Mayflies (Ephemeroptera)



Yüklə 0,99 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/3
tarix13.08.2017
ölçüsü0,99 Mb.
  1   2   3

 

  

 

Ireland 

Red List No. 7 

 

Mayflies 

(Ephemeroptera) 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 



Ireland Red List No. 7: 

Mayflies (Ephemeroptera) 

 

 

Mary Kelly‐Quinn



1

 and Eugenie C. Regan

2

 

 

1



School of Biology and Environmental Science, University College Dublin, Dublin 4 

2

National Biodiversity Data Centre, WIT west campus, Carriganore, Waterford 



 

 

 

 

Citation: 



Kelly‐Quinn,  M.  &  Regan,  E.C.  (2012)  Ireland  Red  List  No.  7:  Mayflies  (Ephemeroptera).  National 

Parks and Wildlife Service, Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Dublin, Ireland. 



 

Cover photos: From top: Heptagenia sulphurea  – photo: Jan‐Robert Baars; Siphlonurus lacustris – 

photo:  Jan‐Robert  Baars;  Ephemera  danica  –  photo:    Robert  Thompson;  Ameletus  inopinatus  ‐ 

photo: Stuart Crofts; Baetis fuscatus – photo: Stuart Crofts. 

 

Ireland Red List Series Editors: N. Kingston & F. Marnell 



© National Parks and Wildlife Service 2012 

ISSN 2009‐2016 



Mayflies Red List 2012 

__________________ 

 



C

ONTENTS

 

E

XECUTIVE 

S

UMMARY

 ..................................................................................................................................... 2

 

A

CKNOWLEDGEMENTS

 .................................................................................................................................... 3

 

I

NTRODUCTION

 ................................................................................................................................................ 4

 

Legal Protection 

4

 

Methodology used 



5

 

Nomenclature & Checklist 



5

 

Data sources 



5

 

Regionally determined settings 



5

 

Species coverage 



6

 

Assessment group 



7

 

Species accounts 



7

 

S



PECIES NOTES

 ................................................................................................................................................. 9

 

Alainites (Baetis) muticus

 

 



9

 

Ameletus inopinatus

 

 

9

 

Baetis atrebatinus

 

 

10

 

Baetis fuscatus

 

 

10

 

Baetis rhodani

 

 

11

 

Baetis scambus

 

 

11

 

Baetis vernus

 

 

11

 

Caenis horaria

 

 

11

 

Caenis luctuosa

 

 

12

 

Caenis macrura

 

 

12

 

Caenis rivulorum

 

 

12

 

Centroptilum luteolum

 

 

12

 

Cloeon dipterum

 

 

12

 

Cloeon simile

 

 

13

 

Ecdyonurus dispar

 

 

13

 

Ecdyonurus insignis

 

 

13

 

Ecdyonurus torrentis

 

 

13

 

Ecdyonurus venosus

 

 

13

 

Electrogena lateralis

 

 

14

 

Ephemera danica

 

 

14

 

Ephemerella notata

 

 

14

 

Heptagenia sulphurea

 

 

15

 

Kageronia fuscogrisea

 

 

15

 

Leptophlebia marginata

 

 

16

 

Leptophlebia vespertina

 

 

16

 

Paraleptophlebia cincta

 

 

17

 

Procloeon bifidum

 

 

17

 

Rhithrogena germanica

 

 

18

 

Rhithrogena semicolorata

 

 

18

 

Serratella ignita

 

 

19

 

Siphlonurus alternatus

 

 

19

 

Siphlonurus armatus

 

 

19

 

Siphlonurus lacustris

 

 

20

 

C



ONCLUSIONS

 ................................................................................................................................................ 21

 

R

EFERENCES

 .................................................................................................................................................... 22

 

A

PPENDIX 

1:

 

S

UMMARY OF THE CRITERIA TO EVALUATE TAXA

. ................................................................. 24

 

A

PPENDIX 

2

 



 

C

HECKLIST OF MAYFLIES

 ....................................................................................................... 25 

Mayflies Red List 2012 

__________________ 

 



E

XECUTIVE 

S

UMMARY

 

Based on almost 14,000 records for Ireland, the 33 species of Irish mayflies (Ephemeroptera) are 

evaluated  for  their  conservation  status  using  International  Union  for  the  Conservation  of 

Nature  (IUCN)  criteria  and  guidelines  (IUCN,  2001;  2003;  2010).  Six  (18%)  of  the  Irish  species 

are assessed as Threatened, two species as Near Threatened and two species as data deficient.  

The six Threatened species are: 

 

Siphlonurus armatus (Northern Summer Mayfly) – Critically Endangered 

 

Baetis atrebatinus (Dark Olive) ‐ Endangered 

 

Ephemerella notata (Yellow Hawk) ‐ Endangered 

 

Rhithrogena germanica (March Brown) ‐ Vulnerable 

 

Procloeon bifidum (Pale Evening Dun) ‐ Vulnerable 

 

Leptophlebia marginata (Sepia Dun) – Vulnerable 

The two Near Threatened species are: 

 

Kageronia fuscogrisea (Brown May Dun) 

 

Ameletus inopinatus (Upland Summer Mayfly) 

The two data deficient species are: 

 

Baetis fuscatus (Pale Watery) 

 

Ecdyonurus torrentis (Large Brook Dun) 

The 

records  used  in  this  assessment  have  been  largely  based  on  collections  of  nymphs. 



This 

poses a problem for species which are only reliably confirmed from adult material and has been 

considered  in  the  assessment.  Interestingly,  most  of  the  Threatened  species  inhabit  rivers, 

although  some  also  occur  in  lakes,  and  their  status  possibly  reflects  a  longer  and  more 

widespread history of pollution pressure on rivers. The 

Threatened species are also those that 

have  restricted  distributions  and  so  are  particularly  vulnerable  to  impact.  A  number  of  other 

species  (Caenis  macrura,  Ecdyonurus  torrentis  and  Siphlonurus  alternatus)  have  restricted 

distributions but have not been listed because no significant change has occurred between the 

two  time  periods  (pre‐1990  and  1990‐2011).  Water  pollution  is  the  key  threat  to  the  species 

listed.    The  implementation  of  the  objectives  of  the  Water  Framework  Directive  should  bring 

about improvement in water quality which should help stem losses in aquatic biodiversity.  In 

the interim the aforementioned species should be prioritised for monitoring together with the 

two  Threatened  and  two  data  deficient  species  with  sampling  focussed  particularly  on  the 

adults. It is also essential that knowledge gaps on the autecological requirements and pollution 

sensitivity  of  these  species  be  addressed  so  as  to  inform  conservation  measures.    Finally,  it  is 

crucial that we identify and protect species‐rich refugia in catchments throughout the country 

that  will  become  important  source  areas  for  ephemeropteran  and  other  pollution‐sensitive 

species as impacted systems recover in the future.

 


Mayflies Red List 2012 

__________________ 

 



A

CKNOWLEDGEMENTS

 

The  authors  would  like  to  thank  the  many  scientists  and  naturalists  who  have  contributed 

ephemeropteran  records  to  the  National  Biodiversity  Data  Centre,  in  particular  the 

Environmental  Protection  Agency,  post‐graduate  students  in  the  School  of  Biology  and 

Environmental Science, University College Dublin, and Imelda O’Neill at the Northern Ireland 

Environment  Agency  who  have  made  large  databases  available  for  this  analysis.  We  are  very 

grateful  to  the  staff  and  students  at  these  organisations  who  helped  with  the  data  collection 

including  Hugh  Feeley,  Pamela  Maher,  Gary  Free,  Ruth  Little,  Deirdre  Tierney,  and  Imelda 

O’Neill.  Thanks  are  also  due  to  Dr  Naomi  Kingston  and  Dr  Brian  Nelson,  NPWS,  for  their 

assistance  with  the  red  listing  and  to  John  Lucey  and  Craig  McAdam  who  were  the  external 

reviewers of this publication. 


Mayflies Red List 2012 

__________________ 

 



I

NTRODUCTION

 

The  Ephemeroptera,  commonly  known  as  mayflies,  is  an  ancient  order  of  insects  dating  from 

the Carboniferous and Permian periods, and the oldest of the extant winged insects.  There are 

over 3,000 species from 42 different families (Barber‐James et al. 2008).  They are totally reliant 

on aquatic habitats where they live most of their life as juveniles, emerging solely to reproduce.  

They have colonised a range of aquatic habitats including streams, rivers, ponds and lakes.  The 

greatest  number  of  species  are  associated  with  running  water  where  some  have  adapted  to 

particular  flow  and  substrate  conditions,  while  other  are  not  so  restricted,  e.g.  Baetis  rhodani.  

Most  species  are  considered  herbivorous  and  are  categorised  as  grazers  but  some  species  are 

also  gatherers  feeding  on  fine  particulate  organic  matter  in  addition  to  plant  material.    Few 

species  are  considered  to  be  predators.    In  fact,  many  species  have  a  fairly  plastic  diet 

capitalizing  on  seasonally  abundant  food  sources.      Mayflies  do  not  feed  during  their  short‐

lived  adult  stage.  They  are  unique  in  that  they  have  two  adult  phases,  the  sub‐imago  or  dun 

which usually moults within 24 hours, and the imago or spinner which is the final reproductive 

stage.  Life history strategies vary in that some complete their life cycle within two years while 

others can produce several generations each year.    

In  Ireland,  the  Ephemeroptera  are  species‐poor  compared  to  Britain  and  mainland  Europe 

(represented by only 33 species) and this is due in large part to our glacial history and isolation 

from  mainland  Europe.    Despite  this  they  represent  a  key  component  of  our  freshwater 

biodiversity.  In running water they can constitute a high proportion, both numerically and in 

terms  of  biomass,  of  the  total  macroinvertebrate  fauna,  except  where  conditions  are  highly 

acidic,  and  they  also  make  a  significant  contribution  to  the  diet  of  salmonid  fishes.    Their 

emergence is important in terms of the energy returned to terrestrial ecosystems.  The adults are 

consumed by a variety of animals from birds to spiders. 

The Ephemeroptera are particularly important as indicators of water quality and form the core 

of  many  biotic  indices  including  the  Irish  EPA  Q‐value  system.    In  the  Irish  index  only  Baetis 



rhodani and the Caenidae are considered relatively tolerant to pollution.  This makes the group 

as  a  whole  particularly  vulnerable  to  species  loss.  Kelly‐Quinn  and  Bracken  (2000)  expressed 

concern about the apparent loss of species richness in many river systems throughout Ireland.   

The  records  of  Ephemeroptera  in  Ireland  date  as  far  back  as  the  late  1800s  and  all  of  our  33 

species were first recorded in Ireland within 100 years of this first record (Figure 1). The work of 

Kelly‐Quinn  and  Bracken  (2000)  brought  together  the  extensive  records  that  existed  for  the 

group.  This  database  was  updated  by  Mary  Kelly‐Quinn  and  the  National  Biodiversity  Data 

Centre  in  2012  with  data  from  university  research  projects  and  from  river  biologists  at  the 

Environmental Protection Agency and the Northern Ireland Environment Agency. The primary 

data repository is the National Biodiversity Data Centre with all records verified by Mary Kelly‐

Quinn. This database was used for the red list analysis. It is now also available online through 

Biodiversity Maps (https://maps.biodiversityireland.ie/). 



Legal Protection 

At the time of writing (May 2012) no ephemeropteran species are legally protected in Ireland. 



Mayflies Red List 2012 

__________________ 

 



D

EVELOPMENT OF THE RED LIST

 

Methodology used 

The  mayfly  list  is  the  seventh  in  a  series  of  regional  red  lists  for  the  island  of  Ireland  being 

developed  by  the  National  Parks  and  Wildlife  Service  and  the  Northern  Ireland  Environment 

Agency  in  conjunction  with  the  National  Biodiversity  Data  Centre  and  the  Northern  Ireland 

biological  records  centre,  CEDaR.  The  International  Union  for  the  Conservation  of  Nature 

(IUCN)  provides  guidelines  for  using  the  red  list  categories  at  a  regional  level  (IUCN,  2003). 

This guidance was used alongside the current IUCN categories and criteria (IUCN, 2001), and 

guidelines for their use (IUCN, 2010; see Appendix 1) in the production of this red list.  

Nomenclature & Checklist 

Nomenclature and checklist follows O’Connor and Nelson (2012).  Nomenclature for common 

names follows MacAdam and Bennett (2010). 

Data sources 

Of  the  five  IUCN  criteria  only  A,  B  and  D2  were  used  in  the  absence  of  any  population  level 

data for the species under consideration (Table 2) (see Appendix 1). 

Regionally determined settings 

The  time  frame  for  assessing  change  was  set  at  1990‐2011  and  pre‐1990.  The  number  and 

distribution of records in the Ephemeroptera of Ireland database from 1850 to 2011 are shown in 

Figures 1 and 2. There are more records for the period 1990‐2011 which implies that any decline 

in distribution shown in the maps is conservative and the real decline may actually be greater 

than the maps show. However, it also needs to be taken into account that a large proportion of 

the  1990‐2011  records  come  from  the  EPA River Biologists’s  data  which  holds  records  of  only 

six ephemeropteran species. A species was considered extinct if it had not been recorded in over 

100  years.  Two  species  were  considered  data  deficient,  i.e.  little  or  no  information  on  the 

abundance  and  distribution  of  the  species.  The  IUCN  advise  that  red  lists  are  re‐evaluated 

every five years where possible, or at least every ten years. The next red list assessment for Irish 

Ephemeroptera should therefore take place no later than 2022. The assessment was carried out 

on  an  all‐Ireland  basis.  The  IUCN  regional  guidelines  recommend  that  regional  assessments 

should be carried out in a two‐step process (IUCN 2003). Step one is the initial assessment of the 

regional  population.  Step  two  can  be  applied  if  there  are  any  conspecific  populations  outside 

the region that may affect the risk of extinction within the region. This was determined not to 

apply to the Irish mayfly populations and the Red List Categories defined by the criteria were 

adopted unaltered.  

 


Mayflies Red List 2012 

__________________ 

 



 

Figure 1: The number of records in the Ephemeroptera of Ireland database from 1850 to 2011 (4,611 

records are from the EPA River Biologist’s data from 2005 to 2009). 



Figure 2: Coverage maps of records of Irish Ephemeroptera showing (A) all the hectads with at least one 

validated record (795), (B) hectads with records before the end of 1989 (282), and (C) hectads with records 

since the start of 1990 (776). The island of Ireland has just over 1000 hectads containing some land. 

Species coverage 

A total of 33 species were assessed (Table 1), which includes all of the ephemeropteran species 

considered  to  occur  in  Ireland.  The  assessment  included  Baetis  fuscatus  which  is  indicated  as 

unconfirmed  on  the  current  Irish  checklist.  Its  presence  in  Ireland  requires  confirmation  with 

adult male voucher material as previous records are based on females and nymphs (O’Connor 

and  Nelson  2012).    All  taxa  were  assessed  at  the  species  level  in  accordance  with  the  IUCN 

guidelines (IUCN 2001; 2003).  





Mayflies Red List 2012 

__________________ 

 



Assessment group 

The  assessment  was  undertaken  on  the  14

th

  of  May  2012  by  a  panel  comprising  Mary  Kelly‐



Quinn,  Brian  Nelson,  Naomi  Kingston  and  Eugenie  Regan.  The  document  was  sent  to  two 

external assessors: Craig Macadam (Ephemeroptera Recording Scheme, Great Britain) and John 

Lucey (Environmental Protection Agency, Ireland). 

Species accounts 

Brief  species  accounts  are  given  with  the  information  derived  from  Kelly‐Quinn  and  Bracken 

(2000).  Additional  ecological  information  is  taken  from  Buffagni  et  al.  (2009).  Information  on 

pollution  sensitivity  is  largely  derived  from  the  EPA  Q‐value  sensitivity  classification 

(McGarrigle  et  al. 2002). Sensitivity  to  deposited  sediment  (hereafter  referred  to  as siltation) is 

taken  from  Extence  et  al.  (2011).  Maps  are  provided  for  the  Threatened  and  Near  Threatened 

species.  

Table 1: Red list of Irish Ephemeroptera (Mayflies).  CR = Critically Endangered, EN = Endangered, VU = 

Vulnerable, NT = Near Threatened, lc = least concern. 



Species 

Authority 

Assessment 

Criteria 

Siphlonurus armatus 

Eaton, 1870 

CR 

B2(a)(b)(iii) 



Baetis atrebatinus 

Eaton, 1870 

EN 

A2(a)(c) 



Ephemerella notata 

Eaton, 1887 

EN 

A2(a)(c), B2(a)(b)(ii)(iv)



Rhithrogena germanica 

Eaton, 1885 

VU 

D(2) 


Procloeon bifidum 

(Bengtsson, 1912) 

VU 

A2(a)(c) 



Leptophlebia marginata 

(Linnaeus, 1767) 

VU 

D(2) 


Kageronia fuscogrisea 

(Retzius, 1783) 

NT 

A2(a)(c) 



Ameletus inopinatus 

Eaton, 1887 

NT 

B2(a)(b)(iii) 



Baetis fuscatus 

(Linnaeus, 1761) 

dd 

  

Alainites (Baetis) muticus 



(Linnaeus, 1758) 

lc 


  

Baetis rhodani 

(Pictet, 1843) 

lc 

  

Baetis scambus 



Eaton, 1870 

lc 


  

Baetis vernus 

Curtis, 1834 

lc 

  

Caenis horaria 



(Linnaeus, 1758) 

lc 


  

Caenis luctuosa 

(Burmeister, 1839) 

lc 

  

Caenis macrura 



Stephens, 1835 

lc 


  

Caenis rivulorum 

Eaton, 1884 

lc 

  

Centroptilum luteolum 



(Müller, 1776) 

lc 


  

Cloeon dipterum 

(Linnaeus, 1761) 

lc 

  

Cloeon simile 



Eaton, 1870 

lc 


  

Ecdyonurus dispar 

(Curtis, 1834) 

lc 

  

Ecdyonurus insignis 



(Eaton, 1870) 

lc 


  

Ecdyonurus torrentis 

Kimmins, 1942 

lc 

  

Ecdyonurus venosus 



(Fabricius, 1775) 

lc 


  

Electrogena lateralis 

(Curtis, 1834) 

lc 

  

Ephemera danica 



Müller, 1764 

lc 


  

Heptagenia sulphurea 

(Müller, 1776) 

lc 

  

Leptophlebia vespertina 



(Linnaeus, 1758) 

lc 


  

Paraleptophlebia cincta 

(Retzius, 1783) 

lc 

  

Rhithrogena semicolorata 



(Curtis, 1834) 

lc 


  

Serratella ignita 

(Poda, 1761) 

lc 

  

Siphlonurus alternatus 



(Say, 1824) 

lc 


  

Siphlonurus lacustris 

Eaton, 1870 

lc 

  


Mayflies Red List 2012 

__________________ 

 




Yüklə 0,99 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə