Managing the front end of innovation The positive impact of the organizational attributes to the front end of innovation performance



Yüklə 0,49 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə2/5
tarix04.05.2017
ölçüsü0,49 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5

1

 

Subject overview 

In this chapter theoretical background of the subject will be discussed. 



1.1

 

Exploring innovation process 

Due to continuously increased competition in the modern global market, innovativeness 

has  become  a  critical  factor  for  companies'  sustainability  (Keskin,  Diehl,  &  Molenaar, 

2013; Jongbae Kim & Wilemon, 2002b; Verworn, 2009; A. Zhang, Zhang, & Zhao, 2003). 



13 

Furthermore, innovation process has to be considered as a critical factor for companies' 

and even countries' growth (Porter, 1990, 1996). Innovation has to be seen as an essential 

condition for firm's long-term survival on the market (Anja Cotic & Prodan, 2008; Boer et 

al., 2001; Boer & Gertsen, 2003). To innovate continually, to develop and improve not 

only  products,  but  also  services  became  a  critical  issue  to  enterprises  sustainable 

economic growth. The simple attitude, that innovation essentially relates merely to new 

product  or  idea  creation,  the  approach  of  innovation  process  became  a  concept  of 

establishing new "business value", namely discovering, learning, improving ideas which 

could  be  realized  in  new  products  and  services  and  would  have  a  positive  impact  on 

companies'  efficiency,  profitability  and  competitiveness  (Morris,  2006).  The  simplified 

innovation process could be categorized into three main phases (see Fig.1). Very  often 

these  phases  play an  important  role  in the  innovation process  and  could  overlap  with 

each other (Tiwari & Buse, 2007). At the same time, these phases could be defined as 

different projects within the innovation process, what makes it possible to manage those 

(Tiwari  &  Buse,  2007).  For  this  reason,  there  is  growing  interest  in  contemporary 

innovation  process  theory  for  the  possibility  to  find  solution  to  govern  and  manage 

innovation process. Moreover, academics and practitioners concern the main issues in 

managing innovation process, namely how to manage the innovation process with the 

most efficiency and effectiveness (Edison et al., 2013; Ho & Tsai, 2011; Koen et al., 2002; 

Rogbeer, Almahendra, & Ambos, 2014; Verworn, 2009). 

 

 



 

14 

 

Figure 1  Three phases of simplified innovation process. Adopted from R. Tiwari (2007) 



1.1.1

 

Development of the innovation process approach 

Austrian economist Schumpeter (1934) made a first attempt to conceptualize innovation 

process.  He  also  proposed  that  the  term  „innovation" has  to  signify not  only  with the 

process  of  developing  of  revolutionary  new  products,  but  more  complex  meaning. 

Opening  broad  horizons  of  innovation  approach,  Schumpeter  draws  attention,  that 

innovation  process  also  includes  all  transformational  processes,  concerning 

organizations,  services  and  already  existing  products  (Schumpeter,  1939).  He  clarified 

innovation  process  from  the  managerial  point  of  view  and  underlined  corporation's 

strategic  issues  as  critical  factors  for  companies'  capability  to  react  to  rapid  market 

changes. 

 Contemporary  innovation  theory  confirms,  that  innovation  process  reflects  the 

market  conditions  and  distinguishes  among  five  generations  in  formation  of  the 

innovation process (Caraça, Lundvall, & Mendonça, 2009; Freeman, 1996; Ortt & van der 

Duin,  2008;  Rothwell,  1994)  Moreover,  academics  point  out,  that  innovation  process 

approach are steel moving towards the new level of its development, namely the fifth 

generation. This concept was proposed by R. Rothwell (1994) and widely recognized by 

many other scientists (Dodgson & Hinze, 2000). Rothwell (1994) differentiates influencing 

factors,  historical  and  environmental    conditions  that  affected  the  innovation process 



15 

creation  and  development.  He  points  out  that  each  level  of  innovation  process 

development was caused by changes in the business and legal environment. Thus, each 

new level or generation in innovation process development became a response to market 

and development  pressure.  Analysing  more  than  forty  years  of history  in  the  business 

environment  and  more  precise  innovation  process  development,  Rothwell  (1994) 

suggested following innovation process generations. 

The first generation of the innovation process 

This  period  (1950-middle  1960's)  was  characterized  by  rapid  industry  economic 

development. The primary aim of the R&D strategy was to create revolutionary advanced 

products and enhance productivity. The objectives of the marketing were to "create" the 

customer  demand  on  the  market  (see  Fig.2).  This  generation  is  also  called  technology 

push. Fast growing R&D sector in turn had a positive effect on general society well-being, 

consumer  market, unemployment rates  (Freeman, 1996;  Rothwell,  1994).  Overlapping 

Schumpeter's theory where the ability to innovation becomes an essential factor for  a 

market advantage (Hübner & Jahnes, 1998), this phase nevertherless underestimates a 

significant role of the  innovation process for existing products. 



The second generation of the innovation process 

The second generation of the innovation process is also known as a market pull (need 

pull). The period end of 1960th to early 70th, common organizational goals were steeled 

to  enhance  company  productivity.  But  the  market  demands  became  the  focus  of  the 

corporate strategy. These shifts also affected  the diversification of corporate activities. 

Increasing market competition, a struggle for a market share  forced companies to pay 

more  attention  to  resource  allocation  (both  time  and  financial)  and  market  needs 

(Rothwell, 1994). Shortened time between research and development projects, focus on 

customer  satisfaction,  made    organizations  search  for  ideas  on  the  market.    In  other 

words,  compared to technology push, R&D of the market pull strategy was a response to 

a market need stimulus (see Fig. 2). 

 


16 

 

Figure 2 Technlogy push versus Market pull. Adopted from M.Martin (1994) 

Academics and practitioners are still discussing both pros and cons of both market-pull 

and  technology-push  strategies  for  the  new  product  and  service  development.  What 

strategy to implement depends primarily on the relative newness of the product (Martin, 

1994; Ortt & van der Duin, 2008; Rothwell, 1994). From one hand, it is less risky to offer 

the  renewed  product  because  customers  are  already  familiar  with  the  product  or 

concept.  From  on  the  other  hand,  completely  new  or  revolutionary  product  could  be 

unexpected  because  of  "demands'  unawareness"  but  well  received  on  the  market 

(Freeman, 1996; Hübner & Jahnes, 1998)

Market and customer researches and analysis 



could  help  organizations  to  find  the  right  strategy  depending  on  their  capabilities  and 

resources. 



The third generation (coupling model) 

Some  significant  changes  on  the  market  established  necessary  conditions  for  the 

Innovation strategy development. From one hand, the market of the early 70th- middle 

80th was characterized by demand saturation  (Galanakis, 2006; Rothwell, 1994). From 

another hand, relatively high inflation rate led to unemployment enhancement. These 

objectives had an impact on companies' strategy rethinking. Costs reduction issues, the 



17 

same as ability to consolidate, utilize and control resources became the  focus of many 

organizations.  Achieving  success  in  the  innovations  became  the  foundation  for 

companies'  leading  position  on  the  market.    This  necessity  to  success  in  innovations 

forced  the  rising  interest  to  the  innovation  process  research.  Market  and  economic 

pressure forced marketing and R&D to work closely and in correlation to each other (see 

Fig.3).  This  linking  or  coupling  tendency  was  by  caused  mostly  by  necessity  in  costs 

reduction. It was still a structured process, characterized by a regular sequence. However, 

because of a  new  feedback  stage,  innovation process  became more  project-  oriented. 

Moreover, innovation was recognized as an essential factor in an organizational strategy 

(Rothwell, 1994). 

 

 



Figure 3 The “Coupling” model of innovation process. Adopted from Rothwell (1994) 

The fourth generation (integration and parallel development) 

Considering economic recovery at the beginning of 80th-90th, organizations focused on 

corporation strategy issues. Technological competence and capability, integrated with a 

customer orientation led to the growth of a number networks alliances. An influence of 

the  shortened  product  life  cycle  forced  both  big  and  small  organizations  to  look  for 

network  advantages.  Strong  linkages  between  R&D  and  customers  were  established 

(Freeman, 1996). Conceptual understanding of the innovation process became a primary 


18 

factor  of  competitive  advantage.  In  order  to  reach  the  greater  performance  in  R&D 

project, the parallel and integrated approach was applied rather than the sequential one. 

The  R&D  project  orientation  became  not  only  costs-reduction,  but  also  time  and 

customer oriented (Hübner & Jahnes, 1998; Rothwell, 1994). The tendencies, to focus on 

time  and  costs  resources,  market  orientation,  and  integrated  strategy  founded  theirs 

origin  in  early  80th,  continued  its  development  in  the  late  90th.  Interconnections 

between marketing (customer and market orientation) and R&D resulted in development 

of the open innovation approach. Knowledge absorptive capability, flexibility, and ability 

not just to be the first on the market, but also addictiveness to market changes had to 

affect positively both new product development time and costs (Hübner & Jahnes, 1998; 

Rothwell, 1994) 



1.2

 

Towards the fifth generation. The modern concept of the innovation 

process 

 The modern innovation process concept involves both issues: creating and developing 

entirely  new  products  and  services,  and  transformations  (renewing)  of  the  existing 

products  (Bygstad  &  Lanestedt,  2009;  Parjanen,  Hennala,  &  Konsti-Laakso,  2012). 

Michael.  E.  Porter  in  his  work  "Competitive  advantage"  (1990)  gave  a  variety  of 

innovation  forms:  "Innovation  can  be  manifested  in  a  new  product  design,  a  new 

production process, a new marketing approach, or a new way of conducting training". 

Respectively, based on accessibility to internal and external knowledge and information 

sources (Óskarsson, 2005), managing of the innovation process comprise such problems 

as  fostering  and  supporting  innovative  idea  generation,  improvement  of  the  new 

products  or  concepts  development,  and  commercialization  of  new  products'  on  the 

market. Solving these problems could help organizations to achieve higher performance 

in the innovation process and in turn in the market advantage (Carayannis & Grigoroudis, 

2014; Castellacci, 2008; Fratesi, 2010; Junmo Kim, 2011; Kleinschmidt et al., 2007; Porter, 

1990,  1996).  In  contemporary  science  innovation  process  has  recognized  as  a  set  of 

organizational  components  and  factors  (Langerak,  Hultink,  &  Robben,  2004;  Purcarea, 

Maria  del  Mar  Benavides,  &  Apetrei,  2013;  Robertson,  Casali,  &  Jacobson,  2012). 

Managing of the innovation process has become a complex issue for many organizations. 

Moreover, in order to become a successful corporative strategy for a long-term market 


19 

advantage,  today's  innovation  process  is  seemed  to  be  open  and  continuous  (H. 



Chesbrough,  2004;  Huizingh,  2011).  In  compare  to  close  innovation  process  (idea 

generation  and  development  process  are  implemented  within  the  organization),  open 



innovation process approach sees courses for new ideas not only inside, but also outside 

their  organizations  (H.  W.  Chesbrough,  2003;  Enkel,  Gassmann,  &  Chesbrough,  2009). 

Customers, suppliers are recognized as valuable information sources. But to be able to 

recognize  opportunities  and  realize  them,  organizations  have  striven  to  possess  a 

knowledge  absorptive  ability  and  capability  to  manage  it  (Óskarsson,  2005).  The 

continuous  innovation  approach  encompasses  an  organizational  ability  to  adapt  and 

rapidly react to changes on the market (Boer & Gertsen, 2003; Davenport, 2013; Morris, 

2006).  Both  approaches  are  closely  interconnected.  Thus,  only  effective  utilizing  of 

internal  and  external  courses  of  knowledge  could  ensure  the  organizational  ability  to 

continuous innovation (Anja Cotic & Prodan, 2008; Óskarsson, 2005). 

1.3

 

Managing the front end of innovation 

The  front  end  of  innovation  (FEI)  refers  to  early  stages  and  called  pre-project  phase 

(Nobelius  &  Trygg,  2002).  Contemporary  scholar  literature  distinguishes  between 

different, but in some way similar definitions of this stage. Thus some scholars use the 

term fuzzy front end, that was spread by Smith and Reinertsen  (Reinertsen, 1999) and 

includes  all  activities  in  the  first  stage  of  NPD  (Alam,  2006;  Brentani  &  Reid,  2012; 

Herstatt, Verworn, & Nagahira, 2004; Reid & de Brentani, 2004). Others prefer another 

term, namely front end of innovation (Elmquist & Segrestin, 2007; Khurana & Rosenthal

1998;  Jongbae  Kim  &  Wilemon,  2002b).  Identifying,  that  the  fuzzy  front  end  is  rather 

uncertain  and  unpredictable  process,  which  is  difficult  to  manage  (Koen  et  al.,  2001), 

contemporary  innovation  management  theory  also,  that,  if  it  is  possible  to  determine 

organizational  components  of  the  innovation  process,  it  is  also  possible  to  manage  it 

(Bessant & Tidd, 2007). Thereby, we prefer using in this research the term the front end 

of innovation (FEI). 

 One of the significant attempts to analyse existing academic literature was proposed 

by R. G. Cooper (1983).  Cooper's investigation raised an issue that is still urgent both for 

scholars  and  practitioners:  how  to  achieve  success  in  the  new  product  development 

(Robert G Cooper, 1983)? Furthermore, Cooper (1983) underlined the need in recognition 



20 

R&D as conceptualized process, which includes different activities and players. Thus, he 

proposed  the  seven  components  model  of  the  Innovation  process:  Idea  generation, 

Preliminary Assessment, Concept, Development, Testing, Trial, Launch (Robert G Cooper, 

1983). Suggesting that all these phases in their interaction could also be seen as unique 

sub  groups  Cooper  put  forward  an  idea  that  to  reach  the  greater  performance  in  the 

innovation process each stage has to be studied separately. The first three stages include: 

1) Idea generation, where the primary concept is generalized and synthesized,  

2)  Preliminary  assessment  stage,  where  such  factors  as  products  advantages, 

differentiation are emphasized and  

3) Concept, where future performance has to be valued) was integrated into so-called 

pre-project phase (Robert G. Cooper, 1983) (See Fig. 4) 

 

 

 



Figure 4 Front end model. Adopted from R.G Cooper (1983) 

In  his  study  „Predevelopment  activities  determine  new  product  success"  (1988) 

Cooper presented more conceptually four phases NPD stage model.  Arguing, that NPD 

could be a source of success for a market, it is also associated with high risks. Challenging 

the  issue  to  minimize  risks  concerning  for  example  with  the  return  on  investment, 

executive  managers  can  apply  to  the  managerial  side  of  the  innovation  process.  

Determining the innovation process as the stage based, Cooper mainly pointed out the 

importance of the first phase (idea stage) in the NPD process (See Fig. 5) and determined 



21 

technical  (production)  activities  and  market  activities.  Furthermore,  in  this  work  he 

claimed,  that  precisely  activities  on  this  stage  affect  the  whole  NPD  process  and  its 

performance (Cooper, 1988). In order to reach an efficiency in implementing innovations, 

the innovation process has to be an integrated and permanent part of the organizational 

strategy (Cooper, 1988).   

 

Figure 5 Predevelopment activities determine new product success. Adopted from R.G Cooper (1988) 

The term "fuzzy front end" came into the light in 1985 and was widely used by scholars 

in later 1990ths (Reinertsen, 1999). This term fuzziness was applied to underline a high 

degree of „uncertainty and opportunity" that defining the FEI as a process  (Reinertsen, 

1999). Koen et al., (2001) argues, that the front end of innovation and new product and 

process development have completely different characteristics, and for this reason they 

have to be managed dissimilar (see Fig.6). Based on such classifications as the essence of 

the work, dates of commercialization, financial resources, revenues and project activities 

Koen et al.,(2001) underlines the specific  nature of the pre-development stage. 


22 

 

Figure 6 Front end of innovation vs. new product and process development. Adopted from Koen et al. 

(2001) 

 In their study Reinertsen and Smith (1991) argued, that especially FEI stage is much 

underestimated in the NPD process and has to become more project oriented. Project 

orientation has to focus on both resource and execution time issues. In addition, authors 

underlined  the  essential  role  of  the  top  management  in  supporting  fuzzy  front  end 

activities (Preston G Smith & Reinertsen, 1991). The significant findings of early 90ths are 

still emergent for the theory and practice. First, both scholars and practitioners have to 

recognize  the  important  role  of  FEI  stage.  Second,  the  fuzzy  front  end  has  to  be 

conceptualized as a project process. Defining the FEI activities as a project process, would 

help to determine objects that could have a positive effect on it performance (Reinertsen, 

1999).  Thus,  Moenaret  et  al.  (1995)  made  analyse  the  impact  of  intercorporate 

communication.  Researchers  found  out that  cooperation  work  inside  of the  FEI  teams 

and open information flow in general had  positive influence on FEI project performance. 

At the beginning of the 2000s, the NPD theorists drew attention to the interdependence 

between  FEI  activities  and NPD processes  (Herstatt  et al.,  2004;  Langerak  et al.,  2004; 

Verworn,  2009).  Moreover,  scholars  made  the  first  attempts  to  find  out  the  most 

significant  for  the  FEI  activities  organizational  components  (Verworn,  2009).  These 

studies also assess the high level of unpredictability and uncertainty, which differentiate 



23 

the front end of innovation from all other stages of NPD process. New ideas or concepts 

creation process is very often chaotic, and not harmonious (Poskela & Martinsuo, 2009; 

Van  Wulfen,  2014).  Contemporary  researchers  tend  to  find  out,  what  organization 

objectives  and  managerial  tools  could  affect  the  FEI  performance  and  minimize 

uncertainty  in  it.  Thus,  FEI  became  a  subject  for  more  precise  and  proper  study. 

Simultaneously,  the  FEI  is  known  as  indispensable  stage;  that  could  force  the 

effectiveness  of  the  late  new  product  or  service  project  involvement  (Jongbae  Kim  & 

Wilemon,  2002a).  To  achieve  an  effectual  result  in  strengthening  their  innovation 

advantage,  organizations  and  executive  managers  have  to  strive  to  improve  the  FEI 

performance  (Khurana  &  Rosenthal,  1998;  Jongbae  Kim  &  Wilemon,  2002b;  Verworn, 

2009; Wagner & Ehrenmann, 2010; Q. Zhang & Doll, 2001). In the study conducted by 

Khurana  and  Rosenthal  (1998)  survey's  results  demonstrated,  that  all-embracing 

organizational approach is required in order to enhance the FEI performance. Innovations 

have to become an integrated part of the organizational culture (Reinertsen, 1999).  

Other  important  statements,  concerning  the  FEI  are  discussed  among  modern 

academics. Thus, formation of organizational managing activities with the focus on both 

organizational attributes, and innovative product development aimed to enhance the FEI 

effectiveness  and  efficiency,  and  accordingly  NPD  process  performance  (Edison  et  al., 

2013; Ho & Tsai, 2011; Jongbae Kim & Wilemon, 2002a; L. Sanders Jones & Linderman, 

2014). In other words, theorists and practitioners looking for the right managerial tools 

and organization objects, in order to solve such urgent problem as enhancing of the front 

end  of  innovation  efficiency  and  effectiveness.    For  instance,  P.  A.  Koen  et  al.,  (2014) 

detected,  that  such  organizational  attributes  and  factors,  as  senior  management 

commitment, vision, strategy, resources and culture clarify 53% effective results of the 

front  end  performance.  Some  scholars  argue  that  effective  utilization  of  the  human 

resources could also contribute to a positive outcome (Ho & Tsai, 2011; Jongbae Kim & 

Wilemon, 2002b; Poskela & Martinsuo, 2009; Reid & de Brentani, 2004). Proper selected 

and  organized  team  work  in  an  edition  affect  the  executive  time  of  the  FEI  projects. 

Shorter procedure time in conditions of the rapidly changing especially on the software 

market could play a crucial role (Hoegl, Ernst, & Proserpio, 2007). Therefore, determine 

the FEI as one of the critical factors for an improved innovation process, academics and 

practitioners challenge the problems in managing the front end of innovation. Taking into 


24 

consideration uncertainty and unpredictability of the FEI, managers and scholar facing 

some crucial dilemmas: how more efficiently to organize the managerial process of the 

front  end  of  innovation  activities,  and  what  tools  could  improve  its  outcome  with  the 

most efficiency? 

1.3.1

 

Managing innovation software development 

Rapid technological and communication  changes hardly influence contemporary world 

and  economic  market.  The  software  branch  has  become  of  the  vast  importance  for 

economic growth of many countries (Lippoldt & Stryszowski, 2009). Working conditions 

has  modified  and  caused  growing  need  of  software  development.  The  process  of 

globalization in business shifted software development demands into high-priority issue 

for  every  company.  Software  development  and  utilization  is  an  urgent  element  of 

corporative environment. It serves business organizations as an urgent element of their 

competitiveness  (Humphrey,  1995;  Stellman  &  Greene,  2005).  The  primary  goal  of 

software developing companies is to satisfy their customers with in-time delivered high-

quality  product  (Stellman  &  Greene,  2005).  Because  of  the  fast  changing  market  and 

customer  demands  software  developing  companies  has  respond  to  all  particular 

requirements that occur during development processes in a rush way. It is not enough to 

come  on  the  market  with  a  new  product.  Permanent  customer  support,  caused  by 

changing  customer  and market demands  probably  play  more  significant role  that  ever 

before  (Herbsleb  &  Moitra,  2001).  Organizations,  involved  in  the  high  technological 

business, such as software development IT service providing face to response particular 

R&D process management issues (Brem & Voigt, 2009). G. Specht (2002) argued, that all 

stages in the R&D process could be systematically planned and controlled. Moreover, he 

distinguishes between technology management (involve predevelopment activities and 

technology  development)  and  R&D  management  as  two  different  sub  activities  of  the 

innovation managerial process (see Fig. 7). An improvement of the management process 

on the different stages would have a positive effect on the whole process (Klein & Specht, 

2002; Specht, Beckmann, & Amelingmeyer, 2002). 

 


25 

 

Figure 7 Classification of technology, R&D and innovation management. Adapted from Klein & Specht 

(2002)  

Both  academics  and  experienced  practitioners  are  looking  for  new  methods  to 

enhance a corporative performance. Thus, so-called Agile Software development process 

has  to  facilitate  software  teams  to  accomplish  value  creation  goal  both  in  software 

development  and  service  facilitation  (Beck  et  al.,  2001;  Cockburn  &  Highsmith,  2001; 

Highsmith, 2002). In it full sense "Agility" means how rapidly software development team 

can  react  to  changes.  Short  time  of  FEI  projects  execution  indicates  the  high  level  of 

flexibility  that  increase  corporate  competitiveness  and  delivered  value  (Chow  &  Cao, 

2008; Dingsøyr et al., 2012). Shortened product life-cycle, growing competition pressure 

force software development and service companies to make rush decisions. Accurately 

potential  to  respond  and  adapt  needful  changes,  and  customers'  requirements  could 

provide  software  development  and  service  delivering  with  the  most  efficiency  and 

effectiveness (Chow & Cao, 2008). The Agile method, is widely used in small and medium 

sized (SMEs) companies (Beck et al., 2001; Karlström & Runeson, 2006) and is aimed to 

improve  the  process  of  software  development.  This  method  focuses  on  all  process 

participants,  such  as  customers  and  software  developers  (Dybå  &  Dingsøyr,  2008; 

Highsmith,  2002).  Relevant  implemented  Cooper's  Stage-Gate  model  (Cooper,  2008) 

proposes  typical  managerial  process,  which  distinguish  between  pre-project  phase, 

decision-making, implementation and outcome phases, see Fig.8 

 


26 

 

 



Figure 8 Stage-Gate model. Adopted from R. G. Cooper (2008)  

Similar to the front end activities, today's software developing process characterized 

by the high level of unpredictability and uncertainty. Modification, problem-solving needs 

could  occur  practically  in  all  stages  of  the  process.  All  these  factors  make  the  typical 

management  approaches  mostly  insufficiently.  As  opposite  to  the  traditional  software 

managerial methods, Agile approach points out the necessity of permanent re-evaluation 

of the new products. From one hand, this applies to the necessary time to consider a new 

product or concept. From another hand, proper recognized the new product concept will 

have  a  positive effect  on  the  NPD.  Under  such condition  new idea  generation process 

becomes an integrated path of the whole process. Software developing teams have to 

become possibility of examine if the product really fit the market and customer demands. 

It has a positive impact on organizational competitiveness because it helps to solve the 

problems caused by uncontrollable factors. In fact, it allows persistent enhancement of 

the front end of innovation performance (Dybå & Dingsøyr, 2008; Highsmith & Cockburn, 

2001; Lippoldt, 2009).  In spite of this, implementation of such methods, as the Agile way 

is  hard  to  achieve  without  organizational  components  and  factors  like  shared  vision, 

managerial support in decision making, ability to solve fuzzy problems (Beck et al., 2001). 

Moreover, software developing teams have to possess such characteristics as creativity, 

ability to communicate well and cross-functional specialization (Highsmith, 2002). 


27 

1.4

 

Measurement of FEI 

Even after many studies, that focused on the positive relationship between the FEI and 

R&D  process  outcome  (Khurana  &  Rosenthal,  1998;  Jongbae  Kim  &  Wilemon,  2002a; 

Ozer, 2007; Q. Zhang & Doll, 2001), both academics and practitioners  still discuss such 

essential  issues as measuring of the FEI performance (Adams, Bessant, & Phelps, 2006; 

L. Sanders Jones & Linderman, 2014). To evaluate the influence of different organizational 

components is essential issue first because it could help to optimize the managerial tools 

in order to enhance innovation process and more specifically the FEI performance (Adams 

et  al.,  2006;  J.  Guan  &  Chen,  2012).  Unfortunately,  even  recognized  the  significant 

influence of FEI on the innovation process, the contemporary methodology gives us not 

comprehensive  answer  how  to  measure  FEI  outcomes.  Scholars  still have  not reached 

unanimity how to provide measurement and what metrics to use  (Edison et al., 2013). 

Many academics mostly assess the impact of FEI on shortening NPD cycle  (Flint, 2002; 

Kumar  &  Phrommathed,  2005).  Others  emphasize  such  questions  as  FEI  costs  and 

outcomes (Poskela & Martinsuo, 2009; Verworn, 2009). H. Edison (Edison et al., 2013) 

highlights that the reason for such differences in FEI measurement determinations could 

be caused by diversity in innovation process definitions. Thus, various definitions propose 

different  points  of  view  and  stress  on  dissimilar  factors  having  an  impact  on  the 

innovation  process  and  more  precise  on  the  FEI  performance  (Mathiassen  & 

Pourkomeylian,  2003).  Respectively  significantly  different  factors  and  components  are 

measured  with  different  metrics  (Edison  et  al.,  2013).  Much  more  discussions  arise 

concerning FEI measurement. From one hand FEI has exploratory nature with a high level 

of uncertainty, and hardly predictable (Jongbae Kim & Wilemon, 2002b; Petala, Wever, 

Dutilh, & Brezet, 2010; Van Wulfen, 2012, 2014; Verworn, 2009). From on the other hand, 

measuring the FEI outcomes will help to improve management of FEI. 

1.4.1

 

Evaluation of the FEI performance: efficiency and effectiveness 

Evaluating  the  FEI  performance  is  a  rather  puzzling  task  (Poskela  &  Martinsuo,  2009). 

Birgit Verworn (2009) examined the FEI influence on the later NPD project performance. 

She found out that activities in FEI phase could have both direct and indirect impact on 

NDP (Verworn, 2009). Thus, risk and uncertainty minimizing on the FEI stage would have 

a  direct  influence  while  project  implementation  has  an  indirect  impact  on  the  FEI 



28 

performance  (Verworn,  2009).  Some  researchers  propose  to  estimate  the  FEI 

performance measuring it effectiveness and efficiency (Ho & Tsai, 2011; Verworn, 2009; 

Wagner  &  Ehrenmann,  2010).  Efficiency  in  this  sense  means  utilization  of  time  and 

financial  resources  (Ho  &  Tsai,  2011;  Verworn,  2009).  The  more  efficient  the  team 

capabilities, time planning, financial resources are utilized; the higher performance will 

be achieved through the FEI activities (Beaume et al., 2009; Sundström & Zika-Viktorsson, 

2009). Measurement of effectiveness in turn focuses on delivered product and value. For 

software industry organizations it means that the software idea is up-to-date and meet 

customer demand, new product concept is determined, clear and steadfast (Ho & Tsai, 

2011; Jongbae Kim & Wilemon, 2002a). Hence, all these factors will in turn affect how 

quickly  new  product  projects  will  develop  through  NPD  process  (Brem  &  Voigt,  2009; 

Elmquist & Segrestin, 2007). 

1.4.2

 

Innovation strategy 

Strategy is a complex of decisions, based on cross comparative analysing and planning, 

which determine company's ability to be competitive on the market (Porter, 1996). The 

issue to establish sustainable market advantage, innovation strategy should become the 

core strategy in a company (Cottam, Ensor, & Band, 2001; Dodgson, Gann, & Salter, 2008; 

Ettlie,  Bridges,  &  O'Keefe,  1984).  Considering  a  vital  role  of  corporate  innovative 

capabilities, both practitioners and scholar rethink the main objectives of the corporate 

strategy. They recognize, that innovation has become a core factor for a sustained market 

advantage  (Dodgson  et  al.,  2008).  Moreover,  they  underline  that  integration  of  the 

innovation strategy in the overall corporate strategy makes this synergy very effective to 

be competitive on the global market. Thus, some studies demonstrate interdependence 

between  the  overall  innovation  corporation  strategy  valuable  innovative  organization 

maintaining  (Adner,  2006;  Goffin  &  Mitchell,  2005;  Terziovski,  2010).  In  particular 

academics  outline  the  interdependence  between  strategy  and  organizational 

performance  by  small  and  medium  size  high-technology  enterprises  (Ring,  Doz,  &  Olk, 

2005;  Terziovski,  2010).  Another  interconnection  is  also  discussed  in  contemporary 

literature,  namely  correlation  between  the  FEI  performance  and  the  organizational 

innovation  strategy  (Claver,  Llopis,  Garcia,  &  Molina,  1998;  Ho  &  Tsai,  2011).  Some 

scholars suggest that companies with the concerted linkage between their FEI and overall 


29 

innovation strategy can achieve the highest performance (Clercq, Menguc, & Auh, 2009; 

Cottam et al., 2001).  

Contemporary innovation strategy distinguishes between two strategic approaches: 

rational approach and incremental approach (Gilbert, 1994; Goffin & Mitchell, 2005). The 

rational  approach  is  based  on  M.  Porter's  competitive  advantage  approach,  where 

companies' advantage could be achieved through low costs production or diversification 

(Porter, 1996). The weaknesses of the rational approach are focusing just on the senior 

management ability to react to external changes in a rush and adequately way (Goffin & 

Mitchell, 2005). 

 In the world of rapid technological changes, it is not enough to rely on just only one 

unit  of  the  organizational  structure.  It  is  necessary  to  build  up  a  kind  of  organization 

where a clear, determined strategic vision shared with all company and all organization 

units  recognize  and  support  corporate  responsiveness  (Dodgson  et  al.,  2008).  This,  in 

turn,  will  support  potential  to  dynamical  learning,  technological  elements,  managerial 

and organizational capabilities (Cassiman & Veugelers, 2006; Dodgson et al., 2008; Ring 

et  al.,  2005).  Because  of  rapidly  external  environment  changes  long-term  strategic 

decision making is critical to predict  (Cronin, 2014). In order to build up an innovative 

organization  is  not  simply  enough  to  allocate  financial  resources  for  R&D  (Jaruzelski, 

Loehr, & Holman, 2011). It is necessary to create an innovative organization (Cassiman & 

Veugelers, 2006). The innovation strategy is one of the most significant components of 

an innovative organization, which gives direction and encompasses the main corporate 

goals (Anthony, Eyring, & Gibson, 2006). The innovation strategy alignment to the overall 

corporative strategy will give a company potential to react in proper way to customer 

needs  (Cottam  et  al., 2001; Dodgson et al.,  2008;  Goffin  & Mitchell, 2005).  Moreover, 

clear  and  shared  vision  of  organizational  strategy  could  help  in  appropriate  decision-

making. Primarily it is important to FEI stage, where significant decisions concerning new 

products  or  concepts  are  made  and  evaluated.  The  lack  of  clear  vision of  corporative 

strategy, the same as understanding of market demands and customer needs would lead 

to R&D projects failure, and so forth cause lost in timing, financial and other resources  

(Herstatt et al., 2004; Petala et al., 2010; Van Wulfen, 2012). Incremental strategy has to 

fulfil some gaps in the rational approach. The incremental strategy also points out the 



30 

significant  role  of  the  corporate  strategy  based  on  external  and  internal  objectives' 

analyses.  But  in  compare  with  the  rational  approach,  the  incremental  strategy 

emphasizes the necessity in continuous reanalysing, rethinking and adopting of occurred 

changes  on  the  market  (Cassiman  &  Veugelers,  2006;  Goffin  &  Mitchell,  2005).  The 

incremental  strategy  approach  determines,  that  in  condition  of  uncertainty  and 

unpredictability  Innovation  strategy,  implemented  with  the  support  of  proper  chosen 

managerial  tools  could  be  a  fundamental  for  the  organizational  long-term  advantage 

(Cronin,  2014;  Goffin  &  Mitchell,  2005).  Sequentially,  integrated  corporate  innovation 

strategy  could have  a positive  impact  on  FEI  activities  (Cronin,  2014;  Ho  &  Tsai,  2011; 

Ozer, 2007; Stellman & Greene, 2005). Thus, we make a proposition that: 

 

H1. Innovation strategic goals have a positive impact on FEI activities performance 

 

1.4.3

 

Innovation culture 

To  be  able  to  support  the  permanent  innovation  process,  companies  are  required  to 

create  such  organizational  innovation  climate  and  environment,  in  which  corporate 

atmosphere will support and force creative thinking. Academics point out that innovation 

culture has to be seen as interconnection between such factors as innovation, creative 

environment, and organizational culture (Martins & Terblanche, 2003). It is academically 

proved,  that  exactly  in  collective  creative  atmosphere  most  people  could  open  their 

imaginative potential resources  (Angel, 2006; Hafiza, Shah, Jamsheed, & Zaman, 2011; 

Martins  &  Terblanche,  2003)  and  the  most  significant  innovations  were  made  due  to 

collaborative  idea  generation  (Adner,  2006;  Angel,  2006).  Team  leaders and  managers 

responsible for establishing and supporting an innovative environment, which in turn will 

increase value and profit (Dodgson et al., 2008). Furthermore, innovative culture foster 

and  support  innovative  idea  generation  (Ahmed,  1998;  Angel,  2006).  One  of  the 

important issues for establishing the innovative culture is utilization of the organizational 

time resource (Jaruzelski et al., 2011). Taking into account rather unpredictable time of 

an idea generation, organization has to create such terms, in which the FEI team will have 

enough time to create and consider new ideas (Bertels, Kleinschmidt, & Koen, 2011). To 

avoid financial and timing resources waste later in project development phase, FEI team 



31 

has to be able to analyse a new concept and align it with the corporate strategy goals and 

customer needs (Angel, 2006; Bertels et al., 2011; Leavy, 2005).  Moreover, innovation 

culture implies senior leadership and employees’ commitment, where all participants can 

acquire, discuss and make resolutions into new idea concepts (Bertels et al., 2011). Many 

academics also point out; that to foster idea generation involves letting employees not 

to be afraid to come out with new ideas. Innovation culture grant privileges to support 

and contradict, to discuss and think over new ideas (Ahmed, 1998; Antikainen & Vaataja, 

2010;  Jaruzelski  et  al.,  2011).  Besides,  the  high  level  of  trustworthy  in  the  company 

encourages  ideas  generation  and  information  flow  (Bertels  et  al.,  2011;  Martins  & 

Terblanche, 2003; Maurer, 2010). Undoubtedly, the human factor is one of the essential 

issues  for  establishing  innovation  culture.  Open-minded  ideas,  creativity  flourish  in 

organizations, which advocate openness and honesty in communication. Opinions of all 

process participants should be estimated and considered as valuable contributes (Angel, 

2006; Bertels et al., 2011). In this way, communication process plays an important role in 

establishing  the  innovative  culture.  Communication  process  could  be  distinguished 

between  external  and  internal  communication  process  (Johannessen  &  Olsen,  2011). 

External  communicating  includes  an  organizational  ability  to  absorb  and  manage 

information  and  knowledge  from  external  sources:  customers,  suppliers  and  so  on 

(Óskarsson,  2005).  Proper  organized  external  communication  process  could  be  an 

inexhaustible  source  of  information  from  the  external  environment  and  lead  to 

knowledge  creation.  Knowledge  creation and  utilization  in  turn  has  an  impact  on  idea 

generation process, enhances employees' competencies and stimulates the innovation 

process in whole (Bertels et al., 2011; H. W. Chesbrough, 2003; Huizingh, 2011) 

 Internal  communication  is  a  set  of  communicative  capabilities  inside  of  an 

organization (Johannessen & Olsen, 2011). Internal communication includes knowledge 

utilization and inter-organizational relationships. Both factors have a positive impact on 

the  FEI  performance  (Johannessen  &  Olsen,  2011;  Óskarsson,  2005).  Another  factor, 

having impact on innovation culture is reward system within  an organization  (Chandy, 

2003). There are different types of corporative rewards: tangible (mostly financial) and 

intangible (moral support, trust, advance training, professional recognition). Both types 

of rewards aim to stimulate FEI process. Recent studies point out the necessity of the 

implementation of both types of the reward systems.  However, some studies underlay 


32 

the significant role of precisely intangible rewards within the organizations. (Antikainen 

&  Vaataja,  2010;  Hafiza  et  al.,  2011;  Jaruzelski  et  al.,  2011;  Maurer,  2010). 

Trustworthiness  and  openness  in  communication,  inter-organizational  relationships, 

relationships  between  leaders  and  employees,  favourable  to  innovation  workplace 

conditions are the important features of the „healthy" innovation culture and could be 

called creativity motivators (Hafiza et al., 2011). Thereby, we hypothesize, that: 

 

H2. Innovation culture has a positive influence on the FEI performance. 

 

1.4.4

 

Senior management commitment 

One of the most important senior management issues is establishing corporate strategic 

goals. Besides typical for the top management responsibilities, such as  determination of 

organizational  objectives,  developing  organizational,  market  and  financial  policies, 

strategic  directions,  risks'  and  advantages'    assessment  and  decision-making,  senior 

managers also keep control  of an organizational structure and utilization of corporate 

resources (financial, human and so on). Into the modern global market conditions, senior 

management  also  faces  new  challenges.  Senior  leadership  is  required  to  build  up 

sustainable  market  advantage  through  the  establishing  and  maintaining  an  innovative 

organization.  This  complex  process  also  includes  stronger  linkage  between  senior 

management  commitment  and  innovation  process  activities  (De  Jong  &  Den  Hartog, 

2007; Leavy, 2005; Salomo et al., 2007). It is regrettable that, many senior managers are 

still  underestimate  the  significance  of  their  commitment  precisely  into  FEI  activities 

(Bonner,  Ruekert,  &  Walker,  2002; De  Jong  & Den  Hartog,  2007).  They  argue that  top 

managers are responsible for the key decision-making and monitoring issues, while front 

end  of  innovations  activities  are  seen  as  a  responsibility  of  experts  (Daellenbach  & 

McCarthy, 1999; Salomo et al., 2007). Thus, senior management is usually involved into 

selecting most perspective projects, but rarely in commitment to front end of innovation 

activities.  More  seldom  exactly  senior  management  initiates  major  new  front  end 

activities. At the same time, selections and implementations of the projects are very often 

made  exclusively  by  project  managers  of  R&D  departments  (Salomo  et  al.,  2007). 

Organization structure, where decision-making carried out by different responsible, could 



33 

cause  a  disorder  and  conflict.  Conversely,  maintaining  coherent  connections  between 

senior  management  and  innovative  groups  will  help  to  provide  FEI  activities  with 

prioritization and in the line with the company's strategy (De Jong & Den Hartog, 2007). 

While  FEI  process  has  to  include  balances  between  assessment  of  total  risks  and 

advantages,  high  senior  management  involvement  in  FEI  process  could  ensure  an 

effective use of organizational resources, both financial and human (Ahmed, 1998). 

Senior management involvement requires flexibility and control, applying for a set of 

versatile knowledge and skills to drive the company forward to its strategic goals. But no 

less  important  issue  for  senior  management  to  create  such  corporate  basis,  where 

creativity  and  innovativeness  will  be  fostered,  motivated,  moved  and  supported  by 

organization  leaders  (Leavy,  2005).  Such  a  corporate  basis,  in  other  words,  corporate 

culture, encourages confidence, willing to risk (Leavy, 2005). Furthermore, exactly senior 

managers can force FEI activities. It could be achieved through aligning the FEI activities 

with the main organization strategic goals, strong motivation of the FEI teams, fostering 

employees’ willing to discover and to create, to a response to customer demands (Krause, 

2004). Thus, we propose, that: 

 

H3. Senior management commitment positively affects the FEI performance. 

 

1.4.5

 

Team issues  

To  set  a  clear  goal  and  to  create  an  innovative  culture  is  a  part  of  the  complex 

organizational  procedures.  Aside  from  it  is  based  first  and  foremost  on  the  human 

resources (Somech & Drach-Zahavy, 2013). Team leaders face the problem how to choose 

and  organize  right  people  with  necessary  skills  that  could  work,  coordinate  and 

communicate well. Correctly selected team members could play a key role in FEI activities 

(Mitchell, Parker, Giles, Joyce, & Chiang, 2012; Somech & Drach-Zahavy, 2013).  

Managers and FEI team leaders face many challenges. First, FEI team has to be able to 

create a new product or concept idea. Respectively FEI team leaders and senior managers 

are  responsible  for  supporting  such  an  environment,  where  idea  generation  could 

flourish  (Anderson,  Hardy,  &  West,  1992;  Axtell,  Holman,  &  Wall,  2006).    Second,  to 


34 

design product a new product is not enough, it should be with the line of corporation 

strategy and customer demand (Adner, 2006). Proper organized FEI team has to be first 

and foremost creative (Reid & de Brentani, 2004). At the same time FEI team members 

should have a clear corporative vision and understanding of organizational strategy and 

goals.  Another  very  significant  factor  for  the  effective  FEI  team  is  communication 

(Jongbae Kim & Wilemon, 2002a; Vera & Crossan, 2005). Communication between team 

members has to be based on the foundation of trustworthy, openness, availability to risk, 

willingness  to  discuss,  capability  to  find  and  apply  solutions  (Anderson  et  al.,  1992; 

Buckley & Hashai, 2014). Scholars and practitioners indicate, that good communication 

strongly  contribute  to  FEI  team  performance  (Crowne,  2008).  Another  very  weighty 

contribute  to  FEI  team  performance  is  an  availability  of  cross-functional  experts 

(Elfvengren, Kortelainen, & Tuominen, 2009; Hoegl et al., 2007; Jongbae Kim & Wilemon, 

2002a).  Varieties  of  experts  ensure  respective  knowledge  capabilities  and  provide 

creative idea generation (Poskela & Martinsuo, 2009; Van Wulfen, 2012; Verworn, 2009). 

Multiplicity of exports in FEI teas has to support diversity in opinion and decision making 

through  the  FEI  activities  (Ho  &  Tsai,  2011). Moreover,  FEI team  expert’s  diversity has 

positive  influence  also  on  FEI  project  time  performance  (Hoegl  et  al.,  2007).  In  turn, 

achieving  the  proper  timing  of  the  FEI  projects  could  play  a  role  of  key  factors  for 

competitive advantage.  FEI group members, who are able to quickly share their vision 

and  align  it  with  the  corporative  strategy,  demonstrate  the  ability  to  collaborate  and 

communicate  well.  Such  teams  represent  well  organized  and  goal  oriented  units 

(Moenaert,  De  Meyer,  Souder,  &  Deschoolmeester,  1995).  Thus,  setting  up  and 

organizing  FEI  teams,  corporation  and  FEI  team  leaders  should  consider  that  many 

organizational conditions and factors could have an impact on FEI activities and have a 

positive effect on the FEI performance (Somech & Drach-Zahavy, 2013). In turn, proper 

organized FEI team, working in the favourable environment would positively contribute 

into the FEI performance.  Therefore, we hypothesize, that: 

 

H4. Properly organized FEI team is positively associated with the FEI performance 


35 

2

 

 The research 

The  purpose  of  this  research  was  to  find  the  answer  to  the  research  question:  "Do 

following  organizational  factors  have  an  impact  on  the  front  end  of  innovation 

performance: innovation strategy, innovation culture, senior management commitment 

and team?"  

Taking into account the importance of the FEI performance for the whole Innovation 

process,  the  framework  of  the  following  research  was  to  find  out  if  there  is  the 

relationship  between  these  factors  and  the  FEI  performance.  Contemporary  literature 

suggests  that  different  organizational  factors,  attributes  and  managerial  tools  have  an 

impact on the FEI activities, and more precise on it performance.  Different combinations 

of organizational factors and attributes, which could be essential to achieve high  level of 

the FEI performance were examined in previous studies (Hanson, Melnyk, & Calantone, 

2011;  Jongbae  Kim  &  Wilemon,  2002b;  L.  Sanders  Jones  &  Linderman,  2014;  Vera  & 

Crossan,  2005).  This  research  proposes  another  group  combination  of  organizational 

attributes  to  consider.  Moreover,  the  research  aims  to  find  out  if  any  relationships 

between this given set of attributes and the FEI performance. 

In  order  to  answer  the  research  question  small  and  medium  sized  softenware, 

development  and  IT  service  providing  Icelandic  companies  were  examined.  Based  on 

previous studies aimed to find out interdependence between organizational factors and 

attributes and the front end of innovation performance (Robert G. Cooper, 1983; Herstatt 

et al., 2004; Ho & Tsai, 2011; Koen et al., 2002; Poskela & Martinsuo, 2009; Preston G. 

Smith  &  Reinertsen,  1992;  Van  Wulfen,  2012;  Verworn,  2009),  we  have  hypothesized, 

that: 

H1 Innovation strategic goals have a positive impact on FEI activities performance. 

H2 Innovation culture have a positive influence on The FEI performance. 

H3 Senior management commitment positively affect the FEI performance. 

H4 Properly organized FEI team is positively associated with The FEI performance. 

Thirty-five software development and IT service providing companies members of the SÍ 

(The  Federation  of  Icelandic  Industries)  were  randomly  chose  to  participate  in  the 

research.  



36 

 

2.1

 

Research method 

Considering,  that  the  purpose  of  this  study  was  to  examine  if  such  organizational 

attributes as innovation strategy, innovation culture, senior management commitment 

and team have an impact on the FEI performance, the quantitative research method was 

applied to answer the research question. Quantitative research method is good to apply 

in order to compare collected data systematically and in generalized form (Bryman, 2012; 

Creswell & Garrett, 2008). Quantitative methods also enable to test proposed theories 

and hypotheses (Bryman, 2012). The aim of this research was to f answer the research 

question, comparing generalized information. Another goal was to explore the results of 

this  study  in  generalized  approach.  It  was  decided  to  apply  the  quantitative  research 

method,  because  exactly  this  method  could  help  in  obtaining  big  data  collections. 

Moreover, quantitative research method make it easier to analyse and compare results 

statistically  (Creswell  & Garrett,  2008).  For this reasons,  quantitative research  method 

was  used  to  identify  statistical  relationships  between  the  organizational  attributes 

(innovation strategy, innovation culture, senior management commitment and team) and 

the FEI performance. 5- point Likert scale (where 1 = "strongly disagree" and 5 ="strongly 

agree")  was  applied  for  the  research.  In  the  following  chapter  will  be  described  and 

discussed  such  questions  as  the  design  of  questionnaire,  execution  of  the  survey, 

primarily information about the research participants and the research findings. 

2.1.1

 

Research design and measurement 

With the support of literature review, we have specified some organizational attributes 

to examine in the following research. Different combinations of the organizational factors 

and attributes are essential to achieve a higher level of the FEI were proved in previous 

studies (Adams et al., 2006; Adner, 2006; Bertels et al., 2011; Boeddrich, 2004; Cooper, 

2008; Hafiza et al., 2011; Kleinschmidt et al., 2007; Martins & Terblanche, 2003; Wagner 

&  Ehrenmann,  2010).  The  following  research  proposed  another  combination  of 

organizational attributes to consider if any correlation between this set of factors and the 

FEI performance. 


37 

The design of the questionnaire was constructed with the support of previous studies. 

Since it is difficult to measure and evaluate the FEI performance because of it expectancy 

and unpredictability, some academics identify two dimensions of the FEI performance: 

efficiency and effectiveness. Where efficiency measured with the use of all organizational 

resources,  both  financial  and  non-financial  (for  example  time,  human  recourses  etc.) 

(Verworn, 2009; Wagner & Ehrenmann, 2010). 

From on the other hand, in the centre of attention measurement of effectiveness are 

outcome  characteristics,  namely  explicitly  and  stability  of  the  product.  Dependent 

variables for this research applied to the FEI performance were adopted from the study 

Ho & Tsai (2011), and focus on two dimensions of the FEI performance: effectiveness and 

efficiency.  The  following  construct  composed  of  four  questions  and  showed  good 

reliability  results  between 

α=0,  75  and  α=0,  82  (Ho  &  Tsai,  2011)  and  therefore  was 

applied  without  any  changes.  Questions  number  1  and  2  are  efficiency  variables,  the 

questions number 3 and 4 are effectiveness measures: 



For each statement, please check whether you strongly disagree, disagree, neither degree 

or disagree, agree, strongly agree. 

1)  Our  last  new  product/service  project  was  the  one  of  the  fastest  projects  ever 

undertaken by our firm 

2) In the front end of innovation stage the development costs did not exceed budget 

3) The project plan was explicit and stable 

4) The new product/ service concept was clear and in the line with customer needs 

Independent variables were adjusted from two early studies: Ho & Tsai, 2011 and Koen 

et al., 2014. Each construct, designed to measure various organizational attributes consist 

of  three  questions.  The same  as  in the dependent  variables  section, participants  were 

asked to mark the intensity of agree/ disagree level: 



For each statement, please check whether you strongly disagree, disagree, neither degree 

or disagree, agree, strongly agree 

The following variables' constructions were identified: 



 Innovation strategy construct (adopted and partly transformed from Ho & Tsai, 2011) 

1.

 



Our project defined clear and realistic project targets. 

38 

2.

 



Team vision and shared purpose were quickly developed during our project. 

3.

 



Our project's goals can fit firms and meet market needs. 

Innovation  culture  variables  construct  (adopted  and  partially  changed  from  Ho  &  Tsai, 

2011 and Koen et al., 2014). 

1.

 

Our firm reward project members for their innovativeness. 



2.

 

Employees of our firm have time to consider and test new ideas. 



3.

 

Employees of our firm receive new ideas in an attentive and professional way. 



Senior management commitment variables construct (borrowed in part from Koen et al., 

2014) 


1.

 

Our team leadership initiates major new front-end projects. 



2.

 

Our team leadership is strongly committed to front-end activities. 



3.

 

Our team leadership participates in making key decisions in project reviews. 



  Dedicated team variables construct (taken from Ho & Tsai, 2011 without modifications; 

α=0, 85 reliability test). 

1.

 

Our team is composed of cross-functional experts. 



2.

 

Our team has sufficient knowledge and capabilities to perform specialized roles. 



3.

 

Our team can communicate and coordinate well. 



Background  information  construct  consists  of  the  questions  aimed  to  identify  the 

common  information  about  the  participants:  sex,  nationality,  education,  age  in  years, 

number of years with the organization and current occupation within the organization. 

Another  three  background  questions  had  a  purpose  to  provide  addition  information 

about the organizations:  

1.

 



How many employees does your company have? 

2.

 



What is the extent of innovation projects in your company? 

3.

 



Our innovation projects generally last for... 

 

 



39 

2.1.2

 

Procedure 

Due  to  the  fact,  that  the  target  organizations  were  among  the  Icelandic  software 

developing and IT-service providing companies, the researcher decided to use English as 

a survey's language. First, English language is usually an official business language for this 

branch. Second, most of these companies actively cooperate with multination partners 

and have international customers all over the world,  have foreign employees, therefore 

English  is  commonly  used  as  an  inter-organization  language.  Choosing  English  as  a 

survey's  language  caused  in  turn  other  challenges.  As  Hall  (1992)  pointed  out, 

misunderstandings in survey answering could negatively affect the validity of the content. 

Not  appropriately  chosen  phrasing  and terminology  could  be  irritating  even  for native 

speakers (Hall, 1992). Especially wording play a significant role for the results when the 

survey conducted not in the native for the target group language (Óskarsson, 2005). Pre-

testing  interviews  among  participants  with  English  as  a  native  language  and  Icelandic 

speakers  were  conducted  to  avoid  this  problem.  Five  participants  (two  English  and  3 

Icelandic speakers) were asked to answer the survey questions and make comments what 

they didn't  understand. Then  the  researcher  went  through the  survey  questions  again 

and asked the participants how they understand each question. Based on the interview 

results, the researcher made necessary changes in phrasing survey questions. On the next 

stage  of  the  study  design,  corrected  form  was  pre-tested  again.  Three  participants  (2 

Icelandic and 1 English speaker) were asked to answer the survey questions in the form 

of an interview with comments.  After these two pre-tests, in an introduction letter the 

participants were suggested to contact the researcher if any questions will arise. Because 

the  survey  design  were  constructed  based  on  previous  studies,  re-examining  of  the 

content validation was not carried out. The survey was constructed on based on Google 

Forms as online survey for simplicity data collecting and analysing.  

The  target  group  organizations  were  randomly  chosen  on  the  website  of  SI-  the 

Federation of Icelandic Industries (the list of Information Technology companies). Since 

the SÍ website provides the common information about the companies, the researcher 

could  easy  find  contact  emails  of  the  organizations.  The  survey  was  conducted  in  the 

online  form.  E-mails  were  sent  to  the  CEOs,  Human  Resource  Managers,  Project 

Managers,  and  Marketing  Managers  where  they  were  kindly  asked  to  answer  the 

questionnaire and send it forward to 3-5 employees of their company, who participates 



40 

in the FEI activities. In e-mails, we have briefly describe the subject and purpose of the 

study. The same information was again in the introduction letter for the survey's online 

form. 


The  online  form  of  the  following  survey  was  open  24  October  2015.  To  motivate 

participants  to  answer  the  questionnaire,  the  researcher  visited  some  chosen 

organization and talked to the managers personally. After that, the researcher was in a 

constant  contact  with  a  "responsible  for  survey"  person  in  each  organization  by 

telephone and e-mail. The online form was closed 2 December 2015, when all efforts to 

increase the number of participants were made. 



2.1.3

 



Yüklə 0,49 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə