muscle and inner layer of

circular muscle (Figure 88, lo and cm). Inner surface of

stomach (Figure 89) with posterior end of esophageal

folds clearly more evident that together form a flat fold.

Another ventral fold surrounding apertures to digestive

diverticula. Gastric style narrower (about

1



6



of gastric

width); internally a pair of tall folds separating intestinal

from style sac components (Figure 88, ss, in).

G

ENITAL



S

YSTEM


: Characters similar to those in pre-

ceding species. Separated masculine and feminine com-

ponents of gonad shown through histological sections in

Figures 91(ts, ov).

C

ENTRAL


N

ERVOUS


S

YSTEM


(F

IGURES


87, 106): Three

ganglia with similar localization and size to those of pre-

ceding species.

Measurements (respectively length, height, width

in mm):

MNHN (Sta. 1361): 22.0 by 28.1 by 12.5

(valve); MNHN (Sta. CC996): 20.0 by 24.3 by 14.3

(valve); MNHN (Sta. CP992): 19.6 by 23.3 by 12.6

(valve).

Geographic Distribution:

Tropical West Pacific.



Depth Range:

750–925 m.



Material Examined:

Holotype; Additional material

(MNHN): SW PACIFIC. 4 lots [32 v, 11 specimens];

Wallis Is., 6 lots [15 v]; Banc Combe, 5 Lots [28 v];

Fortuna Is., 5 lots [18 v]; Banc Waterwitch, 2 lots [3 v];

Banc Tuscarora, 29 lots [63 v]; South Vanuatu - Monts

Gemini, 4 lots [4 v, 1 specimen]; TONGA IS. 8 lots [52

v]; Eua Is. 6 lots [12 v]; Seamount, 6 lots [29 v]; South of

Nomuka group, 1 lot [25 v]; Ha

Јapai Group, 2 lots [4 v];

N Ha’apai group, 3 lots [ 6 v]; NW Tongatapu, 3 lots [16

v]; SW Tongatapu, 5 lots [22 v]; Tongatapu, 6 lots [8 v];

S. Nomuka group, 2 lots [6 v]; Vava’ group, 1 lot [2 v];

NEW CALEDONIA. 5 lots [5 v, 5 specimens]; Lord

Howe, 1 lot [1 v]; Banc Nova, 2 lot [8 v, 1 specimen];

North New Caledonia, 10 lots [tota 20 v]; South New



Figure 109.

Geographic distribution of Spinosipella spp.

Page 74

THE NAUTILUS, Vol. 122, No. 2



Caledonia, 13 lots [46 v, 1 specimen]; off Norfolk, 18 lots

[98 v]; Banc Esponge, 11 lots [144 v]; Banc Kaimon-

Maru, 9 lots [38 v]; Banc Antigonia, 1 lot [1 v]; Banc

Jumeau-West, 4 lots [17 v]; Banc Introuvable, 7 lots [16

v]; Banc Stylaster, 1 lot [1 v] ; Volcans Hunter and Mat-

thew, 2 lots [2 v]; S.E. New Caledonia, 2 lots [2 v]; East

New Caledonia, 6 lots [30 v] Banc Capel, 1 lot [lota 12 v];

Banc Kelso, 1 lot [6 v]; I. Loyaute, 22 lots [44 v]. FIJI.

South of Viti Levu, 42 lots [328 v]; Southeast of Viti

Levu, 17 lots [57 v]; Bohol/Sulu Seas, 2 lots [5 v]; Bohol

Sea - Balicasag Island, 3 lots [5 v]; Bordau, 1 specimen;

TAIWAN. Bashi channel, 2 lots [3 v]; South China Sea,

1 lot [2 v]; East Taiwan, 2 lots [5 v]. (Details in Simone

and Cunha, in press.)

DISCUSSION

T

HE



G

ENUS


S

PINOSIPELLA

W

ITHIN THE



V

ERTICORDIIDAE

.

Despite their larger size, the prickly outer surface of the



shell, and the reduction of the lunule, which differenti-

ates Spinosipella from the remaining verticordiids, this

taxon has traditionally been considered a subgenus of the

genus Verticordia. This set of characters is sufficient in

my opinion to allocate Spinosipella as a separate genus.

This view was previously defended by the author of the

genus (Iredale, 1930) and by Poutiers and Bernard

(1995). Other distinctive characters are the spiral um-

bones (Figures 5, 7, 21, 22, 33, 54, 53), the tall, some-

what uniform radial sculpture, triangular in section; and

the obesity of the valves. The spiral umbones and the

obesity of Spinosipella are quite similar to those in the

fossil genus Pecchiolia Savi and Meneghini in Murchison,

1850 [type-species (by monotypy): Pecchiolia argentea

Savi and Meneghini in Murchison, 1850 (= Chama ari-

etina Brocchi, 1814) middle Tertiary, Europe] (Keen,

1969: 857), from which Spinosipella differs in having

well-developed ribs and zigzag edges.

The full genus status of Spinosipella is based on the

differences with the typical Verticordia sensu stricto

[type species (by monotypy) Verticordia cardiiformis

Sowerby, 1844], such as the higher size and obesity of the

valves; the additional development of the prickly surface

(which also covers the radial ribs, whereas in Verticordia,

when a prickly surface is present, it does not cover the

radial ribs), the absence of lunule; the spiral fashion of

both valves; and the similarity among the radial ribs (rep-

resentatives of Verticordia usually have an unusually

larger rib or space between ribs). The same set of char-

acters also differentiates Spinosipella from Trigonulina

d’Orbigny, 1842 [type species (by monotypy) T. ornata

d’Orbigny, 1842] in the sense of Jung (1996: 46–47).

Representatives of Spinosipella also resemble those of

the genera Haliris Dall, 1886, and Euciroa Dall, 1881, by

their larger size, convexity, and prickly shell surface. Spi-



nosipella differs from those two genera, however, in the

higher degree of convexity, reflected in more obese

shells in its species; in the much more developed and

taller radial ribs; higher degree of spiralization of the

valves; and in the expansion of the ribs beyond the shell

margin.


Further analysis on the verticordiid systematics and

phylogeny can be found in the literature (e.g., Pelseneer,

1888; Salvini-Plawén and Haszprunar, 1982; Bieler and

Mikkelsen, 1992).

COMPARISON BETWEEN THE

SPINOSIPELLA SPECIES

The differentiation between the five species of Spino-



sipella is summarized in the respective diagnoses and in

Table 1. The degree of differentiation in the samples of

each species examined allows for specific separations.

The number of radial ribs is the most notable feature;

despite certain a small amount of intraspecific variation,

the number of radial ribs is somewhat constant in each

species, at least in specimens of larger size. The fossil S.

acuticostata is the species with fewest ribs, 12–13 (Fig-

ures 36, 38, 39), while S. deshayesiana has the largest

number of ribs, 16–19 (Figures 46, 48, 49, 54, 53). The

other species possess an intermediary number of ribs.

The species of Spinosipella usually have radial ribs of

relatively uniform size; the single exception is S. costem-



inens, which has ribs clearly increasing posteriorly; in the

posterior shell slope, however, the ribs abruptly reduce

in size, although in some specimens, particularly in the

young ones, this character is not so clear, i.e., the ribs are

somewhat uniform-sized. The shell inflation is well de-

veloped in most Spinosipella species, but this is clearer in



Table 1. Comparison of characters between the five studied species of Spinosipella.

Character



Spinosipella

acuticostata

Spinosipella agnes

Spinosipella

tinga

Spinosipella

deshayesiana

Spinosipella

costeminens

Distribution

Mediterranean

Tropical W. Atlantic;

Caribbean; to SE Brazil

S-SE Brazil

South and Central

Indo-Pacific

Tropical West Pacific

Shell Inflated

Strongly

Highly


Weakly

Strongly


Highly

Sculptured between

radial ribs

Radial


Disorganized

Radial


Radial

Disorganized

Prickly ribs outer

surface


Rough

Rough


Weakly prickly

Strongly prickly

Rough

Number of Ribs



12–13

15–17


17–18

18–19


16–17

Size (mm)

20.0

20.2


10.4

11.5


20.0

L. R. L. Simone and C. M. Cunha, 2008

Page 75


the larger specimens; while the young specimens are

considerably flatter (Figures 41–45). The prickly outer

shell surface is an outstanding character of the Spino-

sipella species; however, this character is conservative

among the five species; the single exception is the rela-

tively chaotic arrangement in S. agnes (Figure 8) and S.

costeminens, while in the remaining species a radial ar-

rangement is apparent (parallel to the radial ribs) (Figure

32). The Pacific species S. deshayesiana has much larger,

crispy prickles along the tip of the ribs (Figures 42, 45,

46, 48, 49). This is lacking in the remaining species,

except in some very young specimens (e.g., USNM

810889, S. agnes, 6 mm), where the prickles, however,

are not fully developed. The prickly surface is strongly

damaged in eroded specimens (Figure 55), becoming

almost completely smooth. Spinosipella deshayesiana,

perhaps because of this character, has the distal tips of

the zigzag edges of the shell even longer and more pro-

jected (Figures 41, 44, 47, 50, 51, 59, 67). The series of

radial ribs is interrupted in the region between the um-

bos, where a triangular smooth area appears. This area is

particularly large in S. agnes (Figures 7, 9), but is prac-

tically absent in S. tinga (Figures 21, 22); it is narrow in

the remaining three species. The size of the specimens

appears to be another distinctive feature, as S. tinga is

small (around 10 mm), whereas the remaining species

are larger (20–30 mm). The hinge does not vary much

between the Spinosipella species; however, some par-

ticularities exist. The posterior tooth of the left valve is

well developed in S. agnes [Figures 4, 10, 12, 27, 28

(arrow)], very low in S. acuticostata (Figures 35, 39), and

practically absent in remaining species (Figures 20, 25,

50). The tall and pointed cardinal tooth of the right valve

is more developed in S. agnes, in such it is also sharply

pointed and curved (Figures 3, 10, 12). In the remaining

species this tooth is weakly shorter and more rounded

(Figures 26, 34, 47, 51).

The geographic and stratigraphic distribution are

somewhat mutually exclusive for most of the species

(Fig. 72); Spinosipella acuticostata is the only Mediter-

ranean species, S. agnes occurs from Florida to Rio de

Janeiro, S. tinga is found from Rio de Janeiro to Rio

Grande do Sul, along the Brazilian coast. The fine-

resolution distribution of the Indo-Pacific species is still

unclear, but S. deshayesiana and S. costeminens, appear

to be sympatric. Spinosipella acuticostata is a fossil spe-

cies, occurring in Pliocene strata, while the remaining

species are found in the Recent. Apparently no Recent



Spinosipella occur in the Mediterranean.

All samples of Spinosipella from the Atlantic and

Mediterranean have previously been accepted as belong-

ing to the single species S. acuticostata (e.g., Abbott,

1974; Abbott and Dance, 1983; Rios, 1994). However,

analyses of the conchological, geographic, and strati-

graphic differences, show that the separation into three

species is warranted. As the shape changes considerably

during ontogeny, a specimen of S. agnes at same size as

the holotype of S. tinga was chosen to show the differ-


Kataloq: trabalhos

Yüklə 4,77 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə