Main roads western australia


part of the range. Coomallo IBA is within 5 km of the survey area, with the actual Coomallo



Yüklə 29.22 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə5/31
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü29.22 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   31
part of the range. Coomallo IBA is within 5 km of the survey area, with the actual Coomallo 
Reserve lying adjacent to the eastern boundary of the survey area. This IBA supports 
populations of Carnaby's Black Cockatoo (up to 40 breeding pairs), and is identified as an 
important breeding area for the species (Dutson et al. 2009)
. In addition to Carnaby’s Black 
Cockatoo, the Coomallo IBA is known to maintain five other bird species recognised as globally 
important populations. These are the Western Long-billed Corella, Regent Parrot, Rufous 
Treecreeper, Blue-breasted Fairywren and Western Spinebill. 

 
GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834 | 17 
3.5.4
 
Pre-European vegetation associations and extent 
Broad scale (1:250,000) pre-European vegetation mapping of the Geraldton Sandplains area 
was completed by Beard (1979) at an association level. The mapping indicates that three 
vegetation associations are present within the survey area: 

 
Medium woodland; marri & wandoo (association 4) 

 
Mosaic: Shrublands; hakea scrub-heath / Shrublands; dryandra heath (association 1031) 

 
Mosaic: Medium woodland; marri, wandoo, powder bark / Shrublands; dryandra heath 
(association 1032). 
The pre-European mapping was adapted and digitised by Shepherd et al. (2002). The extents 
of the vegetation associations have been determined by the State-wide vegetation remaining 
extent calculations maintained by DPaW (latest update May 2016 

 Government of Western 
Australia (GoWA) 2015). The current extent remaining of vegetation association 1032 is greater 
than 30 % of the pre-European extent at all scales (e.g. State, IBRA Bioregion, IBRA Sub-region 
and Local Government Area (LGA), and is therefore above the 30 % threshold level
3

Vegetation association 4 has less than 30 % of its pre-European extent remaining as the State 
level, however is greater than 30 % at the IBRA Bioregion, IBRA Sub-region and Local 
Government Area (LGA) level. Vegetation association 1031 has less than 30 % of its pre-
European extent remaining as the LGA level, however is greater than 30 % at the State, IBRA 
Bioregion and IBRA Sub-region level. The extent remaining for each association is summarised 
in Table 5. 
Table 5 
Pre-European vegetation extents (Beard 1979, GoWA 2015) 
Vegetation 
association 
Scale 
Pre-
European 
extent (ha) 
Current 
extent (ha) 
Remaining 
(%) 
% Current 
extent in all 
DPaW 
managed 
lands 

State: Western 
Australia 
1,054,279.89  293,916,.91  27.88 
22.74 
IBRA Bioregion: 
Geraldton 
Sandplains 
5,336.70 
2,130.04 
39.91 
18.87 
IBRA Sub-region: 
Lesueur Sandplain 
5,336.70 
2,130.04 
39.91 
18.87 
LGA: Shire of 
Dandaragan 
6,476.43 
2,777.00 
42.88 
21.28 
1031 
State: Western 
Australia 
269,490.91 
88,606.02 
32.88 
42.30 
IBRA Bioregion: 
Geraldton 
Sandplains 
241,349.97 
83,154.99 
34.45 
44.13 
IBRA Sub-region: 
Lesueur Sandplain 
241,349.97 
83,154.99 
34.45 
44.13 
LGA: Shire of 
Dandaragan 
230,488.23 
67,978.55 
29.49 
52.13 
1032 
State: Western 
Australia 
8,317.21 
6,472.06 
77.82 
79.23 
                                                      
3
 
The 30 % threshold level is the level below which species loss appears to accelerate exponentially at an 
ecosystem level (EPA 2000).
 

 
18 | GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834  
Vegetation 
association 
Scale 
Pre-
European 
extent (ha) 
Current 
extent (ha) 
Remaining 
(%) 
% Current 
extent in all 
DPaW 
managed 
lands 
IBRA Bioregion: 
Geraldton 
Sandplains 
8,317.21 
6,472.06 
77.82 
79.23 
IBRA Sub-region: 
Lesueur Sandplain 
8,317.21 
6,472.06 
77.82 
79.23 
LGA: Shire of 
Dandaragan 
3,075.84 
2,653.17 
86.26 
78.06 
 
3.6
 
Conservation significant ecological communities 
A search of the EPBC Act PMST database did not identify any Commonwealth listed TECs 
within the study area. However, a search of the DPaW TEC database identified the presence of 
two TECs within the study area. The two TECs include: 

 
Lesueur-Coomallo Floristic Community A1.2, listed as Endangered under the WC Act. 
This community is described as species-rich heath with emergent Hakea obliqua on sand 
with faithful species of Hakea obliqua and Beaufortia aff. elegans and constant species of 
Dasypogon bromeliifolius and Stirlingia latifolia over well-drained grey sand over pale 
yellow sand on lateritic uplands. Associated species include Allocasuarina humilis, 
Calothamnus sanguineous, Hibbertia hypericoides, Hypocalymma xanthopetalum and 
Schoenus subflavus. This community is found north of the survey area, within Lesueur 
National Park 

 
Lesueur-Coomallo Floristic Community D1, listed as Critically Endangered under the WC 
Act. This community comprises a species-rich low heath, on moderately to well-drained 
lateritic gravels on lower slopes and low rises, dominated by Allocasuarina microstachya 
with A. ramosissima, A. humilis, Baeckea grandiflora, Borya nitida, Calytrix flavescens, 
Calothamnus sanguineous, Conostylis androstemma, Cryptandra pungens, Banksia 
armata, Gastrolobium polystachyum, Hakea auriculata, H. incrassata, H. aff. erinacea, 
Hibbertia hypericoides, Hypocalymma xanthopetalum, Melaleuca trichophylla, Petrophile 
chrysantha, Schoenus subflavus and Xanthorrhoea drummondii. This community has 
previously been recorded within the survey area. 
The database search also identified the presence of three PECs within the study area. The 
three PECs have all previously been recorded within the survey area and include: 

 
Lesueur-Coomallo Floristic Community DFGH (Priority 1) is described as mixed species-
rich heath on lateritic gravel with Hakea erinaceaMelaleuca platycalyx and Petrophile 
seminuda: a fine scale mixture of four floristically-defined communities occurring on 
lateritic slopes. The four communities include 'D' Heath and woodlands on gravelly hills 
and slopes, 'F', 'G' and 'H' Heath on duplex soils, on benched slopes and broad valleys. 
Community 'D' comprises of five subtypes. D1: Allocasuarina microstachya Heath, D2: 
Hakea undulata Heath (Gravel type), D3: Leucopogon Heath, D4: Darwinia neildiana 
Heath and D5: Petrophile chrysantha Heath. Community 'F' comprises of Hakea erinacea 
Heath, Community 'G' of Melaleuca platycalyx Heath and 'H' of Petrophile seminuda 
heath 

 
Lesueur-Coomallo Floristic Community M2 (Melaleuca preissiana woodland) (Priority 1) is 
described as a Melaleuca preissiana woodland along sandy drainage lines with faithful 

 
GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834 | 19 
species of Anigozanthos pulcherrimus and constant species of Chamaescilla corymbosa
Petrophile brevifolia and Xanthorrhoea reflexa 

 
Petrophile chrysantha low heath on Lesueur dissected uplands (Gp200-170) (Priority 2) is 
described as a Petrophile chrysantha low heath on Lesueur dissected uplands. 
Associated species include Banksia armata and Hakea undulata
3.7
 
Flora 
3.7.1
 
Flora diversity 
A search of the NatureMap database identified 1,595 plant taxa, representing 91 families and 
371 genera, which have previously been recorded within the study area. This total comprised 
1,506 native flora taxa and 89 naturalised (non-native) flora taxa. Dominant families include 
Myrtaceae (228 taxa), Proteaceae (185 taxa), Fabaceae (167 taxa) and Asteraceae (77 taxa). 
The NatureMap database search is provided in Appendix C. 
3.7.2
 
Conservation significant flora 
Desktop searches of the EPBC Act PMST database, NatureMap database, and the DPaW 
TPFL and WA Herbarium databases identified the presence/potential presence of 190 
conservation significant flora taxa within the study area. 
The desktop searches recorded: 

 
36 taxa listed as Threatened under either the EPBC Act and/or the WC Act 

 
14 Priority 1 taxa listed by the DPaW 

 
47 Priority 2 taxa 

 
64 Priority 3 taxa 

 
29 Priority 4 taxa. 
The locations of conservation significant flora registered on the DPaW databases are provided 
in Figure 2, Appendix A. A Likelihood of Occurrence assessment for the conservation significant 
flora is provided in Appendix D. 
3.7.3
 
Introduced flora (weeds) 
A search of the NatureMap (DPaW 2016) database identified 89 introduced flora taxa previously 
recorded within the study area. One is listed as a Declared Pest (s22) under the Biosecurity and 
Management Act 2007 (BAM Act), *Asparagus asparagoides, with C3 management required in 
the whole of state. None are listed as a Weed of National Significance (WoNS) (DotEE 2016d).  
3.8
 
Fauna 
3.8.1
 
Fauna diversity 
A search of NatureMap identified 187 vertebrate native fauna taxa previously recorded within 20 
km of the survey area. This total included 17 mammals (three introduced), 10 amphibians, 111 
birds, 47 reptiles and 2 fish. The EPBC Act PMST indicated the potential presence of nine 
additional fauna taxa within 20 km of the survey area. 
3.8.2
 
Conservation significant fauna 
Searches of the EPBC Act PMST and NatureMap database identified the presence/potential 
presence of 16 conservation significant fauna species (Appendix E). Species identified by the 
PMST as marine and migratory marine were excluded from this assessment as no marine 

 
20 | GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834  
habitats were present within or nearby the survey area, however species identified by the PMST 
as migratory terrestrial and wetland were considered as part of this assessment.  
In addition to the 16 species identified by the database searches, five additional species were 
also considered for this assessment as a result of a review of the species listed under 
Schedules 1-3 and 5-7 of the WC Act (revised 20 November 2015) to occur within the DPaW 
Swan region (DPaW 2015). 
 

 
GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834 | 21 
4.
 
Field results 
4.1
 
Vegetation 
4.1.1
 
Vegetation types 
Fourteen vegetation types (VT) were identified and described from the survey area (Table 6 and 
Figure 3, Appendix A). The soil type varied throughout the survey area from white/grey sandy 
soils on slopes and plains to heavy brown/light brown clay loam soils in drainage lines. Sandy 
loam soils were also found throughout the survey area on slopes and plains. The varying soil 
types also had varying degrees of lateritic gravel present, from no gravel through to lateritic 
boulders. The survey area is dominated by woodlands comprising of either Eucalyptus wandoo 
(VT10), Corymbia calophylla (VT09) or a mixed woodland of Eucalyptus todtiana, Banksia 
attenuata and B. menziesii (VT05) (27.61%, 30.99% and 11.02% of the survey area 
respectively). VT01 is the most restricted vegetation type and occurs on light brown clay/sandy 
loam soils on slopes with lateritic gravel occupying only 0.11 ha of the survey area. VT03 and 
VT07 are associated with Melaleuca species along drainage lines, with VT10 also occurring in 
the valleys between low rises. The remaining seven vegetation types are all heathlands with the 
vegetation rarely exceeding 1500 mm and comprised of a range of species at varying densities. 
The areas recovering from previous material extraction activities along the eastern boundary of 
the survey area is comprised of a similar species composition as the surrounding vegetation 
and has not been mapped as a separate vegetation type. Areas identified as cleared/highly 
disturbed (VT14) are areas that have been cleared for pasture species with emergent/isolated 
Corymbia calophyllaEucalyptus wandoo and Melaleuca rhaphiophylla trees. 
4.1.2
 
Other significant vegetation 
All of the native vegetation within the survey area is considered significant vegetation as defined 
by the EPA and DPaW (2015) due to the majority of the survey area being classified in a 
Pristine condition that contains different combinations of taxa associated with a variety of 
heathlands and provides a linkage between Lesueur National Park and Coomallo Nature 
Reserve. In addition, the vegetation is a refuge for a number of conservation significant flora 
that occur throughout the survey area in a variety of vegetation types.  
 

 
22 | GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834  
Table 6 
Vegetation associations recorded during the field survey 
Vegetation types 
Description 
Landform and 
substrate 
Extent (ha) and 
Locality 
Representative photograph 
Allocasuarina 
microstachya 
heathland (VT01) 
Heathland of Allocasuarina microstachya with 
AhumilisBanksia armataHakea incrassata
Hibbertia hypericoidesHypocalymma 
xanthopetalum and Melaleuca ?trichophylla 
over sparse rushland Schoenus 
?nanus/latitansSsubflavus and isolated 
sedges of Lepidobolus quadratus (P3) over 
isolated grasses Neurachne alopecuroidea 
with Xanthorrhoea drummondii
Light brown 
clay/sandy loam soils 
on slopes with 
lateritic gravel.  
0.11 ha 
Quadrat: HR01 
 
Petrophile 
chrysantha 
heathland (VT02) 
Heathland of Petrophile chrysantha with 
Banksia armataCalothamnus sanguineus
Daviesia nudifloraHakea anadeniaHakea 
erinacea and Hibbertia hypericoides over 
sparse rushland Schoenus ?nanus/latitans
and isolated sedge Lepidosperma squamatum 
with isolated herbs ?Craspedia sp., Burchardia 
sp., Tetratheca paucifolia and Anigozanthos 
humilis over isolated grasses Neurachne 
alopecuroidea.  
Grey sandy clay soils 
on slopes with 
lateritic gravel. 
4.26 ha 
Quadrat: HR04 
 
Melaleuca 
preissiana open 
woodland (VT03) 
Melaleuca preissiana open woodland over 
sparse shrubland M. ?delta and Acacia saligna 
over open heathland Verticordia sp., 
Calothamnus quadrifidus and Hakea varia over 
isolated herbs Drosera ?macrantha
Chamaescilla corymbosaTrachymene pilosa 
and Tricoryne elatior
Grey sandy drainage 
lines. 
3.64 ha 
Quadrat: HR02 
 

 
GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834 | 23 
Vegetation types 
Description 
Landform and 
substrate 
Extent (ha) and 
Locality 
Representative photograph 
Melaleuca 
platycalyx 
heathland and 
Eucalyptus wandoo 
subsp. pulverea 
woodland (VT04) 
Eucalyptus wandoo subsp. pulverea woodland 
over Melaleuca platycalyx heathland with 
Gastrolobium polystachyumBanksia armata
Calothamnus sanguineusGspinosum
Hakea neospathulata and Hibbertia 
hypericoides over isolated herbs Tetratheca 
paucifolia and Opercularia vaginata with 
sparse grassland of Neurachne alopecuroidea 
and Xanthorrhoea drummondii
Orange sandy clay 
soils on hill crest and 
slopes with lateritic 
pebbles. 
29.27 ha 
Quadrat: HR03 
 
Eucalyptus 
todtiana, Banksia 
attenuata and B. 
menziesii 
woodland (VT05) 
Eucalyptus todtiana, Banksia attenuata and 
Banksia menziesii woodland over heathland 
Adenanthos cygnorum subsp. cygnorum
Eremaea spp., Hibbertia spp., Banksia 
candolleana and Jacksonia floribunda over 
sparse herbland Blancoa canescens
Conostylis spp., Drosera spp. and Johnsonia 
pubescens subsp. pubescens.  
White sandy plain. 
219.93 ha 
Quadrat: HR10; 
HR12 
 
Xanthorrhoea and 
Kingia heathland 
(VT06) 
Xanthorrhoea spp. and Kingia australis 
heathland with Banksia spp., Calothamnus 
spp., Cryptandra spp., Hakea spp., Hibbertia 
spp. over isolated rushes Caustis dioica and 
Schoenus spp. and sparse herbland of 
Conostylis spp., Drosera spp. and Stylidium 
spp. 
White sandy soils on 
slopes and plains 
with lateritic gravel. 
160.24 ha 
Quadrat: HR09; 
HR11; HR14; HR16; 
HR18 
 

 
24 | GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834  
Vegetation types 
Description 
Landform and 
substrate 
Extent (ha) and 
Locality 
Representative photograph 
Melaleuca 
rhaphiophylla 
woodland (VT07) 
Melaleuca rhaphiophylla woodland with 
Eucalyptus rudis over open shrubland Pimelea 
argentea, MvimineaCalothamnus 
quadrifidus and Trymalium odoratissimum over 
open heathland Hypocalymma angustifolium
Mplatycalyx and Acacia spp. over open 
herbland *Lysimachia arvensis, *Romulea 
rosea and *Ursinia anthemoides
Brown clayey loam 
soils on drainage 
lines and seasonally 
wet flats. 
31.67 ha 
Quadrat: HR08; 
HR15 
 
Ecdeiocolea 
monostachya 
herbland (VT08) 
Ecdeiocolea monostachya herbland with 
Drosera spp. and Burchardia sp. with open 
heathland Allocasuarina microstachya
Banksia armataBshuttleworthianaDaviesia 
nudifloraHibbertia hypericoides and 
Opercularia vaginata over isolated rushes 
Schoenus ?nanus/latitans
Grey sandy soils on 
slopes. 
24.01 ha 
Quadrat: HR13 
 
Corymbia 
calophylla 
woodland (VT09) 
Corymbia calophylla woodland over heathland 
Acacia spp., Banksia shuttleworthiana
Conospermum sp., Hibbertia hypericoides and 
Hakea spp. over isolated rushes 
Lepidosperma sp., Mesomelaena 
pseudostygia and Schoenus ?clandestinus 
with isolated grasses Neurachne 
alopecuroidea and Xanthorrhoea preissii
Grey sandy soils on 
slopes and plains. 
618.12 ha 
Quadrat: HR06; 
HR19 
 

 
GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834 | 25 
Vegetation types 
Description 
Landform and 
substrate 
Extent (ha) and 
Locality 
Representative photograph 
Eucalyptus wandoo 
subsp. pulverea 
woodland (VT10) 
Eucalyptus wandoo subsp. pulverea woodland 
over isolated heath Banksia armataAcacia 
pulchellaHakea lissocarphaHypocalymma 
angustifolium and Macrozamia fraseri over 
sparse herbland Drosera spp., *Romulea 
roseaTrachymene pilosa and Lagenophora 
huegelii with sparse grassland Neurachne 
alopecuroideaRytidosperma sp. and 
Xanthorrhoea drummondii
Brown clay loam 
soils on slopes and 
drainage lines. 
550.73 ha 
Quadrat: HR05 
 
Banksia attenuata 
open heathland 
(VT11) 
Banksia attenuata open heathland over 
Eremaea asterocarpaHibbertia hypericoides
Hypocalymma xanthopetalumMelaleuca 
?tinkeriStirlingia latifolia and Strangea 
cynanchicarpa over sparse rushland 
Mesomelaena pseudostygia and Schoenus 
spp. with isolated herbs Conostylis spp., 
Drosera spp. and Stylidium spp. 
White sandy soils on 
slopes. 
16.64 ha 
Quadrat: HR20 
 
Mixed heath with 
isolated clumps of 
mallee (VT12) 
Heathland of Allocasuarina humilisCryptandra 
pungensHakea anadeniaHibbertia 
hypericoidesConostephium preissii and 
Hypocalymma xanthopetalum with isolated 
clumps of mallee Eucalyptus drummondiiE. 
wandoo subsp. pulverea and Corymbia 
calophylla over sparse rushland Lepidosperma 
spp. and Schoenus spp. with isolated herbs 
Conostylis spp., Drosera spp. and Stylidium 
spp. and sparse grassland Neurachne 
alopecuroidea, and Xanthorrhoea drummondii
Orange sandy loam 
soils on slopes with 
occasional lateritic 
pebbles. 
85.04 ha 
Quadrat: HR07 
 

 
26 | GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834  
Vegetation types 
Description 
Landform and 
substrate 
Extent (ha) and 
Locality 
Representative photograph 
Melaleuca 
?concreta 
heathland (VT13) 
Melaleuca ?concreta heathland with 
Calothamnus quadrifidusHakea lissocarpha
Mplatycalyx and Verticordia sp. over isolated 
herbs Borya sphaerocephalaDrosera spp. 
and Stylidium sp. with isolated rushes Ficinia 
nodosa and Mesomelaena pseudostygia
Brown sandy loam 
soils on slopes with 
occasional lateritic 
pebbles. 
3.14 ha 
Quadrat: HR17 
 
Pasture with 
emergent trees 
(VT14) 
Pasture species with emergent/isolated 
Corymbia calophyllaEucalyptus wandoo 
subsp. pulverea and Melaleuca rhaphiophylla 
trees. 

247.94 ha 
 

 
GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834 | 27 
4.1.3
 
Vegetation condition 
The vegetation condition within the survey area was rated as between Pristine and Completely 
Degraded. The majority of vegetation throughout the survey area was rated as Pristine; in these 
areas the vegetation was pristine, or nearly so with no obvious signs of disturbance when 
removed from the access tracks. Areas mapped as Excellent appeared to be affected by more 
recent fires, with the occasional weed species present. The areas mapped as Very Good are 
largely restricted to creeklines and bordering previously cleared areas. These areas have a 
higher density of herbaceous introduced species present in the understorey with numerous 
diggings and grazing by feral pigs. The areas mapped as Degraded are areas that have been 
historically cleared for material extraction where a few native species are recovering. The area 
mapped as Completely Degraded is largely restricted to the area surrounding the homestead 
and the cleared paddock area within the central eastern boundary of the survey area. These 
areas are comprised of isolated native trees over predominantly *Arctotheca calendula.  
The extents of the vegetation condition ratings mapped within the survey area are provided in 
Table 7 with the vegetation condition of the survey area mapped in Figure 4, Appendix A. 
Table 7 
Extent of vegetation condition ratings within the survey area 
Vegetation Condition 
Extent (ha) 
Pristine 
1220.51 ha 
Excellent 
502.69 ha 
Very Good 
19.06 ha 
Degraded 
4.54 ha 
Completely Degraded 
247.94 ha 
Total 
1994.74 ha 
4.2
 
Conservation significant ecological communities 
The known location of the TEC ‘Lesueur
-
Coomallo Floristic Community D1’ and the three PECs 
(‘Lesueur
-
Coomallo Floristic Community DFGH’; ‘Lesueur
-Coomallo Floristic Community M2 
(Melaleuca preissiana 
woodland)’; ‘
Petrophile chrysantha low heath on Lesueur dissected 
uplands (Gp200-
170)’) that were identified during the desktop search as occurring
 within the 
survey area (See Section 3.6.2) were targeted during the field survey. The conservation 
significant ecological communities identified within the survey area and the associated 
vegetation types are described below: 

 
Lesueur-Coomallo Floristic Community D1, listed as Critically Endangered under the WC 
Act. VT01 is associated with this TEC. Quadrat data from HR01 contain most of the 
species that are identified with this TEC. In addition, the density of the Allocasuarina 
within this vegetation type stands out in the landscape amongst the heath 

 
VT03 is associated with the Lesueur-Coomallo Floristic Community M2 (Melaleuca 
preissiana woodland) Priority 1 PEC. Quadrat data from HR02 contains all the species 
identified in the community description from DPAW, with the exception of Anigozanthos 
pulcherrimus which may have been missed during the survey due to the species not 
being in flower. No other areas identified within the survey area contained the density of 
Melaleuca preissiana along the drainage lines 

 
VT04 is associated with the Lesueur-Coomallo Floristic Community DFGH Priority 1 PEC, 
in particular ‘D’ heath and woodlands on gravelly hills and slopes. The woodland is 
characterised with Eucalyptus wandoo with the quadrat and observational data from 
HR03 containing all five species identified within the subtypes. Locally, Melaleuca 
platycalyx was one of the more dominant shrubs 

 
28 | GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834  

 
VT02 is associated with the Petrophile chrysantha low heath on Lesueur dissected 
uplands (Gp200-170) Priority 2 PEC. Quadrat data from HR04 contains the three species 
identified in the community description from DPAW. In addition, no other heath areas 
within the survey area contained similar species composition. 
4.2.1
 
Flora diversity 
The field survey recorded 344 taxa (including subspecies and varieties) representing 51 families 
and 149 genera within the survey area. This total comprised 330 native species and 13 
introduced (exotic) species. Due to the absence of adequate flowering parts and/or fruiting 
bodies required for identification, nine taxa could only be tentatively identified to family and 56 
taxa could only be tentatively identified to genera. Due to the high floral diversity of the survey 
area and the numerous conservation significant taxa previously recorded within the study area 
(See section 3.6.4), there is no certainty that collections without flowering or fruiting material are 
common or conservation significant flora identified in the desktop assessment. 
Dominant families recorded from the survey area included: 

 
Proteaceae (59 taxa) 

 
Fabaceae (45 taxa) 

 
Myrtaceae (39 taxa) 

 
Haemodoraceae (18 taxa) 

 
Cyperaceae (13 taxa) 

 
Orchidaceae (13 taxa). 
Annual species represented 6.12 % of all recorded plant species within the survey area. The 
average species richness for the 20 quadrats was 38.55 +/- 1.74 (mean +/- standard error of the 
mean), with a range of 25 to 53 species per quadrat. 
A flora species list for the survey area is provided in Appendix D. 
4.2.2
 
Conservation significant flora 
The location of conservation significant flora recorded during the survey is presented in Figure 
3, Appendix A. 
EPBC Act and WC Act 
One EPBC Act and WC Act listed flora taxa was recorded within the survey area during the 
2016 survey, Hakea megalosperma (listed as Vulnerable under both the EPBC Act and WC 
Act). Hakea megalosperma (Plate 2) is known from 91 records (DPaW 2016). Most of the 
records are located within the region surrounding Jurien Bay, with a single record located north 
of Albany near the Stirling Ranges. This species was recorded from two locations within the 
survey area (Figure 3) with up to 12 shrubs (including juveniles) recorded within 20 m at each 
location. 

 
GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834 | 29 
 
Plate 2 
Hakea megalosperma 
recorded within survey area (J Foster) 
 
DPaW Priority Listed Flora Taxa 
Eight Priority flora taxa were recorded from the survey area: 

 
Acacia retrorsa (Priority 2) 

 
Grevillea delta (Priority 2) 

 
Thelymitra variegata (Priority 2) 

 
Hensmania stoniella (Priority 3) 

 
Lepidobolus quadratus (Priority 3) 

 
Stylidium ?hymenocraspedum (Priority 3) 

 
Stylidium ?torticarpum (Priority 3) 

 
Hakea neurophylla (Priority 4). 
Acacia retrorsa (Plate 3) is known from 33 records (DPaW 2016). All of the records are located 
within the region surrounding Jurien Bay. This species was recorded from three locations within 
the survey area on slopes and in drainage lines (Figure 3). Species confirmed by Michael Hislop 
from the WA Herbarium (Accession Number 6917). 
 
Plate 3 
Acacia retrorsa 
recorded within survey area (M Gannaway) 
 
Grevillea delta (Plate 4) is known from 22 records (DPaW 2016). All of the records are located 
within the region surrounding Jurien Bay. This species was recorded from a single location 

 
30 | GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834  
within the survey area on the lower slope, adjacent to a drainage line (Figure 3). Species 
confirmed by Michael Hislop from the WA Herbarium (Accession Number 6917). 
 
Plate 4 
Grevillea delta 
recorded within survey area (J Foster) 
 
Thelymitra variegata (Plate 5) is known from 52 records (DPaW 2016). Records are mainly 
scattered along the coastal areas from Perth to Albany, with two records located in the 
Wheatbelt. A single record is located north of Perth near Lesueur National Park. This species 
was recorded from a single location within the survey area on a white sandy plain (Figure 3).  
 
Plate 5 
Thelymitra variegata 
recorded within survey area (J Foster) 
 
Hensmania stoniella (Plate 6) is known from 44 records (DPaW 2016). All of the records are 
located within the region surrounding Jurien Bay. This species was recorded from a single 
location within the survey area on the upper slope of a low rise with white sandy soil (Figure 3). 
Species confirmed by Michael Hislop from the WA Herbarium (Accession Number 6917). 

 
GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834 | 31 
 
Plate 6 
Hensmania stoniella 
recorded within survey area (J Foster) 
 
Lepidobolus quadratus (Plate 7) is known from 46 records (DPaW 2016). All of the records are 
located within the region surrounding Jurien Bay. This species was recorded from two locations 
within the survey area on the mid and upper slopes of a low rise with clayey sandy soil (Figure 
3). Species confirmed by Michael Hislop from the WA Herbarium (Accession Number 6917). 
 
Plate 7 
Lepidobolus quadratus 
recorded within survey area (J Foster) 
 
Stylidium ?hymenocraspedum (Plate 8) is known from 27 records (DPaW 2016). All of the 
records are located within the region between Jurien Bay and Lancelin. This species was 
recorded from two locations within the survey area on grey sandy slopes of a low rise (Figure 3). 
This species had insufficient flowering material to confirm to species, however the basal leaves 
and labellum align with the description for this species.   

 
32 | GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834  
 
Plate 8 
Stylidium 
?
hymenocraspedum 
recorded within survey area (J 
Foster) 
 
Stylidium ?torticarpum (Plate 9) is known from 59 records (DPaW 2016). The records are 
spread along the coast from the north of Geraldton to the south of Lancelin. This species was 
recorded from a single location within the survey area on brown clay loam soils within a 
drainage line (Figure 3). This species had insufficient flowering material to confirm to species, 
however the basal leaves and seed capsule align with the description for this species.   
 
Plate 9 
Stylidium 
?
torticarpum 
recorded within survey area (J Foster) 
 
Hakea neurophylla (Plate 10) is known from 33 records (DPaW 2016). The records are spread 
along the coast from the north of Geraldton to the south of Lancelin. This species was recorded 
from two locations within the survey area on grey sandy soils on slopes (Figure 3). This species 
had sufficient flowering material to positively identify at the WA Herbarium.   

 
GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834 | 33 
 
Plate 10 
Hakea neurophylla 
recorded within survey area (J Foster) 
 
Likelihood of Occurrence 
A Likelihood of Occurrence assessment was conducted post-field survey for all conservation 
significant flora taxa identified in the desktop assessment (Appendix D). This assessment took 
into account previous records, habitat requirements, efficacy of the survey, intensity of the 
survey, flowering times and the cryptic nature of species. 
The Likelihood of Occurrence assessment post-field survey concluded that seven taxa are 
known to occur, two are likely to occur, 152 may possibly occur and the remaining 29 taxa are 
unlikely or highly unlikely to occur within the survey area. A summary of the outcomes of 
species considered as known or likely to occur is provided below (Table 8). The large number of 
conservation significant taxa that are considered possibly to occur is due to the survey area 
comprising of a varied landscape with a range of soils and landforms that align with the habitat 
considered suitable for the species. In addition, most of the conservation significant taxa have 
been recorded in the adjacent Lesueur National Park and Coomallo Nature Reserve.  
Table 8 
Summary of Likelihood of Occurrence Assessment 
Species  
State (WC 
Act/ DPaW 
listing) 
Federal 
(EPBC Act 
listing) 
Likelihood of Occurrence 
Hakea megalosperma 
VU 
VU 
Known 

 species was recorded 
from within the survey area. 
Acacia retrorsa 
P2 

Known 

 species recorded within 
the survey area. 
Grevillea delta 
P2 

Known 

 species was recorded 
within the survey area. 
Thelymitra variegata 
P2 

Known 

 species was recorded 
from within the survey area. 
Hensmania stoniella 
P3 

Known 

 species was recorded 
from within the survey area. 

 
34 | GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834  
Species  
State (WC 
Act/ DPaW 
listing) 
Federal 
(EPBC Act 
listing) 
Likelihood of Occurrence 
Lepidobolus quadratus 
P3 

Known 

 species was recorded 
from within the survey area. 
Stylidium 
?hymenocraspedum 
P3 

Likely 

 infertile specimen of this 
species was potentially recorded 
from within the survey area. 
Stylidium ?torticarpum 
P3 

Likely 

 infertile specimen of this 
species was potentially recorded 
from within the survey area. 
Hakea neurophylla 
P4 

Known 

 species was recorded 
from within the survey area. 
4.2.3
 
Introduced flora 
The majority of the survey area is in a Pristine condition with the presence of introduced species 
generally restricted to the cleared paddock area, along creeklines and the borders of vegetation 
adjacent to previously cleared areas (see Section 4.1.3). Thirteen introduced taxa were 
recorded within the survey area during the field survey (Appendix D). The most commonly 
recorded weed species in the survey area include *Arctotheca calendula, *Hypochaeris glabra 
and *Romulea rosea
Weeds of National Significance and Declared Pests 
No introduced species listed as a Declared Pest plant under Section 22 of the BAM Act or a 
WoNS (DotEE 2016d), was recorded within the survey area. 
4.2.4
 
Other significant flora 
No other significant flora as defined by the EPA and DPaW (2015) was identified within the 
survey area during the field survey. 
4.3
 
Fauna 
4.3.1
 
Fauna habitat 
Seven main fauna habitat types were recorded during the field survey, which broadly aligned 
with the vegetation associations described in section 4.1.1 and mapped in Figure 3, Appendix A 
and include: 

 
Wandoo Woodlands 

 
Marri Woodland 

 
Eucalyptus todtianaBanksia attenuata/menziesii low Open Woodland  

 
Minor drainage lines and seasonally inundated areas and dams  

 
Heathlands on sandy soils 

 
Heathlands on lateritic soils 

 
Scattered trees of Wandoo and Marri in paddock. 

 
GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834 | 35 
The topography of survey area is undulating ranging from gentle to steep slopes with valleys 
and small hills present. Several creek lines (from three drainage systems) drain to the east and 
south, dividing the undulating terrain and low hills within the survey area. Soils were 
predominantly sandy-clay grey loams in the valleys or white to orange sands in the heaths, with 
some heaths along elevated areas having lateritic gravels or capping. Occasional exposed 
lateritic ridgelines were also recorded on small hils.  
The habitat types for the survey area are described in Table 9.  
Habitat connectivity  
The fauna habitats of the survey area are part of a contiguous largely intact area of remnant 
vegetation within the local area and greater study area. To the north west of the survey area lies 
Mount Lesueur National Park (26,987 ha) and Beekeeper Nature Reserve (120,000 ha) and to 
the east Coomallo Nature Reserve (9,200 ha) with numerous areas of vegetated remnant 
(freehold) lands surrounding. Outside of the reserved remnant areas the land has been 
extensively cleared for agriculture and is part of the Western Australian Wheatbelt, with portions 
of the western boundary of the survey area abutting cleared agricultural land. Within the survey 
area a portion (248 ha) of land has previously been cleared. This area has some large habitat 
trees scattered throughout, which could be utilised by some fauna species.  
The ephemeral drainage lines are part of a larger network of watercourses ultimately draining 
into the much larger tributaries of the Hill River and Coomallo Creek linking the survey area to 
surrounding environments.  
The southern boundary of the survey area borders Jurien Road and provides a barrier to some 
fauna moving south through the landscape. Apart from the cleared area within the survey area, 
a portion of agricultural land to the west and Jurien Road (and other minor access tracks) fauna 
movement is largely unrestricted. Overall, the habitats within the survey area are largely 
contiguous through the local area and mostly well connected with habitats through the greater 
study area.  
Disturbance 
Portions of the habitats within the survey area have been impacted to some degree by past 
disturbances including land clearing, dams, minor roads, fire and grazing. Minor roads make up 
a very small area of impact and were probably maintained by farmers for access and fire 
control. A small dwelling and associated infrastructure is present north of the large cleared area. 
Cattle and horse grazing is evident in portions of the survey area, particularly in the cleared 
areas or bushland adjacent to the cleared area. Feral pest disturbance was also present in 
selected areas with pig activity most prevalent in the north and west and evidence of rabbits 
also recorded in the survey area. 
There were only small areas impacted by recent fire (less than 5 years) with the majority of the 
survey area being longer unburnt (> 20 years) or a mosaic of old fire scars. Most of the recent 
fire scars were in close proximity to the dwelling and infrastructure near the centre of the survey 
area. 
Habitat value 
The survey area provides significant habitat diversity for many native fauna species, including 
species of conservation significance. This is due to the diversity and quality of habitat types (e.g. 
good to excellent structural and floristic diversity within each habitat type), good connectivity and 
for supporting known and potential habitat values for conservation significant fauna species 
(see Table 9). The habitats within the survey area are mostly intact, variable in composition and 
well connected with habitats within the local area and greater study area.  

 
36 | GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834  
Aerial photography indicates the habitats of the survey area are well represented within the local 
area and are probably well represented within the greater study area. The adjoining Mt Lesueur 
National Park (and Beekeepers Nature Reserve) and Coomallo Nature Reserve are also known 
to have high value (e.g. habitat quality) habitats for conservation significant fauna, with the 
survey area linking these two highly important areas. The survey area plus the national park and 
reserve create an area of approximately 158,187 ha of continuous habitat. 
Important Bird Areas 
Five avian species considered important populations were recorded during the field syurvey and 
include the Western Long-billed Corella (Cacatua pastinator
), Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo 
(Calyptorhynchus latirostris), Blue-breasted Fairy Wren (Malurus pulcherrimus), Western 
Spinebill (Acanthorhynchus superciliosus) and Rufous Treecreeper (Climacteris rufa). They are 
all considered to be part of “Globally Important Bird Populations” in this region (
Dutson et al. 
2009). Of these species, the Western Long-billed Corella and 
Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo
 were 
recorded breeding in Wandoo in the survey area. 
 

 
GHD | Report for Main Roads Western Australia - Hill River Offset Property, 61/34834 | 37 
Table 9 
Fauna habitat types within survey area 
Description 
Indicative photograph 
Wandoo Woodland 

 580 ha 
Vegetation association: VT10 (550.73 ha), VT04 (29.27 ha) 
This habitat type occurs across a large portion of the survey area in the valleys or areas of low rises and is 
mostly dominated by Wandoo (Eucalyptus wandoo) with little understorey, however some areas had an 
understorey of Melaleuca platycalyx heath of 30% cover. The overstorey consist of open woodland of 
Wandoo trees (DBH >300 mm) at approximately 26 trees per hectare. These trees were often large (to 20 
m) and provided small, medium and large hollows. Large hollows were present in approximately three trees 
per hectare (based on stem density counts of trees with DBH > 300 mm). The shrub/midstorey layer was 
sparse but sometimes moderate to dense in small patches and consisted of AcaciaBanksia and Hakea 
species. 
The soils consisted of brown clay loam with small areas of gravel incursion. Stony areas are present around 
valley crests and in some areas formed small breakaways however these were small and scattered.  
The majority of the Wandoo Woodland area appeared long unburnt (> 20 years) given the lack of historical 
fire scar evidence. Some small areas (particularly those woodlands closest to the homestead) had more 
recent burn scares (<5 years). 
The woodland provides good denning and breeding opportunities for small native ground mammals, birds 
and reptiles. Seven species of bird were recorded nesting in this habitat. The Western Long-billed Corella, 
Ringneck Parrot (Barnardius zonarius semitorquatus), Tree Martins (Petrochelidon nigricans), Galah 
(Eolophus roseicapilla
and Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo were all recorded nesting in hollows while Australian 
Raven (Corvus coronoides) and Whistling Kite (Haliastur sphenurus) were nesting in large trees. Animal 
tracks, digs and occasional small burrows were recorded in this habitat type, most of which were from 
Echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus). 
Fallen branches and logs were common in this habitat type with many having a range of hollow sizes. The 
persistence of logs is probably an artefact of the lack of fire history. Leaf-litter and other forms of non-
vascular ground cover (dead plant material) was common beneath trees and shrubs.  
 
Habitat value for fauna species of conservation significance 
High value 

Каталог: Documents
Documents -> Исследование диагностических моделей по Пону и Коркхаузу
Documents -> 3 пародонтологическая хирургия
Documents -> Hemoglobinin yenidoğanda yapim azliğina bağli anemiler
Documents -> Q ə r a r Azərbaycan Respublikası adından
Documents -> Ubutumire uniib iratumiye abantu, imigwi y'abantu canke amashirahamwe bose bipfuza gushikiriza inkuru hamwe/canke ivyandiko bijanye n'ihonyangwa ry'agateka ka zina muntu hamwe n'ayandi mabi yose vyakozwe I Burundi guhera mu kwezi kwa Ndamukiza
Documents -> Videotherapy Video: Cool Runnings Sixth Grade
Documents -> Guidelines on methods for calculating contributions to dgs
Documents -> Document Outline form monthly ret cont
Documents -> Şİrvan şƏHƏr məRKƏZLƏŞDİRİLMİŞ Kİtabxana sistemi
Documents -> İnsan hüquq müdafiəçilərinin vəziyyəti üzrə Xüsusi Məruzəçi


Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   31


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə