M a j o r a r t I c L e



Yüklə 0,52 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/3
tarix07.07.2017
ölçüsü0,52 Mb.
  1   2   3

The Journal of Infectious Diseases

M A J O R A R T I C L E

First-in-Human Evaluation of the Safety and

Immunogenicity of an Intranasally Administered

Replication-Competent Sendai Virus

–Vectored HIV Type

1 Gag Vaccine: Induction of Potent T-Cell or Antibody

Responses in Prime-Boost Regimens

Julien Nyombayire,

1

Omu Anzala,



2

Brian Gazzard,

3

Etienne Karita,



1

Philip Bergin,

4

Peter Hayes,



4

Jakub Kopycinski,

4

Gloria Omosa-Manyonyi,



2

Akil Jackson,

3

Jean Bizimana,



1

Bashir Farah,

2

Eddy Sayeed,



5

Christopher L. Parks,

5

Makoto Inoue,



7

Takashi Hironaka,

7

Hiroto Hara,



7

Tsugumine Shu,

7

Tetsuro Matano,



8,9

Len Dally,

6

Burc Barin,



6

Harriet Park,

5

Jill Gilmour,



4

Angela Lombardo,

5

Jean-Louis Excler,



5,b

Patricia Fast,

5

Dagna S. Laufer,



5,a

and Josephine H. Cox

5,a,b

;

the S001 Study Team



1

Projet San Francisco, Kigali, Rwanda;

2

Kenya AIDS Vaccine Initiative Institute of Clinical Research, Nairobi;



3

Chelsea and Westminster Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust, and

4

Human Immunology



Laboratory, International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, London, United Kingdom;

5

International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, New York, New York;



6

Emmes Corporation, Rockville, Maryland;

7

ID Pharma, Tsukuba,



8

University of Tokyo, and

9

National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan



Background.

We report the

first-in-human safety and immunogenicity assessment of a prototype intranasally administered,

replication-competent Sendai virus (SeV)

–vectored, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine.

Methods.


Sixty-

five HIV-1–uninfected adults in Kenya, Rwanda, and the United Kingdom were assigned to receive 1 of 4 prime-

boost regimens (administered at 0 and 4 months, respectively; ratio of vaccine to placebo recipients, 12:4): priming with a lower-dose

SeV-Gag given intranasally, followed by boosting with an adenovirus 35

–vectored vaccine encoding HIV-1 Gag, reverse transcriptase,

integrase, and Nef (Ad35-GRIN) given intramuscularly (S

L

A); priming with a higher-dose SeV-Gag given intranasally, followed by



boosting with Ad35-GRIN given intramuscularly (S

H

A); priming with Ad35-GRIN given intramuscularly, followed by boosting



with a higher-dose SeV-Gag given intranasally (AS

H

); and priming and boosting with a higher-dose SeV-Gag given intranasally (S



H

S

H



).

Results.


All vaccine regimens were well tolerated. Gag-speci

fic IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot–determined response rates and

geometric mean responses were higher (96% and 248 spot-forming units, respectively) in groups primed with SeV-Gag and boosted

with Ad35-GRIN (S

L

A and S


H

A) than those after a single dose of Ad35-GRIN (56% and 54 spot-forming units, respectively) or SeV-

Gag (55% and 59 spot-forming units, respectively); responses persisted for

≥8 months after completion of the prime-boost regimen.

Functional CD8

+

T-cell responses with greater breadth, magnitude, and frequency in a viral inhibition assay were also seen in the S



L

A

and S



H

A groups after Ad35-GRIN boost, compared with those who received either vaccine alone. SeV-Gag did not boost T-cell counts

in the AS

H

group. In contrast, the highest Gag-speci



fic antibody titers were seen in the AS

H

group. Mucosal antibody responses were



sporadic.

Conclusions.

SeV-Gag primed functional, durable HIV-speci

fic T-cell responses and boosted antibody responses. The prime-boost

sequence appears to determine which arm of the immune response is stimulated.

Clinical Trials Registration.

NCT01705990.

Keywords.

replication competent; Sendai virus vector; HIV-1 vaccine; intranasal delivery; immunogenicity; adenovirus 35;

prime-boost; mucosal responses.

Despite signi

ficant progress in prevention and treatment of

human immunode

ficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, de-

velopment of a safe and effective preventive HIV-1 vaccine re-

mains a global priority [

1

,

2



]. Several vaccine regimens have

been tested for ef

ficacy, but only one conferred modest, tran-

sient protection against HIV-1 acquisition [

3

]. Various methods



have been evaluated to enhance responses to HIV vaccines, in-

cluding booster injections, cytokine administration, adjuvants,

electroporation, vector delivery systems, and prime-boost ap-

proaches [

4



8



]. Development of a vaccine that stimulates sus-

tained humoral and/or cellular immunity at mucosal entry

Received 30 June 2016; accepted 13 October 2016; published online 17 October 2016.

Presented in part: HIV Research for Prevention Meeting, Cape Town, South Africa, October

2014.

a

D. S. L. and J. H. C. contributed equally to this work.



b

Present affiliations: International Vaccine Institute, Seoul, Republic of Korea. (J. -L. E.); Vaccine

Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and infectious Diseases, Bethesda, Maryland (J. H. C.).

Correspondence: D.S. Laufer, International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, 125 Broad St, 9th Fl,

New York, NY 10004 (dlaufer@iavi.org).

The Journal of Infectious Diseases

®

2017;215:95



–104

© The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of

America. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/

4.0/), which permits non-commercial reproduction and distribution of the work, in any

medium, provided the original work is not altered or transformed in any way, and that the

work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, contact journals.permissions@oup.com.

DOI: 10.1093/infdis/jiw500

SeV-Vectored HIV-1 Vaccine

JID 2017:215 (1 January)



95


points may be critical for an HIV preventive vaccine. Although

mucosally administered vaccines have been tested and licensed

for other diseases [

9



12

], mucosal administration of an HIV

preventive vaccine has seldom been evaluated [

13

]. Sendai



virus (SeV) is a nonsegmented negative-sense RNA virus in

the Paramyxoviridae family that can infect the upper respirato-

ry tract [

14



17

]. As a live viral vector that is not pathogenic in

humans, SeV offers several properties important for a successful

vaccine: it does not integrate into the host genome, it replicates

only in the cytoplasm without DNA intermediates or a nuclear

phase, and it does not undergo genetic recombination. SeV is

genetically and antigenically related to hPIV-1 [

18



21

]. A live

nonrecombinant SeV vaccine against human parain

fluenza


virus type 1 (hPIV-1) administered intranasally in adults and

young children was safe and immunogenic [

22

,

23



]. SeV anti-

bodies cross-reactive with hPIV-1 antibodies are present in

most people [

24

].



Intranasal delivery of a vaccine could induce a

first line of de-

fense at mucosal points of entry and induce effective systemic

immune responses [

12

,

25



,

26

]. Nonhuman primate studies



with SeV bearing simian immunode

ficiency virus (SIV) genes

demonstrated protection against SIV challenge and evidence

that SeV vectors may boost responses primed by other HIV-1

vaccines [

27



29

]. Intranasal administration and heterologous

prime-boost administration were shown to reduce effects of pre-

existing immunity [

29

,

30



].

In this study, we report the

first-in-human safety and immu-

nogenicity evaluation of a replication-competent SeV-vectored

HIV-1 vaccine administered intranasally; the vaccine was ad-

ministered intranasally at a lower dose (S

L

) or higher dose



(S

H

) of SeV vector encoding clade A HIV-1 Gag (SeV-Gag),



given alone or as a heterologous prime-boost with a nonrepli-

cating adenovirus (Ad) serotype 35 HIV-1 vaccine containing

genes HIV-1 encoding Gag, reverse transcriptase, integrase,

and Nef (Ad35-GRIN) administered intramuscularly. The

Ad35-GRIN was selected for these prime-boost regimens be-

cause it has well-known safety pro

file and robust immunogenic-

ity in both US and African populations [

4

,

7



,

8

,



31

].

METHODS



Volunteers and Study Design

This study was a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled,

dose-escalation trial that was double blinded with respect to

vaccine or placebo but not regimen. The doses were based on

preclinical data [

28

,



29

] and a nonrecombinant live SeV vaccine

study in humans [

23

]; the initial group was administered a lower



dose for safety. The study was conducted at Projet San Francisco

(Kigali, Rwanda), the Kenya AIDS Vaccine Initiative Institute of

Clinical Research (Nairobi, Kenya), and the St Stephen

’s AIDS


Trust (London, United Kingdom). The objectives were to

evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of 4 different 2-dose

regimens (administered at 0 and 4 months) that comprised

SeV-Gag administered at 2 × 10

7

(S

L



) or 2 × 10

8

(S



H

) cell infec-

tious units and Ad35-GRIN vaccine administered at 1 × 10

10

viral particles. Volunteers and clinical/laboratory personnel



were blind to allocation between active vaccine and placebo.

The participants were healthy HIV-negative adults 18

–50

years of age engaging in behavior at low risk for HIV-1 infec-



tion; all women were nonpregnant and used an effective meth-

od of contraception until 4 months after the last vaccination

(detailed inclusion/exclusion criteria are in

Supplementary Ma-

terials

). The respective local governmental ethics and regulatory



bodies for each clinical research center approved the study.

Written informed consent was obtained from each volunteer

prior to undertaking any study procedure. The study was con-

ducted in accordance with International Conference on Harmo-

nization

’s good clinical practice and good clinical laboratory

practice guidelines [

32

].



The study design is presented in Table

1

and in the Consol-



idated Standards of Reporting Trials diagram (

Supplementary

Figure 1

). Volunteers in part I received low-dose SeV-Gag vac-

cine followed by Ad35-GRIN vaccine (S

L

A) or placebo. Follow-



ing review of safety data from part I by an independent safety

review board, a different set of volunteers was randomly as-

signed to participate in part II. Volunteers in part II received

either the higher dose of SeV-Gag as a prime followed by

Ad35-GRIN vaccine (S

H

A); an Ad35-GRIN prime given intra-



muscularly, followed by the higher-dose SeV-Gag boost given

intranasally (AS

H

); prime-boost with the higher-dose SeV-



Gag given intranasally (S

H

S



H

); or placebo.

Each group had 16 volunteers: 12 vaccine recipients and 4

placebo recipients. Enrollment of an additional volunteer was

allowed yielding a sample size of 65. Local and systemic reacto-

genicity were reported for days 0 through 14 following each vac-

cination, adverse events (AEs) were reported through month 1

following the second study vaccination, and serious adverse

events (SAEs) were reported through the

final study visit. He-

matologic and biochemical parameters were assessed at 4 time

points after vaccination (

Supplementary Materials

). Reactoge-

nicity and AEs were assessed using an adapted version of the

Division of AIDS Table for Grading the Severity of Adult and

Pediatric Adverse Events, version 1.0.

Study Vaccines

The SeV-Gag vaccine is based on a replication-competent vec-

tor derived from the SeV Z strain [

33

] with HIV-1 subtype A



gag inserted in the 3

′ terminal region of the virus genome

[

34

], upstream of the nucleoprotein gene. SeV-Gag vaccine



and placebo were administered by syringe; the head was tilted

back, and 100 µL was instilled into each nostril of the volunteer

over approximately 3 minutes to allow absorption.

The Ad35-GRIN vaccine is a recombinant, replication-defective

Ad35 vaccine; it has been previously tested in 4 clinical trials

[

4



,

7

,



8

,

31



] and a recently completed trial in Kenya [

35

]. The



96

JID 2017:215 (1 January)



Nyombayire et al



Ad35-GRIN vaccine and placebo were both administered intra-

muscularly in 0.5 mL. The gag in SeV-Gag and Ad35-GRIN

were fully homologous with regard to amino acid sequence.

Laboratory Assessments for Safety and Immunogenicity

Hematologic and biochemical assays were conducted at the

clinical sites in Africa and at a third-party accredited laboratory

in the United Kingdom. Vaccine-induced seropositivity/

seroreactivity was assessed in each country (

Supplementary

Materials

). For detailed collection and immunogenicity testing

methods, see the

Supplementary Materials

. Brie


fly, peripheral

blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were processed and cryo-

preserved at each clinical site. Mucosal

fluids from nasal

swabs, parotid and transudated saliva, rectal secretions, and cer-

vicovaginal secretions in females were processed as previously

described [

36

,



37

]. Colorectal biopsy specimens were pooled

and disaggregated by collagenase digestion to isolate mucosal

mononuclear cells within 6 hours of collection, and intracellular

cytokine staining (ICS) assays were performed after an over-

night rest as described elsewhere [

38

,

39



]. T-cell responses

were assessed by quali

fied interferon-γ (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked

immunospot (ELISPOT) and ICS assays, using peptides

matched to Gag, and by a functional viral inhibition assay,

using a panel of 8 HIV-1 strains from subtypes A, B, C, and

D [

7

,



8

,

31



,

40

,



41

].

An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used



with HIV-1 subtype B Gag p24 protein (BH10) to assess Gag

p24 binding antibodies in serum and mucosal samples [

7

,

31



,

36

]. Serum neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against SeV were as-



sessed as described previously [

24

].



Samples for analysis of viral shedding were collected from the

middle turbinate region, saliva, and urine on days 2, 5, 6, 7, and

9 (±1 day) after the

first vaccination with SeV-Gag or placebo in

the S

L

A, S



H

A, and S


H

S

H



groups as described in the

Supplemen-

tary Materials

.

Statistical Methods



The statistical methods are described in the

Supplementary

Materials

.

RESULTS



Demographic Characteristics and Participant Flow and Recruitment

The study was conducted between March 2013 and March

2015. Of 65 volunteers, 36 (55.4%) were enrolled in Rwanda,

21 (32.3%) were enrolled in Kenya, and 8 (12.3%) were enrolled

in the United Kingdom. Volunteers were

first enrolled in group

S

L

A only in Rwanda, followed by competitive enrollment at all



sites for groups S

H

A, AS



H

, and S


H

S

H



. Twenty participants

(30.8%) were female, and the mean age was 31.3 years (range,

19

–48 years;



Supplementary Table 1

). All volunteers completed

study vaccinations and visits per protocol (

Supplementary

Figure 1

).

Vaccine Safety and Tolerability



All vaccination regimens were generally well tolerated (

Supple-


mentary Figures 2A and 2B

). There was no statistically signi

fi-

cant difference in the frequency of grade 2 or higher upper or



lower respiratory tract reactogenicity following any SeV-Gag

vaccination, compared with placebo (

Supplementary Table 2

).

All local reactogenicity events after Ad35-GRIN intramuscular



injection were graded as mild or moderate. The frequency of

grade 2 local pain, tenderness, erythema, and swelling following

Ad35-GRIN vaccination was similar in the vaccine and placebo

groups (


Supplementary Table 3

). Most systemic reactogenicity

(chills, malaise, myalgia, headache, nausea, vomiting, and

fever) was grade 1 or 2. The overall frequency of any grade 2

or higher systemic reactogenicity following any vaccination

was similar in vaccine and placebo groups (

Supplementary Ta-

bles 2 and 3

). One volunteer (in the AS

H

group) reported grade



3 malaise on day 2 after Ad35 vaccination and grade 3 chills,

malaise, and myalgia on day 0 after SeV-Gag vaccination (

Sup-

plementary Figure 2



).

There was no difference between groups in the proportion of

volunteers with grade 2 or higher unsolicited AEs (P = .525;

data not shown). The proportions of volunteers with any unso-

licited respiratory AEs (cough, in

fluenza-like illness, nasal con-

gestion, pneumonia, and/or rhinitis) within 4 weeks of

vaccination or at any time during the trial were not statistically

Table 1.

Study Immunization Regimens and Schedule

Group

Regimen


Subjects, No.

Month 0


Month 4

Vaccine Group

Placebo Group

Vaccine


Route

Dose


a

Vaccine


Route

Dose


a

A

S



L

A

12



4

SeV-Gag


Intranasal

2 × 10


7

Ad35-GRIN

Intramuscular

1 × 10


10

B

S



H

A

12



4

SeV-Gag


Intranasal

2 × 10


8

Ad35-GRIN

Intramuscular

1 × 10


10

C

AS



H

12

5



b

Ad35-GRIN

Intramuscular

1 × 10


10

SeV-Gag


Intranasal

2 × 10


8

D

S



H

S

H



12

4

SeV-Gag



Intranasal

2 × 10


8

SeV-Gag


Intranasal

2 × 10


8

Abbreviations: Ad35-GRIN, adenovirus 35

–vectored vaccine encoding Gag, reverse transcriptase, integrase, and Nef; AS

H

, Ad35-GRIN prime followed by SeV-Gag boost; HIV-1, human



immunodeficiency virus type 1; S

H

A, higher-dose SeV-Gag prime and Ad35-GRIN boost; S



H

S

H



, higher-dose SeV-Gag prime and boost; S

L

A, lower-dose SeV-Gag prime and Ad35-GRIN



boost; SeV-Gag, Sendai virus

–vectored vaccine encoding HIV-1 Gag.

a

Data are 1 × 10



7

or 1 × 10

8

cell infectious units/100 µL per nostril (for SeV-Gag) or 1 × 10



10

viral particles (for Ad35-GRIN).

b

Overenrollment was allowed per protocol; one additional volunteer, identified post unblinding as a placebo recipient, was enrolled.



SeV-Vectored HIV-1 Vaccine

JID 2017:215 (1 January)



97


signi

ficant between volunteers receiving SeV-Gag vaccination

and placebo recipients (

Supplementary Table 4

). No vaccine-

related SAE was reported, and no apparent pattern in clinical

AEs or AEs determined by laboratory analysis was observed.

No volunteers tested positive for vaccine-induced seroposi-

tivity/seroreactivity at the end of the study.

Mucosal samples, including nasopharyngeal

fluid, parotid

gland saliva, oral

fluid (transudate), and cervicovaginal and rec-

tal secretions, were collected at 8 time points. Compliance was

excellent for nasal and oral sampling, good for cervicovaginal

sampling, but poor for rectal sampling (

Supplementary

Materials

).

SeV-Gag Shedding



Viral shedding samples were collected from the middle turbi-

nate region, saliva, and urine on days 2, 5, 6, 7, and 9 after

first vaccination with SeV-Gag or placebo. Overall, 20% of all

samples (vaccine vs placebo, P = not signi

ficant) across all

groups and visits (141 of 702) were positive by the cell infec-

tious unit assay, which used immunostaining to detect cells

infected with SeV. The polyclonal SeV antiserum used in



Yüklə 0,52 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə