Main roads western australia



Yüklə 29,22 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə29/31
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü29,22 Mb.
1   ...   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31

DRF PERMIT/ LICENCE No:
SL011729
Note if only observing plants (i.e. no specimens or plant matieral is taken)  then no permit/licence is required. For further information on permit and licening requirements see the
Threatened Flora and Wildlife Licensing pages on DPaW’s website. Any actions carried out under licence/permit should be recorded above in the OTHER COMMENTS section.
SPECIMEN:
Collectors No:
WA Herb.
Regional Herb.
District Herb.
Other:
ATTACHED:
Map
Mudmap
Photo
GIS data
Field notes
Other:
COPY SENT TO:
Regional Office
District Office
Other:
Submitter of record:
Mathew Gannaway
Role:
Ecologist
Signature:
Date submitted:
12
/
09
/
2016

 
GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834 
Appendix E
 
– Fauna Data
 
Fauna species list 
Fauna Likelihood of Occurrence assessment guidelines 
Fauna Likelihood of Occurrence assessment 
 

 
 
Fauna recorded during GHD survey 

 August 2016 
Family 
Scientific name 
Common name 
Status 
August 
Survey 
Birds 
  
  
  
  
Acanthizidae 
Acanthiza apicalis subsp 
whitlocki 
Inland Thornbill 
  

Acanthizidae 
Acanthiza chrysorrhoa 
Yellow-rumped Thornbill 
  

Acanthizidae 
Calamanthus campestris 
Rufous Fieldwren 
  

Acanthizidae 
Gerygone fusca 
Western Gerygone 
  
10 
Acanthizidae 
Smicrornis brevirostris 
Weebill 
  
14 
Acanthizidae 
Sericornis frontalis 
White-browed Scrubwren 
  

Accipitridae 
Aquila audax 
Wedge tailed Eagle 
  

Accipitridae 
Accipiter fasciatus 
Brown Goshawk 
  

Accipitridae 
Haliastur sphenurus 
Whistling Kite 
  

Anatidae 
Anas gracilis 
Grey Teal 
  

Anatidae 
Anas superciliosa 
Black Duck 
  

Anatidae 
Chenonetta jubata 
Australian Wood Duck 
  
20 
Anatidae 
Todorna tadornoides 
Australian Shellduck 
  
camera 
Ardeidae 
Ardea pacifica 
White-necked Heron 
  

Ardeidae 
Egretta novaehollandiae 
White-faced Heron 
  

Artamidae 
Artamus cinereus 
Black-faced Woodswallow 
  

Artamidae 
Cracticus nigrogularis 
Pied Butcherbird 
  

Artamidae 
Gymnorhina tibicen 
Australian Magpie 
  
1, camera 
Artamidae 
Strepera versicolor 
Grey Currawong  
  

Cacatuidae 
Cacatua pastinator 
Western Long-billed 
Corella 
GIBP 
many 
Cacatuidae 
Calyptorhynchus latirostris 
Carnaby's Black Cockatoo 
En En, 
GIBP 
many 
Cacatuidae 
Eolophus roseicapilla 
Galah 
  
many 
Campephagidae 
Coracina novaehollandiae 
Black-faced Cuckoo-
shrike 
  

Campephagidae 
Lalage tricolor 
White-winged Triller 
  

Casuariidae 
Dromaius novaehollandiae 
Emu 
  
8, camera 
Climacteridae 
Climacteris rufa 
Rufous Treecreeper 
GIBP 

Columbidae 
Ocyphaps lophotes 
Crested Pigeon 
  

Columbidae 
Phaps chalcoptera 
Common Bronzewing 
  

Corvidae 
Corvus coronoides 
Australian Raven 
  
6, camera 
Cuculidae 
Cacomantis flabelliformis 
Fan-tailed Cuckoo  
  
10 
Cuculidae 
Cacomantis pallidus 
Pallid Cuckoo 
  

Cuculidae 
Chrysococcyx basalis 
Horsfield's Bronze 
Cuckoo 
  
4, camera 
Cuculidae 
Chrysococcyx lucidus 
Shining Bronze Cuckoo 
  

Falconidae 
Falco berigora 
Brown Falcon 
  

Falconidae 
Falco cenchroides 
Nankeen Kestrel 
  

Falconidae 
Falco longipennis 
Australian Hobby 
  

Halcyonidae 
Dacelo novaeguineae 
Laughing Kookaburra 
int 

Hirundinidae 
Hirundo neoxena 
Welcome Swallow 
  

Hirundinidae 
Petrochelidon nigricans 
Tree Martin 
  

Maluridae 
Malurus elegans 
Red-winged Fairywren 
  

Maluridae 
Malurus pulcherrimus 
Blue-breasted Fairy-wren 
GIBP 

Maluridae 
Malurus splendens 
Splendid Fairywren 
  
6, camera 
Meliphagidae 
Acanthagenys rufogularis 
Spiny-cheeked 
Honeyeater 
  

Meliphagidae 
Acanthorhynchus superciliosus 
Western Spinebill 
GIBP 

Meliphagidae 
Anthochaera carunculata 
Red Wattlebird 
  


 
 
Meliphagidae 
Anthochaera lunulata 
Western Wattlebird 
  

Meliphagidae 
Epthianura albifrons 
White-fronted Chat 
  

Meliphagidae 
Gliciphila melanops 
Tawny-crowned 
Honeyeater 
  

Meliphagidae 
Lichmera indistincta 
Brown Honeyeater 
  

Meliphagidae 
Melithreptus brevirostris 
Brown-headed 
Honeyeater 
  

Meliphagidae 
Phylidonyris niger 
White-cheeked 
Honeyeater 
  
many 
Monarchidae 
Grallina cyanoleuca 
Magpie Lark 
  

Motacillidae 
Anthus australis 
Australasian Pipit 
  

Neosittidae 
Daphoenositta chrysoptera 
Varied Sittella 
  

Otididae 
Ardeotis australis 
Australian Bustard 
  
prints 
Pachycephalidae 
Collurincincla harmonica 
Grey Shrike Thrush 
  

Pachycephalidae 
Oreoica gutturalis subsp 
pallescens 
Crested Bellbird 
  

Pachycephalidae 
Pachycephala rufiventris 
Rufous Whistler 
  

Pardalotidae 
Pardalotus striatus 
Striated Pardalote 
  
many 
Petroicidae 
Petroica boodang 
Scarlet Robin 
  

Petroicidae 
Petroica goodenovii 
Red-capped Robin 
  

Petroicidae 
Macroeca fascinans 
Jacky Winter 
  

Podargidae 
Podargus strigoides 
Tawny Frogmouth 
  

Psittacidae 
Barnardius zonarius 
semitorquatus 
Australian Ringneck 
  
many 
Psittacidae 
Glossopsitta porphyrocephala 
Purple-crowned Lorikeet 
  

Rallidae 
Porphyrio porphyrio 
Purple Swamphen 
  

Rhipiduridae 
Rhipidura albiscapa 
Grey Fantail 
  
10 
Rhipiduridae 
Rhipidura leucophrys 
Willy Wagtail 
  

Strigidae 
Ninox novaeseelandiae subsp 
ocellata 
Southern Boobook 
  
many 
Threskiornithidae 
Threskiornis spinicollis 
Straw-necked Ibis 
  

Timaliidae 
Zosterops lateralis subsp 
chloronotus 
Silvereye 
  

Tytonidae 
Tyto javanica 
Barn Owl 
  

Reptiles 
  
  
  
  
Carphodactylidae 
Underwoodisaurus milii 
Barking Gecko 
  

Diplodactylidae 
Crenadactylus ocellatus 
ocellatus 
Clawless Gecko 
  

Diplodactylidae 
Strophurus spinigerus 
Solt Spiny-tailed Gecko 
  

Elapidae 
Demansia psammophis 
reticulata 
Yellow-faced Whipsnake 
  

Elapidae 
Parasuta gouldii 
Gould's Snake 
  

Scincidae 
Ctenotus fallens 
West Coast Ctenotus 
  

Scincidae 
Lerista distinguenda sp nov. 
South-western Four-toed 
Slider 
  

Scincidae 
Menetia greyii 
Common Dwarf Skink 
  

Scincidae 
Morethia obscura 
Shrubland Snake-eyed 
Skink 
  

Scincidae 
Tiliqua rugosa 
Bobtail 
  
3, camera 
Varanidae 
Varanus gouldii  
Goulds Monitor 
  

Varanidae 
Varanus tristis  
Black-headed Monitor 
  
camera 
Amphibians 
  
  
  
  
Hylidae 
Litoria adelaidensis 
Slender Tree Frog 
  
10 
Limnodynatidae 
Limnodynastes dorsalis 
Pobblebonk 
  

Limnodynatidae 
Heliorporus eyrei 
Moaning Frog 
  

Limnodynatidae 
Neobatrachus pelobatoides 
Humming Frog 
  

Myobatrachidae 
Crinia pseudinsignifera 
False Western Froglet 
  
many 

 
 
Mammals 
  
  
  
  
Canidae 
Vulpes vulpes 
Fox 
int 
prints, 
camera 
Dasyuridae 
Sminthopsis 
crassicaudata/granulipes  
Fat-tailed or White-tailed 
Dunnart (Likely) 
  
camera 
Dasyuridae 
Sminthopsis griseoventer 
Grey-bellied Dunnart 
(Likely) 
  
camera 
Emballonuridae 
Austromomus australis 
White-striped Freetail Bat 
  
calls 
Felidae 
Felis catus 
Cat 
int 
prints, 
camera 
Canidae 
Canis lupis 
Dog 
int 
prints 
Suidae 
Sus scrofa 
Pigs 
int 
digs, 
camera 
Leporidae 
Oryctolagus cuniculus 
Rabbit 
int 
many 
Macropodidae 
Macropus fuliginosus 
Western Grey Kangaroo 
  
many 
Macropodidae 
Macropus irma 
Western Brush Wallaby 
P4 
camera 
Muridae 
Mus musculus 
House Mouse 
int 
camera 
Muridae 
Pseudomys albocinereus 
Ash Grey Mouse (Likely) 
  
camera 
Muridae 
Rattus fuscipes 
Western Bush Rat (Likely) 
  
camera 
Tachyglossidae 
Tachyglossus aculeatus 
Echidna 
  
1, digs, 
camera 
Vespertilionidae 
Chalinolobus gouldii 
Gould’s Wattled Bat 
 
  
calls 
Vespertilionidae 
Chalinolobus morio 
Chocolate Wattled Bat 
  
calls 
Vespertilionidae 
Vespadelus regulus 
Southern Forest Bat 
  
calls 
Vespertilionidae 
Nyctophilus sp. 
Long-eared Bats 
  
calls 
Legend: 
many or number = recorded during current survey or numbers recorded (observed or heard) 
Shed skin, scats, tracks, prints or digs = Evidence of observation 
calls = bat detector (anabat or SM2) record 
GIBP = Global Important Bird Population species 
Camera= Recorded via remote camera 
intro= introduced species 
Conservation codes 

 Appendix B 
 

 
 
Parameters of fauna Likelihood of Occurrence assessment 
Assessment 
outcome 
Description  
Present 
Species recorded during the field survey or from recent, reliable records from within the survey area. 
Likely 
Species are likely to occur in the survey area where there is suitable habitat within the survey area and there are recent records of occurrence of the species 
in close proximity to the survey area  
OR 
Species known distribution overlaps with the survey area and there is suitable habitat within the survey area.  
Unlikely 
Species assessed as unlikely include: those species previously recorded within the study area however: 

 
There is limited (i.e. the type, quality and quantity of the habitat is generally poor or restricted) habitat in the survey area. The suitable habitat within the 
survey area is isolated from other areas of suitable habitat and the species has no capacity to migrate into the survey area. OR  

 
Those species that have a known distribution overlapping with the survey area however: there is limited (i.e. the type, quality and quantity of the habitat is 
generally poor or restricted) habitat in the survey area the suitable habitat within the survey area is isolated from other areas of suitable habitat and the 
species has no capacity to migrate into the survey area.  
Highly 
unlikely 
Species that are considered highly unlikely to occur in the survey area include those species:  

 
That have no suitable habitat within the survey area 

 
That have become locally extinct, or are not known to have ever been present in the region of the survey area. 
 
Status (see Appendix B for full explanation) 
EPBC Act 

 Species listed as one or more of the following MM = migratory marine species, MW = migratory wetland species, MiT = migratory terrestrial species, Vu = 
Vulnerable, En = Endangered 
WC Act - Species listed as CR = critically endangered, En = endangered, Vu = Vulnerable, CD = conservation dependent, IA = international migratory agreement migratory 
birds, OS = other specially protected fauna  
DPaW 

 Species listed as Priority (P) 1, 2, 3 or 4  
Source information - desktop searches 
PMST = DotEE PMST to identify fauna listed under the EPBC Act potentially occurring within the study area accessed July 2016 
NM = DPaW NatureMap (2007-2016) records of threatened fauna, database search within the study area (accessed July 2016),  
DPaW = WA Government, Department of Parks and Wildlife Threatened and Priority fauna rankings (current as of 20 November 2015) - Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 for the 
DPaW Swan region 
http://www.dpaw.wa.gov.au/plants-and-animals/threatened-species-and-communities/threatened-animals
 
Definitions 
study area = a 20 km buffer around the survey area  
locality = the area within an approximate 50 km radius of the survey area 
 
 

 
 
Fauna Likelihood of Occurrence assessment 
Common name 
(species name) 
 
Status (WC 
Act/DPAW, 
EPBC Act) 
Search 
Description & habitat requirements 
Habitat with survey 
areas / Records 
(NatureMap) 
Likelihood of 
Occurrence 
WC 
Act 
EPBC 
Act 
NM 
EPBC 
PMST 
DPaW 
Birds 
Carnaby's Black 
Cockatoo 
(Calyptorhynchus 
latirostris
EN   
EN 


 
Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo mainly occurs in uncleared or 
remnant native eucalypt woodlands and in shrubland or 
kwongan heathland dominated by Hakea, Banksia and 
Grevillea species. The species also occurs in forests 
containing Marri (Corymbia calophylla), Jarrah 
(Eucalyptus marginata) or Karri (E. diversicolor). 
Breeding usually occurs in the Wheatbelt region of WA in 
large Wandoo (E. wandoo), with flocks moving to the 
higher rainfall coastal areas to forage after the breeding 
season. Feeds on the seeds of a variety of native plants, 
including Allocasuarina, Banksia, Eucalyptus, Grevillea 
and Hakea, and some introduced plants (DSEWPaC 
2012). 
Both feeding and 
Breeding habitat is 
present for this 
species with both 
events recorded. 
Numerous birds were 
also recorded moving 
throughout the survey 
area and roosting 
recorded. 
Present, feeding 
breeding and 
roosting was 
recorded. 

 
 
Common name 
(species name) 
 
Status (WC 
Act/DPAW, 
EPBC Act) 
Search 
Description & habitat requirements 
Habitat with survey 
areas / Records 
(NatureMap) 
Likelihood of 
Occurrence 
WC 
Act 
EPBC 
Act 
NM 
EPBC 
PMST 
DPaW 
Western Ground 
Parrot 
(Pezoporus 
flaviventris
CR 
CR 

 
 
There is only one population remaining of the western 
sub-species of the Ground Parrot, in coastal heath east of 
Esperance in southeast of Western Australia. There are 
only two remaining areas of refuge, Cape Arid and 
Fitzgerald River National Parks, with about 110 
individuals still thought to live in the wild. Historically the 
species also inhabited the mid west coastal heath around 
Congara and Jurien Bay, however has not been recorded 
in these areas for some time. The Western Ground Parrot 
inhabits low, dry or swampy, near-coastal heathlands on 
sandplains and uplands in areas that receive 400-500 
mm of rainfall annually (Gilfillan et al 2007, McNee 1999, 
2000). The vegetation in such heathlands consists of 
moderately dense, low shrubs (usually not more than 0.5-
1.0 m tall) and often with an open understorey of low 
sedges, including Mesomelaena species, that are usually 
less than 0.5 m tall. The vegetation usually includes 
scattered clumps of emergent, stunted (DEWHA 2010) 
low-mallee and sometimes taller shrubs, or occasionally 
with some scattered tussock-grasses (Gilfillan et al 2007, 
McNee 1999). The Western Ground Parrot is usually 
recorded in areas of vegetation that have remained 
unburnt for five or more years. 
Low heathland is 
present for this 
species to forage and 
breed. Numerous 
records are present in 
the Mid west from 
Bow River, Moora 
Mullewa and 
Carnamah with the 
most recent record 
from 2015. It should 
be noted that most of 
these records have a 
low certainty rating 
however the most 
recent (2015) is 
highly certain.   
Likely, this species 
could not be 
assessed as 
unlikely due to the 
amount of habitat 
available in the 
area and lack of 
survey effort. This 
species requires 
additional survey 
effort to confirm. 

 
 
Common name 
(species name) 
 
Status (WC 
Act/DPAW, 
EPBC Act) 
Search 
Description & habitat requirements 
Habitat with survey 
areas / Records 
(NatureMap) 
Likelihood of 
Occurrence 
WC 
Act 
EPBC 
Act 
NM 
EPBC 
PMST 
DPaW 
Malleefowl  
(Leipoa ocellata) 
VU 
VU 


 
The Malleefowl generally occurs in semi-arid areas of 
Western Australia, from Carnarvon to south east of the 
Eyre Bird Observatory (south-east WA). It occupies 
shrublands and low woodlands that are dominated by 
mallee vegetation, as well as native pine Callitris 
woodlands, Acacia shrublands, Broombush (Melaleuca 
uncinata) vegetation or coastal heathlands. The nest is a 
large mound of sand or soil and organic matter (Jones 
and Goth 2008; Morcombe 2004). 
Some habitat is 
present for the 
species in the 
Wandoo and Marri 
Woodlands, however 
there are no records 
in the Mount Lesueur 
region and either 
occur in the coastal 
Acacia shrublands or 
further inland in the 
Mallee. This is 
probably due to the 
extremely dense 
nature of the heaths 
in this region. 
Unlikely 
Peregrine Falcon, 
(Falco peregrinus)  
OS 


 
 
The Peregrine Falcon is seen occasionally anywhere in 
the south-west of WA. It is found everywhere from 
woodlands to open grasslands and coastal cliffs - though 
less frequently in desert regions. The species is known to 
have a very large home range and nests primarily on 
ledges of cliffs, shallow tree hollows, and ledges of 
building in cities (Morcombe 2004). 
Habitat is present for 
this species 
throughout the survey 
area for both hunting 
(all of the survey 
area) and some 
breeding (Wandoo 
and Marri). Records 
are present for this 
species surrounding 
the survey are with 
the closest only 
approximately 10 km 
east.  
Likely 

 
 
Common name 
(species name) 
 
Status (WC 
Act/DPAW, 
EPBC Act) 
Search 
Description & habitat requirements 
Habitat with survey 
areas / Records 
(NatureMap) 
Likelihood of 
Occurrence 
WC 
Act 
EPBC 
Act 
NM 
EPBC 
PMST 
DPaW 
Sharp-tailed 
Sandpiper 
(Calidris acuminata)  
 
IA 
IA 

 
 
In WA, scattered records occur along the Nullarbor Plain 
and the southern areas of the Great Victoria Desert. They 
are widespread from Cape Arid to Carnarvon, around 
coastal and subcoastal plains of Pilbara Region to south-
west and east Kimberley Division. Inland records indicate 
the species is widespread and scattered from Newman, 
east to Lake Cohen, south to Boulder and west to 
Meekatharra (Higgins & Davies 1996). The Sharp-tailed 
Sandpiper prefers muddy edges of shallow fresh or 
brackish wetlands, with inundated or emergent sedges, 
grass, saltmarsh or other low vegetation including 
lagoons, swamps, lakes and pools near the coast, and 
dams, waterholes, soaks, bore drains and bore swamps, 
saltpans and hypersaline salt lakes inland. They use 
flooded paddocks, sedgelands and other ephemeral 
wetlands, but leave when they dry. They tend to occupy 
coastal mudflats mainly after ephemeral. Sometimes they 
occur on rocky shores and rarely on exposed reefs 
(Higgins & Davies 1996). They have also been recorded 
roosting in mangroves (Minton & Whitelaw 2000). 
No wetlands or areas 
suitable for this 
species to utilise are 
present within the 
survey area. Minor 
drainage lines are 
present on site but 
would unlikely be a 
resource for this 
species. Records in 
the region are mostly 
coastal or associated 
with larger inland wet 
lands and water 
courses.  
Unlikely 
Grey Plover (Pluvialis 
squatarola
IA 
IA 

 
 
In non-breeding grounds in Australia, Grey Plovers occur 
almost entirely in coastal areas, where they usually 
inhabit sheltered embayments, estuaries and lagoons 
with mudflats and sandflats, and occasionally on rocky 
coasts with wave-cut platforms or reef-flats, or on reefs 
within muddy lagoons. They also occur around terrestrial 
wetlands such as near-coastal lakes and swamps, or salt-
lakes. The species is also very occasionally recorded 
further inland, where they occur around wetlands or salt-
lakes (Marchant & Higgins 1993). 
No wetlands or areas 
suitable for this 
species to utilise are 
present within the 
survey area. Minor 
drainage lines are 
present on site but 
would unlikely be a 
resource for this 
species. Records in 
the region are mostly 
coastal on beaches.  
Unlikely 

 
 
Common name 
(species name) 
 
Status (WC 
Act/DPAW, 
EPBC Act) 
Search 
Description & habitat requirements 
Habitat with survey 
areas / Records 
(NatureMap) 
Likelihood of 
Occurrence 
WC 
Act 
EPBC 
Act 
NM 
EPBC 
PMST 
DPaW 
Grey Wagtail 
(Motacilla cinerea
IA 
IA 
 

 
A migratory species that regularly visits northern Australia 
particularly the area from Broome to Darwin (Morcombe 
2004). The species prefers coastal habitat near to water 
where it prefers to forage. However the species has been 
recorded further inland feeding on plains (Morcombe 
2004). 
The cleared areas of 
the survey area 
maybe utilised by the 
species however very 
few records of the 
species are present 
outside of the 
Kimberley and 
northern regions and 
would rarely visit the 
area.  
Unlikely 
Common Greenshank 
(Tringa nebularia
IA 
IA 
 

 
The Common Greenshank does not breed in Australia; 
however, the species occurs in all types of wetland and 
has the widest distribution of any shorebird in Australia 
(DSEWPaC 2013).  
No wetlands or areas 
suitable for this 
species to utilise are 
present within the 
survey area. Minor 
drainage lines are 
present on site but 
would unlikely be a 
resource for this 
species. Records in 
the region are mostly 
coastal on beaches or 
on inland wetlands 
and water bodies. 
The three dams in the 
survey area maybe 
used 
opportunistically. 
Unlikely 

 
 
Common name 
(species name) 
 
Status (WC 
Act/DPAW, 
EPBC Act) 
Search 
Description & habitat requirements 
Habitat with survey 
areas / Records 
(NatureMap) 
Likelihood of 
Occurrence 
WC 
Act 
EPBC 
Act 
NM 
EPBC 
PMST 
DPaW 
Wood Sandpiper 
(Tringa glareola
IA 
IA 

 
 
The Wood Sandpiper is a seasonal visitor to Australia 
and has its largest numbers recorded in north-west 
Australia (Roebuck Bay near to Broome). Off the Tringa 
group (like the Common Greenshank) the Wood 
Sandpiper utilises a broad range of habitat types 
throughout Western Australia. Typical habitat includes 
well-vegetated, shallow, freshwater wetlands, such as 
swamps, billabongs, lakes, pools and waterholes. This 
species does not breed in Australia (DSEWPaC 2013). 
No wetlands or areas 
suitable for this 
species to utilise are 
present within the 
survey area. Minor 
drainage lines are 
present on site but 
would unlikely be a 
resource for this 
species. Records in 
the region are mostly 
coastal on beaches or 
on inland wetlands 
and water bodies. 
The three dams in the 
survey area maybe 
used 
opportunistically. 
Unlikely 
Sanderling  
(Calidris alba) 
IA 
IA 

 
 
The Sanderling is a seasonal visitor the Australia. In 
Western Australia, the Sanderling occurs on most of the 
coast from Eyre to Derby, and also around Wyndham. 
They are more often recorded on the south and 
southwest coasts, north to around southern Shark Bay, 
with more sparsely scattered records further. The species 
is recorded mostly on open sandy beaches exposed to 
open sea-swell, and also on exposed sandbars and spits, 
and shingle banks, where they forage in the wave-wash 
zone and amongst rotting seaweed (DSEWPaC 2013). 
No wetlands or areas 
suitable for this 
species to utilise are 
present within the 
survey area. Minor 
drainage lines are 
present on site but 
would unlikely be a 
resource for this 
species. Records in 
the region are mostly 
coastal on beaches.  
Unlikely 
Kataloq: Documents
Documents -> Исследование диагностических моделей по Пону и Коркхаузу
Documents -> 3 пародонтологическая хирургия
Documents -> Hemoglobinin yenidoğanda yapim azliğina bağli anemiler
Documents -> Q ə r a r Azərbaycan Respublikası adından
Documents -> Ubutumire uniib iratumiye abantu, imigwi y'abantu canke amashirahamwe bose bipfuza gushikiriza inkuru hamwe/canke ivyandiko bijanye n'ihonyangwa ry'agateka ka zina muntu hamwe n'ayandi mabi yose vyakozwe I Burundi guhera mu kwezi kwa Ndamukiza
Documents -> Videotherapy Video: Cool Runnings Sixth Grade
Documents -> Guidelines on methods for calculating contributions to dgs
Documents -> Document Outline form monthly ret cont
Documents -> Şİrvan şƏHƏr məRKƏZLƏŞDİRİLMİŞ Kİtabxana sistemi
Documents -> İnsan hüquq müdafiəçilərinin vəziyyəti üzrə Xüsusi Məruzəçi

Yüklə 29,22 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə