Main roads western australia



Yüklə 29,22 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə30/31
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü29,22 Mb.
1   ...   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31

Reptiles 

 
 
Common name 
(species name) 
 
Status (WC 
Act/DPAW, 
EPBC Act) 
Search 
Description & habitat requirements 
Habitat with survey 
areas / Records 
(NatureMap) 
Likelihood of 
Occurrence 
WC 
Act 
EPBC 
Act 
NM 
EPBC 
PMST 
DPaW 
Gilled Slender Blue-
tongue Skink, 
(Cyclodomorphus 
branchialis)  
VU 


 
 
The Gilled Slender Blue-tongue Skink is endemic to the 
Midwest of Western Australia.  It occupies an area 
between Murchison River and Irwin River in the coastal 
region, and extends inland to Yalgoo.  This taxon inhabits 
semi-arid scrubs on heavy soil (Storr et. al. 1999).  Little 
is known about the habitat preferences of this taxon 
(Shea and Miller 1995), but specimens have been known 
to burrow under gravelly soils and leaf litter during 
daylight hours. 
Some habitat is 
present for this 
species in heathlands 
on lateritic soils 
however one dubious 
record is known from 
the region. The 
population is typically 
known from the 
region between Irwin 
and Murchison 
Rivers.  
Unlikely 
Western Spiny-tailed 
Skink  
(Egernia stokesii 
subsp. badia) 
VU 
EN 


 
Most of the Western Spiny-tailed Skink brown form sites 
occur in York Gum (Eucalyptus loxophleba) woodland 
with some sites are in Gimlet (E. salubris) and Salmon 
Gum (E. salmonophloia) woodland. Populations persist in 
woodland patches as small as 1 ha and completely 
surrounded by wheat fields. Sites with the greatest 
number of individuals had numerous fallen logs and a low 
intensity of grazing by domestic stock. Hollow logs are 
required for refuge sites in woodland habitat. Preferred 
refuges consist of piles of several overlapping hollow logs 
providing a combination of basking and shelter sites. 
Populations on farms in the Perenjori shire occupy 
abandoned farmhouses, sheds and woodpiles. 
Some habitat is 
present for the 
species in the 
Wandoo and Marri 
Woodlands, however 
there are no records 
in the Mount Lesueur 
region. All the records 
in NatureMap are 
present further inland 
in open woodlands.  
Unlikely 

 
 
Common name 
(species name) 
 
Status (WC 
Act/DPAW, 
EPBC Act) 
Search 
Description & habitat requirements 
Habitat with survey 
areas / Records 
(NatureMap) 
Likelihood of 
Occurrence 
WC 
Act 
EPBC 
Act 
NM 
EPBC 
PMST 
DPaW 
Woma Python 
(Aspidites ramsayi 
SW pop.) 
P1 
 
 
 

The Woma inhabits woodlands, heaths and shrublands, 
often with spinifex. It occurs in the sub-humid and arid 
areas across Australia’s interior with a separate sub
-
population occurring in the Wheatbelt and Goldfields of 
Western Australia. The Woma shelters mainly in 
abandoned monitor and mammal burrows and in soil 
cracks (Wilson and Swan 2010). 
Some habitat is 
present for this 
species in heathlands 
on sandy soils and 
records are present in 
the region with one 
approximately 40 km 
south east. The 
species is highly 
cryptic and rarely 
observed and the 
survey area is within 
the known distribution 
of the south western 
population. 
Likely 
Black-striped Snake  
(Neelaps calonotos
P3 
 
 
 

This Black-striped Snake is restricted to the sandy 
coastal strip near Perth, between Mandurah and 
Lancelin. It occurs on dunes and sand-plains vegetated 
with heaths and eucalypt/banksia woodlands. This 
species is seriously threatened by increasing 
development within its restricted distribution (Wilson and 
Swan 2013). 
Some habitat is 
present for this 
species in heathlands 
on sandy soils and 
records are present in 
the region with two 
records 
approximately 20 km 
north and 23 km east 
of the survey area. 
The species is highly 
cryptic and rarely 
observed and the 
survey area is within 
the known range of 
the species. 
Likely 
Mammals 

 
 
Common name 
(species name) 
 
Status (WC 
Act/DPAW, 
EPBC Act) 
Search 
Description & habitat requirements 
Habitat with survey 
areas / Records 
(NatureMap) 
Likelihood of 
Occurrence 
WC 
Act 
EPBC 
Act 
NM 
EPBC 
PMST 
DPaW 
Dibbler 
(Parantechinus 
apicalis
En 
En 
 
 

Historically Dibblers have been recorded over an 
extensive area from Jurien Bay to Cape Arid National 
Park and numerous islands of the coast (two populations 
are present on Boullanger and Whitlock Islands of the 
coast of Jurien) and it is likely that they can occupy a 
diverse range of habitats (Friend 2004). However, the 
species seem to prefer vegetation with a dense canopy 
greater than 1 m high which has been unburnt for at least 
10 years or more (Baczocha & Start 1997). Typically, 
captures have been on sandy substrates although 
occasional records are on laterite soils. 
Some habitat is 
present for this 
species in dense 
heathlands on sandy 
and lateritic soils, 
however few records 
are available on the 
mainland (two 
populations are 
present on Boullanger 
and Whitlock Islands 
of the coast of Jurien) 
for this species with 
one record 
approximately 120 km 
south east of the 
survey area in 1999.  
Unlikely 
Chuditch, Western 
Quoll  
(Dasyurus geoffroii) 
Vu 

 

 
The Chuditch inhabits eucalypt forest (especially Jarrah, 
Eucalyptus marginata), dry woodland and mallee 
shrublands. In Jarrah forest, Chuditch populations occur 
in both moist, densely vegetated, steeply sloping forest 
and drier, open, gently sloping forest. Most diurnal resting 
sites in sclerophyll forest consist of hollow logs or earth 
burrows (Van Dyke and Strahan 2008). The species can 
travel large distances, has a large home range and is 
sparsely populated through a large portion of its range. 
Habitat is present for 
this species 
throughout the survey 
area with the 
woodlands providing 
refugia for denning 
and breeding and 
heathlands and 
shrubland for 
foraging. Numerous 
records for the 
species are present 
to the south of the 
survey area with the 
closest being 75 and 
81 km away.  
Likely, this species 
could not be 
assessed as 
unlikely due to the 
amount of habitat 
available in the 
area and lack of 
survey effort. This 
species requires 
additional survey 
effort to confirm. 

 
 
Common name 
(species name) 
 
Status (WC 
Act/DPAW, 
EPBC Act) 
Search 
Description & habitat requirements 
Habitat with survey 
areas / Records 
(NatureMap) 
Likelihood of 
Occurrence 
WC 
Act 
EPBC 
Act 
NM 
EPBC 
PMST 
DPaW 
South-western Brush-
tailed Phascogale 
(Phascogale 
tapoatafa)  
Vu 
 
 
 

Dry sclerophyll forests and open woodlands with a 
generally sparse ground-storey, which contain suitable 
nesting resources such as tree hollows, rotted stumps 
and tree cavities (Van Dyck and Strahan 2008). 
Habitat is present for 
this species 
throughout the survey 
area with the 
woodlands providing 
refugia for denning 
and breeding and 
heathlands and 
shrubland for 
foraging, however no 
records for the 
species are 
documented north of 
Perth.  
Unlikely  
Ghost Bat, 
(Macroderma gigas) 
Vu 
Vu 

 
 
The Ghost Bat occurs in a wide range of habitats, and 
requires an undisturbed cave, deep fissure or disused 
mine shaft in which to roost. It is patchily distributed 
across Australia, and is sensitive to disturbance, with 
populations now contracting north and present only in the 
Pilbara and Kimberley (Van Dyck and Strahan 2008). 
Habitat is present for 
the species in the 
woodlands 
particularly those 
trees with large 
hollows however the 
species has not been 
recorded in the region 
for over 200 years. 
Highly Unlikely 

 
 
Common name 
(species name) 
 
Status (WC 
Act/DPAW, 
EPBC Act) 
Search 
Description & habitat requirements 
Habitat with survey 
areas / Records 
(NatureMap) 
Likelihood of 
Occurrence 
WC 
Act 
EPBC 
Act 
NM 
EPBC 
PMST 
DPaW 
Southern Brown 
Bandicoot, (Isoodon 
obesulus) 
P5 


 
 
The Quenda prefers dense scrubby, often swampy, 
vegetation with dense cover up to one metre high.  
However, it also occurs in woodlands, and may use less 
ideal habitat where this habitat occurs adjacent to the 
thicker, more desirable vegetation.  The species often 
feeds in adjacent forest and woodland that is burnt on a 
regular basis and in areas of pasture and cropland lying 
close to dense cover (Van Dyck and Strahan 2008). 
Some habitat is 
present for this 
species in dense 
heathlands on sandy 
and lateritic soils, 
however few records 
are present for this 
species in the region, 
with the survey area 
being at the most 
north limit of their 
distribution. One 
record is 
approximately 20 km 
south west of the 
survey area.  
Likely, this species 
could not be 
assessed as 
unlikely due to the 
amount of habitat 
available in the 
area and lack of 
survey effort. This 
species requires 
additional survey 
effort to confirm. 
Tammar Wallaby 
(Macropus eugenii 
derbianus
P4 
 
 
 

The Tammar Wallaby inhabits dense, low vegetation for 
daytime shelter and open grassy areas for feeding. 
Inhabits coastal scrub, heath, dry sclerophyll (leafy) forest 
and thickets in mallee and woodland The tammar wallaby 
is currently known to inhabit three islands in the Houtman 
Abrolhos group, Garden Island near Perth, Middle and 
North Twin Peak Islands in the Archipelago of the 
Recherche, and at least nine sites on the mainland 
including, Dryandra, Boyagin, Tutanning Batalling 
(reintroduced) Perup, private property near Pingelly, 
Jaloran Road timber reserve near Wagin, Hopetown, 
Stirling Range National Park, and Fitzgerald River 
National Park (Van Dyck and Strahan 2008). 
Habitat is present for 
this species in the 
dense heathlands 
and shrublands 
however the species 
is not known to occur 
in the region, except 
on some islands 
within the Abrolhos of 
Geraldton. 
Unlikely 

 
 
Common name 
(species name) 
 
Status (WC 
Act/DPAW, 
EPBC Act) 
Search 
Description & habitat requirements 
Habitat with survey 
areas / Records 
(NatureMap) 
Likelihood of 
Occurrence 
WC 
Act 
EPBC 
Act 
NM 
EPBC 
PMST 
DPaW 
Western Brush 
Wallaby  
(Macropus Irma
P4 


 
 
The Western Brush Wallaby is a grazer found primarily in 
open forest or woodland, particularly favouring open, 
seasonally wet flats with low grasses and open scrubby 
thickets. It is also found in some areas of mallee and 
heathland, and is uncommon in karri forest. This species 
was once very common in the south-west of WA but has 
undergone a reduction in range and a significant decline 
in abundance in its current habitat. (Van Dyke and 
Strahan 2008). 
Habitat is present for 
this species in the 
dense heathlands 
and shrublands and 
woodlands. The 
species is known to 
occur in the region, 
with multiple records 
surrounding the 
survey area. A 
sighting of a wallaby 
was undertaken 
during the survey and 
the species was 
verified via remote 
camera  
Present 
References: 
Baczocha, N. and Start, A.N 1997, Status and ecology of the dibbler, (Parantechinus apicalis) in Western Australia. 1996 annual report. Unpublished report to Environment 
Australia. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Perth. 
Bell, P.J. and Mooney, N 2002, Distribution, Habitat and Abundance of Masked Owl (Tyto novaehollandiae) in Tasmania, In; Ecology and Conservation of Owls, Eds. Newton I.  
del Hoyo J, Elliott A, Christie DA Sargatal J, 1996, Handbook of the Birds of the World: Hoatzin to Auks. Barcelona: Lynx Edicions.   
DSEWPaC, 2012, Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 referral guidelines for three threatened black cockatoo species, Department of 
Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities, Australian Government, Canberra.  
DSEWPaC 2013, Species Profile and Threats Database (SPRAT), Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities, Australian Government 
Canberra. 
Friend, J.A 2004, Dibbler Recovery Plan,. Department of Conservation and Land Management - Western Australian Threatened Species and Communities Unit. Western 
Australia. 
Garnett ST and Crowley GM 2000, The Action Plan for Australian Birds 2000. Environment Australia, Canberra. 

 
 
Gilfillan, S., S. Comer, A.H. Burbidge, J. Blyth & A. Danks 2007, South Coast Threatened Birds Recovery Plan Western Ground Parrot Pezoporus wallicus flaviventris, Western 
Bristlebird Dasyornis longirostris, Noisy Scrub-bird or Tjimiluk Atrichornis clamosus, Western Whipbird (Western Heath Subspecies) Psophodes nigrogul. Western Australian 
Department of Environment and Conservation, Perth. 
Higgins, P.J. and Davies SJJF, eds 1996, Handbook of Australian, New Zealand and Antarctic Birds. Volume Three - Snipe to Pigeons. Melbourne, Victoria: Oxford University 
Press. 
Hockey PAR, Dean WRJ and Ryan PG (eds), 2005, Roberts - Birds of southern Africa, VIIth ed. The Trustees of the John Voelcker Bird Book Fund, Cape Town.                                                 
del Hoyo, J Elliot A and Sargatal, J 1992, Handbook of the Birds of the World, vol. 1: Ostrich to Ducks. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona, Spain. 
Jones D and Goth A 2008, Mound-builders, CSIRO Publishing, Victoria Australia.                                                                      
Marchant S. and P.J. Higgins, eds 1993, Handbook of Australian, New Zealand and Antarctic Birds, Volume 2 - Raptors to Lapwings. Melbourne, Victoria: Oxford University 
Press 
McNee, S.A. 1999, Report on Western Ground Parrot Survey at Waychinicup and Manypeaks April to October 1998. Supplement to Western Australia Bird Notes. Sup.. 3. 
McNee, S. 2000, Implementing the Western Ground Parrot Interim Recovery Plan. Search for the Western Ground Parrot in Cape Arid National Park and nearby areas June 
1999 to June 2000. Western Australian Bird Notes. 
Minton, C and Whitelaw, J 2000, Waders roosting on mangroves, Stilt, vol 37, pp 23-24. 
Morcombe M, 2004, Field Guide to Australian Birds. Steve Parish Publishing Archer Field Queensland Australia. 
Nevill S, 2008, Birds of the Greater South West Western Australia, Simon Nevill  Publications, Perth Australia.               
Pizzy G and Knight F, 2012, The Field Guide to the Birds of Australia, ninth edition, HarperCollins Publishers Australia Pty Limited. 
Storr, GM, Smith, LA and Johnstone, RE 1999, Lizards of Western Australia, Volume 1: Skinks, revised edition, Perth, Western Australian Museum. 
Shea, G.M., and Miller,B 1995, A taxonomic revision of Cyclodomorphus branchialis species group (Squamata: Scincidae). Records of the Australian Museum 47(3): 265-325. 
Van Dyke S and Strahan R, 2008, The Mammals of Australia, Third Edition, New Holland Publishing, Sydney Australia. 
Wilson S and Swan G, 2013, A Complete Guide to Reptiles of Australia, 2nd Edition New Holland Press Sydney Australia. 
 

 
 
Ultrasonic detection surveys  
Ultrasonic files containing potential bat calls were recorded during the field surveys using 
Anabat Express detectors (Titley Scientific) and SM2BAT+ SongMeter recorders (Wildlife 
Acoustics Inc. USA). Bat calls were recorded between sunset and sunrise across consecutive 
nights at each site.  
Call analysis 
Craig Grabham from GHD completed the analysis of all data collected during the survey using 
ultrasonic bat detectors.  
Data from SM2 units was downloaded and viewed using Kaleidoscope Viewer (version 3.1.6, 
Wildlife Acoustics Inc. 2016) as full-spectrum audio files. WAC files were also converted to 
Anabat sequence files (zero-crossing format) suitable for analysis in AnalookW version 4.1s 
(Corben 2015). 
WAC files were viewed and bat calls were identified using Kaleidoscope Viewer by visually 
comparing the Kaleidoscope Viewer spectrogram and call characteristics (e.g. characteristic 
frequency and call shape) with reference calls and/or species call descriptions from available 
reference material. The spectrogram displayed each call sequence (see below for call definition) 
with information on the number and timing of calls.  
Anabat sequence files were viewed and bat calls were identified using AnalookW by visually 
comparing the Analook time-frequency graph and call characteristics (e.g. characteristic 
frequency and call shape) with reference calls and/or species call descriptions from available 
reference material. 
The call identification was also assisted by consulting distribution information for possible 
species (ALA and DPAW NatureMap records). No reference calls were collected during the 
survey. 
A call (pass) was defined as a sequence of three or more consecutive pulses of similar 
frequency and shape. Calls with less than three defined consecutive pulses of similar frequency 
and shape were not unambiguously identified to a species but were used as part of the activity 
count for the survey area.  
Due to variability in the quality of calls, the lack of published information regarding non-search 
phase calls and the difficulty in distinguishing some species the identification of each call was 
assigned a confidence rating (see Mills et al. 1996 & Duffy et al. 2000) as summarised in the 
table below. Due to the absence of reference calls from the study area and the poor quality of 
some the recordings and known overlap in call characteristics between some species, a 
conservative approach was taken when analysing calls. 
Species nomenclature follows Armstrong (2011), then van Dyck et al. (2013).  
 
 

 
 
Confidence ratings applied to calls 
Identification 
Description 
D - Definite 
Species identification not in doubt. Call sequence contains three or more 
consecutive pulses of similar frequency and shape. Call characteristics match those 
in referenced material or species reference calls. 
PR - Probable 
Call most likely to represent a particular species, but there exists a low probability of 
confusion with species of similar call type or call lacks sufficient detail (e.g. number 
of pulses). 
SG - Species 
Group 
X = Call made by one of two or more species. Call characteristics overlap making it 
too difficult to distinguish between species  
 
Summary of results and survey effort 
Microchiropteran bat detector surveys were completed for 26 nights at three locations during 
August 2016 within the survey area.  
Five species were positively (Definite) identified of the 12 species that are known to occur from 
this part of the region (Armstrong 2011; NatureMap 2016). As many as three other species may 
also have been recorded using bat detectors, but poor data quality and/or interspecific call 
similarities precluded reliable identification of additional species.  
The tables below provide site location details and a summary of the results for each site for 
each night.  
Summary of bat call analysis May 2016 
Species / Group 
Anabat Express 
SM2 unit 1 
SM2 unit 2 
Austronomus 
australis 



Chalinolobus gouldii 



Chalinolobus morio 



Vespadelus regulus 



Nyctophilus sp. 



Ozimops kitcheneri 

PR 

Notes: 
Total number of species recorded for each night/site is based on definite (D) identification only. Total number of D 
species for each night includes one Nyctophilus species where recorded.  
See Table 1 for confidence rating e.g. D or Pr, - = not recorded. X = species group present. 
CE, E, VU 

 species listed under the Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999
P1- 4 (priority species) species under the Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 
Qualifications 
Craig Grabham has completed microchiropteran bat surveys and assessments in WA, New 
South Wales (NSW), Queensland (QLD), Victoria, Tasmania and the Northern Territory (NT) 
employing a variety of methods including harp trapping, light tagging, habitat surveys (e.g. cave 
assessments), roost surveillance (using infrared and thermal video cameras), and echolocation 
survey (Wildlife Acoustic’s SongMeter and Eco Meter devices and Titley Electronic Anabat 
devices) and analysis (Wildlife Acoustic’s SongScope and Chris Corben’s Analook). He h
as 
completed bat surveys for infrastructure, residential, and mining projects. Craig has also 
completed bat inventory surveys for National Parks, Nature Reserves, catchment management 
areas and private land conservation projects. His honours project investigated the use of 
remnant and revegetated habitats by microchiropteran bats across a fragmented rural 
landscape in the Eastern Billabong Catchment (south-west slopes) in NSW. 

 
 
Craig has completed the following training courses with regard to ultrasonic call recording and 
analysis: 

 
Anabat system training course 

 Titley Scientific (December 2012) 

 
Wildlife Acoustic’s Song Meter and SongScope training –
 Faunatech/Austbat (July 2015).  
To date Craig has completed echolocation analysis and reporting for more than 102 projects 
from WA, NSW, NT, QLD and Victoria since joining GHD in 2006 from calls collected during 
field surveys from Anabat detectors and/or Song Meter units and identified using Analook or 
SongScope software. 
References 
Armstrong, K. N. (2011). The current status of bats in Western Australia. In: 
‘The biology and conservation 
of Australasian bats.’ (Eds B. Law, P. Eby, D. Lunney and L. Lumsden.) pp. 257–
269. (Royal Zoological 
Society of New South Wales: Mosman.) 
Armstrong, K. N., and Coles, R. B. (2007). Echolocation call frequency differences between geographic 
isolates of Rhinonicteris aurantia (Chiroptera: Hipposideridae): implications of nasal chamber size. Journal 
of Mammalogy 88, 94-104. 
Bullen, R. D. and McKenzie, N. L. (2011). Recent developments in studies of the community structure, 
foraging ecology and conservation of Western Australian bats. In ‘The biology and conservation of 
Australasian bats.’ (Eds B. Law, P. Eby, D. Lunney and L. Lumsden.) pp. 31
-43. (Royal Zoological Society 
of New South Wales: Mosman.) 
Churchill, S 2008. Australian Bats, Allen and Unwin, Australia.  
Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, (2010). Survey guidelines for Australia’s 
threatened bats Guidelines for detecting bats listed as threatened under the Environment Protection and 
Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999. 
Duffy, AM, Lumsden, LF, Caddle, CR, Chick, RR & Newell, GR (2000). The efficacy of Anabat ultrasonic 
detectors and harp traps for surveying microchiropterans in southeastern Australia, Acta Chiropterologica 
2: 127-144.  
Law, B, Anderson, J & Chidel, M (1998). A bat survey in State Forests on the south-west slopes of New 
South Wales with suggestions of improvements for future surveys, Australian Zoologist 30(4): 467-479.  
Law, BS, Anderson, J Chidel, M (1999). Bat communities in a fragmented forest landscape on the south-
west slopes of New South Wales, Australia, Biological Conservation 88(3): 333-345.  
Mills, DJ, Norton, TW, Parnaby, HE, Cunningham, RB & Nix, HA (1996), Designing surveys for 
microchiropteran bats in complex forest landscapes 

 a pilot study from south-east Australia. Forest 
Ecology and management 85(1-3):149-161.  
McKenzie, N. L., and Bullen, R. D. (2009). The echolocation calls, habitat relationships, foraging niches 
and communities of Pilbara microbats. Records of the Western Australian Museum Supplement 78: 123

155. 
McKenzie, N. L., and Bullen, R. D. (2012). An acoustic survey of zoophagic bats on islands in the 
Kimberley, Western Australia, including data on the echolocation ecology, organisation and habitat 
relationships of regional communities. Records of the Western Australian Museum Supplement 81: 67

108. 
Webala, P. W, Craig, M. D, Law, B. S. Armstrong K. N, Wayne A. F, Bradley, J. S. (2011) Bat habitat use 
in logged jarrah eucalypt forests of south-western Australia, Journal of Applied Ecology 2011, 48, 398

406 
Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC) (2016), Conservation Advice Rhinonicteris aurantia 
(Pilbara form) (Pilbara Leaf-nosed Bat). Approved 10/03/2016. 
Van Dyke. S, Gynther. I, and Baker. A. (2013). Field Companion To The Mammals of Australia. New 
Holland Publishers.
  
 

 
 
Appendix F
 
– Offsets Calculator
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1   ...   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə