Main roads western australia



Yüklə 29,22 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə10/31
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü29,22 Mb.
1   ...   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   ...   31

178.2ha
121.1ha
9ha
173.1ha
55.2ha
31.3ha
11.2ha
0.9ha
327,000
327,000
328,000
328,000
329,000
329,000
330,000
330,000
331,000
331,000
332,000
332,000
6,6
55
,00
0
6,6
55
,00
0
6,6
56
,00
0
6,6
56
,00
0
6,6
57
,00
0
6,6
57
,00
0
6,6
58
,00
0
6,6
58
,00
0
6,6
59
,00
0
6,6
59
,00
0
6,6
60
,00
0
6,6
60
,00
0
6,6
61
,00
0
6,6
61
,00
0
G:\61\34834\GIS\Maps\MXD\6134834_006_Rev0_Fig6BlackCockatooHabitat.mxd
0
500
1,000
250
Metres
Map Projection: Transverse Mercator
Horizontal Datum:  GDA 1994
Grid: GDA 1994 MGA Zone 50
o
©
 2016. Whilst every care has been taken to prepare this map, GHD, Landgate and Main Roads WA make no representations or warranties about its accuracy, reliability, completeness or suitability for any particular purpose and cannot accept liability and responsibility of any kind 
(whether in contract, tort or otherwise) for any expenses, losses, damages and/or costs (including indirect or consequential damage) which are or may be incurred by any party as a result of the map being inaccurate, incomplete or unsuitable in any way and for any reason.
Main Roads WA
Figure 6
Job Number
Revision 0
61-34834
12 Sep 2016
Black Cockatoo Habitat
Date
Data source: GHD: Vegetation Types, Cockatoo Breeding Trees, Cockatoo Breeding Habitat - 20160728, Site Boundary - 20160722, Conservation Significant Fauna - 20160824; Landgate; Aerial Imagery - Virtual Mosaic, Created by:afeeney
Page Size A3
999 Hay Street, Perth WA 6000 Australia    T  61 8 6222 8555    F  61 8 6222 8555    E  permail@ghd.com.au    W  www.ghd.com.au
Jurien Offset Property, EVA & Level 1 Survey
LEGEND
^
_
Conservation significant fauna - Brush Wallaby
!
(
Suspected Black Cockatoo breeding tree
!
(
Actual Black Cockatoo breeding tree
Survey area
Black Cockatoo breeding habitat
Vegetation type
VT01 Allocasuarina microstachya heathland
VT02 Petrophile chrysantha heathland
VT03 Melaleuca preissiana open woodland
VT04 Melaleuca platycalyx heathland and Eucalyptus wandoo woodland
VT05 Eucalyptus todtiana, Banksia attenuata and B. menziesii woodland
VT06 Xanthorrhoea and Kingia heathland
VT07 Melaleuca rhaphiophylla woodland
VT08 Ecdeiocolea monostachya herbland
VT09 Corymbia calophylla woodland
VT10 Eucalyptus wandoo woodland
VT11 Banksia attenuata open heathland
VT12 Mixed heath with isolated clumps of mallee
VT13 Melaleuca ?concreta heathland
VT14 Pasture with emergent trees
Scattered trees of Wandoo and Marri

 
GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834 
Appendix B
 
– Relevant legislation, conservation 
codes and background information
 

 
GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia 

 Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834
 
Legislation 
Federal 
Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999
 
The Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) is the Federal 
Government’s central piece of environmental legislation. It provides a legal framework to protect and 
manage nationally and internationally important flora, fauna, ecological communities and heritage 
places, which are defined in the EPBC Act as Matters of National Environmental Significance (MNES). 
The biological aspects listed as MNES include: 

 
Nationally threatened flora and fauna species and ecological communities 

 
Migratory species 
A person must not take an action that has, will have, or is likely to have a significant impact MNES, 
without approval from the Federal Minister for the Environment. 
A person must not undertake an action that has, will have, or is likely to have a significant impact 
(direct or indirect) on MNES, without approval from the Australian Government Minister for the 
Environment. 
State 
Environmental Protection Act 1986
 
The Environmental Protection Act 1986 (EP Act) is the primary legislative Act dealing with the 
protection of the environment in Western Australia. It provides for an Environmental Protection 
Authority (EPA), for the prevention, control and abatement of pollution and environmental harm, for the 
conservation, preservation, protection, enhancement and management of the environment and for 
matters incidental to or connected with the above. 
Clearing of native vegetation in Western Australia requires a permit from the Department of 
Environment Regulation (DER) (formerly the Department of Environment and Conservation 

 DEC), 
unless exemptions apply. Native vegetation includes aquatic and terrestrial vegetation indigenous to 
Western Australia, and intentionally planted vegetation declared by regulation to be native, but not 
vegetation planted in a plantation or planted with commercial intent.  
In the EP Act Section 51A, clearing is defined as the killing or destruction of; the removal of; the 
severing or ringbarking of trunks or stems of; or the doing of substantial damage of some or all of the 
native vegetation in an area, including the flooding of land, the burning of vegetation, the grazing of 
stock or an act or activity that results in the above.  
When making a decision to grant or refuse a permit to clear native vegetation the assessment 
considers clearing against the ten clearing principles as specified in Schedule 5 of the EP Act: 
a) 
Native vegetation should not be cleared if it comprises a high level of biodiversity. 
b) 
Native vegetation should not be cleared if it comprises the whole or a part of, or is necessary for 
the maintenance of a significance habitat for fauna indigenous to Western Australia. 
c) 
Native vegetation should not be cleared if it includes, or is necessary, for the continued 
existence of rare flora. 
d) 
Native vegetation should not be cleared if it comprises the whole or part of native vegetation in 
an area that has been extensively cleared. 
e) 
Native vegetation should not be cleared if it is significant as a remnant of native vegetation in an 
area that has been extensively cleared. 
f) 
Native vegetation should not be cleared if it is growing in, or in association with, an environment 
associated with a watercourse or wetland. 

 
GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia 

 Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834
 
g) 
Native vegetation should not be cleared if the clearing of the vegetation is likely to have an 
impact on the environmental values of any adjacent or nearby conservation area. 
h) 
Native vegetation should not be cleared if the clearing of the vegetation is likely to cause 
appreciable land degradation. 
i) 
Native vegetation should not be cleared if the clearing of the vegetation is likely to cause 
deterioration in the quality of surface or underground water. 
j) 
Native vegetation should not be cleared if clearing the vegetation is likely to cause, or 
exacerbate, the incidence of flooding. 
There are a number of Environmentally Sensitive Areas (ESAs) within Western Australia where 
exemptions in regulations do not apply. ESAs include locations of threatened communities and 
species.  
State 
Environmental Protection (Clearing of Native Vegetation) Regulations 2004 
ESAs are declared by a notice under Section 51B of the EP Act. The Table below outlines the aspects 
of areas declared as ESA (under the Environmental Protection (Clearing of Native Vegetation) 
Regulations 2004 

 Reg 6). 
Aspects of Environmentally Sensitive Areas 
Aspects of Environmentally Sensitive Areas 
A declared World Heritage property as defined in Section 13 of the Environment Protection and 
Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act). 
An area that is registered on the Register of the National Estate (RNE), because of its natural values, 
under the Australian Heritage Commission Act 1975 of the Commonwealth (the RNE was closed in 
2007 and is no longer a statutory list 

 all references to the RNE were removed from the EPBC Act 
on 19 February 2012). 
A defined wetland and the area within 50 m of the wetland. 
The area covered by vegetation within 50 m of rare flora, to the extent to which the vegetation is 
continuous with the vegetation in which the rare flora is located. 
The area covered by a TEC. 
A Bush Forever Site. 
The areas covered by the following policies: 
a) 
The Environmental Protection (Gnangara Mound Crown Land) Policy 1992
b) 
The Environmental Protection (Western Swamp Tortoise Habitat) Policy 2002
The areas covered by the lakes to which the Environmental Protection (Swan Coastal Plain Lakes) 
Policy 1992 (SCPL) (EPP Lakes) applies. 
Protected wetlands as defined in the Environmental Protection (South West Agricultural Zone 
Wetlands) Policy 1998
Areas of fringing native vegetation in the policy area as defined in the Environmental Protection 
(Swan and Canning Rivers) Policy 1997
 
 

 
GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia 

 Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834
 
State 
Wildlife Conservation Act 1950
 
The Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 (WC Act) provides for the conservation and protection of wildlife. It 
is administered by the Department of Parks and Wildlife (DPaW) (formerly the DEC) and applies to 
both flora and fauna. Any person wanting to capture, collect, disturb or study fauna requires a permit 
to do so. A permit is required under the WC Act if removal of threatened species is required. 
State 
Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007
 
Under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007 (BAM Act), a Declared Pest is a 
prohibited organism or an organism for which a declaration under Section 22(2) is in force. The 
Department of Agriculture and Food Western Australia (DAFWA) maintains a list of Declared Pests for 
Western Australia. If a Pest is declared for the whole of the State or for particular Local Government 
Areas, all landholders are obliged to comply with the specific category of control. Declared plants are 
gazetted under categories, which define the action required. The category may apply to the whole of 
the State, districts, individual properties or even paddocks. Categories of control are defined below. 
Among the factors considered in categorising Declared Pests are: 

 
The impact of the plant on individuals, agricultural production and the community in general 

 
Whether it is already established in the area 

 
The feasibility and cost of possible control measures 
The BAM Act replaces the repealed Agriculture and Related Resources Protection Act 1976 (ARRP 
Act). 
Department of Agriculture and Food (Western Australia) Categories for Declared 
Pests under the 
Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007
 
Control class code 
Description 
C1 (Exclusion) 
Pests will be assigned to this category if they are not established in Western 
Australia and control measures are to be taken, including border checks, in 
order to prevent them entering and establishing in the State. 
C2 (Eradication) 
Pests will be assigned to this category if they are present in Western 
Australia in low enough numbers or in sufficiently limited areas that their 
eradication is still a possibility. 
C3 (Management) 
Pests will be assigned to this category if they are established in Western 
Australia but it is feasible, or desirable, to manage them in order to limit their 
damage. Control measures can prevent a C3 pest from increasing in 
population size or density or moving from an area in which it is established 
into an area which currently is free of that pest. 
 
 

 
GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia 

 Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834
 
Background information and conservation codes 
Reserves and conservation areas 
Department of Parks and Wildlife managed lands and waters 
DPaW manages lands and waters throughout Western Australia to conserve ecosystems and species, 
and to provide for recreation and appreciation of the natural environment. DPaW managed lands and 
waters include national parks, conservation parks and reserves, marine parks and reserves, regional 
parks, nature reserves, State forest and timber reserves. DPaW managed conservation estate, is 
vested with the Conservation Commission of Western Australia. Access to, or through, some areas of 
DPaW managed lands may require a permit or could be restricted due to management activities. 
Proposed land use changes and development proposals that abut DPaW managed lands will 
generally be referred to DPaW throughout the assessment process. 
Ramsar Listed Wetlands 
The Convention of Wetlands of International Importance was signed in 1971 at the Iranian town of 
Ramsar. The Convention has since been referred to as the Ramsar Convention. Ramsar Listed 
wetlands are “sites containing representative, ra
re or unique wetlands, or wetlands that are important 
for conserving biological diversity … because of their ecological, botanical, zoological, limnological or 
hydrological importance” (DotE
E 2016a). Once a Ramsar Listed Wetland is designated, the country 
agrees to manage its conservation and ensure its wise use. Under the Convention, wise use is broadly 
defined as “maintaining the ecological character of a wetland” (DotE
E 2016a). 
Nationally important wetlands 
Wetlands of national significance are listed under the Directory of Important Wetlands in Australia. 
Nationally important wetlands are wetlands which meet at least one of the following criteria (DotEE 
2016b): 

 
It is a good example of a wetland type occurring within a biogeographic region in Australia 

 
It is a wetland which plays an important ecological or hydrological role in the natural functioning 
of a major wetland system/complex 

 
It is a wetland which is important as the habitat for animal taxa at a vulnerable stage in their life 
cycles, or provides a refuge when adverse conditions such as drought prevail 

 
The wetland supports one percent or more of the national populations of any native plant or 
animal taxa 

 
The wetland supports native plant or animal taxa or communities which are considered 
endangered or vulnerable at the national level 

 
The wetland is of outstanding historical or cultural significance 
Vegetation extent and status 
The National Objectives and Targets for Biodiversity Conservation 2001

2005 (Commonwealth of 
Australia 2001) recognise that the retention of 30 percent or more of the pre-clearing extent of each 
ecological community is necessary if Australia’s biological diversity is to be protected. This is the 
threshold level below which species loss appears to accelerate exponentially and loss below this level 
should not be permitted. This level of recognition is in keeping with the targets recommended in the 
review of the National Strategy for the Conservation of Australia’s Biological Diversity (ANZECC 2000) 
and in Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) Position Statement No. 2 on environmental protection 
of native vegetation in Western Australia (EPA 2000). 

 
GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia 

 Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834
 
From a purely biodiversity perspective and taking no account of any other land degradation issues, 
there are a number of key criteria now being applied to the clearing of native vegetation in Western 
Australia (EPA 2000). 

 
The “threshold level” below which species loss appears to accelerate exponentially at an 
ecosystem level is regarded as being at a level of 30 percent of the pre-European extent of the 
vegetation type. 

 
A level of 10 percent of the original extent is regarded as being a level representing 
Endangered. 

 
Clearing which would put the threat level into the class below should be avoided. 

 
From a biodiversity perspective, stream reserves should generally be in the order of at least 200 
metres (m) wide. 
Vegetation condition 
The vegetation condition in the Geraldton Sandplains IBRA Bioregion can be assessed in accordance 
with the vegetation condition rating scale for the South West and Interzone Botanical Provinces (EPA 
and DPaW 2015). The scale recognises the intactness of vegetation and consists of six rating levels 
as outlined below. 
 

 
GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia 

 Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834
 
Vegetation condition rating scale  
Vegetation 
Condition 
Eremaean and Northern Botanical Provinces description  
Pristine 
Pristine or nearly so, no obvious signs of damage caused by human activities since 
European settlement. 
Excellent 
Vegetation structure intact, disturbance affecting individual species and weeds are 
non-aggressive species. Damage to trees caused by fire, the presence of non-
aggressive weeds and occasional vehicle tracks. 
Very Good 
Vegetation structure altered obvious signs of disturbance. Disturbance to vegetation 
structure caused by repeated fires, the presence of some more aggressive weeds
dieback, logging and grazing. 
Good 
Vegetation structure significantly altered by very obvious signs of multiple 
disturbances. Retains basic vegetation structure or ability to regenerate it. 
Disturbance to vegetation structure caused by very frequent fires, the presence of 
very aggressive weeds, partial clearing, dieback and grazing. 
Degraded 
Basic vegetation structure severely impacted by disturbance. Scope for 
regeneration but not to a state approaching good condition without intensive 
management. Disturbance to vegetation structure caused by very frequent fires, the 
presence of very aggressive weeds at high density, partial clearing, dieback and 
grazing. 
Completely 
Degraded 
The structure of the vegetation is no longer intact and the area is completely or 
almost completely without native species. These areas are often described as 
‘parkland cleared’ with the flora comprised weed or crop species with isolated native 
trees and shrubs. 
 
Conservation codes 
Species of significant flora, fauna and communities are protected under both Federal and State Acts. 
The Federal EPBC Act provides a legal framework to protect and manage nationally important flora 
and communities. The State WC Act is the primary wildlife conservation legislation in Western 
Australia. Information on the conservation codes is summarised in the following sections. 
Conservation significant communities 
Ecological communities are defined as naturally occurring biological assemblages that occur in a 
particular type of habitat (English and Blyth 1997). Federally listed Threatened Ecological 
Communities (TECs) are protected under the EPBC Act administered by the Department of the 
Environment (DotEE) (formerly Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and 
Communities 

 DSEWPaC). The DPaW also maintains a list of TECs for Western Australia; some of 
which are also protected under the EPBC Act. TECs are ecological communities that have been 
assessed and assigned to one of four categories related to the status of the threat to the community
i.e. Presumed Totally Destroyed, Critically Endangered, Endangered and Vulnerable. 
Possible TEC that do not meet survey criteria are added to the DPaW Priority Ecological Community 
(PEC) List under Priorities 1, 2 and 3. These are ecological communities that are adequately known; 
are rare but not threatened, or meet criteria for Near Threatened. PECs that have been recently 
removed from the threatened list are placed in Priority 4. These ecological communities require regular 

 
GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia 

 Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834
 
monitoring. Conservation dependent ecological communities are placed in Priority 5. PECs are not 
listed under any formal Federal or State legislation. 
 
Conservation codes and definitions for Threatened Ecological Communities 
endorsed by the Western Australian Minister for the Environment and listed under 
the 
Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 
Western Australia conservation categories 
Federal Government 
Conservation Categories 
(EPBC Act) 
Presumed 
Totally 
Destroyed 
(PD) 
The community has been found to be totally 
destroyed or so extensively modified throughout 
its range that no occurrence of it is likely to 
recover its species composition and/or structure in 
the foreseeable future.  
Critically 
Endangered 
(CR) 
If, at that time, it 
is facing an 
extremely high 
risk of extinction 
in the wild in the 
immediate future 
Critically 
Endangered 
(CR) 
An ecological community that has been 
adequately surveyed and found to have been 
subject to a major contraction in area and/or that 
was originally of limited distribution and is facing 
severe modification or destruction throughout its 
range in the immediate future, or is already 
severely degraded throughout its range but 
capable of being substantially restored or 
rehabilitated  
Endangered 
(EN) 
If, at that time, it 
is not critically 
endangered and 
is facing a very 
high risk of 
extinction in the 
wild in the near 
future 
Endangered 
(EN) 
An ecological community that has been 
adequately surveyed and found to have been 
subject to a major contraction in area and/or was 
originally of limited distribution and is in danger of 
significant modification throughout its range or 
severe modification or destruction over most of its 
range in the near future. 
Vulnerable 
(VU) 
If, at that time, it 
is not critically 
endangered or 
endangered, and 
is facing a high 
risk of extinction 
in the wild in the 
medium-term 
future 
Vulnerable 
(VU) 
An ecological community that has been 
adequately surveyed and is found to be declining 
and/or has declined in distribution and/or condition 
and whose ultimate security has not yet been 
assured and/or a community that is still 
widespread but is believed likely to move into a 
category of higher threat in the near future if 
threatening processes continue or begin operating 
throughout its range. 
Kataloq: Documents
Documents -> Исследование диагностических моделей по Пону и Коркхаузу
Documents -> 3 пародонтологическая хирургия
Documents -> Hemoglobinin yenidoğanda yapim azliğina bağli anemiler
Documents -> Q ə r a r Azərbaycan Respublikası adından
Documents -> Ubutumire uniib iratumiye abantu, imigwi y'abantu canke amashirahamwe bose bipfuza gushikiriza inkuru hamwe/canke ivyandiko bijanye n'ihonyangwa ry'agateka ka zina muntu hamwe n'ayandi mabi yose vyakozwe I Burundi guhera mu kwezi kwa Ndamukiza
Documents -> Videotherapy Video: Cool Runnings Sixth Grade
Documents -> Guidelines on methods for calculating contributions to dgs
Documents -> Document Outline form monthly ret cont
Documents -> Şİrvan şƏHƏr məRKƏZLƏŞDİRİLMİŞ Kİtabxana sistemi
Documents -> İnsan hüquq müdafiəçilərinin vəziyyəti üzrə Xüsusi Məruzəçi

Yüklə 29,22 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   ...   31




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə