Main roads western australia



Yüklə 29,22 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə4/31
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü29,22 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   31

Proposed offset 
Portion of Lot 1, 1395 Banovich Road, Hill 
River 
Area: 1993 ha including 1771.5 ha native 
vegetation and 27.5 ha of highly modified 
vegetation 
Time horizon (years) 
Time over which loss is averted 
20 years 

 
GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834 | iii 
Offset calculator attribute 
Input value 
Time until ecological benefit 
10 years 
Start area (ha) 
564 ha 
Start quality (scale of 1-10) 

Future area and quality with and without offset (%) 
Risk of loss (%) without offset 
15% 
Future quality without offset (scale 1-10) 

Risk of loss (%) with offset 
2% 
Future quality with offset (scale 1-10) 

Confidence in result (%) 
Averted loss component input  
80% 
Change in habitat quality component input 
80% 
Output 
 
Net present value (adjusted hectares) 
75.63 
 

 
iv | GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834  
Table of contents 
1.
 
Introduction..................................................................................................................................... 1
 
1.1
 
Background .......................................................................................................................... 1
 
1.1
 
Purpose of this report........................................................................................................... 1
 
1.2
 
Location ............................................................................................................................... 1
 
1.3
 
Scope of works .................................................................................................................... 1
 
1.4
 
Relevant legislation, conservation codes and background information ............................... 2
 
1.5
 
Report limitations and assumptions ..................................................................................... 2
 
2.
 
Methodology ................................................................................................................................... 4
 
2.1
 
Desktop assessment............................................................................................................ 4
 
2.2
 
Field survey .......................................................................................................................... 4
 
2.3
 
Limitations .......................................................................................................................... 10
 
3.
 
Desktop assessment .................................................................................................................... 14
 
3.1
 
Climate ............................................................................................................................... 14
 
3.2
 
Regional biogeography ...................................................................................................... 14
 
3.3
 
Landforms and soils ........................................................................................................... 15
 
3.4
 
Hydrology ........................................................................................................................... 15
 
3.5
 
Land use ............................................................................................................................ 16
 
3.6
 
Conservation significant ecological communities .............................................................. 18
 
3.7
 
Flora ................................................................................................................................... 19
 
3.8
 
Fauna ................................................................................................................................. 19
 
4.
 
Field results .................................................................................................................................. 21
 
4.1
 
Vegetation .......................................................................................................................... 21
 
4.2
 
Conservation significant ecological communities .............................................................. 27
 
4.3
 
Fauna ................................................................................................................................. 34
 
5.
 
Offset Assessment Guide Inputs ................................................................................................. 55
 
5.1
 
The offset ........................................................................................................................... 55
 
5.2
 
Time horizon ...................................................................................................................... 55
 
5.3
 
Start area ........................................................................................................................... 56
 
5.4
 
Start quality ........................................................................................................................ 56
 
5.5
 
Future area and quality with and without offset ................................................................. 59
 
5.6
 
Confidence in result (%)..................................................................................................... 60
 
5.7
 
Net present value (adjusted hectares) ............................................................................... 60
 
5.8
 
Summary of inputs ............................................................................................................. 60
 
6.
 
Conclusion.................................................................................................................................... 62
 
6.1
 
Vegetation and Flora.......................................................................................................... 62
 
6.2
 
Fauna ................................................................................................................................. 63
 
6.3
 
Offset Calculator ................................................................................................................ 63
 
7.
 
References ................................................................................................................................... 64
 

 
GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834 | v 
 
Table index 
Table 1
 
Data collected during the flora and vegetation field survey ................................................. 5
 
Table 2
 
Camera trap locations and effort undertaken ...................................................................... 7
 
Table 3
 
Survey limitations ............................................................................................................... 11
 
Table 4
 
Department of Water geographic atlas queries for the survey area .................................. 16
 
Table 5
 
Pre-European vegetation extents (Beard 1979, GoWA 2016) .......................................... 17
 
Table 6
 
Vegetation associations recorded during the field survey ................................................. 22
 
Table 7
 
Extent of vegetation condition ratings within the survey area ........................................... 27
 
Table 8
 
Summary of Likelihood of Occurrence Assessment .......................................................... 33
 
Table 9
 
Fauna habitat types within survey area ............................................................................. 37
 
Table 10
 
Type and extent of Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo habitat within the survey area 
(1993 ha) ............................................................................................................................ 50
 
Table 11
 
Tree Plot Data from the Survey Area ................................................................................. 51
 
Table 12
 
Summary of fauna species of conservation significance recorded during survey 
and determined likely to occur within the survey area ....................................................... 53
 
Table 13
 
Summary of inputs into Offset Calculator .......................................................................... 61
 
 
Appendices 
Appendix A 

 Figures 
Appendix B 

 Relevant legislation, conservation codes and background information 
Appendix C 

 Desktop searches 
Appendix D 

 Flora Data 
Appendix E 

 Fauna Data 
Appendix F 

 Offsets Calculator 
 
 

 
GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834 | 1 
1.
 
Introduction 
1.1
 
Background 
Main Roads Western Australia (Main Roads) is currently constructing Stage 1 of the Mitchell 
Freeway Extension (project). The ultimate works for the project have been divided in to three 
stages, of which Stage 1 includes the works associated with the extension from Burns Beach 
Road to Hester Avenue and the connecting roads (Neerabup Road and Hester Avenue).  
Stage 1 was referred to the Department of the Environment (DotE
1
) under the Environment 
Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) and was determined to be a 
‘controlled action’ due to the likely significant impacts on Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo 
(Calyptorhynchus latirostris). The impact is clearing of 88.7 hectares (ha) of native vegetation 
that provides known and potential foraging, roosting and breeding habitat for Carnaby’s Black 
Cockatoo. 
Condition 3 of EPBC approval 2013/7091 stipulated that Main Roads must provide an offset 
property with suitable environmental values to be transferred to the Conservation and Parks 
Commission of Western Australian and managed by Department of Parks and Wildlife, to be 
reserved for conservation in perpetuity.  
Main Roads acquired a potential offset property (Lot 1, 1395 Banovich Road, Hill River). A 
biological survey (‘Ecological Values Assessment’) including a Black Cockatoo habitat 
assessment was commissioned to determine the environmental values of the property. The 
property consists of 1,993 ha (survey area) of bushland in the locality of Hill River (near the 
town of Jurien), situated approximately 170 kilometres (km) from the project.  
1.1
 
Purpose of this report 
The purpose of the assessment was to delineate key flora, vegetation, fauna, soil values within 
the survey area. The outcomes of the assessment will be used to determine the suitability of the 
property being used as an offset for the project and for future Main Roads offsets. 
1.2
 
Location 
1.2.1
 
Study area 
A study area was defined for the desktop based searches of the survey area and includes a 20 
km buffer around the survey area. 
1.2.2
 
Biological survey area 
The survey area is located west of Banovich Road and north of Jurien Road, approximately 20 
km east northeast of Jurien town site, in the Shire of Dandaragan. The location of the survey 
area is mapped in Figure 1, Appendix A. 
1.3
 
Scope of works 
The scope of works, as detailed in the Main Roads Consultants Brief was to undertake a 
desktop assessment and Level 1 flora, vegetation and fauna survey, including targeted Black 
Cockatoo habitat assessment for the project. The following actions were undertaken: 
                                                      
1
 The Department of the Environment is now the Department of the Environment and Energy (DotEE)  

 
2 | GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834  

 
Complete a desktop assessment of the study area prior to the field survey work to identify 
all biological features and constraints, which may be in, or nearby the survey area  

 
Identify and review any existing and relevant environmental reports 

 
Identify significant flora, vegetation/ecological communities, fauna, soil, groundwater and 
surface water values and potential sensitivity to impact 

 
Identify broad pre-European vegetation type(s) using Beard (various) 

 
Conduct a Level 1 field survey (to be done by an environmental specialist in accordance 
with regulatory expectation for years of experience in the relevant bioregion) to 
verify/ground truth the desktop assessment findings through targeted and comprehensive 
survey 

 
Undertake vegetation condition mapping using an appropriate condition scale for the 
bioregion (as per Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and DPaW 2015) 

 
Undertake ecological community mapping to a scale appropriate for the bioregion and 
described according to the National Vegetation Information System (NVIS) structure and 
floristics 

 
Undertake targeted Black Cockatoo habitat assessment and mapping 

 
Undertake relevant environmental constraints mapping using GIS mapping software (e.g. 
ArcMap) 

 
Assess the project areas plant species diversity, density, composition, structure and weed 
cover, recording the percentage of each in 20 flora sampling quadrats. 
The biological survey aspects that relate to flora were undertaken having regard to the EPA and 
DPaW (2015) Technical Guide and those aspects that relate to fauna were undertaken having 
regard to EPA Guidance Statement No.56 (EPA 2004) and the subsequent Technical Guide 
(EPA and Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC) 2010).  
1.4
 
Relevant legislation, conservation codes and background 
information 
In Western Australia some ecological communities, flora and fauna are protected under both 
Federal and State Government legislation. In addition, regulatory authorities also provide a 
range of guidance and information on expected standards and protocols for environmental 
surveys. 
An overview of key legislation and guidelines, conservation codes and background information 
relevant to this biological survey is provided in Appendix B. 
1.5
 
Report limitations and assumptions 
This report has been prepared by GHD for Main Roads and may only be used and relied on by 
Main Roads for the purpose agreed between GHD and the Main Roads as set out in section 1.3 
of this report. 
GHD otherwise disclaims responsibility to any person other than Main Roads arising in 
connection with this report. GHD also excludes implied warranties and conditions, to the extent 
legally permissible. 
The services undertaken by GHD in connection with preparing this report were limited to those 
specifically detailed in the report and are subject to the scope limitations set out in the report.  

 
GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834 | 3 
The opinions, conclusions and any recommendations in this report are based on conditions 
encountered and information reviewed at the date of preparation of the report (including species 
listings). GHD has no responsibility or obligation to update this report to account for events or 
changes occurring subsequent to the date that the report was prepared. 
The opinions, conclusions and any recommendations in this report are based on assumptions 
made by GHD described in this report. GHD disclaims liability arising from any of the 
assumptions being incorrect. 
GHD has prepared this report on the basis of information provided by Main Roads and others 
who provided information to GHD (including Government authorities), which GHD has not 
independently verified or checked beyond the agreed scope of work. GHD does not accept 
liability in connection with such unverified information, including errors and omissions in the 
report which were caused by errors or omissions in that information. 
The opinions, conclusions and any recommendations in this report are based on information 
obtained from, and testing undertaken at or in connection with, specific sample points. Site 
conditions at other parts of the site may be different from the site conditions found at the specific 
sample points. 
Investigations undertaken in respect of this report are constrained by the particular site 
conditions, such as the location of access tracks, operational works, services and vegetation. As 
a result, not all relevant site features and conditions may have been identified in this report. 
Site conditions may change after the date of this Report. GHD does not accept responsibility 
arising from, or in connection with, any change to the site conditions. GHD is also not 
responsible for updating this report if the site conditions change. 
This report has assessed the flora and fauna within the survey area (Figure 1, Appendix A). 
Should the survey area change or be refined, further assessment may be required. 

 
4 | GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834  
2.
 
Methodology 
2.1
 
Desktop assessment 
Prior to the commencement of the field survey, a desktop assessment was undertaken to 
identify relevant environmental information pertaining to the study area and to assist in survey 
design. The search parameters used were a 20 km radius of a point at 30° 11
’ 
31
” S, 11
5° 
14’ 
11
” E
. This included a review of: 

 
The DotEE Protected Matters Search Tool (PMST) to identify communities and species 
listed under the EPBC Act potentially occurring within the study area (DotEE 2016a) 
(Appendix C) 

 
The DPaW Threatened Ecological Communities (TECs) and Priority Ecological 
Communities (PECs) database (Reference Number: 14-0716EC) to determine the 
potential for TECs or PECs to be present within the study area 

 
The NatureMap database for flora and fauna species previously recorded within the study 
area (DPaW 2016) (Appendix C) 

 
The DPaW Threatened (Declared Rare) and Priority Flora (TPFL) database
2
 (Reference 
Number: 02-0816FL), the DPaW Threatened and Priority Fauna database (Reference 
Number: FAUNA#5265), and the WA Herbarium database for Threatened flora and fauna 
species listed under the Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 (WC Act) and listed as Priority by 
the DPaW, previously recorded within the study area 

 
Existing datasets including previous vegetation mapping of the survey area (Beard 1979), 
aerial photography, geology/soils and hydrology information to provide background 
information on the variability of the environment, likely vegetation units and fauna habitats 
and to identify areas with potential to contain TECs, PECs, and Threatened and Priority 
listed flora and fauna species. 
2.2
 
Field survey 
2.2.1
 
Vegetation and flora 
As part of the biological survey, a Level 1 single season vegetation and flora assessment of the 
survey area was conducted by botanists Mathew Gannaway (SL011729) and Joshua Foster 
(SL011812) from the 1 to 5 August 2016. The field survey was undertaken to verify the results 
of the desktop assessment, identify and describe the dominant vegetation units where possible, 
assess vegetation condition and identify and record vascular flora taxa present at the time of 
survey. Searches for conservation significant ecological communities and flora taxa were also 
undertaken. 
The survey methodology employed was undertaken with reference to the EPA and DPaW 
Technical Guide 

 Terrestrial Flora and Vegetation Surveys for Environmental Impact 
Assessment (EPA and DPaW 2015). 
Data collection 
Field survey methods involved a combination of sampling quadrats located in identified 
vegetation units and traversing the survey area by foot. Twenty pegged quadrats (measuring 10 
metres (m) x 10 m) were recorded in the survey area. To sample all the apparent vegetation 
                                                      
2
 DPAW would only supply data for a 5 km radius search of the survey area for the DPAW TPFL 
database search. 

 
GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834 | 5 
units across the survey area, the location of quadrats was made primarily on the basis of aerial 
photographic maps. The locations of TECs and PECs were previously recorded within the 
survey area were targeted. Additional sites were selected in situ, based on observations of 
vegetation units during the field assessment.  
Field data for each quadrat were recorded on a pro-forma data sheet and included the 
parameters detailed in Table 1. Quadrat data are provided to Main Roads in Excel format. 
Table 1 
Data collected during the flora and vegetation field survey 
Aspect  
Measurement 
Collection attributes 
Personnel/recorder; date, quadrat dimensions, photograph of the 
quadrat. 
Physical features 
Aspect, soil attributes, ground surface cover, leaf and wood litter. 
Location 
Coordinates recorded in GDA94 datum using a hand-held Global 
Positioning System (GPS) tool to accuracy approximately ± 10 m. 
Location recorded at the north-west corner peg. 
Vegetation condition 
The vegetation condition of the survey area was assessed and 
mapped in accordance with the vegetation condition rating scale for 
the South West and Interzone Botanical Provinces (EPA and DPaW 
2015. 
Disturbance 
Level and nature of disturbances (e.g. weed presence, fire and time 
since last fire, impacts from grazing, exploration activities). 
Flora 
List of dominant flora from each structural layer 
List of all species within the quadrat including average height, 
number and cover (using a modified Braun-Blanquet scale). 
A flora inventory was compiled from taxa listed in described quadrats and from opportunistic 
floristic records throughout the survey area. 
Vegetation units 
Vegetation units were identified and boundaries delineated using a combination of aerial 
photography, topographical features and field data/observations.  
Vegetation units were described based on structure, dominant taxa and cover characteristics as 
defined by quadrat data and field observations. Vegetation unit descriptions follow the National 
Vegetation Information System (NVIS) framework and are consistent with NVIS Level V 
(Association). At Level V, three (or occasionally more) taxa per stratum are used to describe the 
association (Executive Steering Committee for Australian Vegetation Information (ESCAVI) 
2003).  
Vegetation condition 
The vegetation condition of the survey area was assessed and mapped in accordance with the 
vegetation condition rating scale for the South West and Interzone Botanical Provinces (EPA 
and DPaW 2015). The scale recognises the intactness of vegetation and consists of six rating 
levels as outlined in Appendix B.  
Flora identification and nomenclature 
Species well known to the survey botanists were identified in the field; all other species were 
collected and assigned a unique collection number to facilitate tracking. All plant specimens 
collected during the field assessment were dried and processed in accordance with the 
requirements of the WA Herbarium. Plant species were identified by the use of taxonomic 
literature, electronic keys and online electronic databases. Where necessary, plant taxonomists 
considered to be authorities on particular plant groups were consulted. 

 
6 | GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834  
The conservation status of all recorded flora was compared against the current lists available on 
FloraBase (WA Herbarium 2016) and the EPBC Act List of Threatened Flora (DotEE 2016b).  
Conservation significant flora that could not be confidently identified at the WA Herbarium by the 
field botanist were submitted to the WA Herbarium for formal identification (Accession Number: 
6917). 
Nomenclature used in this report follows that used by the WA Herbarium as reported on 
FloraBase (WA Herbarium 2016). 
Surveys for conservation significant flora 
Prior to the field survey, information from the desktop assessments (e.g. aerial photography, 
geology, soils and topography data, EPBC Act PMST, TPFL and NatureMap) was reviewed to 
determine conservation significant flora taxa potentially present within the survey area. 
Additionally, ecological information (e.g. habitat, associated flora taxa and phenology) was 
sourced from FloraBase (WA Herbarium 2016) and other relevant publications where available, 
to provide further details. 
Potential habitats were searched for the presence of conservation significant flora. Locations 
within the survey area with differing hydrology, fire or disturbance history to the surrounding 
areas were also searched where identified.  
When any known or potential Threatened, Priority or significant flora was located, the following 
data was collected: GPS location, height (m), number of plants and corresponding area of 
population, reproductive state and plant condition. 
2.2.2
 
Fauna 
Zoologists (Glen Gaikhorst and Craig Grabham) undertook a single season Level 1 fauna 
survey (reconnaissance survey) of the survey area from the 1 to 5 August 2016. The fauna 
survey was undertaken concurrently with the vegetation and flora assessment and with 
reference to the EPA Guidance Statement No. 56 Terrestrial Fauna Survey for Environmental 
Impact Assessment in Western Australia (EPA 2004). The purpose of the reconnaissance 
survey was to verify the accuracy of the desktop study, and delineate and characterise the 
fauna assemblages present in the survey area. 
The majority of the survey area was traversed on foot and by vehicle over the course of five 
days to identify and describe the dominant fauna habitat types and their condition, assess 
habitat connectivity, identify and record fauna species within the survey area. A Likelihood of 
Occurrence assessment for conservation significant fauna and their habitats occurring within the 
survey area was also undertaken. 
Habitat assessment 
Fauna habitats were assessed in-situ and comprised visual assessment of the following: 

 
Habitat structure (e.g. vegetation type, presence/absence of structural layers such as 
ground cover and mid storey) 

 
Presence/absence of refuge including: density of ground covers, fallen timber, hollow-
bearing trees and stags and rocks/boulder piles, and the type and extent of each refuge 

 
Presence/absence of waterways including type, extent and habitat quality within 
waterways  

 
Location of the habitat within the survey area in comparison to the habitat within the 
surrounding landscape 

 
GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834 | 7 

 
Habitat connectivity and identification of wildlife corridors within and immediately adjacent 
to the survey area 

 
Current land use and disturbance history 

 
Identification and evaluation of key habitat features and types identified during the 
desktop assessment relevant to fauna of conservation significance 

 
Evaluation of the Likelihood of Occurrence of conservation significant fauna within the 
habitat (based on presence of suitable habitat and observations) 

 
A representative photograph of each habitat type. 
Opportunistic fauna searches 
Opportunistic fauna searches were also conducted across the survey area. The majority of 
opportunistic searches were undertaken at habitat assessment locations and focussed on the 
following: 

 
Searching the survey area for tracks, scats, bones, diggings and feeding areas for both 
native and feral fauna 

 
Searching through microhabitats including turning over rocks and ground debris (e.g. leaf 
litter) and examining tree hollows and hollow logs for reptile and other small vertebrate 
fauna 

 
Visual and aural surveys. This accounted for many bird species potentially utilising the 
survey area The Michael Morcombe eGuide to Australian Birds 

 phone application 
(Morcombe 2014) and binoculars were used to assist visual observations. Pre-recorded 
calls (Morcombe 2014) were used to assist with aural identification of bird species 

 
A visual assessment of the water bodies to identify any fish species observed 

 
Recording GPS locations of any conservation significant fauna species.  
Camera traps 
Remote sensor cameras (15 x Reconyx-Hyperfire and 5 x ScoutGuard DTC 560K) were 
deployed for 15 nights each at 20 locations within the survey area. Cameras were positioned in 
areas where key habitat features were present or potential activity of species was recorded. 
Cameras were baited with cereal laced with peanut butter and honey to attract fauna. For each 
camera location the time and date deployed and recovered, a GPS coordinate, and brief habitat 
description were recorded (as seen in Table 2). Camera locations are displayed in Figure 5, 
Appendix A. Data from the cameras was downloaded to a computer and analysed for the 
presence of animals following the field survey. 
Table 2 
Camera trap locations and effort undertaken 
Sites 
Easting  
Northing 
Deployed 
Collected 
Total 
Nights 
Comments 
SG2 
329377 
6659242  3 Aug 
19 Aug 
15 
Wandoo Woodland 
SG7 
329354 
6659348  3 Aug 
19 Aug 
15 
Wandoo Woodland 
R16 
331296 
6660200  3Aug 
19 Aug 
15 
Wandoo Woodland 
R16b 
331280 
6660051  3 Aug 
19 Aug 
15 
Wandoo Woodland 
SG10 
329356 
6659374  3 Aug 
19 Aug 
15 
Wandoo Woodland 

 
8 | GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834  
Sites 
Easting  
Northing 
Deployed 
Collected 
Total 
Nights 
Comments 
R20 
331319 
6656593  3 Aug 
19 Aug 
15 
On dam edge 
R8 
331362 
6656589  3 Aug 
19 Aug 
15 
On dam edge 
RA 
331394 
6656519  3 Aug 
19 Aug 
15 
Wandoo Woodland 
R14c 
331441 
6656539  3 Aug 
19 Aug 
15 
Wandoo Woodland 
R12 
331464 
6656549  3 Aug 
19 Aug 
15 
Wandoo Woodland 
R13b 
331292 
6660127  3 Aug 
19 Aug 
15 
Kingia Heath on 
lateritic Ridge 
SG6 
329363 
6659313  3 Aug 
19 Aug 
15 
Kingia Heath on 
lateritic Ridge 
R31 
331285 
6660101  3 Aug 
19 Aug 
15 
Kingia Heath on 
lateritic Ridge 
SG9 
329361 
6659278  3 Aug 
19 Aug 
15 
Kingia Heath on 
lateritic Ridge 
R6 
331248 
6659981  3 Aug 
19 Aug 
15 
Kingia Heath on 
lateritic Ridge 
R14 
328641 
6660175  3 Aug 
19 Aug 
15 
Low Heath with 
Banksia 
R3 
328609 
6660146  3 Aug 
19 Aug 
15 
Low Heath with 
Banksia 
R21 
328579 
6660119  3 Aug 
19 Aug 
15 
Low Heath with 
Banksia 
R27 
328699 
6660166  3 Aug 
19 Aug 
15 
On isolated Rock 
Boulder 
R15 
328654 
6660175  3 Aug 
19 Aug 
15 
Low Heath with 
Banksia 
Bat survey 
Two Songmeter SM2BAT+ recorder (Wildlife Acoustics Inc., USA) and one Anabat Express 
recorder (Titley Scientific) was deployed at three locations. The three units were deployed for a 
combined total of 26 nights to record ultrasonic echolocation calls emitted by microchiropteran 
bats. Figure 5, Appendix A displays the detector locations within the survey area.  
Data from the detector were downloaded to a computer and analysed for the presence of bat 
calls by Craig Grabham of GHD following the field survey (see Appendix E). 

 
GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834 | 9 
Fauna species identification 
Fauna species were identified in the field using available field and electronic guides (e.g. 
Morcombe 2014). Where identification was not possible, photographs of specimens were 
collected to be later identified. 
Nomenclature follows that used by the WA Museum (as shown on NatureMap), as it is deemed 
to contain the most up-to-date species information for WA, with the exception of birds, where 
Christidis and Boles (2008) was used. 
Targeted survey for Black Cockatoo 
The aim of the habitat assessment was to assess the presence, quality and extent of habitat for 
Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo 
within the survey area based on their modelled distribution 
(Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC 
2012a). 
Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo 
is the only Black Cockatoo in this region with both Forest 
Red-
tailed Black Cockatoo and Baudin’s Black Cockatoo not modelled to be present 
(DSEWPaC 2012a). The survey involved visual and aural assessment of the survey area 
identifying breeding habitat (presence/absence of actual and potential breeding trees), foraging 
habitat, roosting areas, current activity and any other signs of use by 
Carnaby’s Blac
k Cockatoo. 
For the purpose of this assessment, the DSEWPaC (2012a) Black Cockatoo referral guideline 
was used to define breeding, foraging and night roosting habitat.   
Information collected during the field survey included:  

 
Foraging habitat 

 the location and extent of suitable Black Cockatoo species foraging 
habitat was identified and mapped for the survey area, based on the vegetation 
associations and presence/absence of known foraging species. During the field surveys 
any direct or indirect evidence of foraging by Black Cockatoos was recorded via GPS 

 
Breeding habitat - suitable breeding habitat for Black Cockatoos is defined by DSEWPaC 
(2012a) as trees of species known to support breeding within the range of the species 
which either have a suitable nest hollow or are of a suitable diameter at breast height 
(DBH) to develop a nest hollow. For most tree species, suitable DBH is 500 millimetres 
(mm). For Salmon Gum and Wandoo, suitable DBH is 300 mm (DSEWPaC 2012a). 
Breeding habitat was identified and mapped according to the presence of suitable 
woodland habitat. Individual trees for the entire survey area were not mapped however 
10 (50 x 50 m) plots were undertaken in Wandoo Woodland and four in Marri Woodland 
to ascertain tree densities within these habitats. For each breeding tree, details of the tree 
species, size and number of hollows observed, evidence of use and any other significant 
observations were recorded. On average, Carnaby’s Black Cockatoos are known to nest 
in hollows with an entrance diameter greater than 200-300 mm (Johnstone and Storr 
1998; Groom 2011). Therefore, during the field survey a suitable nesting hollow currently 
able to support breeding was defined as a tree hollow with an entrance diameter of 200 
mm or greater  

 
Night roosting habitat - suitable roosting habitat is defined by DSEWPaC (2012a). 
Suitable roosting habitat was identified based on the presence of suitable tall trees
proximity of known roosting sites and the presence of suitable foraging habitat  

 
Opportunistic observations (both visual and aural) for the presence of Black Cockatoos 
within the survey area and surrounding areas were also noted during the survey.  
This information was used to map and calculate the amount of foraging habitat, breeding, 
potential breeding habitat and night roosting sites within the survey area. Any area containing 
known foraging species or potential nesting trees was considered as habitat for Black 
Cockatoos. 

 
10 | GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834  
2.3
 
Limitations 
2.3.1
 
Desktop limitations 
The EPBC Act PMST is based on bioclimatic modelling for the potential presence of species. As 
such, this does not represent actual records of the species within the area. The records from the 
DPaW searches of Threatened flora and fauna provide more accurate information for the 
general area. However, some collection, sighting or trapping records cannot be dated and often 
misrepresent the current range of Threatened species. 
2.3.2
 
Field survey limitations 
The EPA and DPaW (2015) Technical Guide and Guidance Statement No. 56 (EPA 2004) 
states that flora and fauna survey reports for environmental impact assessment in WA should 
contain a section describing the limitations of the survey methods used. The limitations and 
constraints associated with this field survey are discussed in Table 3. 
 

 
GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834 | 11 
Table 3 
Survey limitations 
Aspect 
Constrai
nt 
Comment 
Sources of 
information and 
availability of 
contextual 
information. 
Nil 
Adequate information is available for the survey area; this includes:  

 
Broad scale (1:250,000) vegetation mapping by Beard (1979) and digitised by Shepherd et al. (2002)  

 
Regional biogeography (Desmond and Chant 2001) 

 
Regional vegetation (Department of Conservation and Land Management (CALM) 1995; Bell et al. 1984). 
Scope (what life 
forms were sampled 
etc.) 
Nil 
Vascular flora and terrestrial vertebrate fauna were sampled during the survey. Non-vascular flora, invertebrate 
and aquatic fauna were not assessed as part of survey, although opportunistic records were taken of 
invertebrate and aquatic fauna during the survey. 
Proportion of flora 
collected and 
identified (based on 
sampling, timing and 
intensity) 
Proportion of fauna 
identified, recorded 
and/or collected 
Moderate  The vegetation and flora survey was a single season survey only and was undertaken in early August 2016. The 
optimal time to undertake flora and vegetation surveys in the Northern Sandplains region is in Spring from 
September to November (EPA and DPaW 2015). The majority of the conservation significant flora identified in 
the desktop assessment flower from September to October and therefore the survey timing was a little early with 
many of the observed species either budding or not in flower. The proportion of flora collected and identified was 
considered low for the region; with annuals representing only 6.12 % of species recorded. Orchids represented 
only 3.79 % of species while grasses and daisies combined also only represented 4.66 % of species.  
The fauna survey was undertaken in early August 2016 and was a reconnaissance survey only. The fauna 
assessment sampled those species that can be easily seen, heard or have distinctive signs, such as tracks, 
scats, diggings, etc. Twenty remote cameras were deployed for 15 days in Wandoo woodlands and healthlands 
to gather additional data on some nocturnal species. Many cryptic (e.g. invertebrate species) and localised 
nocturnal species would not have been identified during a reconnaissance survey and seasonal variation within 
species often requires targeted surveys at a particular time of the year.  
The fauna assessment was aimed at identifying habitat types and terrestrial vertebrate fauna utilising the survey 
area. No sampling for invertebrates or aquatic species occurred. Where terrestrial invertebrate fauna was 
recorded opportunistically, these findings were mentioned in this report. However, this report is limited to an 
assessment of terrestrial vertebrate fauna, as the information available on the identification, distribution and 
conservation status of invertebrates is generally less extensive than that of vertebrate species. 
Flora determination 
Moderate  Flora determination was undertaken by Mathew Gannaway and Joshua Foster in the field and by Mathew 
Gannaway at the WA Herbarium.  
Fifty-six taxa could only be identified to genus and nine taxa could only be identified to family due to lack of 
flowering and fruiting material required for identification. With no flowering or fruiting material, positive 
identification of these collections and their resemblance to conservation significant flora identified in the desktop 
assessment could not occur. Additionally, some species, particularly small herbs and annuals were unable to be 
identified due to only cotyledons present or insufficient material available for identification. 

 
12 | GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834  
Aspect 
Constrai
nt 
Comment 
The taxonomy and conservation status of the WA flora is dynamic. This report was prepared with reliance on 
taxonomy and conservation status current at the time report development, but it should be noted this may 
change in response to ongoing research and review of International Union for Conservation of Nature criteria. 
Completeness and 
further work which 
might be needed 
(e.g. was the 
relevant area fully 
surveyed) 
Minor 
The survey area is large (approximately 1993 ha) and was surveyed through the use of a vehicle, surveying only 
those areas accessible with vehicle tracks. Information gained from the survey was extrapolated across the 
sections of the survey area not easily accessed by vehicle to assist with determining the extent of vegetation 
and habitat types for the survey area. As the survey area is in a dynamic landscape with varied low heath 
formations that are not easily discernible from aerial imagery, extrapolation of the vegetation and habitat caries 
a small degree of uncertainty. In addition, the flora is very complex in the survey area with some species unable 
to be distinguished from similar species due to insufficient flowering and fruiting material. 
As the survey area is not proposed for clearing but rather for retention as conservation estate, lack of 
comprehensive coverage is not a true constraint for this project. 
Mapping reliability 
Nil 
High resolution Environmental Systems Research Institute aerial imagery was available.  
Data were recorded in the field using hand-held GPS tools (e.g. Tablet using the Collector Application and 
Garmin GPS). Certain atmospheric factors and other sources of error can affect the accuracy of GPS receivers. 
The Garmin GPS units used for this survey are accurate to within +/-10 m on average. Therefore the data points 
consisting of coordinates recorded from the GPS may be imprecise. 
Timing/weather/ 
season/cycle 
Moderate  The field survey was conducted in early August 2016. In the four months prior to the survey (April to July), 
Jurien Bay weather station (No. 0091316, Bureau of Meteorology (BoM) 2016) recorded a total of 401.7 
millimetres (mm) of rainfall. This rainfall is well above the long term average (LTA) for the same period (April to 
July; 328.2 mm) (BoM 2016). While sufficient rainfall was received within the survey area, an assessment of the 
flowering times of conservation significant flora taxa shows that September to October is the optimum time to 
capture a majority of the conservation significant flora in flower (Appendix D) as plant flowering is linked to both 
rainfall and temperature. It was noted during the field survey that a majority of taxa had either just started to bud 
or showed no flowering or fruiting material, suggesting the survey was too early to capture flowering times for a 
majority of species. In addition, annuals only represented 6.12 % of species recorded. 
Disturbances (e.g. 
fire, flood, accidental 
human intervention) 
Minor 
The majority of the survey area has been exposed to a mosaic of historical fire regimes with a variety of burn 
ages recorded. Most of the disturbances throughout the survey area were associated with historical coal drilling 
activity with a number of wells located throughout the northern part of the property, and associated vehicle 
tracks. Around the homestead and paddock area pasture species, in particular *Arctotheca calendula was 
prevalent. Feral pig activity was noted throughout the survey area, in particular along drainage lines. 
Intensity (in 
retrospect, was the 
intensity adequate) 
Moderate  The vascular flora of the survey area was sampled in accordance with the EPA and DPaW (2015) Technical 
Guide and terrestrial fauna sampled in accordance to EPA (2004a) as required by the scope of works. 
The survey area is large (approximately 1993 ha), which meant the survey area could only be covered efficiently 
through the use of a vehicle, surveying only those areas accessible with vehicle tracks. Certain areas of the 

 
GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834 | 13 
Aspect 
Constrai
nt 
Comment 
survey area were unable to be accurately assessed due to insufficient vehicle tracks and time constraints 
limiting the ability to traverse the survey area on foot. Information gained from along the vehicles tracks were 
extrapolated across the areas not accessed by vehicle. 
Resources 
Nil 
Adequate resources were employed during the field survey. Sixteen person days were spent undertaking the 
survey using two dedicated botanists and two zoologists (1 botanist and 1 zoologist for five days each and 1 
botanist and 1 zoologist for 3 days each).  
Access restrictions 
Nil 
No access problems were encountered during the survey. The survey area was accessed by vehicle and only 
time constraints limited the accessibility of the survey area on foot.  
Experience levels 
Nil 
The ecologists who executed the survey were practitioners suitably qualified in their respective fields.  
Glen Gaikhorst (zoologist) is a Senior Ecologist with over 20 years’ experience in undertaking ecological 
surveys, most of which is undertaking surveys in Western Australia, including projects in the Northern 
Sandplains. Craig Grabham (zoologist) is a Senior Ecologist with over 16 years’ experience in undertaking 
ecological surveys, including 4 years’ experience undertaking surveys in Western Australia
. Joshua Foster is a 
Principal 
Ecologist (botanist) with over 18 years’ experience in undertaking ecological surveys in Western 
Australia, including extensive experience in the Northern Sandplains. Mathew Gannaway is an Ecologist 
(botanist) with 8 years’ ex
perience in undertaking ecological surveys in Western Australia, including projects in 
the Northern Sandplains. 

 
14 | GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834  
3.
 
Desktop assessment 
3.1
 
Climate 
The survey area is located in the Northern Sandplains Region of WA and experiences a dry, 
warm Mediterranean climate with winter precipitation ranging from 300-500 mm with seven to 
eight dry months per year (Beard 1990). 
The BoM Jurien Bay station (site number: 009131) is the nearest active weather station to the 
study area with continuous long-term data (approximately 20 km south west from the study 
area). Climatic data from this site indicates the mean maximum temperature of the area ranges 
from 19.5 degrees Celsius (°C) in July to 30.9 °C in February, and the mean minimum 
temperature of the area ranges from 9.3 °C in July to 18.0 °C in February. The LTA annual 
rainfall is 551.7 mm, with an average of 71.4 rain days per year (BoM 2016). 
Rainfall and temperature data for Jurien Bay in the 12 months preceding the survey are 
summarised in Plate 1 (BoM 2016). In the four months prior to the survey (April to July), Jurien 
Bay weather station recorded a total of 401.7 mm of rainfall. This rainfall total is higher than the 
LTA for the same period (April to July; 328.4 mm) (BoM 2016). The weather conditions recorded 
during the field survey included (BoM 2016):  

 
Maximum temperature range: 18.0 °C - 21.5 °C  

 
Minimum temperature range: 5.0 °C - 13.0 °C  

 
Rainfall 2.7 mm. 
 
Plate 1 Rainfall and temperature data for Jurien Bay
 (BoM
 2016) 
3.2
 
Regional biogeography 
The survey area is situated in the Southwest Botanical Province of WA (Beard 1990), within the 
Geraldton Sandplains Bioregion and Lesueur Sandplain Sub-region as described by the Interim 
Biogeographic Regionalisation of Australia (IBRA) (DotEE 2016c). 
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
160
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
2015
2016
Te
m
pe
ratu
re 
(
°
C)
Rai
nfa
ll
 (m
m
)
Month
LTA Rainfall
2015/2016 Rainfall
LTA Maxima
2015/2016 Maxima
LTA Minima
2015/2016 Minima

 
GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834 | 15 
The Geraldton Sandplains Bioregion comprises the central and northern Perth Basin, the 
Pinjarra Orogen, and the south end of the Carnarvon Basin. Outcrops of Jurassic siltstones and 
sandstones can be heavily lateralised. Extensive proteaceous heaths and scrub-heaths often 
with emergent mallees, Banksia and Actinostrobus, occur on an undulating, lateritic sandplain 
mantling Permian to Cretaceous strata. These heaths are rich in endemics (CALM 2002). 
The Lesueur Sandplain Subregion comprises coastal Aeolian and limestone soils, Jurassic 
siltstones and sandstones (often heavily lateralised) of the central Perth Basin. Alluvial soils are 
associated with drainage systems. There are extensive yellow sandplains in the south-eastern 
parts of the Subregion, especially where the Subregion overlaps the western edge of the Pilbara 
Craton. Shrub-heaths rich in endemics occur on a mosaic of lateritic mesas, sandplains, coastal 
sands and limestone soils (Desmond and Chant 2001). 
3.3
 
Landforms and soils 
The survey area is located within the Arrowsmith Zone of the Greenough Province. The 
Greenough Province is characterised by a lateritised plateau developed on Jurassic and 
Permian sediments and Proterozoic granites; dissected at fringes. There is a narrow coastal 
plain with Quaternary sands and calcarenite on the western margin. The Arrowsmith Zone is 
characterised by a dissected lateritic sandplain on Cretaceous and Jurassic sediments and is 
bounded in the east by the Dandaragan Scarp and in the south and west by the Gingin Scarp. 
The sandy and gravelly soils were formed in colluvium and the rock weathered in-situ 
(Schoknecht et al. 2004). 
The Australian Soil Resource Information System (ASRIS) (2016) mapping indicates that one 
soil landscape type occurs within the survey area: 

 
Wd10 

 Broad valleys and undulating interfluvial areas; some evenly sloping pediments 
with exposure of sandstone and shale. Chief soils are sandy acidic yellow mottled soils, 
containing much ironstone gravel in the A horizons and forming a complex pattern with 
lateritic sandy gravels. Associated are leached sands underlain by lateritic gravels, and 
mottled clays that occur about three feet in depth. Other soils include yellow duplex soils 
as well as podzol soils on the pediments; and red duplex soils in areas where country 
rock has been exposed. 
3.4
 
Hydrology 
A summary of the Department of Water (DoW) Geographic Data Atlas (DoW 2016) results for 
the survey area is provided in Table 4. The study area is located within the Jurien Groundwater 
Area and the Hill River and Tributaries Catchment Surface Water Area as listed under the 
Rights in Water and Irrigation Act 1914 (RIWI Act). Munbinea Creek and associated minor 
tributaries flow through the western portion of the survey area (Figure 2; Appendix A).  
 
 

 
16 | GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834  
Table 4 
Department of Water geographic atlas queries for the survey area 
Aspect 
Details 
Result 
Groundwater areas 
Groundwater areas proclaimed under the 
RIWI Act. 
Jurien 
Surface water areas 
Surface water areas proclaimed under the 
RIWI Act. 
Hill River and 
Tributaries 
Catchment 
Irrigation district 
Irrigation Districts proclaimed under the 
RIWI Act. 
None present 
Rivers 
Rivers proclaimed under the RIWI Act. 
None present 
Public Drinking Water 
Source Areas (PDWSA) 
PDWSAs is a collective term used for the 
description of Water Reserves, Catchment 
Areas and Underground Pollution Control 
Areas declared (gazetted) under the 
provisions of the Metropolitan Water 
Supply, Sewage and Drainage Act 1909 or 
the Country Area Water Supply Act 1947
None present 
Waterway Management 
Areas 
Areas proclaimed under the Waterway 
Conservation Act 1976
None present 
3.5
 
Land use 
3.5.1
 
Conservation reserves and estate 
There are a number of DPaW-managed conservation areas located within the study area 
including: Drovers Cave National Park, Beekeepers Nature Reserve, Hill River Nature Reserve, 
South Eneabba Nature Reserve and a number of smaller Crown reserves for the conservation 
of flora and fauna. The closest DPaW-managed conservation areas are located immediately 
adjacent to the survey area, including the Coomallo Nature Reserve (Class C) to the east and 
Lesueur National Park (Class A) to the north. No DPaW-managed conservation areas are 
located within the survey area. 
3.5.2
 
Environmentally Sensitive Areas 
A number of Environmentally Sensitive Areas (ESAs) are located within the study area, primarily 
associated with the presence of TECs and Threatened flora locations. Two ESAs located 
adjacent to the survey area include the Coomallo Nature Reserve located to the east and 
Lesueur National Park located to the north. A ESA 
associated with the TEC ‘
Lesueur-Coomallo 
Floristic Community D1

 is located within the survey area (Figure 2, Appendix A). 
3.5.3
 
Important bird areas 
In a project managed by BirdLife Australia, thirteen Important Bird Areas (IBAs) have been 
designated specifically for Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo (Dutson 
et al. 2009). IBAs are sites of 
global bird conservation importance and are considered a priority for bird conservation. The 
criteria used for the designation of IBAs for Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo are sites supporting at 
least 20 breeding pairs, or 1% of the population regularly utilising an area in the non-breeding 

Kataloq: Documents
Documents -> Исследование диагностических моделей по Пону и Коркхаузу
Documents -> 3 пародонтологическая хирургия
Documents -> Hemoglobinin yenidoğanda yapim azliğina bağli anemiler
Documents -> Q ə r a r Azərbaycan Respublikası adından
Documents -> Ubutumire uniib iratumiye abantu, imigwi y'abantu canke amashirahamwe bose bipfuza gushikiriza inkuru hamwe/canke ivyandiko bijanye n'ihonyangwa ry'agateka ka zina muntu hamwe n'ayandi mabi yose vyakozwe I Burundi guhera mu kwezi kwa Ndamukiza
Documents -> Videotherapy Video: Cool Runnings Sixth Grade
Documents -> Guidelines on methods for calculating contributions to dgs
Documents -> Document Outline form monthly ret cont
Documents -> Şİrvan şƏHƏr məRKƏZLƏŞDİRİLMİŞ Kİtabxana sistemi
Documents -> İnsan hüquq müdafiəçilərinin vəziyyəti üzrə Xüsusi Məruzəçi

Yüklə 29,22 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   31




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə