Melaleuca deanei F. Muell. ( National Recovery Plan Deane’s Paperbark)



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Implementation


Appendix 1 outlines the statutory responsibilities for Public Authorities in relation to this species. Table 8 outlines the costs and parties responsible for implementation of recovery actions specified in this recovery plan.

8Social and Economic Consequences

8.1Social consequences


The implementation of this recovery plan is not expected to affect responsible public land usage to any great extent, and modification of private land management patterns will occur at the land manager’s discretion. Liaison with the local community, affected landholders and government agencies will address and minimise any unforeseen negative social impacts arising from the conservation of M. deanei.

It is expected that the implementation of this recovery plan will have positive social impacts. The main social benefit of conserving M. deanei habitat is in meeting the desire of many in the community that further loss of remnant bushland and threatened species should be prevented. The involvement of the local communities in the implementation of recovery actions (including site monitoring, surveys and site protection measures) will provide benefits for the environment and enhance the general well being of the community and individuals involved.


8.2Economic consequences


The economic consequences of this recovery plan are those costs that are associated with its implementation. Actions involving on-ground management programs and the long-term monitoring of sites will have the greatest economic consequences for land managers. Many of the costs will be met by seeking funding from external sources. The costs will be minimised by:

  • implementing a long-term strategic framework for managing the species and its habitat; and

  • adopting a co-operative approach to management, which involves the DECCW, other relevant landholders and the community.

The improved environmental impact assessment that will result from mechanisms established in this recovery plan will assist land managers and consent and determining authorities to meet their statutory responsibilities.

9Biodiversity Benefits


The conservation and study of M. deanei will benefit other threatened species that share the same habitat, particularly Darwinia biflora, Tetratheca glandulosa, Acacia bynoeana, and Pseudophryne australis (S. Douglas pers. comm.).
Increased awareness of M. deanei resulting from the implementation of this recovery plan will raise the profile in the community of all threatened species. This in turn will lead to greater opportunities for the conservation of threatened species and increased protection of biodiversity.

10Preparation Details


This recovery plan has been prepared by Martin Bremner and Ann Goeth from the DECCW Biodiversity Conservation Section, Metropolitan Region. The information in this recovery plan was based on the best available knowledge on the date it was approved.

11Review Date


This recovery plan will be reviewed and updated by DECCW within 5 years of the date of its publication.

12References


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NSW Scientific Committee. 2003, Final determination to list ‘Invasion of native plant communities by exotic perennial grasses’ as a key threatening process on Schedule 3 of the Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995. NSW Scientific Committee, Hurstville.

NSW Scientific Committee. 2006, Final determination to list ‘Invasion, spread and establishment of Lantana camara’ as a key threatening process on Schedule 3 of the Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995. NSW Scientific Committee, Hurstville.

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Tindall, D., Pennay, C., Tozer, M.G., Turner, K., & Keith, D.A. 2004, ‘Native vegetation map report series. No. 4. Araluen, Batemans Bay, Braidwood, Burragorang, Goulburn, Jervis Bay, Katoomba, Kiama, Moss Vale, Penrith, Port Hacking, Sydney, Taralga, Ulladulla, Wollongong NSW’, Department of Environment and Conservation and NSW Department of Infrastructure, Planning and Natural Resources, Sydney.

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Wrigley, J.W. & Fagg, M. 1993, Bottlebrushes, paperbarks and tea trees and all other plants in the Leptospermum alliance. Angus & Robertson, Pymble.


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