Managing the front end of innovation The positive impact of the organizational attributes to the front end of innovation performance



Yüklə 0,49 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə4/5
tarix04.05.2017
ölçüsü0,49 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5

Figure 11. Fig.11 Innovation culture 

 The  regression  analysis  both  for  team  and  senior  management  commitment 

constructs showed nearly similar results, 15 and 14 percent respectively. Necessary to 

point out, that the average score for the team construct was M=4, 08. These results are 

in  the  line  of  early  studies  that  point  out  the  role  of  team  organization.  Thus,  many 

authors pay attention to that fact, that proper organized team consists of multifunctional 

specialists, team members trust each other, can communicate and coordinate well. Such 

team  organization  could  be  more  effective  in  developing and  decision-making  process 

(Peltokorpi & Hasu, 2014; Somech & Drach-Zahavy, 2013). The average result for senior 

management commitment was 3, 59, not very low, but not very high. This indicates, that 

executive management between Icelandic IT firms could be more active to involve in front 

end of innovation activities. Active senior management participation in the front end of 

innovation  activities  in  turn  could  stimulate  Innovation  capacity  and  the  front  end  of 

innovation performance (Daellenbach & McCarthy, 1999; De Jong & Den Hartog, 2007; 

Krause, 2004).  

To  sum  up,  the  collected  data  analysis  confirmed  that  the  following  organizational 

attributes are positively related to the FEI performance: innovation strategy, innovation 



53 

culture,  senior  management  commitment  and  team.  Moreover,  given  constructions 

model explains 45, 1% outcome of the front end of innovation performance (see Fig.13).  

 

 



Figure 12.Results of the regression analysis for organizational attributes constructs 

These  positive  relationships  between  organizational  attributes  and the front  end  of 

innovation  performance  also  support  previous  studies  (De  Jong  &  Den  Hartog,  2007; 

Lafley & Charan, 2010), which emphasize the importance of the holistic approach into the 

managing the front end of innovation activities. The holistic approach first and foremost 

requires  an  efficient  linkage  between  corporative  strategy,  new  product  or  service 

strategy  and  decision-making  concerning  the  product  specifications  (Khurana  & 

Rosenthal,  1998;  Lafley  &  Charan,  2010).  This  linkage  could  be  achieved  through  the 

integration  of  all  such  essential  elements  as  the  development  of  the  new  product 

strategy,  planning  and  development  of  new  product  concept,  portfolio,  financial  and 

human  resources  planning  into  the  corporative  business  running  process  (Lafley  & 

Charan, 2010). In over words, success in the innovation process could be attained through 

the  integration  and  support  of  all  the  core  elements  of  the  Innovation  organization, 

namely corporative vision, innovative strategy, innovative culture, senior management 

commitment  in  reviews  and  decision  making,  teams'  organization.  Both  structure 

attributes and process organization have to be seen as essential elements for the front 

end of innovation activities (Koen et al., 2002). 

FEI Performance

45 % of variance 

explained

Innovation 

Stratgey

Innovation Culture

Senior 

management

commitment

Team


54 

 

3.1

 

Contributions and limitations. 

The  given  research  provides  some potentially  useful  managerial  implications  within 

the  front  end  of  innovation  activities.  First,  it  is  emphasizing  the  important  role  of 

organizational  attributes  contributing  to  the  front  end  of  innovation  performance. 

Second,  from  the  managerial  point  of  view,  it  could  help  to  improve  the  front  end  of 

innovation activities in order to achieve a higher performance in the innovation process. 

There are also some possible limitations of this research. The research sample size was 

just 111 and larger sample size could be more representative. The data was collected just 

from  Icelandic  companies.  Considering  the  impact  of  the  Icelandic  culture,  another 

dataset  between  the  companies  in  the  other  markets  could  have  another  result.  The 

majority  of  the  organizations  participated  in  the  survey  were  small-and  medium-sized 

companies (69, 4%). Thus, the larger proportion of the big companies could also have an 

impact on the research results. 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

55 

Appendices 

Appendix 1: The Durbin-Watson statistic 

 

 



Model Summary

b

 

Model 



R Square 

Adjusted R 

Square 


Std. Error of 

the Estimate 

Durbin-

Watson 


,689


a

 

,475 



,451 

,53082 


1,824 

a. Predictors: (Constant), Leadership_total, Strategy_total, Team_total, 

Culture_total 

b. Dependent Variable: Total_performance 



 

Appendix 2: Histogram 

 

 



 

56 

Appendix 3: Normal P-P Plot 

 

 



 

 

3.2



 

Appendix 4: The final questionnaire 

Dear Sir/ Madam 

This survey will take approximately 3-5 minutes of your time and aimed at studying 

factors  which  are  relevant  for  the  first  phase  of  the  Innovation  process,  sometimes 

referred to as the Front End of Innovation or FEI.  

In this research, a product development project relates to the development of new 

products/ services which the company offers to its clients.  

Based  on  your  last  new  product/service  development  project,  please  answer  the 

following questions.  For each statement, please check whether you strongly disagree, 

disagree, neither degree nor disagree, agree, strongly agree. 

The answers will not be traced to individuals and will be confidential. 


57 

Alesya Alexandersdóttir (alk16@hi.is) 



 

 

1.  Our  last  new  product/  service  project  was  the  one  of  the  fastest  projects  ever 

undertaken by our firm 

 





 

Strongly disagree 



 

 

 



 

 

Strongly agree 



2. In the Front End of Innovation stage the development costs did not exceed budget. 

 





 

Strongly disagree 



 

 

 



 

 

Strongly agree 



3. The project plan was explicit and stable 

 





 

Strongly disagree 



 

 

 



 

 

Strongly agree 



4. The new product /service concept was clear and in the line with customer needs 

 





 

Strongly disagree 



 

 

 



 

 

Strongly agree 



5. Our project defined clear and realistic project targets. 

 





 

Strongly disagree 



 

 

 



 

 

Strongly agree 



6. Team vision and shared purpose were quickly developed during our project. 

 





 

Strongly disagree 



 

 

 



 

 

Strongly agree 



58 

7. Our project's goals can fit firm's goals and meet market needs 

 





 

Strongly disagree 



 

 

 



 

 

Strongly agree 



8. Our firm reward project members for their innovativeness 

 





 

Strongly disagree 



 

 

 



 

 

Strongly agree 



9. Employees of our firm have time to consider and test new ideas 

 





 

Strongly disagree 



 

 

 



 

 

Strongly agree 



10. Employees of our firm receive new ideas in an attentive and professional way. 

 





 

Strongly disagree 



 

 

 



 

 

Strongly agree 



11. Our team is composed of cross-functional experts 

 





 

Strongly disagree 



 

 

 



 

 

Strongly agree 



12. Our team has sufficient knowledge and capabilities to perform specialized roles 

 





 

Strongly disagree 



 

 

 



 

 

Strongly agree 



13. Our team can communicate and coordinate well 

 





 

Strongly disagree 



 

 

 



 

 

Strongly   agree 



59 

14. Our team leadership initiates major new front-end projects 

 





 

Strongly disagree 



 

 

 



 

 

Strongly agree 



15. Our team leadership is strongly committed to front-end activities 

 





 

Strongly disagree 



 

 

 



 

 

Strongly agree 



16. Our team leadership participates in making key decisions in project reviews. 

 





 

Strongly disagree 



 

 

 



 

 

Strongly agree 



17. What are the extent of innovation projects in your company? 

 1-5 projects/ year 

 5-10 projects/ year 

 10-15 projects/ year 

 15-20 projects/ year 

 More than 20 projects/ year 



18. Our innovation projects generally last for... 

 1-3 months 

 3-6 months 

 6-12 months 

 12-24 months 

 Longer than 24 months 



3.3

 

Background information 

Sex 

 Male 


 Female 

Nationality 

 


60 

  

Age in years. 

 

  

Number of years with the organization. 



 

  

Current occupation 

 

  

Education 



 High school 

 BS/BA degree 

 MS/MA/MBA degree 

 Phd/DBA degree 

 Other: 

 

How many employees does your company have? 

 10-29 

 30-49 


 50-249 

 250- and more 

 

 

 



61 

References 

 

Adams,  R.,  Bessant,  J.,  &  Phelps,  R.  (2006).  Innovation  management  measurement:  A 



review. International Journal of Management Reviews, 8(1), 21-47. doi: 10.1111/j.1468-

2370.2006.00119.x 

Adner, R. (2006). Match your innovation strategy to your innovation ecosystem. Harvard 

Business Review, 84(4), 98.  

Ahmed, P. K. (1998). Culture and climate for innovation. European Journal of Innovation 



Management, 1(1), 30-43.  

Alam, I. (2006). Removing the fuzziness from the fuzzy front-end of service innovations 

through  customer  interactions.  Industrial  Marketing  Management,  35(4),  468-

480. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.indmarman.2005.04.004 

Anderson, N., Hardy, G., & West, M. (1992). Management Team Innovation. Management 

Decision, 30(2), 17.  

Angel, R. (2006). Putting an innovation culture into practice. Ivey Business Journal, 70(3), 

1-5.  

Anja  Cotic,  S.,  &  Prodan,  I.  (2008).  How  Internal  and  External  Sources  of  Knowledge 



Contribute to Firms' Innovation Performance. Managing Global Transitions, 6(3), 

277-299.  

Anthony, S. D., Eyring, M., & Gibson, L. (2006). Mapping your innovation strategy. Harvard 

Business Review, 84(5), 104.  

Antikainen, M. J., & Vaataja, H. K. (2010). Rewarding in open innovation communities–

how  to  motivate  members.  International  Journal  of  Entrepreneurship  and 

Innovation Management, 11(4), 440-456.  

Axtell, C., Holman, D., & Wall, T. (2006). Promoting innovation: A change study. Journal 



of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 79(3), 509-516.  

Bates, D. M., & Watts, D. G. (1988). Nonlinear regression: iterative estimation and linear 



approximations: Wiley Online Library. 

Beaume,  R.,  Maniak,  R.,  & Midler,  C.  (2009).  Crossing  innovation and product projects 

management:  A  comparative  analysis  in  the  automotive  industry.  International 

Journal 

of 

Project 

Management, 

27(2), 

166-174. 

doi: 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijproman.2008.09.004 



Beck, K., Beedle, M., Van Bennekum, A., Cockburn, A., Cunningham, W., Fowler, M., . . . 

Jeffries, R. (2001). Manifesto for agile softenware development.  

Bertels, H. M., Kleinschmidt, E. J., & Koen, P. A. (2011). Communities of Practice versus 

Organizational Climate: Which One Matters More  to Dispersed Collaboration in 

the Front End of Innovation?*. Journal of Product Innovation Management, 28(5), 

757-772.  

Bessant, J., & Tidd, J. (2007). Innovation and entrepreneurship: John Wiley & Sons. 


62 

Boeddrich, H.-J. (2004). Ideas in the Workplace: A New Approach Towards Organizing the 

Fuzzy Front End of the Innovation Process. Creativity & Innovation Management, 

13(4), 274-285. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-8691.2004.00316.x 

Boer, H., Caffyn, S., Corso, M., Coughlan, P., Gieskes, J., Magnusson, M., . . . Stefano, R. 

(2001).  Knowledge  and  continuous  innovation  The  CIMA  methodology. 

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, 21(4), 490-504.  

Boer, H., & Gertsen, F. (2003). From continuous improvement to continuous innovation: 

a (retro)(per) spective. International Journal of Technology Management, 26(8), 

805-827.  

Bonner, J. M., Ruekert, R. W., & Walker, O. C. (2002). Upper management control of new 

product  development  projects  and  project  performance.  Journal  of  Product 



Innovation Management, 19(3), 233-245. doi: 10.1111/1540-5885.1930233 

Brem,  A.,  &  Voigt,  K.-I.  (2009).  Integration  of  market  pull  and  technology  push  in  the 

corporate  front  end  and  innovation  management—Insights  from  the  German 

softenware 

industry. 

Technovation, 

29(5), 

351-367. 

doi: 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.technovation.2008.06.003 



Brentani,  U.,  &  Reid,  S.  E.  (2012).  The  Fuzzy  Front-End  of  Discontinuous  Innovation: 

Insights  for  Research  and  Management.  Journal  of  Product  Innovation 



Management, 29(1), 70-87. doi: 10.1111/j.1540-5885.2011.00879.x 

Bryman, A. (2012). Social research methods: Oxford university press. 

Buckley, P. J., & Hashai, N. (2014). The role of technological catch up and domestic market 

growth in the genesis of emerging country based multinationals. Research Policy, 43(2), 

423-437. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.respol.2013.11.004 

Bygstad, B., & Lanestedt, G. (2009). ICT based service innovation – A challenge for project 

management. International Journal of Project Management, 27(3), 234-242. doi: 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijproman.2007.12.002 

Caraça,  J.,  Lundvall,  B.-Å.,  &  Mendonça,  S.  (2009).  The  changing  role  of  science  in  the 

innovation  process:  From  Queen  to  Cinderella?  Technological  Forecasting  and 



Social Change, 76(6), 861-867.  

Carayannis,  E.,  &  Grigoroudis,  E.  (2014).  Linking  innovation,  productivity,  and 

competitiveness: implications for policy and practice. The Journal of Technology 

Transfer, 39(2), 199-218. doi: 10.1007/s10961-012-9295-2 

Cassiman, B., & Veugelers, R. (2006). In search of complementarity in innovation strategy: 

Internal  R&D  and  external  knowledge  acquisition.  Management  science,  52(1), 

68-82.  


Castellacci, F. (2008). Innovation and the competitiveness of industries: Comparing the 

mainstream  and  the  evolutionary  approaches.  Technological  Forecasting  and 



Social 

Change, 

75(7), 

984-1006. 

doi: 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.techfore.2007.09.002 



Creswell, J. W., & Garrett, A. L. (2008). The" movement" of mixed methods research and 

the role of educators. South African Journal of Education, 28(3), 321-333.  

Chandy, R. K. (2003). Research as innovation: rewards, perils, and guideposts for research 

and  reviews  in  marketing.  Journal  of  the  Academy  of  Marketing  Science,  31(3), 

351-355.  

Chesbrough,  H.  (2004).  MANAGING  OPEN  INNOVATION.  Research  Technology 



Management, 47(1), 23.  

63 

Chesbrough, H. W. (2003). The Era of Open Innovation. MIT Sloan Management Review, 



44(3), 35-41.  

Chow, T., & Cao, D.-B. (2008). A survey study of critical success factors in agile softenware 

projects.  Journal  of  Systems  and  Softenware,  81(6),  961-971.  doi: 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jss.2007.08.020 

Claver, E., Llopis, J., Garcia, D., & Molina, H. (1998). Organizational culture for innovation 

and  new  technological  behavior.  The  Journal  of  High  Technology  Management 



Research, 9(1), 55-68. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/1047-8310(88)90005-3 

Clercq,  D.  D.,  Menguc,  B.,  &  Auh,  S.  (2009).  Unpacking  the  relationship  between  an 

innovation strategy and firm performance: The role of task conflict and political 

activity. 



Journal 

of 

Business 

Research, 

62(11), 

1046-1053. 

doi: 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2008.10.021 



Cockburn, A., & Highsmith, J. (2001). Agile softenware development: The people factor. 

Computer, 34(11), 131-133.  

Cohen, J. (1992). A power primer. Psychological bulletin, 112(1), 155.  

Cooper,  R.  G.  (1983).  A  process  model  for  industrial  new  product  development. 

Engineering Management, IEEE Transactions on(1), 2-11.  

Cooper,  R.  G.  (1983).  A  process  model  for  industrial  new  product  development. 



Engineering  Management,  IEEE  Transactions  on,  EM-30(1),  2-11.  doi: 

10.1109/TEM.1983.6448637 

Cooper,  R.  G.  (1988).  Predevelopment  activities  determine  new  product  success. 

Industrial Marketing Management, 17(3), 237-247.  

Cooper,  R.  G.  (2008).  Perspective:  The  Stage‐Gate®  Idea‐to‐Launch  Process—Update, 

What's New, and NexGen Systems*. Journal of Product Innovation Management, 

25(3), 213-232.  

Cottam, A., Ensor, J., & Band, C. (2001). A benchmark study of strategic commitment to 

innovation. European Journal of Innovation Management, 4(2), 88-94.  

Cronin,  M.  J.  (2014).  The  Challenge  of  Innovation  Top  Down  Innovation  (pp.  1-12): 

Springer. 

Crowne, K. A. (2008). What leads to cultural intelligence? Business Horizons, 51(5), 391-

399. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bushor.2008.03.010 

Daellenbach, U. S., & McCarthy, A. M. (1999). Commitment to innovation: The impact of 

top management team characteristics. R&D Management, 29(3), 199.  

Davenport,  T.  H.  (2013).  Process  innovation:  reengineering  work  through  information 



technology: Harvard Business Press. 

De Jong, J. P., & Den Hartog, D. N. (2007). How leaders influence employees' innovative 

behaviour. European Journal of Innovation Management, 10(1), 41-64.  

Dingsøyr,  T.,  Nerur,  S.,  Balijepally,  V.,  &  Moe,  N.  B.  (2012).  A  decade  of  agile 

methodologies:  Towards  explaining  agile  softenware  development.  Journal  of 

Systems 

and 

Softenware, 

85(6), 

1213-1221. 

doi: 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jss.2012.02.033 



Dodgson,  M.,  Gann,  D.  M.,  &  Salter,  A.  (2008).  The  management  of  technological 

innovation: strategy and practice: Oxford University Press. 



Yüklə 0,49 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə